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Ord 04-460 ORDINANCE NO. 04-460 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FEDERAL WAY, WASIDNGTON, ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER EIGHT "POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA SUBAREA PLAN" OF THE CITY'S GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AMENDING CHAPTER TWO "LAND USE", AMENDING CHAPTER FOUR "ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT" AND REPEALING THE EXISTING CHAPTER EIGHT "POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREAS." WHEREAS, the Growth Management Act of 1990, as amended, (Chapter 36.70A RCW or "GMA") requires the City of Federal Way to adopt a Comprehensive Plan which includes a land use element (inclùding a land use map), housing element, capital facilities plan element, utilities element, and transportation element (including transportation system map[s]); and WHEREAS, the GMA also requires the City of Federal Way to adopt development regulations implementing its Comprehensive Plan; and WHEREAS, the Federal Way City Council adopted its Comprehensive Plan with land use map (the "Plan") on November 21, 1995, and adopted development regulations and a zoning map implementing the Plan on July 2, 1996; and subsequently amended the Comprehensive Plan, land use map, and zoning map on December 23, 1998, September 14,2000, and November 1,2001 and March 27, 2003; and WHEREAS, under RCW 36.70A130, the Plan and development regulations are subject to continuing review and evaluation, but the Plan may be amended no more than once per year; and WHEREAS, the Council shall be considering three separate actions to amend the Comprehensive Plan, all of which will be acted upon simultaneously in order to comply with RCW 36.70AI30; and WHEREAS, these actions include Ordinance No. 04-461 , a change in Comprehensive Plan designation and zoning from Business Park (BP) to Multifamily Residential 3600 (RM 3600) and associated development agreement and development plan for 46.58 acres located south of S. 336th Street ORD # 04-460 , PAGE I ORt GINAL between Pacific Highway South and Interstate 5 pertaining to the Christian Faith Center proposed development; and WHEREAS, these actions include Ordinance No. 04-462 , a request from the Quadrant Corporation to remove the planned extension of Weyerhaeuser Way South, north of South 320th Street shown on Map III-27B (2003-2020 Regional Capital Improvement Plan [CIP]) from the Comprehensive Plan and to delete this project from Table III-19 (Regional CIP Project List); and WHEREAS, these actions include the adoption of a PotentÜil Annexation Area (P AA) Subarea Plan, which will replace Chapter 8, "Potential Annexation Areas" of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan and address certain Comprehensive Plan text changes in Chapter 2, "Land Use" and Chapter 4, "Economic Development" pertaining to the Community Business (Be) Comprehensive Plan designation and zoning classification; and WHEREAS, the last of these actions, adoption of a P AA Subarea Plan and associated text changes to the "Land Use" and "Economic Development" Chapters of the Comprehensive Plan, is the subject of this ordinance; and WHEREAS, the City of Federal Way, in conjunction with neighboring jurisdictions has adopted P AA boundaries; and WHEREAS, the GMA encourages the annexation of urban and urbanizing areas within P AAs where urban level facilities and services can be provided; and WHEREAS, the GMA, State annexation law, County-Wide Planning Policies of King County, King County Comprehensive Plan, and Federal Way Comprehensive Plan encourage cities to prepare in advance a comprehensive subarea land use plan that will become effective if and when the P AAs are annexed pursuant to Chapter 35.13 RCW; and WHEREAS, King County partially funded and actively participated in research and preparation of the proposed Comprehensive Plan text and map amendments; and ORD # 04-460 , PAGE 2 WHEREAS, the proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan text and maps reflect and incorporate new and expanded information pertaining to the P AA including, but not limited to, Comprehensive Plan designations; zoning classifications; policies regarding land use; transportation; environment; parks; housing; capital facilities; and public service: as well as fiscal impacts associated with annexation; and WHEREAS, RCW 35.13 .177 authorizes the City to adopt pre-annexation Comprehensive Plan designations and zoning classifications as a component of the Comprehensive Plan, including adoption of Comprehensive Plan and zoning maps, provided the designations shall not be amended within one year of adoption; and WHEREAS, the City may consider Comprehensive Plan and development regulation amendments pursuant to Article IX, Chapter 22 of the Federal Way City Code (FWCC); and WHEREAS, four individual property owners submitted requests for certain P AA Comprehensive Plan designations and zoning classifications; and WHEREAS, the four individual requests described above are incorporated into the proposed P AA Subarea Plan Comprehensive Plan text and map amendments addressed in this ordinance (collectively "Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments"); and WHEREAS, the Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments include proposed modifications to the BC zone locational criteria in the Land Use and Economic Development chapters of the Comprehensive Plan; and WHEREAS, on February 18, 2004, the City SEP A Responsible Official issued a Determination of Non Significance on the Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments; and WHEREAS, the Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments are consistent with all of the goals and requirements set forth in the GMA, which encourages annexation planning; and WHEREAS, the City, through its staff, Planning Commission, City Council Committees, and full City Council, received, discussed, and considered public testimony and written comments, and materials ORD# 04-460 , PAGE 3 regarding the Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments, resulting from the following public outreach and public hearings: 1. Three public meetings with homeowner's associations; 2. Three public open houses within the P AA and the City; 3. A City Planning Commission public meeting held March 3, 2004; 4. City Planning Commission public hearings held on March 17, 2004, April 7, 2004 and April 21, 2004, following which it recommended adoption of the Plan text and map amendments with three modifications; s. City Council Land Use and Transportation Committee public meetings on May 3, 2004 and May 24, 2004 following which it recommended adoption of the Plan text and map amendments with four modifications; and 6. Two City Council public hearings on June 1, 2004 and July 6, 2004, as required by RCW 35A.14.340; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires to adopt the Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments as recommended by the Land Use and Transportation Committee. Now, TIlEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Federal Way, Washington, does hereby ordain as follows: Section 1. Findings. The Proposed P AA Subarea Plan Amendments reflect new or updated information developed since the initial adoption of the Comprehensive Plan, and are specifically related to the City's Potential Annexation Area. They bear a substantial relationship to public health, safety, and welfare; are in the best interest of the residents of the City; and are consistent with the requirements of Chapter 36.70A RCW, the King County County-Wide Planning Policies, and the unamended portion of the City's Comprehensive Plan. Section 2. Comprehensive Plan Amendments Adoption. The 1995 City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, as thereafter amended in 1998, 2000, 2001 and 2003, including its Land Use ORD # 04-460 , PAGE 4 element map, copies of which are on file with the Office of the City Clerk, hereby are and shall be amended as set forth in Exhibit A (Potential Annexation Area Subarea Plan), B (Amended Land Use Chapter) and C (Amended Economic Development Chapter) attached hereto. Copies of Exhibits A, Band C are on file with the Office of the City Clerk and are hereby incorporated by this reference as if set forth in full. Section 3. Amendment Authority. The adoption of Plan amendments in Section 2 above is pursuant to the authority granted by Chapters 36.70A and 35A.63 RCW, and pursuant to FWCC Section 22-541. Section 4. Severability. The provisions of this ordinance are declared separate and severable. The invalidity of any clause, sentence, paragraph, subdivision, section, or portion of this ordinance, or the invalidity of the application thereof to any person or circumstance, shall not affect the validity of the remainder ofthe ordinance, or the validity of its application to other persons or circumstances. Section 5. Savings Clause. The 1995 City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, and 1996 Zoning Map, as thereafter amended in 1998, 2000, and 2001, shall remain in force and effect until the amendments thereto become operative upon the effective date of this ordinance. Section 6. Ratification. Any act consistent with the authority and prior to the effective date of this ordinance is hereby ratified and affirmed. Section 7. Effective Date. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force five (5) days from and after its passage, approval, and publication, as provided by law. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Federal Way this July , 2004. 20th day of ORD # 04-460 , PAGE 5 CI7);;:¡& ~ Mayor, Dean McColgan ~ ?lOr (1¿~LSÞU~~ City Clerk, N. Christine Green, CMC APPROVED AS TO FORM: ~~~ City Attorney, Patricia A. Richardson ORDINANCE No: 06/29/04 07/20/04 07/24/04 07/29/04 04-460 FILED WITII TIlE CITY CLERK: PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL: PUBLISHED: EFFECTIVE DATE: ORD # 04-460 , PAGE 6 EXHJBIT A - - Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Subarea Plan Proposed Final December 2003 . ' ',', ", " , '",," '0' ' , " . ,'" . , ' 0' "', ,'0' ' ,'" 0' 00. :~,:, ", " :,,' ,°,; , " ' ... ~ " ' ' ,~~,~':, "'" ,::~,~r~~~~~~;:~l -,../ . t_-_. ~ """ = _° "t'8 ¡~.., '°, l.~-;' -,.,,:.;-,' - ..-, . ""__sri':' -":;--',:.>....,,'~..'~."'.'-..' . -.' --'- ~ CITY OF 4fIII' ~ Federal Way CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Federal Wav Otv Council: Jeanne Burbidge (Mayor) Jack Dovey Eric Faison Mary Gates Linda Kochmar Dean McColgan (Deputy Mayor) Mike Park Federal Wav Planning Commission: John Caulfield (Chair) William Drake Dini Duclos Hope Elder (Vice Chair) Marta Justus Foldi David Osaki Grant Newport Christine Nelson (Alternate #\) Tony Moore (Alternate #2) Merle Pfeifer (Alternate #3) Lawson Bronson (Alternate #4) Potential Annexation Area Steering Committee: Hope Elder, Federal Way Planning Commission William Drake, Federal Way Planning Commission Eric Faison, Federal Way City Council Linda Kochmar, Federal Way City Council Lois Kutscha, Resident Representative Thomas Murphy, Federal Way Chamber of Commerce Gail Pearson, Resident Representative Paul Reitenbach, King County, DDES Ed Stewart, Commissioner, Lakehaven Utility District Bev Twiddle, Commissioner, Lakehaven Utility District Geri Walker, Federal Way School District Potential Annexation Area StajT Work Group Representatives of the following Agency Departments and Divisions have participated: Citv of Federal Way Community Development Serviccs- Planning Division City Manager's Office Management Services-Finance Division Management Services-GIS Division Parks and Recreation Department Public Safety Department Public Works-Solid Waste Division Public Works-Surface Water Management Division Public Works-Transportation Division Other Agencies: Federal Way Fire Department Highline Utility District King County DDES Lakehaven Utility District Puget Sound Energy Agency Report Preparation Team: Consultant Report Preparation Team: City of Federal Way, Department of Community Development Services, Project Management City Federal Way, GIS Division, GIS Mapping Services King County, DDES, Data Coordination Jones & Stokes, Project Management ECONorthwest Henderson, Young and Company Mirai Associates Tetra Tech/KCM, Inc. December 2003 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 1 Purpose of Subarea Plan ..........................................,.,...".............."..................",..,........., I PAA Location and General Characteristics """.""""""""'..""""""""""""""""""""'" I Subarea Plan Relationship to Other Elements ."""""""""."""""""""."""'...........,.".... 2 Subarea Planning Process and Concepts '..""""""""""""".""""""'.""""""""""'."""'. 2 Public Input Process .....,....,...........,...........,......,....,.........................,....,..,......,..................3 POLICY BACKGROUND...........,...........................................................................5 2.1 Statewide Planning Goals................................................................,.................,....,..........5 2.2 Countywide Planning Policies """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..........6 2.3 City Planning Goals or Policies ...................................................................................,....8 2.4 Consistency of Subarea Plan with Key State, Countywide, and Local Planning Goals 8 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA................................... 9 Federal Way PAA Boundary ......................................................................,............,.,......9 Accomplishments since 1991 Issue Paper...................................................................... 10 Feasibility Analysis.. ............. ............. .... .... ....... ........ ........ ............... ....... .......... 11 Annexation Feasibility Analysis Purpose....................................................................... II Study Area Population...................,.................................................................................13 Feasibility Study Methodology... ......... .....,.. ............. .,.. .... .......... ......... ..... ..,.. ...... ........... 14 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT .................................................................................. 15 Summary of Inventory..................... .......... ..................... .............. ...............,....... ............ 15 Environmental Goals and Policies...... ......". ........ ......". ...... ....... ..... ............. ......... .......... 18 LAND USE ............................................................................................".............. 19 Existing Land Uses ......................................................................,................................... 19 Land Use Plan ......,......................................................,....................................................21 Land Use Goals and Policies...........................................................................................25 HOUSING ...........................................................................................................26 Summary of Inventory....,....... ......... ....................... ....".. .............,..... ...... .... ."......, ..........26 Housing Goals and Policies.............................................................................................28 PARKS AND RECREATION .................................................................................29 Summary of Parks Planning Efforts and Inventory ....................................,.................. 29 Future Parks and Recreation Needs ............................... ............., ..... ...... ..... ...... ..........." 30 Parks & Recreation Goals and Policies ..........................................................................33 SURF ACE WATER... ....... ..... ........... ....... ...... ...... ....... ..... ......... ..... .......... ..... ........., 34 Summary of Inventory.......... .....,............. ..."....... ...... ..,. ....... ......... .... ......... ..". .......... ...." 34 Future Surface Water Needs .....,.....................................................................................37 Surface Water Goals and Policies ............................................. ................. ............. ........41 TRANSPORTATION .............................................................................................42 10.1 Summary of Inventory ...............".................................................................................." 42 1 0.2 Existing and Future Transportation Levels of Service ..................................................43 10.3 Transportation Goals and Policies ..................................................................................49 P RIV ATE UTI LITI ES ........, ................... ........ ........ .......".. .......... ,.... .......... ......... ....., 51 l.l 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 3.1 3.2 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 6.1 6.2 6.3 7.1 7.2 8.1 8.2 8.3 9.1 9.2 9.3 ii December 2003 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 12 11,1 Summary ofPAA Inventory """"",,""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""'" 51 11.2 Private Utilities Goals and Policies ................................................................................52 PUBLIC SERVICES AND CAPITAL FACILITIES .....................................................53 12.1 Inventory of Public Services Likely to Change as a Result of Annexation ................. 53 12,2 Summary of Fiscal Impacts and Strategies """""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""" 55 12,3 Services Unlikely to Change as a Result of Annexation:.............................................. 61 12.4 Public Services and Capital Facilities Goals and Policies ....................................,.......64 PUB LlC P ARTI C I P A TI 0 N................. ....................... """"""""'" """""""""" ...... 66 13.1 Public Participation Goal and Policies ...........,.................................,...................,.........66 GOVERNANCE AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL COORDINATION...................... 67 14,1 Governance/Interjurisdictional Goals and Policies.............. """""" ........... ........ ....... .... 67 AN N EXA TI ON oo. .oo. .oo. .oo............oooooo......oo...oo ""'" oo..oooo.oooo.oo..oo................oo OOOO""" 68 15.1 Annexation Goals and Policies ............. ...... ........... ...... ......... """"""". """"""" ............. 69 TECHNICAL REFERENCES TO THE SUBAREA PLAN 'OOOOOO'OO"'OO"OO'OOOOOO"'oo..'OOOOOOOOOO 72 13 14 15 16 List of Tables Table I Year 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2020 Population and Housing """""""""""""""""""" 13 Table 2 Existing Land Use by Parcel.......................................................................................... 19 Table 3 P AA Housing Sales and Affordability """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""."""'" 28 Table 4 P AA Park Facilities Owned by King County............................................................... 29 Table 5 P AA and City Parks Levels of Service .........................................................................30 Table 6 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Cost for Parks and Recreation....... 31 Table 7 In-Road Surface Water Facilities...................................................................................35 Table 8 Regional Stormwater Facilities ..... ..". ...... ..... """""""" .................. ..... ....... ...... ............. 35 Table 9 Residential and Commercial Drainage Facilities.......................................................... 35 Table 10 Road Maintenance Problems in PAA.......................................................................... 37 Table II Road Maintenance Problems Near P AA.... .................................................................37 Table 12 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Cost for Surface Water Capital Improvements...........................................""""""""""""""""""""""""""'"..............40 Table 13 Street Inventory within P AA """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""'" 43 Table 14 Future LOS and Recommended Improvements .........................................................45 Table 15 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Cost for Roadway Improvements..............................................""""""""""""""""""""""""""'"...........47 Table 16 Operating Revenues Generated, by P AA (2003)........................................................56 Table 17 Operating Costs by Department by Potential Annexation Area (2003) .................... 57 Table 18 Annual Net Operating Revenues (or Operating Cost) of Annexation, by P AA (2003).............................................................................................................................57 Table 19 Federal Way Potential Annexation'Area Capital Revenue to 2020..........................57 Table 20 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Estimated Future Capital Costs................ 58 Table 21 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Estimated Net Capital Revenues.............. 58 iii December 2003 List of Maps Each Map follows after Page 72: CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Map I Federal Way PAA Map II Community Level Subarea Boundaries Map III Sensitive Areas Map IV Geologic Hazards Figure V 2002 Existing Land Use Distribution Map VI Parks & Cultural Resources Map VII-I Federal Way P AA Pre-Annexation Comprehenisve Plan Designations Map VII-2 Federal Way PAA Pre-Annexation Zoning Map Map VIII Surface Water Facilities Map IX Arterials and Local Streets Map X Existing Roadway Level of Service Map XI Year 2020 Roadway Level of Service Map XII 20 Year Proposed Intersection Improvements Map XIII Fire Department Facilities Map XIV Public School Facilities Map XV Water Service Map XVI Wastewater Service, Septic Repair and Complaints iv December 2003 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 P.urpose of Subarea Plan The City of Federal Way Potential Annexation Area (P AA) was established through a series of interlocal agreements between the City of Federal Way and neighboring south King County cities. Based upon the State of Washington Growth Management Act (GMA) and King County Countywide Planning Policies, the City would ultimately annex and provide services within its designated P AA. While the City's Comprehensive Plan focuses upon plans and policies for property in the City limits, this Subarea Plan augments the Comprehensive Plan and addresses in more detail the Federal Way PAA, located principally to the east of 1-5, with a small portion located west of 1-5 and north of the City limits near the Redondo neighborhood. Over time, property owners in the P AA have made annexation requests to the City of Federal Way, which requires a thorough City analysis of service/capital expenditures, revenues, and other issues. To review its P AA comprehensively and in advance of individual requests, the City of Federal Way, with the support of King County, initiated a PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study of which this PAA Subarea Plan is a part. By evaluating the feasibility of potential annexations and planning for the future delivery of services, residents of the P AA and the City can make more informed choices about their future. Specific Subarea Plan purposes include: . To act as an informational resource for the City and County staff, elected officials, residents, property owners, and business owners; . To identify the P AA-specific goals, policies, pre-annexation Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Map designations and capital plans; and To provide the City with a framework to guide future annexations. . In coordination with the City's overall Comprehensive Plan, this PAA Subarea Plan provides a Year 2020 long-range land use and policy plan to guide pre- annexation planning efforts and annexation requests. 1.2 P AA Location and General Characteristics The Federal Way PAA is located in South King County, and, with the exception of a small future annexation area near the intersection of South 272nd Street and Pacific Highway South (SR 99), lies generally east of the City of Federal Way and Interstate 5. The P AA is characterized by a series of residential neighborhoods focused around numerous lakes beginning with Star Lake at the north and concluding with Five Mile Lake at the South. See Maps I and II. December 2003 1.3 1.4 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Subarea Plan Relationship to Other Elements The GMA requires that the City of Federal Way prepare a 20-year comprehensive plan that at a minimum addresses land use, housing, capital facilities, utilities, transportation, economic development, and parks and recreation, Optionally, a city or county may choose to include subarea plans and/or other elements, GMA does not limit optional topics, Since its adoptioI1in 1995, the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan has included policies identifying the need for comprehensive land planning in its designated P AA, The City's Comprehensive Plan was prepared in accordance with the GMA and underwent an extensive public participation process including City residents, property owners, and business owners as documented in the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan Introduction. The City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan in its entirety contains ten elements: Land Use, Transportation, Economic Development, Housing, Capital Facilities, City Center, Potential Annexation Area, Natural Environment, and Private Utilities. The Consolidated Plan for Housing and Human Services, and the Parks Recreation and Cultural Services Plan are incorporated by reference. When adopted in final form, this P AA Subarea Plan will be a component of the overall Federal Way Comprehensive Plan focusing upon the 5,OOO-acre future annexation area, and will replace the Potential Annexation Area Element of the Comprehensive Plan currently in place, It is intended that the City's Comprehensive Plan Elements provide the general goals and policies for land use, transportation, economic development, etc. for the P AA as well as the City. However, the P AA Subarea Plan is intended to address unique characteristics or situations relevant to the P AA. Future annexation proposals will be evaluated, and, if approved, implemented in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, that will include the PAA Subarea Plan, Subarea Planning Process and Concepts This P AA Subarea Plan has been prepared in accordance with an established work program that included reviews by the City of Federal Way, King County, and two working committees. The work program has included public participation throughout the process. The key steps in this planning process include: . Inventory: The inventory identifies current environmental and public service conditions. See Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March 18,2002. Analysis: Several analyses have been undertaken including land use and population review, levels of service (roads, surface water, police, etc.), and preliminary cost and revenue estimates. (Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level (~rService Analysis, July 1 I, 2003; Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Land Use Analysis Compilation, March 5, 2003.) . 2 December 2003 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . Draft Plan: The March 2003 Draft P AA Subarea Plan contained draft policies and plans, and was the basis for a fiscal analysis. Final Plan: Based on public input and the fiscal review of the Draft Plan, the Final Subarea Plan has been prepared. It is coordinated with the PAA Annexation Few,.ibility Study including strategic alternatives such as annexation area phasing and service provision phasing, ~dopted Plan: As part of the City's public hearing process, the Federal Way Planning Commission will review and makè a recommendation to the Federal Way City Council Land Use and Transportation Committee (LUTe) regarding the adoption of the Subarea Plan. The LUTC will review the Subarea Plan and the Planning Commission recommendation and issue a recommendation to the Federal Way City Council regarding the adoption of the Subarea Plan. The City Council will review the Subarea Plan and the Planning Commission and LUTC recomrnendations in its consideràtion of adopting the Subarea Plan. . . As the PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study have progressed to date, key concepts have been elicited about the P AA: . The City of Federal Way recognizes annexation as a citizen-based process. The Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study are intended to provide for advanced planning of the PAA allowing both citizens and the City to make informed choices about their future. The PAA is part of the larger Federal Way community, but is distinct in its own right. Given its proximity, inter-dependent transportation network, shared school district/utility districts/emergency service providers, and the City's subregional economic role, the P AA is inter-related with the City of Federal Way. However, the P AA has its own unique characteristics - residential neighborhood variety, natural features including headwaters to several significant streams, a road system functioning with rural standards in an urbanizing area, some economic nodes such as in Redondo, and many other distinct features. . 1.5 Public Input Process Key to the development of the PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study has been and will be public participation. Public participation methods for the PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study have included: . Articles for inclusion in City and Utility District newsletters, and City and County website pages sites (www.cityoffederalway.com; www.metrokc.gov, respectively), as well as a link from the Federal Way School District website page to City and County website. December 2003 3 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . Creation ofa PAA Study webpage on the City's website that provides an opportunity for residents, property owners, and business owners to view draft and final work products, provide comments and suggestions, as well as other features, . Coordination of draft work products with neighboring jurisdictions and ,- affected agencies, . City facilitation of public neighborhood meetings with the North Lake, Lake Kilarney, and lake Geneva Homeowner's Associations to explain the purposes of the P AA Study and its scope of work, . City-issued press releases announcing the publication of draft work products and the hosting of public meetings. . The maintenance of a comprehensive stakeholder list that is used for mailing public meeting announcements and the announcement of the issuance of recently issued draft work products. . The mailing of the City's quarterly newsletter to each P AA household. Each newsletter provides an update regarding the status of the P AA study and the announcement of recently issued draft work products. Announcement of the publication of draft work products and hosting of public meetings on the City's public access television station. P AA Steering Committee, Planning Commission, and City Council regular meetings open to the public. To date, Steering Committee Meetings have been held in December 2001, January and February 2002, and January and April 2003, and more are planned. Planning Commission and City Council meetings are forthcoming. . . . Public open houses where residents, property owners, and business owners can review infonnation of interest relevant to their neighborhood, and talk individually with officials and staff. To date public open houses have been held in February 2002, and January and September 2003, Meetings were held at local public schools in the PAA and at the City of Federal Way City Hall. At the meetings, the public could review the P AA inventory, land use concepts, levels of service and fiscal analyses as well as provide comments and ask questions. Later in the process, public hearings before the PlalU1Ìng Commission and/or City Council to present formal testimony, including written comments in advance of the public hearings. . A Steering Committee was formed to act as a "sounding board" reviewing products of the Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study, and assessing the direction of the project, particularly the Subarea Plan. The P AA Steering Committee consists of officials from the Federal Way City Council, Planning Commission, School District, Chamber of Commerce, King County, Lakehaven Utility District, and P AA Resident representatives. December 2003 4 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan A Staff Work Group comprised of City staff from multiple departments, a County staff representative, Utility District representatives, and Fire District staff provided technical review of P AA Subarea Plan products and furnished data and information to the Subarea Plan preparation team. 2 POLICY BACKGROUND 2.1 statewide Planning Goals The GMA contains 13 statewide planning goals addressing: . Urban growth . Natural resource industries . Reduce sprawl . Open space and recreation . Transportation . Environment . Housing . Citizen participation and . Economic development coordination . Public facilities and services . Property rights . Historic preservation . Permits While all have been considered in the Subarea Planning process, three in particular are most relevant to P AA planning efforts: . Urban growth - Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist, or can be provided in an efficient manner. Reduce sprawl - Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. Public facilities and services - Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. In terms of urban growth and reduction of sprawl, the P AA contains primarily single-family development, with a few commercial nodes along major arterial roadways, where services are or can be extended, identified as neighborhood or community centers. The land use/zoning pattern based on the Pre-Annexation Comprehensive Plan and Zoning designations would result in urban densities of about 4 units per net acre or greater, meeting GMA goals for urban level growth. Select areas have Pre-Annexation Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Designations to accommodate approximately I residential unit per acre on the periphery of the . . December 2003 5 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan P AA, due to sensitive areas and infrastmcture limitations. The ability of the City and Special Districts to provide public facilities and services to the P AA is another key topic of this Subarea Plan, The principles contained in the Subarea Plan are to meet community service and infrastmcture needs cõnculTent with growth, to conduct additional capital planning in areas where data gaps have been found (e.g. surface water), and to provide public services in a cost-efficient manner recognizing the historic level of service differences between the City and the County.. 2.2 Countywide Planning Policies In King County, the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP's) that were enacted pursuant to the GMA also provide guidance with regard to multi-jurisdictional joint planning, annexation, and the phasing of urban development. The most applicable policies are: LU28 LU29 LU30 Within the Urban Growth Area, growth should be directed as follows: a) first, to centers and urbanized areas with existing infrastructure capacity; b) second, to areas which are already urbanized such that infrastructure improvements can be easily extended; and c) last, to areas requiring major infrastructure improvements. All jurisdictions shall develop growth phasing plans consistent with applicable capital facilities plans to maintain an urban area served with adequate public facilities and services to maintain an urban area to meet at least the six year intermediate household and employment target ranges consistent with LU67 and LU68. These growth phasing plans shall be based on locally adopted definitions, service levels, and financing commitments, consistent with State GMA requirements. The phasing for cities shall not extend beyond their Potential Annexation Areas. Interlocal agreements shall be developed that specify the applicable minimum zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation for the Potential Annexation Areas. Where urban services cannot be provided within the next 10 years, jurisdictions should develop policies and regulations to: a. Phase and limit development such that planning, siting, densities, and infrastructure decisions will support future urban development when urban services become available. b. Establish a process for converting land to urban densities and uses once services are available. December 2003 6 FW13 LU31 LU32 LU33 LU34 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Cities are the appropriate provider of local urban services to urban areas, either directly or by contract. Counties are the appropriate provider of most countywide services, Urban services shall not be extended through the use of special purpose districts without the approval of the city in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. Within the urban area, as time and conditions warrant, cities should assume local urban services provided by special purpose districts. In collaboration with adjacent counties, cities, and King County, and in consultation with residential groups in affected areas, each city shall designate a potential annexation area. Each potential annexation area shall be specific to each city, Potential annexation areas shall not overlap. Within the potential annexation area, the city shall adopt criteria for annexation, including conformance with Countywide Planning Policies, and a schedule for providing urban services and facilities within the potential annexation area. This process shall ensure that unincorporated urban islands of King County are not created between cities and strive to eliminate existing islands between cities. A city may annex territory only within its designated potential annexation area, All cities shall phase annexations to coincide with the ability for the city to coordinate the provision of a full range of urban services to areas to be annexed. Land within a city's potential annexation area shall be developed according to that city's and King County's growth phasing plans. Undeveloped lands adjacent to that city should be annexed at the time development is proposed to receive a full range of urban services. Subsequent to establishing a potential annexation area, in-fill lands within the potential annexation area that are not adjacent, or not practical to annex, shall be developed pursuant to interlocal agreements between the County and the affected city. The interlocal agreement shall establish the type of development allowed in the potential annexation area and standards for that development so that the area is developed in a manner consistent with its future annexation potential. The interlocal agreement shall specify, at a minimum, the applicable zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation within the potential annexation area. Several unincorporated areas are currently considering local governance options. Unincorporated urban areas that are already urbanized and are within a city's potential annexation area are encouraged to annex to that city in order to receive urban services. Where annexation is inappropriate, incorporation may be considered. The CWPP's are particularly reflected in Subarea Plan sections 12 and 15, Public Services and Capital Facilities, and Annexation. December 2003 7 2.3 2.4 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan City Planning Goals or Policies The Land Use Element of a Comprehensive Plan plays a central role in guiding and directing all other Elements by indicating the desired land use pattern that consequently drives the demand for infrastructure and services. The key City Planning Goals are based then on the City's Land Use Concept in the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan (see Federal Way Land Use Element, Map II-2), In summary, the City of Federal Way land use concept is based upon creating land use patterns that support multiple modes of transportation, with attention to neighborhood enhancements and protection, and community amenities and needs (design quality; parks; etc.) to ensure compatible land uses. These concepts include the transformation of the City's retail core into a dense, mixed use City Center, preservation of residential neighborhoods, a hierarchy of mixed-use retail and employment nodes to serve the community, and development that recognizes environmentally sensitive areas. The PAA, as part of the larger Federal Way community, is reviewed in this Land Use Concept framework while also reviewed with respect to unique P AA circumstances. Consistency of Subarea Plan with Key State, Countywide, and Local Planning Goals This Subarea Plan has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Washington State GMA, the King County Countywide Planning Policies, and the City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan to ensure coordinated planning. In summary, the Subarea Plan is consistent with the following State, Regional, and City "indicator" policies: . Growth Management Act: The Subarea Plan applies urban densities to accommodate growth, avoid sprawl, and provide services efficiently within the Urban Growth Area. As described in Section 6, the predominant land classification would support urban level densities except in areas with significant environmental or infrastructure limitations. Public service capital and operational needs and improvements are identified to support the P AA land use plans. . Countywide Planning Policies: The land capacity of the P AA would accommodate the P AA housing target of 1,320 units and employment target of 134 between 2001 and 2022, described further under Section 6.2. Public service capital and operational needs and improvements are identified to support the P AA land use plans, The phasing of services and annexation areas is encouraged in Subarea Plan policies. City Policies: Subarea Plan designations and policies support the Comprehensive Plan such as the hierarchy of Commercial Centers by providing for local-serving commercial and mixed-use nodes, and by supporting the predominant residential character of the P AA. . 8 December 2003 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 3 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA 3.1 Federal Way PAA Boundary Federal Way Adoption of P AA Boundary Process The City of Federal Way formally began the process of evaluating its logical service delivery areas and the boundaries of its P AA with the publication of a July 1991 issue paper. This paper examined the requirements of GMA as they relate to UGA's, and included a discussion of how urban services were being provided. The paper also described special purpose district boundaries, the transportation system, parks and recreation facilities, and physical features that potentially affect urban service delivery. The analysis that was included in the 1991 issue paper provided the basis for a proposed P AA area for the City. Staff presented the issue paper and proposed Urban Growth Boundary to the Federal Way Planning Commission. The Commission reviewed the proposal and held a public hearing. Most of the testimony received by the Commission was supportive of the proposed urban growth boundary. The Commission recommended that the City Council adopt the proposed P AA boundary. The City Council accepted the recommendation, but did not adopt it. Rather, the Council directed staff to begin negotiations with the neighboring cities of Auburn, Milton, Algona, Pacific, Des Moines, and Kent, all of whom had developed urban growth boundaries that overlapped with Federal Way's proposal. The City negotiated with each of its municipal neighbors for the better part of a year. By the Fall of 1993, staff presented a revised P AA boundary to the City Council. The Council reviewed the proposal and adopted the P AA boundary on December 21, 1993. That boundary was amended in 1994. The City executed interlocal agreements with all of the neighboring cities based on the boundary shown on MapI. Neighborhood Analysis levels F or purposes of data collection efficiencies and resources, the P AA has been divided into three Major Subareas as well as seven smaller Community Level Subareas. The Major and Community Level Subareas are as follows (see Map II): . The Redondo East Community Level Subarea is in the Redondo East Major Subarea (both with identical boundaries), west of 1-5 and is approximately 43 acres in size. . Star Lake, Camelot, and North Lake Community Level Subareas comprise the Northeast Major Subarea, east ofI-5 and north of SR-18, and total approximately 2,527 acres in size. December 2003 9 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . Lakeland, Parkway, and Jovita Community Level Subareas comprise the Southeast Major Subarea, east of 1-5 and south of SR-18, and total approximately 2,470 acres in size. The Community Level Subarea Boundaries are shown on Map If. The subarea boundaries are based upon City-defined Transportation Analysis Zones which align with Census Tract geography, neighborhood affinities as expressed in prior County planning efforts, and the ability of the County to provide information within existing resources, as well as input from the P AA Steering Committee in December 2001. 3.2 Accomplishments since 1991 Issue Paper The following has been accomplished since completion of the 1991 Issue Paper: . Used technical information from neighboring jurisdictions and information from affected citizens to identify and establish a P AA boundary for the City of Federal Way. Established an interlocal agreement on mutually agreeable P AA boundaries with the following South King County Cities: Des Moines, Kent, Auburn, Algona, Pacific, and Milton. . . Completed a preliminary analysis of the P AA that identified potential issues associated with annexation and a scope of work for a more comprehensive study of the PAA. Initiated a comprehensive study of the PAA in conjunction with King County. . The comprehensive study of the P AA includes several phases as described above: inventory, analysis, draft and final plan formulation, etc. The Federal Way PAA Inventory (March 18, 2002) addresses a range of environmental, economic, and social conditions within the Federal Way PAA. The Inventory is primarily a compilation ofreadily available data from King County, Special Districts, and the City of Federal Way, and was supplemented with some limited field review. The purpose of the Inventory was to serve as a basis for additional planning and analysis of the P AA including levels of services, current and future fiscal conditions, and subarea planning. The P AA Inventory was followed by a series of reports about levels of service (LOS) in the PAA (Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003). The LOS reports address a wide range of governmental services including community development, human services, parks/recreation, police services, roads, surface water, solid waste, water and wastewater. However, the LOS reports focus upon surface water and transportation in more detail due to the complexity and importance of these services to the community and the City. Also completed was a series ofland use classification and policy December 2003 10 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan analyses analyzing current and proposed land use patterns and policy issues. These recent P AA inventories and analyses are summarized and integrated as appropriate into this Subarea Plan. Additional phases addressing costs and revenues and annexation strategies in the AnnexatÎon Feasibility Study, December 2003, have also been integrated with this P AA Subarea Plan. 4 Feasibility Analysis 4.1 Annexation Feasibility Analysis Purpose An Annexation Feasibility Study (December 2003) has been prepared to estimate the long-term fiscal impact annexation would have on the City of Federal Way. This section provides information on the basic assumptions and methodology of the analysis. The results of the Feasibility Analysis are reviewed in the appropriate topical section of this P AA Subarea Plan (e.g. transportation, surface water, parks and recreation), but are summarized in total in Section 12. As a baseline assessment, the Feasibility Study looks at the net fiscal gap the new, expanded City of Federal Way would face if the City were to annex any of the identified P AAs while trying to maintain current levels of services and current levels of taxation and fees. To account for the differences between the fiscal impacts associated with the day- to-day operation of the City and the impacts associated with needed capital investments, the Feasibility Study takes a three-pronged approach to assessing impacts: 1. Estimate the incremental operating costs introduced by annexation of the P AAs on an annual basis, and compare those costs to the incremental revenues the City would receive from the same areas. 2. Discuss how the balance of operating costs and revenues would be likely to change in future years. 3. Estimate the additional capital investments that the City would take on with annexation and compare those costs to the additional capital revenues the City could expect to receive from the P AAs. To provide the most intuitive and up-to-date information about estimated impacts, this analysis provides a snapshot of what the operating impacts would be if the City were in the position of fully governing each P AA in 2003. The assessment of operating impacts is based on 2003 costs of service and 2003 tax and fee structures, as outlined in the City of Federal Way 2003/2004 Adopted Budget, and is intended to represent a picture of fiscal impacts under steady-state operation. In essence, these estimated steady-state operating impacts reflect the ongoing "costs" December 2003 11 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan that the City would face each year, beginning perhaps, in the third year after annexation and extending into perpetuity.l Estimated costs of capital improvements are based on the most recent available data (2002) and reflect estimates of the combined investments that will be necessary through the planning horizon of 2020 (all presented in 2002 dollars). There is no material effect on this fiscal analysis from using 2003 operating costs impacts and 2002 capital costs, primarily because the capital improvement costs are expressed in current (2002) dollars regardless of when the projects may be built in the next 20 years. The purpose 0 f estimating the hypothetical gap that would be created if the City were to try to extend current service levels to the P AAs without increasing taxes is to present decision makers and the public with a picture of the true "cost" of annexation. Ultimately, any such gap between costs and revenues is hypothetical. Cities have no choice but to cover their costs of operation. Consequently, if Federal Way were to annex any of the P AAs, any estimated "cost" associated with annexation would have to be made up through some combination of (1) stretching City resources through decreased levels of service and/or (2) increasing City revenues. The Feasibility Study Implementation Strategies are integrated into the Subarea Plan Section 12, and examine a variety of options to improve the financial feasibility of future annexations. The Feasibility Study provides fiscal analysis and annexation strategies that are integrated into the Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan, particularly in terms of: . Identifying public services and capital improvements that would need to be in place to serve the Subarea Plan current and future land use pattern over time, and Incorporating into Subarea Plan policies the strategies regarding agency coordination, funding sources, future land use amendments, levels of service, and others, that could improve the financial feasibility of annexations in the PAA. . 1 In the initial years of annexation costs could be either higher or lower than the estimated steady- state impacts, depending on how the City chose to manage annexation. Among the determinants of transition-period costs will be the direct and indirect costs of managing the transition and the pace at which the City chooses to ramp up certain, discretionary service levels in the annexed area. December 2003 12 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 4.2 study Area Population Population data for the Annexation Feasibility Study covers several time periods. The data is consistent among time periods, but different periods are used in order to produce the most accurate forecast of operating and capital costs and revenues. Baseline data was developed from the last US Census and other sources that used the US Census. This enabled the study to start from a reliable base of data for the year 2000. The Operating Cost/Revenue analysis is a snapshot in time based on the City's 2003 budget and rates, with some trend analysis. As a result, population forecasts for 2003 were prepared for use in the analysis of operations. The Capital Cost/Revenue analysis covers the period 2002 through 2020 in order to provide a long-range forecast similar to other long-range planning strategies for capital. The data to support the capital improvements analysis is based on the City's PAA market population and employment forecast from 2000 to 2020. Table 1 shows the population and housing units for each Major Subarea and the total P AA for the years 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2020. The area included in this fiscal analysis comprises a substantial population equal to approximately 25 percent of the 2002 population of the current City of Federal Way (83,850, 2002). Table 1. Year 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2020 Population and Housing 2000 2000 2002 2002 2003 2003 2020 2020 Subarea Population Housing Population Housing Population Housing Population Housing Units Units Units Units (Total) Redondo 260 150 260 150 260 150 388 204 East Northeast 11,600 3,900 II ,900 4,015 12,300 4,130 15,870 5,705 Subarea Southeast 8,700 3,200 8,800 3,307 8,900 3,340 9,761 3,564 Subarea PAA Total 20,560 7,250 20,960 7,472 21 ,460 7,620 26,019 9,473 Source: 2000 U S Census, and King County Office of Regional Policy and Planning, January 2002; ECONorthwest 2002 and 2003 December 2003 13 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 4.3 Feasibility Study Methodology Cost and Revenue Forecasts There are many ways to forecast costs and revenues associated with annexation. Examples include per capita analysis or estimates that are based on the experiences of a handful of so-called "comparable" cities. The City of Federal Way desired an analysis with a high degree of reliability; therefore the Study Approach to evaluating the fiscal impacts of annexation is based on a more detailed analysis of the fundamental characteristics of the three Major PAA Subareas and comparisons of those characteristics with the defining characteristics of the existing City of Federal Way. The Feasibility Study analysis looks at the fundamental drivers of demand for City services within the existing boundaries of Federal Way, and based on a comparison of similar drivers in the three P AAs, estimates the additional demand for each service that would be introduced by annexation of each area. In the case of law enforcement, for example, a typical assessment of service costs might be based on figures like average-cost-per-resident or the cost associated with extending police services in a manner that would maintain the City's current count of officers-per-thousand-residents. While each of these measures is attractive due to their ease of use, neither measure does a particularly good job of capturing the true demand for police services. To account for the unique characteristics of the PAA Major Subareas (and to account for the many differences between the P AAs and the existing City of Federal Way) the Feasibility Study estimates of the demand drivers for police services take into account, first, differences in the level of commercial activity among each of the areas, and second, the different characteristics of each area's residential base. Among households in each of the P AAs, the Study estimate of police demand distinguishes between the typical demand characteristics associated with five different combinations of housing type and tenure: (l) owner-occupied single- family homes; (2) renter-occupied single-family; (3) owner-occupied multifamily; (4) renter-occupied multifamily; and (5) mobile homes. The estimates of the relative contribution of each of these segments of the residential base to police demand is based on a series of statistical analyses of more than 100 cities across Washington State. Other examples of drivers used in this study include: land area (solid waste and surface water services), signals/street lights/road miles/population (traffic and road maintenance services) as well as several others. Feasibility Study Assumptions The Feasibility Study analysis is based on five assumptions: December 2003 14 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . Redondo East, Northeast and Southeast P AAs would receive levels of service similar to those now provided by the City of Federal Way. The current level of service, staffing and expenditures in Federal Way is the benchmark for forecasting comparable levels of service, staffing and costs in the P AA. Cities that have undertaken annexations in the past have found that there is a surge in demand for services after annexation. The Study methodology of "drivers" and "outputs" produces a more accurate forecast than a simple population-driven forecast, but it may not fully capture the increment of increased demand during the first few months after annexation. The fiscal analysis includes cost and revenue estimates only for those taxes or services that would change upon annexation. The local services that would not change include water and sewer, firelEMS, schools, regional transit, health services, and regional parks. In other words, after annexation existing school and fire district boundaries will remain as they are, and regional transit, health and regional parks will continue to be provided by King County. The Feasibility Study projections of revenues and costs for determining fiscal analysis are conservative. This means that when a forecast includes judgment as well as data, the Study selected lower alternatives for revenues and higher alternatives for costs. . . . . Again Feasibility Study results are integrated throughout the Subarea Plan by relevant topic, but are fully summarized in Section 12. 5 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Environmentally sensitive areas in the P AA include wetlands, streams and lakes, fish and wildlife habitat conservation areas, aquifer recharge areas, frequently flooded areas, and geologic hazard areas. The March 18, 2002, P AA Inventory Report provides a detailed inventory and description of these critical areas. Many of these areas have already been identified, delineated, mapped, and classified. In addition, the Inventory Report details the implications of Federal, State, and local policies regarding environmentally sensitive areas pending any potential future annexation. 5.1 Summary of Inventory The Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA), Washington State Priority Habitat and Species Program (PHS), and the State Growth Management Act (GMA) provide levels of protection for endangered, threatened, or sensitive species and habitats, and hazard protection. Please refer to Maps III and IV for locations of sensitive and hazard areas within the P AA. A brief description of the results from December 2003 15 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan research on the environment is provided below. Wetlands There are approximately 440 acres of wetlands in the P AA, with the largest acreage of wetlands found in the Northeast Subarea. Within the smaller individual Community Subareas, Lakeland has the largest acreage of wetlands. See Map III. Both the County and City have regulations protecting wetlands with buffers and other requirements varying by wetland class. Streams A distinctive characteristic of the P AA is that most of the area is a headwater to several major streams (Hylebos Creek, Mullen Slough, and Mill Creek). Most of the streams in the Federal Way PAA are classified by the County as Class 2 with salmonids requiring a 100 foot buffer. If using the City of Federal Way classification system, most streams would be considered Major Streams, also requiring a 1O0-foot buffer. Lakes Lakes in the P AA include Star, Dollof, North, Killarney, Geneva, and Five Mile lakes. The City of Federal Way Code has defined specific wetlands within the City as the Regulated Lakes. i.e. those located in the City and contained in King County Wetlands Inventory Notebook Volume 3, South. Upon annexation of areas containing lakes, the City would designate specific lakes within the P AA as Regulated Lakes. The setback requirement for Regulated Lakes is 25-feet landward in every direction from the ordinary high water mark of the lake. Fish and Wildlife Habitat Conservation Areas Based on the State Priority Species and Habitat Mapping Program, within the P AA there are three anadromous running streams. These include the headwaters of West Hylebos creek, the south draining stream from Lake Dolloff and East Hylebos Creek south of Lake Kilarney. King County has also identified downstream and west of 1-5 in the City limits that Hylebos Creek has a "Chinook distribution 500 foot buffer." The City definition of fish and wildlife areas is found in the Federal Way City Code (FWCC 18-28 and 22-1). The Federal Endangered Species Act listings of two fish, Chinook and bulltrout, as threatened are resulting in reassessments of County and City policies and permitting procedures. Interim ESA approaches in the King County permit process include use of existing regulatory tools with greater emphasis on application and enforcement as well as the adoption of more stringent Comprehensive Plan policies. The City of Federal Way requires all project applicants to fill out an "ESA Listed Salmonids Checklist," primarily using the SEP A process to determine mitigation required beyond code requirements. December 2003 16 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Aquifer Recharge Areas King County has mapped low, medium, and high potential groundwater contamination areas in the P AA and has adopted numerous regulations addressing critical aquifer recharge areas. These regulations address on-site sewage disposal systems, clearing restrictions, and through some overlay districts restrict certain land uses. The County is also in the process of preparing a Groundwater Management Program, which is slated to produce a Groundwater Management Plan for South King County, including Federal Way and its P AA. It is expected that this plan will include a work program to guide future actions and will establish a groundwater protection committee to guide its implementation. The Lakehaven Utility District's main source of water is from four aquifer systems that underlie the City: the Redondo-Milton Channel Aquifer, the Mirror Lake Aquifer, the Federal Way Deep Aquifer, and the Eastern Upland Aquifer. The locations of wells in relationship to the aquifer systems are shown on Map III. Aquifer recharge areas are located in areas where permeable soil and rock materials are relatively close to the land surface and where there is an excess of water from precipitation. The Lakehaven Utility District notes that the precise extent of the aquifer recharge areas is uncertain. Highline Water District services a small part of the P AA in the Star Lake area. Until 1962, all water came from the Highline District's wells. Today, about 90 percent of the water supply of the District is purchased from Seattle Public Utilities. The District supplements its Seattle water source with local wells. The wells, which draw from an intermediate aquifer approximately 400 feet underground, were designed to furnish approximately 15 percent of the total volume of water supplied by the District. The District has wells located in Des Moines and also near Angle Lake outside of the PAA and Federal Way. As defined in the City of Federal Way, Sensitive Area Ordinance, siting criteria for wells must comply with State law. Futhermore, any improvement or use on a subject property is subject to State requirements regarding separation of wells from sources of pollution. Frequently Flooded Areas There are no Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-recognized frequently flooded areas in the City of Federal Way. There is a lOa-year floodplain located around Lake Dolloff in the P AA (See Map III). King County regulations require that development activities including fill may not cause the base flood elevation to rise. Federal Way has similar floodplain regulations in its Surface and Stormwater Management Code, Chapter 21 of the Federal Way City Code. Geologic Hazard Areas There are small portions of the Parkway, Jovita, and North Lake Subareas, which December 2003 17 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan have Landslide Hazard Areas and Erosion Hazard Areas, mostly located near streams or steep slope areas. There are also small portions of the Camelot and Lakeland Subareas that have erosion hazard areas. The Star Lake Subarea has a significant proportion of both Landslide Hazard and Erosion Hazard areas along its eastern border. Please refer to Map IV. 5.2 Environmental Goals and Policies - The following environmental goal and policies are provided to address P AA environmental conditions. Environmental Goal Practice environmental stewardship by protecting, enhancing and promoting the natural environment in and around the P AA. Environmental Policies P AA Env - 1 Prior to and upon annexation, the County and City in partnership shall promote the protection of P AA wetland and lake complexes, as much of the area is a headwater to significant fish-bearing streams, including Hylebos Creek, Mullen Slough, and Mill Creek. P AA Env - 2 The County shall, prior to annexation, manage the 100-year floodplain of Lake Dolloff in accordance with Federal, State, and County laws and guidelines. Regulations to prevent reductions in base flood storage volumes should continue to be implemented. Upon annexation, the City shall continue the policy and practice of floodplain management. P AA Env - 3 Prior to and upon annexation, the County and City in partnership should encourage the establishment of an active lake management system to monitor and manage lake water quality. This management system should actively involve property owners, homeowner's associations, lake management districts, and agency stormwater utilities within the P AA. P AA Env - 4 Prior to the annexation of large areas, updated surface water basin management plans should be prepared by the County in conjunction with the City for the PAA basins and sub-basins, particularly east ofI-5. Basins and sub-basins should be prioritized for study and coordinated with all appropriate State and local agencies. The topology, soils, drainage, flow and channel monitoring, vegetation, habitat identification, utilities, RID maintenance, and mitigation policies should be uniquely identified and defined for each basin/sub- basin. . P AA Env-5 In preparation of applying City Environmentally Sensitive Area regulations in the future, the City and County should inventory and map steep slope areas in the P AA. December 2003 18 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan P AA Env-6 Prior to and upon annexation, the City should coordinate with the King County Solid Waste Division regarding the environmental monitoring of the closed Puyallup/Kit Corner Landfill. P AA Env - 7 The City shall coordinate with King County through interlocal agreements or other means to institute common environmental protection standards while the area is in transition from County to City jurisdiction. Standards would include, but are not limited to, wetland buffers and mitigation standards, stream buffers, geologically hazardous area disturbance avoidance and buffers, and others as appropriate. 6 lAND USE 6.1 Existing land Uses With the exception of the Redondo East neighborhood, which lies along Pacific Highway South and contains a higher percent of land devoted to multifamily or commercial uses, the Federal Way P AA contains primarily single family residential land uses as shown in Figure 5, and in Table 2. Of any neighborhood, the Parkway neighborhood has the most acres in multiple family uses although still primarily containing single family uses. Table 2. Existing Land Use by Parcels CATEGORY Redondo East Star Lake Camelot North Lake Lakeland Parkway Jovita Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Agriculture 0.0 0% 5.5 1% 0.0 0% 1.3 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% Commercial 4.8 11% 12.2 1% 7.2 1% 0.9 0% 47.0 3% 1.1 0% 0.0 0% Easements 0.0 0% 6.0 1% 12.3 1% 0.1 0% 6.8 1% 2.8 0% 0.0 0% Industrial \.9 4% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 10.5 1% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% No Data 0.0 0% 1.1 0% 12.1 1% 0.0 0% 0.7 0% 0.0 1% 0.3 0% Office 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.2 0% 2.3 1% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% Open Space, 0.2 1% 27.7 3% 35.8 3% \.8 0% 7.7 1% 56.9 9% 0.1 0% Common Areas & Drainage Public Park 0.0 0% 16.7 2% 18.4 1% 0.0 0% 64.7 5% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% Quasi-Public 0.0 0% 46.0 5% 49.5 4% 0.0 0% 24.3 2% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% Recreation 4.4 10% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% Residential, 9.3 21% 6.2 0% 53.4 4% 1.4 0% 30.1 2% 82.8 11% 3.9 0% Multi-Family Residential, 6.9 16% 412.3 50% 702.6 54% 140.6 37% 643.0 47% 27 \.9 41% 217.3 49% Single-Family Rights-of-Way 7.0 16% 105.3 13% 190.6 15% 57.7 15% 179.2 13% 128.7 19% 56.8 13% Utilities 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% 30.6 5% 0.0 0% December 2003 19 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan CATEGORY Redondo East Star Lake Camelot North Lake Lakeland Parkway Jovita Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Acres % Vacant 8.8 20% 165.7 20% 202.0 15% 126.5 33% 295.9 22% 87.1 13% 167.1 37% Water 0.0 0% 33.6 4% 20.7 1% 51.9 13% 52.6 4% 0.0 0% 0.0 0% TOTAL 43.3 100% 838.3 100% 1304.8 100% 384.5 100% 1362.5 100% 661.9 100% 445.5 100% Notes: The acre figures are derived from the Arclnfo Geographic Infonnation System (GIS). Multi family includes triplex, fourplcx, apartments, condominiums and group homes. No Data is used for parcels where King County parcel infonnation was unavailable. Easements include transportation and utility. Not all right of way (ROW) is developed. Source: King County Department of Assessments 2001 and City of Federal Way GIS Division, 2002 While the predominant land use in the P AA neighborhoods is residential, there are several businesses including the following types: . Redondo - Convenience stores, taverns, fast food, auto service and repair, personal services, offices, manufacturing, vehicle storage, and others Star Lake - Tavern, nursery Camelot - Gas stations, offices North Lake - Nursery, gas station . . . . Lakeland - Convenience store, espresso, auto repair, day care center Parkway - Auto salvage and towing. PAA Generally - Numerous home occupations (for example, home day care operations, individual construction contractors, home-based professional services, and others). . . During the years 2000 and 2001, King County processed a variety of land use and building permits, including preliminary plats containing approximately 576 lots, as well as multifamily developments totaling about 605 units. The majority of the preliminary plat lots were located in the Star Lake and Lakeland Neighborhoods, and the majority of the multi-family units permitted were located in the North Lake and Star Lake Neighborhoods. Residential development has continued since the compilation of County data in 2000 and 2001. Essential Public Facilities RCW 36.70A.200 states that essential public facilities are "those facilities that are typically difficult to site, such as: . Airports, . State education facilities State or regional transportation facilities as defined in RCW 47.06.140, . . State and local correctional facilities, Solid waste handling facilities, . December 2003 20 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . In-patient facilities including substance facilities, mental health facilities, group homes, and Secure community transition facilities as defined in RCW 71.09.020." . Essential public facilities can be government owned and operated facilities, or privately owned facilities that are regulated by public entities. This definition is not considered to be all-inclusive, but provides examples of facilities that are difficult to site. No local comprehensive plan or development regulation may preclude the siting of essential public facilities. The P AA contains several essential public facilities including highways of statewide significance such as 1-5 and SR-18, a WSDOT maintenance facility, the closed & monitored Puyallup/Kit Corner Landfill (see section 12.1, Solid Waste), group homes, and potentially others that remain to be identified beyond present inventory efforts. Under County or City plans and rules, essential public facilities are required to undergo a review process for siting them. Cultural Resources The King County Historic Preservation Program has identified historic properties included in the King County Historic Resource Inventory. The only designated or potentially eligible historic landmarks are in the Lakeland neighborhood of the Southeast Subarea (see Map VI). The Sutherland Grocery and Gas Station, built in the 1930's, was designated a King County Landmark in 2002. The two other potentially eligible historic sites are the Westborg House, a farmhouse built in 1905 by M. Westborg on property originally part of a 160-acre homestead owned by James Duncan, and the Fancher House, a home and barn built in 1923. The King County Historic Preservation Program recommends an inventory update to identify any additional historic properties in the P AA area as well as the City limits since the last inventory was conducted 15 years ago. Additionally, the County recommends an interlocal agreement for preservation services to provide a mechanism and incentives for protecting significant historic properties within the current and future annexed city boundaries. 6.2 land Use Plan The predominant character of theP AA consists of single-family residential with several nodes of commercial and multifamily uses, principally along arterial roadways. The King County land use plans governing the P AA have generally recognized this character. For the Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan, the base or starting point for developing a comprehensive land use plan was first to match the most similar City classification to the current County classification. Although the basis of the PAA Subarea Plan is the King County Comprehensive Land Use Plan, the City conducted a detailed review of existing land uses and future land use/zoning classifications to determine if adjustments to the basic land December 2003 21 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan classification system were warranted in certain locations of the P AA. Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis produced a series of maps to help identify: . Nonconfonning Uses: Existing uses that either under the King County classification/zoning system or the City potential classification/zoning system may be considered nonconfonning - i.e. legally established land uses that do not conform to existing zoning regulations. Mobile Home Parks and Units: Mobile home parks and single manufactured homes that mayor may not meet Federal Way manufactured home park design standards. Parcel Size and Minimum Lot Size Requirements: Parcels smaller than the minimum lot size associated with potential zoning categories. . . Additionally, other issues and locations were reviewed, including: . King County R -1 Zoning areas were reviewed to determine if environmental characterIstics warrant Federal Way equivalent zoning (RS- 35.0) to King County's R-l (one residential dwelling per acre) zoning. Potential Incompatibilities: The P AA Subarea Planning team reviewed sites where there could be a potential for incompatibility with City policies/codes, or other concerns. . The result of the land use and zoning analysis is a Land Use Plan that: . Recognizes and supports the predominant single- family suburban character of the P AA. Recognizes the need for neighborhood or community level business goods and services at key nodes in the P AA such as at the intersection of arterials. . Creates a consistent, compatible long-term land use pattern recognizing the predominant and unique character of P AA neighborhoods. land Use Capacity Analysis . The Federal Way PAA has an estimated Year 2003 population of21,460 with most of the population residing in the Northeast Subarea. The GMA and Countywide Planning Policies for King County require that King County and its cities accommodate their fair share of the future growth projected for King County. The PAA has been found to contain a large supply of vacant and underdeveloped land, with the capacity to accommodate significant future development (approximately 3,717 dwelling units as described further below). Future development "targets", expressed in the number of housing units, are determined through an interactive, multi-jurisdictional process between King County and cities located within, considering land capacity, market factors, and other parameters. Through this ongoing regional process, the P AA growth target for the years 2001 to 2022 is established at 1,320 units. The employment target is established at 134 jobs. The P AA land capacity yield can be compared with the December 2003 22 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan growth targets to help determine the ability of the land use plan to meet growth management obligations. As part of a countywide effort to prepare an analysis of buildable lands pursuant to GMA requirements, the County has estimated the capacity of vacant and underdeveloped (land not developed to full potential) lands in the P AA. Consistent with regionally established methods that are tailored to reflect King County conditions, the total vacant and underdeveloped acres were discounted for critical areas such as wetlands, streams, and steep slopes, rights-of-way and public purpose lands, and market factors (i.e. not all property owners would want to sell or develop). These acres were then multiplied by density factors based upon achieved densities in developed projects over the period 1995-2000. The results for the 20-year period of 200 1 to 2022 are a potential dwelling capacity of 3,754 units and an employment capacity of 134 jobs calculated by King County. The City of Federal Way conducted a similar residential capacity analysis with results of 3,717 dwelling units, very close to the County's analysis since similar land use classifications are assumed. It should be noted that a capacity analysis may make adjustments or discounts to the amount of available land, but does not estimate the time or rate that growth will occur, only the capacity of the land for additional development. The market demand for homes and places of employment will in part determine the timing and rate of growth within the 20-year planning period for the P AA. To help identify potential market demands, the City conducted a market analysis for the P AA with the Puget Sound Regional Council forecasts as a starting point. The outcome of the market analysis is a year 2000 to year 2020 projection of2,223 dwelling units and 115 jobs, which for dwellings exceeds the P AA housing targets, and for employment approaches the employment target, in a nearly similar time horizon. For the purposes of capital facility planning the market analysis figures are used to ensure that facility planning efforts do no overestimate facility demand, capital needs, and funding requirements. The market analysis population growth to 2020 and the City level of service standards have been the basis for the capital needs projections in this Subarea Plan. The County or City plans need to accommodate and direct growth in its comprehensive plan, development regulations, and resource allocation decisions, but the achievement of the Subarea Plan land use plan and other policy objectives will be driven in large part by the private sector, including individual property owner decisions. It is the County and City role to provide opportunities and capacity to meet regional fair share growth, monitor growth, and respond to changing needs and circumstances as they arise through regular review of comprehensive plans, development regulations, and budgets. Comprehensive Plan land Use; relationship to Pre- Annexation Zoning As part of implementing the P AA Subarea Plan, the City has the option of December 2003 23 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan adopting a pre-annexation comprehensive plan and zoning map designations (RCW 35.13.177), which would become effective upon annexation. Pre- annexation comprehensive plan classification and zoning map designations could provide more certainty to property owners and residents about the future character of the area should they annex to the City. As part of the Federal Way PAA Subarea Planning Process, a more specific P AA Pre-Annexation Zoning Map shown in Map VII-2 has been prepared to correspond to the proposed P AA Pre- Annexation Comprehensive Plan in Map VII-I. The process of adopting a pre-annexation land use plan and pre-annexation zoning would follow these steps in accordance with RCW 35.13: After a proposed comprehensive plan or zoning regulation is prepared, the legislative body of the city must hold at least two public hearings on it. These hearings must be held at least 30 days apart. Notice of each hearing must be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the annexing city and in the area to be annexed. The notice must give the time and place of hearing. A copy of the ordinance or resolution adopting the proposed plan, any part of the proposed plan, or any amendment, together with any map referred to or adopted by the ordinance or resolution, must be filed with the county auditor and the city clerk. The ordinance, resolution, and map must be duly certified as a true copy by the clerk of the annexing city. The county auditor is to record the ordinance or resolution and keep the map on file. (Municipal Research & Services Center of Washington, Annexation Handbook, Revised December 2001 - Report No. 19) The adopting ordinance for the pre-annexation plan and zoning should specify the time interval following an annexation during which the ordinance adopting the pre-annexation plan and zoning, must remain in effect before it may be amended, supplemented or modified by subsequent ordinance or resolution adopted by the annexing city or town. Any amendment to the pre-annexation land use plan that is adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plan is subject to the general GMA limitation that the comprehensive plan may be amended no more frequently than once a year, unless exceptions are met. (Municipal Research & Services Center of Washington, Annexation Handbook, Revised December 2001 - Report No. 19) The Steering Committee has held public meetings in preparing the Subarea Plan. Planning Commission and City Council public hearings are planned as part of the remainder of the Subarea Plan process to fulfill local City public participation requirements and the requirements to ultimately establish a Pre-Annexation Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Map designations. See Section 1.5. December 2003 24 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 6.3 land Use Goals and Policies The P AA land use goal and policies are provided in this section, and address land use character and land use planning in the P AA. land Use Goal Respect the character, integrity, and unique qualities of P AA neighborhoods in land use planning efforts. land Use Policies General Policies P AA LV - 1 Proposed annexations should be implemented to be consistent with the pre-annexation land use plans and zoning of the Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan. (See Policy P AA Annex-4.) P AA LV - 2 City and County plans and regulations shall emphasize single- family detached dwellings as the primary use in the P AA' s established single- family neighborhoods. P AA LV - 3 The City and County P AA commercial and multi-family land use patterns and regulations should meet community needs, respect the hierarchy of districts and centers in the Federal Way planning area, and support the Federal Way City Center. P AA LV - 4 The City and County P AA land use plan should provide sufficient zoned capacity, and a variety of housing types, to address total household growth targets for the P AA. P AA LV - 5 Areas with significant environmental hazards, unique or fragile ecosystems of high rank, order, and function, or long-term infrastructure limitations, may be further protected beyond the application of development regulations through Federal Way RS-35.0 zoning in the Star Lake, Jovita, and Parkway neighborhoods. P AA LV - 6 To promote financially self-supporting annexations, the City should support the County in facilitating or conducting coordinated master or sub- area planning of vacant, underdeveloped, or transitionalland areas in the P AA that may present unique and/or highly visible sites for high tax generating land uses, such as but not limited to auto sales. Expedited or advanced environmental review, incentives to encourage assemblages of land, and/or coordinated and comprehensive approaches to site development and environmental protection should be considered. Cultural Resources Policy PAALV-7 Prior to and upon annexation, the City and County should December 2003 25 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan coordinate with the King County Historic Preservation Program, the Cultural Development Authority of King County, and local historical societies (such as the Historic Society of Federal Way) to promote the preservation of historic resources in the PAA. P AA LU-8 The City and/or County should conduct a P AA historic inventory update prior to or upon annexation. P AA LU-9 The City should consider mechanisms to offer historic preservation services-and incentives in the P AA upon the annexation of P AA properties into the City, including, but not limited to, an interlocal agreement with King County for resource evaluation and incentives. Economic Development Policies PAA LV - 10 Commercial locations, development standards, and pennitted uses of City and County Comprehensive Plans and Zoning Regulations should reflect a hierarchy of business districts, recognizing the Federal Way City Center as the primary Citywide business center, and business districts in the P AA as secondary and tertiary nodes catering to local and/or neighborhood needs. P AA LU - 11 The City and County should support neighborhood level business retention, improvement, and development on commercially zoned properties to the east of 1-5 to meet the needs of local residents. PAA LU -12 The City and County should promote the redevelopment and strengthening of viable commercial centers, such as in the Redondo East Community Subarea. P AA LV - 13 Commercial development should be encouraged on properties designated commercial on the P AA Comprehensive Plan Land Use and Zoning maps to help meet the P AA employment target determined in the Countywide Planning Policies. Essential Public Facilities Policies The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan Land Use Element policies address essential public facilities. Additional policies are not proposed. 7 HOUSING 7.1 Summary of Inventory The Federal Way PAA has an estimated Year 2003 population of21,460 with the larger population residing in the Northeast Subarea. As of the Year 2000, a majority of the dwelling units are single-family (83 percent; 6,050 units) in the December 2003 26 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan P AA as a whole, and most dwellings are owner-occupied rather than rented except in Redondo East. Most of the single-family housing has typically been developed since 1960. However, there are pockets of older, well-maintained homes occupied by long- time area residents. The communities with the newest single-family housing stock i.pclude Red°!ldo East, Star Lake, and Parkway. Few single-family homes are considered to be in poor condition and most are considered average in all neighborhoods. Neighborhoods with the highest percent of homes rated "good" by the King County Assessor include Camelot, Jovita, and Lakeland. There are about 1,200 multifamily units in the P AA (17 percent of total Year 2000 units). PAA multifamily complexes (excluding mobile home parks) are described by the King County Assessor as average or low quality in condition. The King County Countywide Planning Policies commit the City and the County to ensuring there is capacity in their Comprehensive Plans to meet their assigned targets, which for the P AA equals 1,320 additional housing units. There is sufficient vacant and underdeveloped land in the P AA to accommodate this target without significant zoning changes. It should be noted, however, that the timing and rate of this growth would occur based upon market forces. In addition to apportioning general housing growth targets, the Countywide Planning Policies indicate that jurisdictions should promote affordable housing to low and very low income households, at 20-25 percent and 17 percent of the overall housing target respectively. In 1998, King County published a King County Market Rate AfJordability Study. A review of the housing stock affordability was conducted for the City of Federal Way, and all of Unincorporated King County. The results show that Federal Way and Unincorporated King County as a whole provide substantial percentages of affordable housing, both ownership and rental, particularly in relation to other King County locations. Housing sales information for the P AA would tend to support the Countywide study. Considering principal and interest (7 percent assumed) costs, most single-family homes would be affordable to households of Low-Median income level (80 percent), and some are affordable to Moderate Income households (60 percent). Relative to each other, the Jovita and Camelot neighborhoods are the most affordable, and the Star Lake and Redondo East neighborhoods are the least affordable. See Table 3. December 2003 27 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Table 3. P AA Housing Sales and Affordability Housing/Mortgage Characteristic Camelot North Star Jovita Lakeland Parkway Redondo Lake Lake East Median Sales Price for SF Sales* $162,500 $174,000 $245,000 $159,500 $203,000 $185,000 $214,900 Count of Transactions 466 35 259 70 186 264 10 200 I Average Assessed Value of Single Family Homes $152,443 $187,658 $187,301 $160,798 $189,162 $172,263 $212,029 Monthly Mortgage Payment for 95% $1,026.59 $1,099.25 $1,547.79 $1,007.64 $1,282.45 $1,168.74 $1,357.63 Median Sales Price: 7% interest** Annual Mortgage Costs for 95% Median $12,319.13 $13,190.94 $18,573.45 $12,091.70 $15,389.43 $14,024.85 $16,291.57 Sales Prices: 7% interest** Year 2002, income level at 80% of median $54,400 King County Income, Family of 4 Year 2002, income level at 60% of median $46,740 King County Income, Family of 4 80% of Median Income x 30% of Annual $16,320.00 Income, Family of 4 60% of Median Income x 30% of Annual $14,022.00 Income, Family of 4 Notes: *Includes recorded sales valued at $25,000 and above for the years 1999, 2000, and most of 200 I. ** Assumes Mortgage Payment Factors (principal and interest only) 30 year fixed, 7 percent interest. The inclusion of taxes and insurance, as well as a higher interest rate would raise monthly housing costs, but there appears to be a margin between the mortgage figures and affordable monthly housing costs, which would mean conclusions would generally stay the same when factoring in those other costs. Source: ECONorthwest, Inc.; Bucher, Willis & Ratliff; U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development As growth occurs, a key policy would be to help maintain the conditions allowing for housing affordable to a variety of incomes. 7.2 Housing Goals and Policies For the PAA, the following housing goal and policy have been developed. Housing Goal Promote the preservation and enhancement existing residential neighborhoods, and allow for new housing developments meeting future needs in the P AA. Housing Policy P AA House - 1 The City, in cooperation with King County, should promote the preservation of existing housing. Private investment should be encouraged in older residential neighborhoods, and multifamily complexes. Programs supporting weatherization, home repair and rehabilitation, and infrastructure maintenance should be supported. The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan Housing Element policies address housing stock protection, existing and future affordability, and special needs, and would also be applicable to the P AA. December 2003 28 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan 8 PARKS AND RECREATION 8.1 Summary of Parks Planning Efforts and Inventory The City of Federal Way Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services (PRCS) Department has prepared a Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan, which was originally created in 1991 and updated in 1995 and 2000. The PRCS plan is currently being updated and, once completed, will be adopted by reference into the FWCP. The plan divides the City and P AA into subareas for purposes of long-range planning. The primary goal of the Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan is to assure that a park serves every neighborhood in Federal Way. Currently, the City is providing 10.1 acres of parks per 1,000 population in the current City limits. The City's goal is to provide a level of service of 10.9 acres per 1,000 in population within the City limits. The City's goal is to maintain this level of service standard as Federal Way grows in population and size. The City of Federal Way's existing parks and recreational areas are divided into six categories. Each category represents a distinct type of recreational activity or opportunity. Please note that this classification system is for the existing parks only. The categories are: Neighborhood Parks, Community Parks, Regional Parks, Special Use Areas, Trails, and Undeveloped Land/Open Space Areas. The total parkland in Federal Way equals 846.0 acres as of year 2002. The PAA is primarily served by five County park sites totaling 109.52 acres. See Table 4. All of the active park facilities are located in the Lakeland community subarea, while natural park and passive park areas are found in the Star Lake and Camelot community subareas. Completed in 2000, the South County Ballfields Phase 2 is the only recent capital project completed in the P AA. Furthermore, King County Executive's Proposed 2002-2007 Capital Improvement Program does not include plans for any new projects or improvements in the P AA. Table 4. P AA Park Facilities Owned By King County P AA Neighborhood Park Site Name County Park Plan Acreage Classification Star Lake Bingaman Pond Natural 16.72 Camelot Camelot Park Passive 18.08 Lakeland Five Mile Lake Park Active 31.7] Lake Geneva Park Active 18.64 South County Ballfields Active 24.37 Total Acres 109.52 Source: Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March] 8,2002 December 2003 29 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan In addition to King County parks, the Federal Way School District (during non- school hours) and the State of Washington also provide public recreation facilities and opportunities in the P AA. These include sites located in the Camelot, and North Lake community subareas. Private recreation facilities may also be required in residential subdivisions and developments of five units or more in accordance with King County development regulations and King County's determination of recreation facility needs. 8.2 Future Parks and Recreation Needs Currently, the PAA's existing amount of park acres does not meet the City's level of service standard for parks and recreation (see Table 5). Additionally with forecast growth additional demand for park services would occur. These existing and forecast park and recreation needs to meet City levels of service would require investment of capital and operating revenue sources to provide for park services. Table 6 identifies the capital costs of providing park services to meet existing and future parks & recreation needs for the major subareas of the P AA: Redondo, Northeast (Star Lake, Camelot, and North Lake) and Southeast (Lakeland, Jovita, Parkland). A discussion of public service operating and capital costs and revenues, including Parks & Recreation, can be found in Section 12, Public Services and Capital Facilities. Table 5. P AA and City Parks Levels of Service Redondo Northeast Southeast Federal Way Level of Service Measure East P AA PAA PAA Subarea Subarea A. Neighborhood Park Land Acres per 1,000 Population. Total acres of parks (2-7 acres) with playgrounds divided by population (times 1,000) Actual Level of Service (acres per 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.5 1,000) Level of Service Standard (acres per NA* NA* NA* 1.7 1,000) 8. Community Park Land Acres per 1,000 Population. Total acres of community-wide parks (15-25 acres) for active use divided by population (times 1,000) Actual Level of Service (acres per 0 0 8.6 2.6 1,000) Level of Service Standard (acres per NA* NA* NA* 2.8 1,000) C. Trail Acres per 1,000 Population. Total acres of trail system divided by population (times 1,000) ** Actual Level of Service (acres per 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.1 1,000) Level of Service Standard (acres per NA* NA* NA* 2.2 1,000) December 2003 30 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Redondo Northeast Southeast Federal Way Level of Service Measure East P AA PAA PAA Subarea Subarea D. Open Space Acres per 1,000 Population' Total acres undeveloped land by population (times 1,000) Actual Level of Service (acres per 0.0 3.0 0.0 4.2 1,000) Level of Service Standard (acres per NA* NA* NA* 6.0 1,000) E. Community Center Square Feet per 1,000 Population' Total square feet - divided by population (times 1,000) Actual Level of Service (square feet 0.0 0.0 0.0 131 per 1,000) Level of Service Standard (square feet NA* NA* NA* 600 per 1,000) Source: Henderson, Young & Company, July 11,2003 * King County LOS standards are based on a parks classification system that is different than the City of Federal Way ** There are no trails in the P AA meeting the City's definition of a trail. Table 6. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Costs for Parks and Recreation Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 ID 1.00 Areawide CIP 0 0 0 0 Programs 2.00 Parkway Neighborhood 2.01 Neighborhood Parks 271,581 810,006 1,081,587 360,529 360,529 360,529 2.02 Community Parks 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.03 Trails 229,878 1,348,618 1,578,496 526,165 526,165 526,165 2.04 Open Space 1,198,152 5,573 1,203,725 401,242 401,242 401,242 2.05 Community Center 0 334,368 334,368 111,456 111,456 111,456 Subtotal Parkway 0 1,699,611 2,498,565 4,198,176 1,399,392 1,399,392 1,399,392 Neighborhood 3.00 Jovita Neighborhood 3.01 Neighborhood Parks 89,416 266,688 356,104 118,701 118,701 118,701 3.02 Community Parks 147,273 774,897 922,170 307,390 307,390 307,390 3.03 Trails 75,686 444,022 519,708 173,236 173,236 173,236 3.04 Open Space 394,482 1,835 396,317 132,106 132,106 132,106 3.05 Community Center 0 110,088 110,088 36,696 36,696 36,696 Subtotal Jovita 0 706,857 1,597,530 2,304,387 768,129 768,129 768,129 Neighborhood 4.00 Lakeland Neighborhood December 2003 31 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 ID 4.01 Neighborhood Parks ¡ 98,072 590,761 788,833 262,944 262,944 262,944 4.02 Community Parks 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.03 Trails 167,657 983,585 1,151,242 383,747 383,747 383,747 4.04 Open Space 873,846 4,064 877,910 292,637 292,637 2'ì2,637 4.05 Community Center 0 243,864 243,864 81,288 81,288 81,288 Subtotal Lake1and o 1,239,575 1,822,274 3,061,849 1,020,616 1,020,616 1,020,616 Neighborhood Subtotal Southeast 0 3,646,043 5,918,369 9,564,412 3,188,137 3,188,137 3,188,137 Area 5.00 North Lake Neighborhood 5.01 Neighborhood Parks 146,434 436,748 583,182 194,394 194,394 194,394 5.02 Community Parks 241,185 1,269,027 1,510,212 503,404 503,404 503,404 5.03 Trails 123,948 727,162 851,110 283,703 283,703 283,703 5.04 Open Space 646,032 3,005 649,037 2 I 6,346 216,346 216,346 5.05 Community Center 0 180,288 180,288 60,096 60,096 60,096 Subtotal North Lake 0 1,157,599 2,616,230 3,773,829 1,257,943 1,257,943 1,257,943 Neighborhood 6.00 Star Lake Neighborhood 6.01 Neighborhood Parks 235,557 702,564 938,121 312,707 312,707 3 12,707 6.02 Community Parks 387,977 2,041,390 2,429,367 809,789 809,789 809,789 6.03 Trails 199,386 1,169,731 1,369,117 456,372 456,372 456,372 6.04 Open Space 320,264 1,490 321,754 107,251 107,251 107,251 6.05 Community Center 0 290,016 290,016 96,672 96,672 96,672 Subtotal Star Lake 0 1,143,184 4,205,191 5,348,375 1,782,792 1,782,792 1,782,792 Neighborhood' 7.00 Camelot Neighborhood 7.01 Neighborhood Parks 551,934 1,646,176 2,198,110 732,703 732,703 732,703 7.02 Community Parks 909,068 4,783,178 5,692,246 1,897,415 1,897,415 1,897,415 7.03 Trails 467,181 2,740,795 3,207,976 1,069,325 1,069,325 1,069,325 7.04 Open Space 1,657,564 7,710 1,665,274 555,091 555,091 555,091 7.05 Community Center 0 679,536 679,536 226,512 226,512 226,512 Subtotal Camelot 0 3,585,747 9,857,395 13,443,142 4,481,047 4,481,047 4,481,047 Neighborhood Subtotal Northeast 0 5,886,530 16,678,816 22,565,346 7,521,782 7,521,782 7,521,782 Area 8.00 Redondo East December 2003 32 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Constr uction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 201S-2020 ID Neighborhood ~.OI Neighborhood Parks 22,690 67,675 90,365 30,122 30,122 30,122 ~.O2 Community Parks 37,372 196,63~ 234,010 78,003 78.003 n,O()3 8.03 Trails 19,206 112,675 131,881 43,960 43,960 43.960 ~.04 Open Spaee 100,104 466 !O(),570 33,523 33,523 33.523 8.05 Community Center () 27,936 27,936 9,312 9,312 9,312 Subtotal Redondo Area 0 179,372 405,390 584,762 194,921 194,921 194,921 Total 0 9,711,945 23,002,575 32,714,520 10,904,840 10,904,840 10,904,840 Source: Henderson Young and Company, 2003 To develop capital cost estimates, first, the standard for park land was multiplied times the population of each neighborhood in the P AA to calculate the number of acres of each type of park land that is needed to serve the population of each area. Second, the acres needed were compared to the number of acres of existing parks. Whenever the acres needed were more than the acres of existing parks, the difference is the number of acres to be acquired through the Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Third, the cost of acres to be acquired through the CIP was estimated using City estimates of costs per acre. The CIP project costs were calculated by multiplying the City's cost per acre (or mile, or square foot, as appropriate) times the number of acres (or miles or square feet) needed for each neighborhood. The portion of the park capital cost estimate that would be attributed to meeting the higher City parks level of service standard for the existing population (i.e. the cost of the existing "deficiency" -- providing Federal Way's level of service to the existing P AA population) is $25.6 million, and the cost of growth through the year 2020 is $7.1 million for a total cost of $32.7 million. The Northeast Subarea has low maintenance costs because it has little parkland now. The high capital cost in this CIP will bring the Northeast Subarea up to the City's standard, and that, in turn, will cause a significant increase in future operating costs. 8.3 Parks & Recreation Goals and Policies The following goal and policies address P AA parks and recreation needs. Parks Goal Maintain current facilities and acquire new lands to meet P AA community park and recreation needs. December 2003 33 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Parks Policies P AA Park - 1 The City should continue to address the P AA in its comprehensive parks, recreation, and open space system plans. P AA Park - 2 , The City should review County park maintenance and operation plans for each County park facility that may be transferred in the event of annexation. The City will assess available resources at the time of annexation and determine the appropriate level of maintenance for all acquired County facilities. P AA Park - 3 Additional parkland, open space, and trails should be acquired and developed according to the standards outlined in the City of Federal Way Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan. Phasing in a gradually increasing level of service standard may be appropriate based on agency resources at the time of annexation. 9 SURFACE WATER 9.1 Summary of Inventory The P AA is almost entirely within the nearly level upland plateau which is immediately adjacent to steep slopes at the edge of the Green and White River valleys, and Puget Sound (in the case of the Redondo Subarea). As a result, historical stormwater systems within the P AA include a series of lake and wetland complexes that drain in steep ravines to the rivers and streams below. The most distinctive characteristic of the P AA is that most of the area is a headwater to several significant streams (Hylebos Creek, Mullen Slough, and Mill Creek). Five drainage basins have been identified by King County mapping within the P AA. These designations also agree with the City of Federal Way designations: Lower Green River, Mill Creek, White River, Hylebos Creek, and Lower Puget Sound. See Map VIII. Surface Water Facilities Within the various drainage basins, the P AA contains a variety of surface water facilities that require inspection and maintenance by several County divisions and/or property owners as listed in Tables 7 through 9: December 2003 34 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Table 7. In-Road Surface Water Facilities Measurement Unit Redondo Northeast Southeast Facility Subarea Subarea Subarea Curb And Gutter LF lineal feèt 1,902 252,806 92,206 Catch Basin & Manhole EA each 19 1,361.00 633 Paved Ditch And Gutter LF lineal feet 0 755 450 Open Ditch LF lineal feet 707 85,292.00 81,916.00 SP lineal feet Enclosed System stonn pipe 1,557 149,913 70,980 Cross Tile And Access EA each 9 985 699 Cross Culverts EA each 7 614 332 Curb & Gutter And Thick RM road mile 0.3 55.2 22.5 Bridge Drains EA each 0 6 6 Auxiliary Pipe LF lineal feet I 2,697 1,611 Trash Racks EA each 0 0 0 Headwalls EA each 0 I 0 Cross Culverts LF lineal feet 0 590 0 Box Culverts EA each 0 0 0 RID Facilities EA each 0 2 1 Source: King County Roads Division, January 2002 Table 8. Regional Stormwater Facilities Subarea Facility Name Address Type Of Facility Northeast Sweet Briar Drainage 4700 S 29200 St. Pipe Improvement (immediately east of 4613 S. 292nd ) Northeast P-32 (Camelot Park) 29800 36tn PI. S. Pump Station Northeast Lake Dolloff Outlet 4200 308tn PI. S. Channel/weir Southeast Peasley Canyon Culvert 5100 S. Peasley Canyon Rd. Culvert Southeast S. 360tn St. Embankment 2100 S. 360tn St. Regional RID Southeast Regency Woods Div I 37546 21st Ave. S. HOPE Pipe Southeast Regency Woods Div I 37694 18tn PI. S. HOPE Pipe Southeast Regency Woods Div 4 37934231'0 PI. S. HOPE Pipe Southeast Regency Woods Div 4 37811 21st Ct. S. HOPE Pipe Southeast Regency Woods Div 4 1817 S 380m PI. HOPE Pipe Source: King County Department of Natural Resources, December 21, 200 I; January 29, 2002 Table 9. Residential and Commercial Drainage Facilities Type Of Facility Subarea Number Of Facilities Residential Northeast 40 Southeast 26 Redondo I Total 67 December 2003 35 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Type Of Facility Subarea Number Of Facilities Commercial Northeast 9 Southeast 16 Redondo 4 Total 29 TOTAL 96 Source: King County Department of Natural Resources, December 21, 200 I; January 29, 2002. Surface Water Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003. Regional and local surface water facilities are shown on Map VIII. Surface Water Problems One function of drainage system maintenance is to respond to complaints and problems in connection with drainage conditions. The data in the P AA Inventory report (March 18,2002) indicated that most of the citizen complaints have come out of the Star Lake and Camelot neighborhoods in the Northeast subarea, two of the more populated neighborhoods. However, out of 160 complaints received in the past 5 years, only 8 remained open with the King County Roads Maintenance Division as of December 2002. The closed complaints were resolved in various ways: technical advice, determination that there was no identifiable problem, maintenance work, referral to other agencies, etc. Most complaints appeared to be resolved with routine responses. A few complaints required more study or action for resolution. No information was obtained about their disposition. It is likely that some of the more enduring problems overlap the drainage problems observed by King County Road Maintenance, discussed below. Discussion with King County Roads Maintenance Division 3 indicates a number of locations with drainage related problems. Certain street locations are subject to occasional flooding. Also, as noted in the P AA Inventory, the area around Lake Dolloff, is in a designated floodplain. Recently the Roads Maintenance Division addressed surface water problems with a 48-inch crosstile at Peasley Canyon Road, and a pipe and catch basin within an easement to Lake Geneva. The Peasley Canyon Road area is subject to landslide and erosion due to sensitive environmental conditions (designated landslide and erosion hazard area). Lake Geneva is subject to periodic maintenance for cleaning of inlets and drainage structures, which indicates potential for periodic sediment and debris accumulations. More problematic drainage conditions indicated by King County Roads Maintenance Division 3 are listed in Table 10. The drainage facilities and locations listed are subject to flooding by excessive stormwater flows, and must be monitored during storms. The problems are severe enough to warrant study of a design solution for the facility and the local drainage system. Several other nearby areas with known problems are also listed in the following Table I 1. The problems may be related to drainage conditions in the P AA, possibly contributing flow or groundwater, and Federal Way may be asked to participate in a solution to December 2003 36 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan that problem. Problems on Tables 10 and 11 appear on Map VIII. Table 10. Road Maintenance Problems in PAA King County Maintenance Division 3 No. Subarea Street Problem I. Northeast SE nil St. ({I; [-5 2 Catch basins 2. Northeast 3366 S. 290 SI. 2 Catch basins 3. Northeast 3i1 Ave. S. & S. 304 Water over road signs. On going problem. 4. Southeast S 342 St. & 44 Ave. S. Crosstile e/of 44 Ave. S. Should be monitored. Source: King County Roads Maintenance Division 3, 2002, Updated April 2003 Table 11. Road Maintenance Problems Near P AA King County Maintenance Division 3 No. Subarea Street Problem 5. Northeast S. 296 St. east of 64 Steep bank, excessive water. Should be monitored. Ave. S. w/ofW. Valley Rd from 64 Ave S. Down to Merideth Hill 6. Northeast S. 296th St east of 61 Crosstile to pond. Should be monitored. Ave. S. w/of55 Ave. S. 7. Northeast Lower Lk. Fenwick Rd. 36" inlet to MH/1ake overflow. Needs to be monitored. S. 8. Northeast West Valley Hwy bit S Flooding. Needs to be monitored. 272 - S 285 9. Redondo East Old Star Lake Road All inlets and Catch basins. Needs to be monitored. from S 272 to Military Source: King County Roads Maintenance Division 3, 2002, Updated April 2003 It is anticipated that after annexation, Federal Way will experience a similar level of complaints and responses in the P AA. Costs associated with complaint response would include staff time to respond to inquiries and issues, and the labor, equipment and materials to provide minor corrective actions. Non-routine problems, i.e. street flooding, severe stream bank erosion, etc., may become more identifiable over time and require further action. Certain problem areas may require continual non-routine maintenance due to existing environmental conditions (such as Peasley Canyon Road), or could become candidates for further study and capital improvements (such as Lakes Geneva and Dolloff). 9.2 Future Surface Water Needs As part of a more detailed level of service analysis (Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003), program and capital improvements have been identified. To transition the P AA from the existing County level of service to the Federal Way program for surface water, the following actions will be needed: . The City will need to conduct a field inventory of the storm drainage conveyance system for inclusion in a map or GIS database. December 2003 37 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan . The City facilities and GIS databases will need to be updated to provide coverage of the P AA. The increased inventory of facilities to maintain, due to the annexation, will over the long term require a propOliional increase in the Cit/s maintenance budget. Increased program spacc needs will possibly require larger maintenance facilities than those currently planned by Federal Way and possibly acceleratc the need for new facilities. . . . It is anticipated that after annexation, Federal Way will experience a level of complaints and responses in the P AA similar to current levels. Costs associated with complaint response would include staff time to respond to inquiries and issues, and the labor, equipment and materials to provide minor corrective actions. Non-routine problems, i.e. street flooding, severe stream bank erosion, etc., may become more identifiable over time and require further action. Certain problem areas may require continual non-routine maintenance due to existing environmental conditions (such as Peasley Canyon Road), or could become candidates for further study and capital improvements (such as Lakes Geneva and Dolloff). . . Ten Regional Stormwater Facilities constructed and maintained by King County will need to be maintained by Federal Way. King County has identified 67 residential and 29 commercial drainage facilities in the P AA. The residential facilities are inspected and maintained by King County. The commercial facilities are inspected by King County and maintained by the property owner. Federal Way will need to evaluate the feasibility of inspection and maintenance. An initial sustained cleaning effort will likely be needed to bring the ditch system to a level of improvement where minimal routine maintenance would be needed. This could take approximately two years, depending on the levels of accumulations and restoration needed, and may need to respond to the Tri-County Regional Road Maintenance Program, a program that implements road maintenance practices that protect habitat by reducing pollutants and sediment from reaching environmentally sensitive areas such as rivers, streams and wetlands. The program also encourages the removal of old road culverts and other blockages that prevent fish from reaching spawning areas. It is anticipated with the annexation that Federal Way may take a more active role with the drainage and water quality aspects of the P AA lake system. There are various options for Federal Way to set up the lake management system, including use of homeowners associations, lake management districts, and the City's stormwater management utility. Upon annexation of the P AA, it is anticipated that Federal Way will expand its water quality program to provide more lake water quality . . . . December 2003 38 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan . management and surface water quality monitoring. This could include a variety of program elements, such as volunteer groups, monitoring stations, community organization, and public education. Federal Way will need to increase other stonnwater program components to include the P AA. A notable expansion element will be a field inventory of the storm drainage system, which is a part of the Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination requirement in the Phase II National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program. . Potential capital improvements are anticipated to include: 0 The four problem areas indicated in Table 10, from King County Maintenance Division 3. Some additional improvements may be needed depending on the outcome of complaints that have remained open as shown in the P AA Inventory. 0 King County Executive Proposed Basin Plan for Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound include the following: - Project 2442: S.360th Street Regional Detention Pond - Construct a regional detention facility on tributary 00 116A at about S 360th Street (extended). This project may be completed through a partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation and the City of Federal Way. - Project 2444: SR 161 Conveyance Upgrades- Upgrade three culvert crossings at tributaries 00 16A, 0016, and 0006. - Project 2446: SR 161 Regional Pond - Construct a regional detention facility on tributary 0015 at SR 161. As the Basin Plan is ten years old, it is likely that the conditions and potential project list should be re-examined and prioritized. 0 There are several projects identified in the Mill Creek Special Area Management Plan and Mill Creek Basin Flood Management Plan. These projects are not within the P AA, however the City of Federal Way may be asked to help adjacent jurisdictions with cost sharing in the future if annexation occurs because King County was identified as a possible agency which could provide cost sharing and because of the location of the headwaters for these projects within the P AA. The projects identified are as follows: - Bingaman Creek Levee Overflow Improvements (King County). - Study of Mullen Slough Intercept Hillside Drainage (King County). - Sediment Trap on Peasley Canyon Tributary (City of Auburn). Due to the date of the basin study in 1997, some of these projects may December 2003 39 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan have begun and may have received funding from other sources. These projects are not within the P AA and were not included in P AA CIP cost estimates. To meet City surface water level of service standards, and accomplish the studies and improvements identified in the P AA studies, capital cost estimates have been developed and are summarized in Table 12. Table 12. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Costs for Surface Water Capital Improvements Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Year of Construction and 2002 Dollars (000) Project 10 Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 1.00 Area Wide Programs 1.01 Stonn Drain System 300 300 300 Inventory and Comprehensive Plan Major Maintenance: 1.02 Ditch Cleaning 544 544 1.03 Stonnwater Facility 223 223 Cleaning Subtotal Genera 300 1,067 1,067 2.00 Parkway Neighborhood Hylebos Executive Proposed Plan 2.01 2442-S 360th Regional Det. 1,565 1,565 Pond 2.02 2444-SR 161 Conveyance 372 372 Upgrades 4.00 Lakeland Neighborhood Hylebos Executive Proposed Plan 4.01 2446-SR 161 Regional 598 598 Pond King County Road Maintenance Div 3 - Identified Problems 4.02 Crosstile east of 44 Ave. S 7 35 42 42 Subtotal Southeast Area 7 35 2,578 2,578 7.00 Camelot Neighborhood King County Road Maintenance Div 3 - Identified ProblEms December 2003 40 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Year of Construction and 2002 Dollars (000) Project ID Capi tal Projcct List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 7.0] (I) 2 Catch basins 7 35 42 42 7.02 (2) 2 Catch basins 7 35 42 42 7.03 (5) Water over road signs 165 825 990 990 Subtotal Northeast Area 179 895 1,074 1,074 Subtotal Redondo Area 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 486 0 930 4,719 4,719 Source: TetraTech/KCM, Inc., 2003 Notes: (I) All projects assumed for construction in 5 years unless differently stated in source CIP document (2) No separate cost given for design, acquisition for Hylebos, certain other CIP figures (3) Estimated cost for maintenance problems and projects assume 100 percent contingency (very general estimates). Pennitting costs were assumed to be included in the contingency. (4) Costs escalated from original sources to 2002 dollars (5) Does not include water quality program costs, including lake management (6) Does not include routine maintenance increase, such as catch basin cleaning, street sweeping. (7) There are several projects identified in the Mill Creek SAMP and Mill Creek Basin Flood Management Plan. These projects are not within the PAA, however the City of Federal Way may be asked to help adjacent jurisdictions with cost sharing in the future if annexation occurs because King County was identified as a possible agency which could provide cost sharing and because of the location of the headwaters for these projects within the PAA. However, there has been no detennination of specific cost share by Federal Way, and none are estimated above. (8) Cost data for estimates were derived from the following sources: a. Federal Way estimates for ditch cleaning, with a 33 percent contingency. b. Federal Way staff infonnation for pond cleaning costs. Pond facilities (wet ponds, infiltration facilities, etc.) were estimated at $5,000 per facility. Other facilities (catch basins, tanks, etc.) were assumed at $1,000 per facility. The costs were assumed to include some contingency; therefore, no additional contingency was applied. c. Planning cost estimates for stonnwater facilities developed for the City of Auburn 2002 Comprehensive Drainage Plan. Conveyance costs included a ratio of four catch basins per 300 feet. When individual catch basins or manholes were indicated, separate cost estimates for the catch basin or manhole were made, using the planning cost estimates developed for the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) outfall inventory project (2002). d. Costs for certain stonnwater facilities, and costs for mobilization, traffic control, tax, engineering, and land acquisition were obtained from planning cost estimates developed for WSDOT outfall inventory project (2002). A discussion of public service operating and capital costs and revenues including the Surface Water enterprise fund, can be found in Section 12, Public Services and Capital Facilities. 9.3 Surface Water Goals and Policies Surface water management would be guided by the following goal and policies. Surface Water Goal Promote a P AA surface water system that protects the environment and property, and allows for efficient operation and maintenance. December 2003 41 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Surface Water Policy In addition to Natural Environment and Capital Facility policies, the following policy is provided specific to surface water concerns: P AA SW -1 Prior to annexations of large areas, the County, in conjunction with the City and in partnership with other agencies, should further inventory surface water facilities and conditions, and prepare hydrologic models and basin plans for the P AA areas east of 1-5. Surface water analysis of the Redondo East Subarea should occur as necessary, in conjunction with any area-wide subbasin or basin plans for the vicinity. 10 TRANSPORTATION 10.1 Summary of Inventory The Federal Way PAA is served by a series of arterial roadways that provide local and regional transportation access. Refer to Map IX King County has been responsible for maintenance of public roadways and accompanying facilities such as shoulders, sidewalks, traffic signs, striping and signals, guardrails, and landscaping. The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has jurisdiction over state highways within the P AA. State Highways located within the boundaries of the Study Area include Interstate 5 (1-5), SR-18, SR-99 (Pacific Highway S) and SR-161 (Enchanted Parkway S). The City of Federal Way is currently responsible for the maintenance of these facilities within the City limits, except 1-5 and SR-18, which are currently maintained by WSDOT. Transit service, including several park and ride facilities along the 1- 5 Corridor, is provided by King County Metro. The majority of the street network in the P AA is characteristically rural with asphalt concrete pavement, gravel shoulders, and ditches for drainage purposes. The street network is largely underdeveloped, with many cul-de-sacs and dead- end streets creating insufficient connectivity. Furthermore, a general lack of sidewalks and existing luminaires inhibit pedestrian traffic and present public safety concerns. Luminaires are limited to street intersections along arterial streets and newer subdivisions, with very few mid-block luminaires along arterial streets. Most arterial corridors in the P AA, particularly in the Southeast, lack sidewalks and, in most cases, are poorly lit. As shown in Table 13, sidewalks are a smaller percent of lane road miles. December 2003 42 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Table 13. Street Inventory Within PAA Inventory Item Redondo East Northeast Subarea Southeast Subarea Subarea All Road Miles* 0.3 miles 46.6 miles 28.9 miles All Paved Road Surfaces, Lane Miles 0.6 93.2 57.3 Curb & Gutter (linear 1,902 252,806 92,206 feet) (-0.4 miles) (~48 miles) (~17miles) Paved Sidewalk, one side 0.4 miles 25.5 miles 12.3 miles (miles) Traffic Signals (EA)** 0 12 2 Luminaires (EA) 10 561 190 Street Signs (EA)*** 37 980 520 Notes: *There are several street clusters in the Study Area for which road logs do not exist, including: private streets (approx. 7 miles), as well as several unmaintained public gravel streets (approx. 7 miles), and in some cases relatively new public asphalt streets (about 1-2 miles), and these are not included in the totals above. * * Based upon City staff review and field confinnation, there appear to be nine signals, two flashing beacons, one fire signal and two traffic signals on SR 161 (currently WSDOT responsibility) that would become the City's responsibility upon annexation. Controllers would need to be replaced to connect to the City's system. *** King County does not inventory street name signs, which would understate the number of signs maintained. Source: King County Roads The largest traffic volumes exist along east/west arterial routes, which provide access to 1...:5. Over half of the arterial roadway miles within the study area have accident rates that are higher than the average King County accident rates. 10.2 Existing and Future Transportation levels of Service The purpose of the intersection level-of-service (LOS) analysis is to identify LOS deficiencies in the City's P AA and then evaluate the improvements that will be needed to meet the City's LOS standard. LOS is a letter designation that describes a range of operating conditions along a roadway segment or at an intersection. The Highway Capacity Manual 2000 (HCM2000) defines the LOS concept as "a quality measure describing operational conditions within a traffic stream, generally in terms of such service measures as speed and travel time, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions, and comfort and convenience." Six grades of LOS are defined for traffic operational analysis. They are given letter designations A through F, with LOS A representing the best range of December 2003 43 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan operating conditions and LOS F the worst. The specific terms in which each level of service is defined vary with the type of transportation facility involved. In general, LOS A describes a free-flowing condition in which individual vehicles in the traffic stream are not affected by the presence of other vehicles. LOS F generally describes a breakdown in operations that occurs when traffic arriving at a point is greater than the facility's capacity to discharge the traffic flow; consequently, vehicle queues develop. Existine LOS For this study, LOS was analyzed at a total of twenty-five (25) intersections with the results presented in Map X. Intersection LOS analyses were performed using Highway Capacity Software Version 4.1 b (HCS2000). Representative intersections in various parts of the P AA that the City and/or County monitor now, or desire to monitor in the future when the roadways are constructed, were analyzed. (Based on information from the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003.) In base year of 2000, the LOS analysis was done by using actual traffic counts between years 2000 to 2002. Analysis indicated that all signalized intersections operated at an acceptable LOS during the PM peak hour and most unsignalized intersections were operating at an acceptable LOS. Exceptions included: S 288th Street at 51st Avenue S S 296th Street at 51 st A venue S LOSF LOSF SR 99 at 16th Avenue S LOSF Future LOS Analysis of the transportation impacts of future land use requires development of future transportation networks. The future land use projection analyzed is based on Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) projections and market analysis, and was developed for the year 2020 (based on information from the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003). In order to determine a future road network, the City provided a future street improvement list by analyzing the Transportation Improvement Programs, comprehensive plans, and near term transportation improvement projects of King County, the Washington State Department of Transportation, and the City of Federal Way. In order to analyze the year 2020 LOS, future intersection volumes were estimated using a calibrated EMME/2 transportation model. On behalf of the City, Mirai Associates developed the EMME/2 model based on the forecasted land use and future transportation improvements described briefly above. The results of the analysis are shown in Map XI (based on information from the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11, 2003). Overall the most congested locations included are those with two-way stop control, and those December 2003 44 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan located in the Military Road corridor. 20-year intersection LOS deficiencies are shown in Map XI. The average vehicle delay and LOS changes are: Congested Locations Military Road S at S 272IKJ Street Military Road S at S 320tllStreet S 27th Street at 55th A venue S S 288th Street at 5 ¡st A venue S Military Road S at S 312th Street Peasley Canyon Way S at S Peasley Canyon Road Military Road S at Peasley Canyon Way S Military Road S at S Star Lake Road (N Jet.) 5151 Avenue S at S 296th Street Military Road S at S 360th Street 28th A venue S at S 360th Street SR 99 at 16th Avenue S Average Vehicle Delay and LOS Change from 42 sec to 116 sec, from 0 to F from 27 see to 73 see, from C to E from 59 see to 195 sec, from E to F from 64 sec to 361 sec, from F to F Exceeds calculable limits (ECL) from 26 see to 351 see, from D to F from 34 see to 559 see, from 0 to F from 39 sec to ECL, from E to F from 106 see to 996 see, from F to F from 22 see to ECL, from C to F from 46 sec to 770 sec, from E to F Exceeds calculable limits (ECL) To determine the additional improvements needed to meet the City's LOS standard, the lowest cost capacity improvement is sought to address identified deficiency and then LOS analysis is conducted with the recommended improvements to insure that all locations will meet the City's LOS standard. With the recommended improvements listed in Table 14 and shown on Map XII, the City's LOS standard is met at all future deficient locations. Table 14. Future LOS and Recommended Improvements 2020 Recommended Improved Intersection LOS Problem Improvements LOS 1. Military Road S @ S 272nd Street F Substantial demand for Add one additional 0 southbound traffic. southbound through lane. 2. Military Road S @ S 320th Street E Substantial demand for Construct an D eastbound right turn eastbound right traffic. turn lane. 3. S 277th Street @ 55th A venue S F The northbound right turn Construct new E demand is queuing while signalized waiting for the eastbound intersection. to westbound through green cycle. 4. S 288th Street @ 51 st Avenue S F Insufficient intersection Construct a left 0 capacity for the A WSC turn lane from (25-sec intersection. westbound to southbound. delay) December 2003 45 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan 2020 Recommended Improved Intersection LOS Problem Improvements LOS Install a traffic D signal. (47-scc delay) 5. Military Road S @ S 312th Strect F Traffic demand on Install a traffic D eastbound approach signal with one exceeds the LOS for eastbound Icft turn TWSC intersections. pocket and one eastbound right turn lane. 6. Peasley Canyon Way S @ S Peasley F Traffic demand on Install a traffic C Canyon Road northbound approach signal. exceeds the LOS for TWSC intersections. 7. Military Road S @ Peasley Canyon F Traffic demand on the Install a traffic B WayS east/west approaches signal at Military exceeds the LOS for Road Sand S TWSC intersections. 340th Street and close the southbound movement on Peasley Canyon Way S from S 340th to Military Road S. 8. Military Road S @ S Star Lake Road (N F Traffic demand on Install a traffic B Jct.) westbound approach signal with an exceeds the LOS for additional TWSC intersections. southbound through lane. 9. 51 st A venue S @ S 296th Street F Traffic demand on Install a traffic B westbound approach signal with exceeds the LOS for additional TWSC intersections. southbound and westbound left turn pockets. 10. Military Road S @ S 360th Street F Traffic demand on the Install a traffic C east/west approaches signal with exceeds the LOS for additional TWSC intersections. northbound and southbound left turn pockets. II. 28th A venue S @ S 360th Street F Insufficient intersection Install a traffic C capacity for the A WSC signal with one intersection. southbound right turn pocket and one southbound through lane. December 2003 46 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan 2020 Recommended Improved Intersection LOS Problem Improvements LOS 12. SR99@ 16thAvenueS/S279thPlaceF Traffic demand on Install a traffic E eastbound approach signal. exceeds the LOS for TWSC intersections. Source: Jones & Stokes 2003 (Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level o(Service Analysis, Južv II. 2003) Notes: A WSC = All Way Stop Controlled; TWSC = Two Way Stop Controlled The total estimated capital cost for roadway improvements in the P AA, existing and future needs to achieve levels of service, is $10,882,000 through 2020, as - .-.. shown in Table 15. About 21 percent of the total capital facility cost estimate is related to existing deficiencies ($2,241,000). Existing deficiencies due to levels of service below E were found at: . S 288th Street at 51 st Avenue S S 296th Street at 51 st Avenue S SR 99 at 16th A venue S . . Of the three subareas in the PAA, the Northeast Subarea has the largest estimated roadway cost at $7,561,000. The largest part of this is the Military Road South project described above. The Southeast Subarea has an estimated roadway capital cost of$3,039,000, with the largest project consisting of a $1,188,000 improvement to the Military Road South/South 360th Street intersection. The Redondo East Subarea has a total roadway cost of $282,000, which consists entirely of the SR 99/16th Avenue South intersection improvement project. Table 15. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Costs for Roadway Improvements Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 lD 1.00 Areawide CIP Programs 0 0 0 0 2.00 Parkway Neighborhood 3.00 Jovita Neighborhood 3.01 Peasley Canyon Way S & S 41 0 234 275 275 Peasley Canyon Rd Intersection Improvement 3.02 Peasley Canyon Way S & Military 158 16 916 1,090 1,090 Rd S Intersection Improvement 4.00 Lakeland Neighborhood 4.01 Military Rd S & S 360th St 162 84 942 1,188 1,188 Intersection Improvement December 2003 47 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 ID 4.02 28th Ave 5 & 5 360th 5t 65 47 374 486 - 486 Intersection Improvement Subtotal Southeast Area 426 147 2,466 3,039 1,188 1,576 275 5.00 North Lake Neighborhood 5.01 5 320th 5t & Military Rd 5 108 165 623 896 896 Intersection Improvement 6.00 Star Lake Neighborhood 6.01 Military Rd 5 & 5 272nd 5t 91 327 528 946 946 Intersection Improvement 6.02 Military Rd S & S Star Lake Rd 41 0 234 275 275 (N Jet) Intersection Improvement 6.03 Military Rd 5 Improvement - 5 305 496 1,770 2,571 0 801 1,770 272nd 5t to 5 Star Lake Road 6.04 5 277th 5t & 55th Ave 5 92 291 531 914 914 Intersection Improvement 7.00 Camelot Neighborhood 7.01 S 288th St & 51st Ave S 66 0 385 451 451 Intersection Improvement 7.02 S 296th St & 51st Ave S 206 109 1,193 1,508 1,508 Intersection Improvement 7.03 S 312nd St Improvement 0 Subtotal Northeast Area 909 1,388 5,264 7,561 2,234 1,747 3,580 8.00 Redondo East Neighborhood 8.01 SR-99 & 16th Ave S Intersection 41 0 241 282 282 Improvement Subtotal Redondo Area 41 0 241 282 282 0 0 Subtotal LOS Projects 1,376 1,535 7,489 10,882 3,704 3,323 3,855 9.00 Southeast Areawide 9.01 Paving 19,200 19,200 6,400 6,400 6,400 9.02 Curb and Gutter 5,400 5,400 1,800 1,800 1,800 9.03 Sidewalk 7,400 7,400 2,400 2,600 2,400 Subtotal Southeast Area 32,000 32,000 10,600 10,800 10,600 10.00 Northeast Areawide 10.01 Paving 13,900 13,900 4,600 4,700 4,600 10.02 Curb and Gutter 6,100 6,100 2,000 2,100 2,000 [0.03 Sidewalk 10,900 10,900 3,600 3,700 3,600 Subtotal Northeast Area 30,900 30,900 10,200 10,500 10,200 11.00 Redondo East Neighborhood 11.01 Curb and Gutter 32 32 IO 12 10 December 2003 48 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Year of Construction and Project Costs in 2002 Dollars (000) Project Capital Project List Design Acquisition Construction Total 2002-2007 2008-2014 2015-2020 ID 11.02 Sidewalk :ì() 39 13 13 13 Subtotal Redondo Area 71 71 23 25 23 Subtotal Road Cross Section 0 0 62,971 62,971 20,823 21,325 20,8B Improvements - -~. Total 1,376 1,535 70,460 73,853 24,527 24,648 24,678 Source: Jones & Stokes. 2003 Notes: Current expenses for similar construction work within the region were reviewed to detem1ine unit prices for broad categories of construction line items and typiealpereentages for standard items. All LOS project costs assume a 30 percent contingency factor. While the focus of the capital cost estimates are the improvements required to ensure the City's intersection LOS would be met, other capital costs may be incurred to bring essentially rural road standards to the City's urban road standards (e.g. curb, gutter, sidewalk, paving of public gravel or public bituminous surface roads). These road cross-section improvements may be made incrementally as new development makes street frontage improvements, or through local improvement districts, or other means. The road cross-section estimates were made in a preliminary fashion for order of magnitude level of analysis, using as a basis data provided by the County on lane miles, feet of sidewalk, etc. in the P AA. The Northeast Subarea and Southeast Subarea have similar road cross-section costs at $30,900,000 and $32,000,000 respectively. The cross-section improvements in Redondo East Subarea total $71,000. Please refer to Table 15. A discussion of public service operating and capital costs and revenues, including Transportation, can be found in Section 12, Public Services and Capital Facilities. 10.3 Transportation Goals and Policies Transportation would be guided by the following goal and policies. Transportation Goal Establish a safe, coordinated, and linked multi modal transportation system serving local and area-wide travel needs. Transportation Policies P AA Trans - 1 Prior to annexations, particularly in the Northeast and Southeast Subareas, the City and County should jointly classify streets in the P AA consistent with Federal, State, and City guidelines, and future roadway usage. Joint City-County street standards should also be established, such as the City of Federal Way standards, a hybrid of standards, or others as determined by the City and County. This may be achieved through an interlocal agreement and any December 2003 49 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan required County Comprehensive Plan amendments. The joint classification system will help ensure a common set of standards are applied as new roadway improvements are proposed and implemented in the P AA, and that the roadways meet City standards upon annexation. The City classification system for the P AA is presented in Map IX. P AA Trans - 2 Joint City and County street standards identified in P AA Trans- I should address: . Property access . Street signs . Street lighting . Pedestrian and bicycle safety . Street widths. P AA Trans - 3 As development proposals are proposed or capital improvements are implemented in the P AA prior to annexation, the City and County should encourage the connection of streets when considering subdivision or street improvement proposals, unless prevented by topographic or environmental constraints. The City and County should limit the use of cul-de- sacs, dead-end streets, loops, and other designs that fOnD barriers to a coordinated transportation network in the community. P AA Trans - 4 The City should work with the County to ensure unifonn maintenance standards for public streets are instituted and conducted by the County until such time as annexation occurs. P AA Trans - 5 Prior to annexation of P AA properties, the County, in consultation with the City, should review high accident locations, and improve street safety and functions focusing efforts at the most critical locations. P AA Trans - 6 To ensure that City and County LOS standards are met as development occurs prior to annexation, the City and County should agree to joint implementation of LOS standards for concurrency. Development applicants should prepare reports that contain dual analysis of the County's Transportation Adequacy Measurement (TAM) and Roadway Segment level of service standards and the City's LOS E intersection standard. P AA Trans - 7 Prior to annexation of the Northeast and Southeast Subareas, a coordinated Capital Improvement Program should be prepared between the City and County to ensure that improvements required to meet levels of service are implemented concurrent with development. P AA Trans - 8 The City and County shall continue to coordinate with park- and-ride and transit service providers in establishing appropriate LOS for the P AA, promoting alternative modes and assisting the achievement of LOS December 2003 50 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan standards. P AA Trans - 9 Prior to annexation of the Northeast and Southeast Subareas, as part of a P AA interlocal agreement the City and County shall establish a regional traffic planning and mitigation payment system. 11 PRIVATE UTILITIES Utilities described in this section include electric (power), natural gas, telephone, and cable. Public utilities are described under Public Services and Capital Facilities. Private utility providers rely on coordination of information such as population and employment forecasts as well as coordination of construction activities, such as street improvements. 11.1 Summary of PAA Inventory Electric Electric utility service for the Federal Way PAA is provided by Puget Sound Energy (PSE). The PSE grid provides a link between the Bonneville Power Administration (BP A) Bulk Transmission System and the local distribution system that connects with customers. Bulk transmission lines supply power into the Federal Way distribution system and provide connections to Tacoma City Light, King, and Pierce Counties. Power is transferred from the transmission system to the PSE local distribution system at distribution sub-stations. There are 115,000 volt, 230,000 volt, and 500,000 volt transmission lines in the Federal Way PAA. Distribution substations transform voltages of 115kV (Kilovolt) or greater to lower voltages of 12 or 34kV. Electric Substations serving the Federal Way PAA include: Marine View; Lakota; Belmor; Christopher; Weyerhaeuser; Starwood; Kitts Comer; and West Campus. Most of the Substations include one or two 25,000 kV A transformers. The load on the substation varies continuously, exactly meeting the demand of the customers. The average PSE residential customer uses approximately 2 kV A per person during peak winter conditions. Commercial loads are highly business specific. (Based on information found in the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March 18, 2002.) As new development occurs or consumer electrical demand increases, future substations will be needed to meet the increased demand. The future substations in the PSE long-range plan include: Federal Way; Dolloff; Twin Lakes; Enchanted; Five Mile Lake; and Killarney. There are planned expansions at Marine View Substation and the development of the Transmission line corridor between Christopher and Marine View. There are also future 115 kV lines planned in the Five Mile Lake area (in Lakeland). (Based on information found December 2003 51 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan in the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area InventOlY, Final, March 18, 2002.) Natural Gas Puget Sound Energy provides natural gas to the Federal Way PAA. The PSE customer count in the Federal Way PAA is approximately 5,250. Natural gas is not an essential service, and-therefore PSE is not mandated to serve all areas. Significant lines in or near the P AA include a 12" STW (steel wrap) supply main located in Military Road South and 6" STW located in 288th Street. At this time within the Federal Way P AA, no improvements are planned to existing facilities. Long Range plans for the years 2006-2007 call for installation of a 16" STW High Pressure supply main from Aub~rn Valley to the Star Lake area, and the route is still in the planning stage. (Based on information found in the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March 18, 2002.) Telephone Qwest delivers telecommunication services to the Federal Way planning area as regulated by WUTC. Qwest is required by law to provide adequate telecommunications services on demand. Accordingly, Qwest will provide facilities to accommodate whatever growth pattern occurs within the P AA. Due to advances in technology, additional capacity is easily and quickly added to the system. (Based on information found in the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March 18, 2002.) Wireless Service and Cable Providers Numerous wireless service providers currently serve the City of Federal Way and the P AA. Com cast Cable serves the majority of the City and P AA. (Based on information found in the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Final, March 18, 2002.) 11.2 Private Utilities Goals and Policies Coordination with private utilities is addressed in the following goal and policy. Private Utilities Goal Facilitate provision of electric, natural gas, telecommunication, and cable services to the greater Federal Way community. Private Utilities Policy P AA Utility - 1 The County and City should coordinate with electric, natural gas and telecommunication providers to ensure P AA services support planned growth, meet desired customer service needs, and result in a comparable community system in the greater Federal Way area. December 2003 52 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan 12 PUBLIC SERVICES AND CAPITAL FACILITIES This section provides a summary of current and projected public services and capital facilities in the P AA, addressing local government as well as special district services and facilities. For services that the City would provide if the P AA were to be annexed, an analysis of operating and capital costs and revenues is provided based upon the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Annexation Feasibility Report, December 20a3. 12.1 Inventory of Public Services Likely to Change as a Result of Annexation General Government The City of Federal Way and King County house a variety of operations such as administration, public safety, court services, community/senior centers, and maintenance bases at government facilities. The P AA contains the following County government facility: Lake Dolloff Community Policing Storefront just west of 51 st Avenue S. in the Camelot neighborhood. A private, non-profit senior center operates in the P AA at S. 352nd Street in the Lakeland neighborhood. While this facility has received some King County and City of Federal Way funding, it is not owned or operated by either jurisdiction. Also, the North Lake Improvement Club clubhouse is a non-profit center available for public use, although not owned or operated by the City of Federal Way or King County. The operating costs that could be borne by the City, if it annexed the P AA and provided General Government services, is estimated in Table 17 further below. (Also see Section 8 regarding capital costs for community centers.) Parks and Recreation Please refer to subsections 8 and 12.2. Police Services The King County Sheriff provides police protection services to the P AA. The P AA is served by Precinct 3, George Sector, with its headquarters in Maple Valley. However, there is a local storefront police station near Lake Dolloff in the Camelot neighborhood. The substation is not manned for general public visitors, and one must call and leave a message. Although calls for service in the P AA have decreased by five percent between 1999 and 2000, during this time period the number of traffic citations and traffic accident events increased by 17 and 12 percent respectively. As of 2000, the crime rate of 35.26 per 1,000 population was nearly equal to the crime rate for the December 2003 53 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan countywide area patrolled by the Sheriffs Office. According to the King County Executive's Proposed 2002-2007 Capital Improvement Program, there are no new proposed or expanded capital facilities in the Federal Way P AA. At the time of incorporation, the City contracted with the King County Sheriffs Department for police services. In the spring of 1995, the City decided to terminate its contract relationship with King County and form its own police department. The City's Public Safety Department began limited service on September 16, 1996, and was fully operational on October 16, 1996. Federal Way's Public Safety Department could be expanded at some time in the future so that it could effectively provide services to the P AA. (A comparison of levels of service in the County and City can be found in Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003.) State laws require and establish procedures for the lateral transfer to a City of qualified county sheriff's office employees who would otherwise be laid off as a result of the annexation of unincorporated territory into that city (RCW 35.13.360 to 400). The City would not be required to put all transferring employees on the police department payroll. It is within the City's discretion to detennine what staffing provides an adequate level of law enforcement service. Estimates of public safety operating costs to the City should annexation occur are provided in Table 17 below. Solid Waste The King County Department of Natural Resources, Solid Waste Division, operates King County's transfer and disposal system comprised of a regional landfill, eight transfer stations, and two rural drop boxes for residential and non- residential self-haul customers and commercial haulers. The closest waste transfer station to the PAA and the City of Federal Way is in the City of Algona. Unincorporated areas of King County are served by private garbage collection companies, which receive oversight through the Washington State Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC). While Federal Way Disposal serves the City of Federal Way, local haulers within the PAA operate within two service areas: Allied Service Area (SeaTac Disposal) and Waste Management and Allied Service Area (Sea- Tac Disposal and RST Disposal), with the dividing line at about S. 300th Street. In the event of annexation, the City may decide to contract for solid waste collection or undertake solid waste collection itself. However, in accordance with State Law, the holder of the franchise or permit in the annexing area may continue to operate for the remaining term of the original franchise or permit, or for seven years, whichever time period is shorter (RCW 35A.14.900). In the Parkway neighborhood, the Puyallup/Kit Corner Landfill is sited southeast of the 1-5 and SR-18 interchange. This landfill was closed in the mid-1960's prior December 2003 54 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan to existing regulations requiring extensive environmental controls. Environmental systems are being monitored and maintained, and gas extraction systems are in place. Estimates of solid waste operating costs to the City should annexation occur are provided in Table 17 below. Surface Water See Subsections 9 and 12.2. Transportation See Subsection 10 and 12.2. 12.2 Summary of Fiscal Impacts and Strategies Fiscal Impacts Summary The City of Federal Way would experience a significant negative fiscal impact on its operating budget if the Southeast and Northeast Major Subareas (Southeast: Lakeland, Jovita, Parkway neighborhoods; Northeast: Star Lake, Camelot, and North Lake neighborhoods) were annexed to the City and the City used the same revenue sources and rates, and provided the same level of services as it provides to the residents and businesses in the current boundaries of the City. The annual deficit would be just under $3.6 million ($8.2 million cost; $4.6 million revenue). The cost of providing the City's levels of service in the PAA would exceed revenues from the P AA by 78 percent annually. The net operating revenue (or net costs) presented here represent the gap between operating revenues generated in each of the PAAs under the City's 2003 revenue structure and the costs of extending 2003 levels of City services to the same areas. In order to present a full picture of operating impacts, this presentation combines fiscal impacts across a number of disparate City Funds. The City would undoubtedly continue City policy that Surface Water Management (SWM) costs would be covered by Surface Water Fees within the structure of the Surface Water Enterprise Fund. Such a strategy would require increased SWM fees and/or decreased levels of SWM services by $538,000 (the difference between estimated SWM operating costs ($823,000) given current service levels and estimated revenues ($285,000). The remaining $3.0 million gap, then, would be bridged through some combination of other strategies. Another way of understanding the fiscal impact of the approximately $3.4 million deficit is to see how it compares to the combined revenue of the City of Federal Way and the combined Northeast/Southeast PAA subareas. If Federal Way and the Northeast and Southeast P AA subareas are viewed as a single City of over 105,000 population, the annual deficit of $3.6 million equals six percent of the combined operating revenue. It would be like running a business that loses six December 2003 55 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan percent every year. In addition, the City of Federal Way would experience major costs for capital improvements in the P AA totaling over $48.3 million. Dedicated capital revenue is anticipated to be 532.0 million through the year2020, leaving an unfunded cost of S ¡ 6.3 million (which averages $0.9 million per year through 2020). As noted for operating costs above, City policy for surface water (and other enterprise activities) is to cover costs with fee revenue. Assuming that the City would use enterprise policy to cover the $4.7 million cost of stormwater capital, the remaining deficit would be $11,564,520 (which is an annual average of $642,473). In addition, the City will undoubtedly receive mitigation payments or impact fees from development in the P AA, which were not possible to estimate at this time, but they would reduce the size of the deficit. Tables 16 to 21 provide the cost and revenue information supporting the conclusions above: Table 16. Operating Revenues Generated, by P AA (2003) Northeast Southeast PAA PAA Redondo Total Property Tax $947,000 $699,000 $24,000 $1,670,000 State Shared Revenues $365,000 $264,000 $8,000 $637,000 Sales Tax - Criminal Justice $246,000 $178,000 $5,000 $429,000 Local Retail Sales Tax $107,000 $173,000 $79,000 $359,000 Utility Taxes (O&M) * $196,000 $135,000 $6,544 $337,544 Surface Water Fees $159,000 $116,000 $10,000 $285,000 Fines and Forfeits $106,000 $115,000 $6,000 $227,000 Building Permit Fees $121,000 $90,000 $7,000 $218,000 Vehicle License Fee - - - - Franchise Fees $102,000 $74,000 $2,000 $178,000 Solid Waste Revenues $41,000 $41,000 $1,000 $83,000 Development Services $39,000 $27,000 $1,000 $67,000 Fees Recreation Fees $23,000 $33,000 $500 $56,500 Zoning Fees $7,000 $5,000 $1,000 $13,000 Gambling Tax $13,000 - $16,000 $29,000 Business License Fees $4,000 $3,000 $1,000 $8,000 Total $2,476,000 $1,953,000 $168,044 $4,597,044 Revenues per Resident $201 $219 $646 $214 Source: ECONorthwest analysis. December 2003 56 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Table 17. Operating Costs by Department by Potential Annexation Area (2003) Northeast Southeast PAA PAA Redondo Total City Council $26,000 $26,000 $1,000 $53,000 City Manager $193,000 $204,000 $10,000 $407,000 Community Development $299,000 $22 I ,000 $13,300 $533,300 Law $129,000 $136,000 $6,000 $271,000 Management Services * $182,000 $187,000 $7,000 $376,000 Parks & Recreation $55,000 $406,000 $1,000 $462,000 Public Safety $1,651,000 $1,780,000 $98,000 $3,529,000 Public Works $1,457,000 $1,038,000 $21,000 $2,516,000 Total $3,992,000 $3,998,000 $157,300 $8,147,300 Costs per Resident $325 $449 $605 $380 Source: ECONorthwest analysis. Table 18. Annual Net Operating Revenues (or Operating Cost) of Annexation, by PAA (2003) Northeast Southeast PAA PAA Redondo Total $2,476,000 $1,953,000 Operating Revenues $168,044 $4,597,044 Operating Cost $3,992,000 $3,998,000 $157,300 $8,147,300 Net Revenues or Cost -$1,516,000 -$2,045,000 $10,344 * -$3,550,256 Costs oer Resident -$123 -$230 $41 -$166 Source: ECONorthwest analysis. * Given the uncertainties surrounding estimates of costs and revenues for a small area like Redondo, the reported net revenue of $1 0,344 for the Redondo area could be viewed as essentially equal to zero. Table 19 Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Capital Revenue to 2020 Capital Revenues Northeast Southeast Redondo All Subareas Real Estate Excise Taxes $ 300,000 $ 222,000 $ 7,000 $ 530,000 Utility Taxes (Capital) 694,000 480,000 20,000 1,194,000 Annual Total $ 995,000 $ 702,000 $ 27,000 $1,724,000 CIP Planning Horizon (years 2002-2020) 18 18 18 18 2020 Total of Annual Revenue 17,910,000 12,636,000 486,000 31,032,000 December 2003 57 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan Capital Revenues Northeast Southeast Redondo All Subareas Grants for Roads 1,000,000 0 0 1,000,000 2020 Revenue Total 18,910,000 12,636,000 486,000 32,032,000 Source: ECONorthwcst 2003 Table 20. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Estimated Future Capital Costs Redondo Area Wide Northeast Southeast East TOTAL Subarea Subarea Subarea Parks and Recreation $-0- $22,565,346 $9,564,412 $584,762 $32,714,520 Roads: Level of Service -0- 7,561,000 3,039,000 282,000 $10,882,000 Surface Water 1,067,000* 1,074,000 2,578,000 -0- $4,719,000 Total $1,067,000 $31,200,346 $15,181,412 $866,762 $48,315,520 Sources: Jones & Stokes, Henderson Young & Company, TetraTech/KCM, Inc., 2003 * Area wide capital programs include a joint P AA stonn drain system inventory and comprehensive plan, and major maintenance of ditches and other stonnwater facilities. Table 21. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Estimated Net Capital Revenues Northeast Southeast Redondo Area Wide Subarea Subarea Subarea TOTAL Capital Revenue $18,910,000 $12,636,000 $486,000 $ 32,032,000 Capital Cost 1,067,000 31,200,346 15,181,412 866,762 48,315,520 Net Revenue (1,067,000) (12,290,346) (2,545,412) (380,762) (16,283,520) Sources: ECONorthwest, Jones & Stokes, Henderson Young & Company, TetraTech/KCM, Inc., 2003 Implementation Strategies To address the fiscal impact the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Annexation Feasibility Report, December 2003 identifies six categories of strategies that could be pursued to address the significant negative fiscal impacts of annexation, as follows, without a priority order: 1. State and County Support: With this option, the City could indicate that its ability to annex the Southeast and Northeast Subareas is contingent upon the State of Washington and/or King County providing new resources to offset the significant cost of such annexations. Examples could include a new local option sales tax per State Law that authorizes King County to submit such a tax for voter approval, State December 2003 58 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan grants, and unexpènded County impact fees being provided to the City. The County's ability to continue to service urban unincorporated islands has decreased over the last several years, and the County has been cutting back services. Accordingly, in August 2003, it was reported that King County will offer a total of $1 0 million to a number of cities that annex unincorporated areas in their P AAs. Details were not announced, and will depend on the County's budget decisions. 2. Local Taxpayers: With this option, the City could use one or more general taxes to have all taxpayers in Federal Way and the combined annexation area share in paying the annual operating deficit. The City could ask voters to approve long-term debt in the form of a general obligation bond that is used to build capital improvements. Of particular interest are enterprise funds. Like many cities, Federal Way has a policy that costs of enterprise funds, such as Surface Water Management and Solid Waste are to be covered by user fees. Such a strategy would require increased fees and/or decreased levels of services. Federal Way could increase user fees throughout the City and P AA for its stormwater utility and/or solid waste utility and use the proceeds to offset the increased cost of providing those services in the PAA. 3. Tax Base Expansion: A long-term strategy for Federal Way could be to increase City revenue by increasing the tax base in the P AA and/or in the City limits. Some businesses, like automobile dealerships, generate significantly more tax revenue than the cost of the public services they receive. These strategies could be pursued independently by the City of Federal Way, but King County could make annexation more attractive if it were to take the lead in rezoning selected parcels in the P AA in accordance with provisions of the approved Subarea Plan and assisting in the economic development strategies to develop those areas. A caveat would be that the City of Federal Way and the PAAs currently have vacant and underdeveloped land to absorb decades of anticipated commercial growth. 4. Special Districts: One strategy to generate revenue to pay for Federal Way's level of service in the annexation area would be to create a special district and charge a property tax levy in that district. Washington law allows the creation of limited special purpose districts for a number of purposes, such as roads, parks, transportation, and "local improvements." Voter approval is required to create special districts that have taxing authority. Property owner approval is required to create special districts that use special assessments. There is some risk associated with using special districts as a strategy to pay for providing urban levels of service the P AA. A vote on creating a special taxing district would occur subsequent to an annexation vote. If voters approve annexation, but do not approve the creation of the district(s), the City December 2003 59 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan would be left with insufficient money to provide its level of service. 5. Reduced or Phased Levels of Service: Another way for the City to address the difference in levels of service between Federal Way and the County wouÍd be to pennanently provide a lower level of service for one or more services, either broadly citywide or only within specific areas. A second strategy for addressing the difference in level of service would be to phase-in the increases in level of service in the annexation area. Phasing would reduce costs during the transition, and it would provide Federal Way with time to recruit and hire personnel an'd acquire facilities and equipment. However, eventually, phased levels of service will grow to equal the standards achieved by the City of Federal Way. When that occurs, service levels will be the same throughout the City, and the City will experience the full fiscal impacts of those levels of service. A variation on phased or reduced levels of service could include alternative service delivery strategies or customized strategies for specific neighborhoods tailored to the needs or characteristics of the PAA location. For example, crime prevention programs could vary by neighborhood depending on the type residential dwellings, commercial uses, and previous crime rate statistics. 6. Phased Annexation: This strategy would involve annexing those areas that are financially self-supporting first and then annexing other areas later, perhaps in conjunction with other strategies to improve fiscal impact of these subsequent annexations. Phased annexation based on fiscal impacts could be accomplished by annexing Redondo first because it has no operating cash deficit. The Northeast P AA subarea, or portions thereof, could be annexed next because its operating costs exceed revenues by 61 percent. Last to be annexed could be the Southeast P AA subarea, because its costs are estimated to be more than double the revenue it would generate (i.e., the deficit is 105 percent). Phasing can also be accomplished by smaller areas, such as community subareas. For example, if community subareas were annexed in order of their fiscal impact, from least to most net operating cost, the following would be the phasing sequence: Northlake, Lakeland, Star Lake, Jovita, Camelot, and Parkway. If other Implementation Strategies are considered and employed to detennine phasing for annexation. the order might be different than the preceding list. It should be noted that phasing annexation emphasizes differences among the areas, and misses the opportunity to mitigate the apparent differences among areas by taking them all at the same time, thus effectively averaging the "highs" and "lows" of both revenues and costs. December 2003 60 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan Some implementation strategies may be suitable to different portions of the P AA while others may not be. Study of the altematives prior to or at the time of annexation requests would be warranted. 12.3 Services Unlikely to Change as a Result of Annexation: In the event of annexation, some services currently being provided in the P AA through special districts will not change. The current service providers, levels of service, or costs of services including fire protection, library, schools, water and wastewater will remain unchanged. However, it is important that the City and service providers coordinate planning efforts to match services and facilities with the current and future population and employment levels. Each of the services are summarized below based on the March 18,2002 PAA Inventory. Fire Services The Federal Way Fire Department provides service to the City of Federal Way and most of the surrounding unincorporated area in the Federal Way PAA. However, the Fire Department is not part of the City of Federal Way government. The Department was formed in 1980 from a series of mergers, which united several smaller fire districts in the area, some of which had been in existence since 1946. The resulting boundary encompasses some 34 square miles and has an estimated population of over 100,000. Services provided by the Federal Way Fire Department include fire suppression, fire prevention (building inspection and public information), emergency medical, and communications center operation for 911 emergency calls. Emergency medical response calls or service make up a majority of the calls for the Department. The PAA is served by four of the Department's six stations (Map VIII). One of these stations is located outside of the P AA, within the Redondo area. The other fire stations serving the P AA are located within the Lakeland and Camelot community subareas. The fire station in the Camelot area lies on the border of the Camelot and North Lake community sub areas. A 1996 Des Moines annexation (W oodmonURedondo) could result in area currently served by the Federal Way Fire Department to be served by Fire District 26 if either party should give the required 12-month notice to eliminate the contract allowing the Federal Way Fire Department to continue providing service. Ifthe contract is eliminated, District 26 would take ownership of Station 66. The Federal Way Fire Department has purchased property at South 288th and Interstate 5 as a contingency should they need to replace Station 66. This would accommodate the building of a new station that is more centrally located in the north end of the City. This realignment of stations, response areas, and revenues would require closure of Station 65 (4966 South 298th). Both Stations 65 and 66 serve portions of the Federal Way PAA. December 2003 61 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan F or the City and P AA Planning efforts, the City has worked closely with the Department in reviewing the Fire District Master Plan, which complies with the GMA. The Department's Master Plan identifies the new facilities the Department will need to continue providing service as its service area grows. The City included the Department's new facilities requirements and cost and revenue estimates in the City's Capital Facilities chapter. Library Services Library services are provided by King County. There are no public libraries inside the P AA, but there are six libraries of different sizes serving residents of the P AA including: Algona-Pacific Library - 5,250 square feet (medium) 255 Ellingson Road Auburn Library - 15,000 square feet (resource) 1102 Auburn Way South Federal Way 320th Library- 10,000 square feet (large) 848 S. 320th St. Federal Way Regional Library - 25, 000 square feet (regional) 34200 1st Way S. Kent Regional - 22,500 square feet (regional) 212 2nd Avenue N. Woodmont Library - 5,250 square feet (medium) 26809 Pacific Highway South King County Library System (KCLS) plans for capital projects, including expansions, depend on the KCLS Board determining whether they wish to propose a bond issue to King County voters and whether it passes. The KCLS staff and Board have discussed many possible projects for such a bond issue and some of the libraries serving the P AA have been included. However, there are no capital plans or funds to provide library services in the P AA at this time. Schools/Education Probably more than any other special district, a school district provides an area with a sense of community. The Federal Way School District #210 (as outlined on Map XIV) extends from the county line south to South 252nd west of 1-5 and South 232nd Street, east ofl-5 to the north, and for the most part along the edge of the plateau to the east. A school district provides a common thread, be it through school activities such as organized sports, or through voting during elections. City staff meets regularly with School District #210 administrators to discuss December 2003 62 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan growth management and school development issues. The District primarily serves students in the Cities of Federal Way, Des Moines, and Kent, and unincorporated King County. The District administration has indicated in these meetings that they would prefer to work with one jurisdiction as the District attempts to anticipate growth and develop plans for new school facilities. Seven schools are located in the P AA, including five elementary schools, one junior high school, and one high school (as outlined on Map XIV). Aside from Thomas Jefferson High School, all schools within and serving the P AA have some student dcmand beyond the building capacity, rcquiring the use of portable classrooms. Water and Wastewater The Lakehaven Utility District and Highline Water District provide water service to properties within the P AA. As indicated on Map XV, the current Lakehaven Utility District boundary is generally bordered on the south by the Pierce/King County line, on the east by the Green River Valley, and on the west by Puget Sound. The Lakehaven Utility District's northern boundary is generally bordered by South 272nd Street with a narrow strip extending along Puget Sound to South 252nd Street. Maps contained in the Lakehaven District's water system comprehensive plan describe an extensive system of wells, storage tanks, and distribution mains. The water distribution infrastructure is sufficient to provide water to virtually all of the Lakehaven Utility District. The Highline Water District water service area boundary encompasses most of the PAA Star Lake community subarea and parts of the City of Federal Way (Map XV). Both the 1998 Lakehaven Utility District Comprehensive Water System Plan and 2002 Highline Water District Capital Improvement Plan have identified the following water quality and service goals and objectives: maintain their water systems and water quality to the highest level of service and at least the level required by applicable regulations; participate in the conservation efforts to maximize existing water supply resources and develop new water resources; and install new water distribution systems as necessary to serve the existing and future populations within their Districts. Both Districts have existing rate structures and capability to ensure this level of service. Wastewater systems in the P AA include both septic and sanitary sewer systems. Sanitary sewer service is available in several areas outside the City limits including the Camelot/ Star Lake area, north of Lake Dolloff, Redondo, Woodmont, a small area east of 1-5 and south of Kitts Corner Road, and portions of the Weyerhaeuser Corporate campus east of 1-5. See Map XVI. Relevant to the P AA, the Lakehaven Utility District plans estimate that sewer December 2003 63 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan service will be extended to the east-central area of the District in the near future and the area is projected to reach its target population in the Year 2007, based on the Lakehaven Sewer Master Plan which estimated growth based upon City of Federal Way traffic analysis zone growth projections available in approximately 1999. The number of onsite septic systems throughout the District was estimated to be 7,500. The Utility District plan assumptions are that 50 percent of the onsite systems will be replaced with sanitary sewer connections by the year 2017. Under ultimate development conditions, it is anticipated that all areas that could feasibly and economically be served would be served. The City of Federal Way's responsibility with regard to the water and wastewater systems will be limited to updating the FWCP in future years in accordance with the City's regular planning efforts, and providing development applications to the Lakehaven Utility District and Highline Water District for their input as part of the City's Development Review Committee process. 12.4 Public Services and Capital Facilities Goals and Policies The provision of public services and capital facilities would be guided by the following goal and policies. Public Services and Capital Facilities Goal Provide effective, efficient, and quality capital facilities and services at the level necessary to meet community needs and support allowed growth. Public Services and Capital Facilities Policies In addition to Governance and Intergovernmental Coordination Policies, the following policies are proposed: P AA CapFac - 1 Prior to annexation, the City, in conjunction with King County, should develop and maintain an inventory of capital facilities in the P AA. As new infonnation becomes available, supplementary inventories should be completed for surface water facilities and roadway improvements to bridge gaps in infonnation identified in the Final Potential Annexation Area Inventory, Ci~y of Federal Way, March 18, 2002. P AA CapFac - 2 City and County plans should address the P AA to ensure that systems are reviewed comprehensively, and in order to support desired annexation phasing. P AA CapFac - 3 Through an interlocal agreement prior to annexation, shared City-County capital facility maintenance standards should be implemented. Standards, funding, and practices should seek to avoid maintenance deferrals prior to annexation. Maintenance standards should be consistent with approved functional plans for transportation, stonnwater, parks, and other systems that would become a part of the City system upon annexation. December 2003 64 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan P AA CapFac - 4 The City should allow for a variety of service delivery or revenue enhancement optionsto increase the feasibility of annexation. Based on the P AA Annexation Feasibility StucÚ', these options may include, but are not limited to: a. State of Washington and/or King County providing new resources to offseuhe significant cost of annexation, through such options as New Local Option Sales Tax, State Grants, unspent County Impact Fees, County monetary incentives to annex, or others. b. The County or City posing to voters general obligation bonds or general taxes. c. The County or City proposing to create special limited districts in P AAs to pay for specific costs. d. Tax base expansion per Policy LU-6. e. Increase in fees for enterprise funds such as surface water management or the solid waste program. f. When considering annexation proposals, the City could provide a lower level of service for one or more services. The reduction could be City-wide (e.g. lower park standards) or just in the PAAs (e.g. lower roadway pavement rating in the newly annexed neighborhoods). g. When considering annexation proposals, the City could explore alternative service delivery strategies or customized strategies for specific neighborhoods tailored to the needs or characteristics of the P AA location. h. The City could address the difference in County and City levels of service by phasing-in the increases in level of service in the annexation area. 1. The City could annex those areas that are financially self-supporting first and then annex other areas in conjunction with other strategies to improve fiscal impact of these subsequent annexations, such as identified in "a" to "h" above. P AA CapFac-5 To avoid City assumption of nonconforming infrastructure, a coordinated Capital Improvement Program should be prepared between the City and County. Such a program should be developed prior to annexation, particularly of the Northeast and Southeast subareas, to ensure that improvements required to meet levels of service are implemented concurrent with new development. When considering annexation proposals that have significant existing nonconforming infrastructure, the City should consider service delivery and revenue enhancement options identified in Policy P AA CapFac-4. December 2003 65 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan 13 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION GMA requires public participation in the adoption and amendment of Comprehensive Plans and Development Regulations, including the preparation of Subarea Plans like the Federal Way P AA Subarea Plan. Public participation efforts in the development of the Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan are addressed in prior sections of this report, and have included public meetings, open houses, and various means of advertisements. Once adopted, the approved P AA Subarea Plan will require some implementing activities including interlocal agreements, and additional capital planning. Implementing activities depending on the nature of the activity may result in additional opportunities for public input in accordance with State and local laws. Also, if the Subarea Plan is amended in the future which is allowed typically on an annual basis by the GMA, other public participation efforts would be needed. Finally, the annexation process would require public notification and participation efforts pursuant to State laws. 13.1 Public Participation Goal and Policies The following goal and policy would help direct public participation efforts in the PAA. Public Participation Goal Actively seek public involvement in PAA planning efforts. Public Participation Policy PAA Pub-l Consistent with Washington State law, the City of Federal Way recognizes annexation as a process which requires and benefits from public participation. As the City is the designated future municipal service provider to the P AA, the City should inform P AA residents, property owners, and business owners of City activities and invite participation from P AA residents, property owners, and business owners through the following efforts: a. Encourage City staff and elected officials to regularly attend civic and community organization meetings. b. Seek broad representation on boards, commiSSIOns, and advisory groups. c. Prior to action on City plans and regulations, seek and integrate public input through public workshops, meetings and hearings. December 2003 66 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan 14 GOVERNANCE AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL COORDINATION In accordance with the provisions of the GMA, new development should occur in designated urban growth areas, and urban services should primarily be provided by cities. In consultation with the County, a P AA for Federal Way has been designated in which it is anticipated that the City would ultimately provide services as property owners and citizens elect to annex. This will require a transition from County governance to City governance. Additionally, GMA requires coordination between land use and services/capital planning, such as between the City of Federal Way, neighboring cities, special districts and the County, for which the Countywide Planning Policies help provide a regional framework. While some servic~ providers would not change, such as special districts including the Lakehaven Utility District, Highline Water District, Federal Way Fire Department, and Federal Way School District, other services provided by the County including police and corrections services, surface water management, land use and building permitting, human services, and others would change. (A comparison of services and levels of service between the two agencies is identified in Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis, July 11,2003; a detailed discussion of fiscal impacts is found in the Annexation Feasibility Study, December 2003.) Section 12 provides strategies to minimize negative impacts to public services and facilities impacted negatively by annexation. 14.1 Governance/lnterjurisdictional Goals and Policies Governance and interjurisdictional coordination would be directed by the following goal and policies. Governance/lnterjurisdictional Coordination Goal Coordinate PAA planning efforts with other neighboring jurisdictions and agencies. Governance/lnterjurisdictional Coordination Policies P AA Gov - 1 The City shall coordinate with King County to ensure service provision and land development prior to City annexation is consistent with the goals and policies of this Plan. Methods to allow for coordination may include, but are not limited to, execution of an Interlocal Agreement between the City of Federal Way and King County to: a. Establish guidelines for development plan review, impact fees, and SEP A mitigation consistent with the P AA Subarea Plan; and December 2003 67 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan b. Define service delivery responsibilities, level of service standards, and capital facility implementation consistent with the P AA Subarea Plan. P AA Gov - 2 Through regional planning efforts, the County and City should ensure P AA plans are compatible with neighboring jurisdictions, including ~ing and Pierce Counties, and the Cities of Algona, Auburn, Edgewood, Kent, Milton, and Pacific. PAA Gov - 3 Coordinated planning efforts between the City, County, Lakehaven Utility District, Highline Water District, Puget Sound Energy, Federal Way School District and Federal Way Fire Department should continue to assure managed growth supportive of the P AA land use, annexation phasing, and service delivery objectives. 15 ANNEXATION For purposes of efficient services, coordinated land planning and development, and unity between economically and socially related areas, annexation may be desired by citizens, property owners, and the City. As noted above, the GMA provides for coordinated urban growth area planning between counties and cities with the intent that urban and urbanizing areas ultimately be served by municipalities. In the GMA framework, annexations may occur only within a jurisdiction's designated PAA. By addressing its city limits and PAA in its Comprehensive Plan, the City is responding to the GMA framework to manage growth, provide efficient services, and meet community needs in the broader Federal Way community. There are currently four methods of annexation applicable to the Federal Way PAA. . The Election Method, Initiated by Ten Percent Petition, is initiated by the collection of signatures from qualified electors in the area proposed for annexation equal to ten percent of the number of voters in the last general election in that area. This method would require an election by the residents of the area being considered for annexation. This method could be used to annex portions of or all of the P AA at a time. The Election Method, Initiated by Resolution, may be initiated by City Council resolution. This method would require an election by the residents of the area being considered for annexation. This method could be used to annex portions of or all of the P AA at a time. . December 2003 68 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan . In May 2003, legislation became effective which adopted a new "Petition Method of Annexation" designed to overcome the State Supreme Court's findings of constitutional defects in the State's previous petition method. Under the new law, the annexation petition must be signed by property owners (owning a majority of the area) and by registered voters (a majority in the area). If there are no registered voters (vacant, commercial, or industrial property, or property that has residents but no registered voters), then only owners of a majority of the area need sign. This method could be used to annex portions of or all of the P AA at a time. In July 2003, another "Island Method of Annexation" became effective. It allows a legislative body to initiate an annexation process for an urban island of territory by adopting a resolution commencing negotiations for an interlocal agreement between the initiating city and the county. At least 60 percent of the is land must be contiguous to one or more cities. A public hearing is required by the county and the city separately or jointly, before the agreement is executed. Following adoption and execution of the agreement by both legislative bodies, the city legisla tive body is to adopt an ordinance providing for the annexation of the territory described in the agreement. Generally, a petition or public vote is not required. The method has a vote requirement if property owners reject annexation through obtaining a certain number of petition signatures. This Island method could be used to annex all of the Redondo East, and/or all of the Northeast and Southeast P AAs as a whole. It may be possible to use the Island method to annex portions of the Major Subareas. . As identified in Section 12, no individual strategy or combination of strategies will make annexation feasible for the Major or Community Level Subareas (other than Redondo), without significant sacrifices or costs to the City in the form of reduced levels of service or financial impacts to citizens. Annexation of smaller areas involve portions of the cost of the entire P AA; therefore requests for small area annexations should be reviewed in the context of the annexation strategies and policies in Section 12, as well as the policies below. 15.1 Annexation Goals and Policies Annexation Goals Provide a framework for processing annexation requests. Annexation Policies P AA Annex - 1 The City should give priority consideration to annexation proposals that are financially self-sufficient or those where the fiscal impact can be improved through annexation strategies such as those identified in Policy P AA CapFac-4. As areas become feasible for annexation, such areas may be prioritized for annexation in accordance with the following: December 2003 69 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan a. Priority criteria should include: . Neighborhood willingness to annex; Land use developability where urban densities may be achieved, rate of growth indicating City oversight of growing area would ensure compatible development with City goals and requirements, and other similar land use factors; . . Ability to provide a b"alance in costs and revenues to the City; City's ability to provide appropriate levels of service; The annexation include~eas with regionally serving infrastructure that meets City of Federal Way Level-of-Service (LOS) standards. Infrastructure examples may include parks and recreation facilities, arterial roadways, regional surface water detention facilities, etc. Annexation areas containing nonconforming infrastructure should have sufficient planning and funding mechanisms in place to assure existing LOS deficiencies are addressed. Sufficient planning mechanisms may include affected areas being addressed in capital facility plans. Sufficient funding mechanisms may include anticipated utility tax revenues from the affected area, and the establishment of a Local Improvement District to minimize any gaps in tax revenues. Logical and reasonable service areas based on Policies P AA Annex -2 and PAA Annex-3. . . . b. Annexation of the geographic subareas may be phased over several years. P AA Annex - 2 The City should process annexation requests in accordance with review criteria. Review criteria should include: a. The proposal meets the priority criteria of P AA Annex - I. b. Annexations are an appropriate size. Appropriate size means an area that warrants the staff time and expense involved in processing annexation requests and complies with the goals of the GMA and the CWPPs. c. Annexations generally should not have or create abnormally irregular boundaries. d. The annexation must, to the greatest extent possible, preserve natural neighborhoods and communities. e. The annexation proposal should use physical boundaries, including but not limited to bodies of water, highways, and land contours, including meeting provisions ofPAA Annex-3; December 2003 70 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PM Proposed Final Subarea Plan f. The annexation proposal should create and/or preserve logical service areas, including meeting provisions of P AA Annex-3. P AA Annex 3: The City will use, but may not be limited to, the following factors in determining the specific location of an annexation proposal boundary: a. The annexation boundary, where appropriate, shculd adjust any impractical or irregular boundaries created in the past. b. The annexation boundary should provide a contiguous and regular boundary with current City limits. c. The annexation boundary, where appropriate, should be drawn along property and/or existing or future right-of-way boundaries. Annexation boundaries, where possible, should not be drawn along right-of-way centerlines. d. P AA roadways contiguous to a proposed annexation area should not be included within the proposed annexation boundary, unless the roadways are contiguous to current City limits. e. When a proposed annexation is located in the vicinity of a P AA King County surface water management facility, the City Public Works Department should evaluate the facility and the water basins it serves to determine whether the boundary should be modified to include the public facility. f. When a proposed annexation is located in the vicinity of a P AA public recreation facility, the City Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services Department should evaluate the financial feasibility of modifying the annexation boundary to include the public facility. g. When a proposed annexation includes portions of a natural lake, the annexation boundary should be modified to include or exclude the entire lake area from the proposed annexation. h. When a proposed annexation is located in the vicinity ofa PAA special purpose district facility (i.e. school, fire station, etc.), the City should consult with the respective district regarding modifying the boundary to include the special purpose district facility. P AA Annex - 4 Upon annexation, properties shall be required to assume FWCP designations and zoning as found in the adopted P AA Subarea Plan (Maps VII-I and VII-2). a. The adopting ordinance for the pre-annexation plan and zoning shall specify the time interval following an annexation during which the ordinance adopting the pre-annexation plan and zoning, must remain in effect before it may be amended by the City. December 2003 71 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY PAA Proposed Final Subarea Plan b. Any amendment to the pre-annexation land use plan that is adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plan is subject to the general GMA limitation that the comprehensive plan may be amended no more frequently than once a year, unless exceptions are met. P AA Annex - 5 Where appropriate, the City and/or County should allow development agreements in the P AA that are consistent with the approved Subarea Plan. P AA Annex - 6 The City will require owners of land annexing into Federal Way to assume their proportion of existing City bonded indebtedness. P AA Annex - 7 The City and County will work with affected neighborhoods upon annexation to provide a smooth transition from King County to City of Federal Way administration. P AA Annex - 8 The City should establish departmental service needs prior to major annexations through a fiscal impact analysis. As revenues from each annexation area are collected, increase City services to maintain current citywide levels of service or determine other level of service phasing, reduction, or customization as identified in Policy P AA CapFac-4. P AA Annex - 9 The City should evaluate the unincorporated lands beyond the P AA boundaries, including but not limited to, the Browns Point and Dash Point areas of Pierce County and the southwest King County "gap" area, that may be appropriate to include within the P AA. The City should work with King County and Pierce County and neighboring jurisdictions regarding the potential addition of any lands to the Federal Way P AA. 16 TECHNICAL REFERENCES TO THE SUBAREA PLAN The following technical references are available under separate cover: A. City o{ Federal Way PotentÏal Annexation Area InventOlY, Final, March 18, 2002. B. "Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Level of Service Analysis," July 11, 2003. C. "Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Land Use Analysis Compilation," March 5, 2003. D. Federal Way Potential Annexation Area Annexation FeasÏbilÏ(v Study, December 2003. December 2003 72 ---..., .3,. j ~;;;iìi-¡ c.._) I! I --_.r- , Auburn I ¡ ,... --f-~ ~. . .uf .- I 1',,"; ~- J -..I ! . , J - . I . J , . , . ,..~ . .~ &' i j M I 110ft .." ,f/ .io./ j,~/ _~r -..---..- City of Federal Way- Potential Annexation Area Federal Way PAA Legend: D Federal Way D Algona D Auburn D Des Moines D Kent D Milton D D D D D Kent, P.A.A. D D Pacific Federal Way, P A.A. Algona. P.AA Auburn, P AA. Milton, P.A.A. Pacific, P.A.A. VIcinity Map 0 Scale: 112 Mile ~ N ~ Map Date: December, 2003 Cltv at Federal W~. 33&0 First Wæ¡ S, Federal WI'¡. WA 9&003 {258} 661-4000 WNN.ci .fedllral-my.wa.uS Ple3le NolB: This map 18 Intandlld for use as a graphical repruentallon ONLY. The City of Federal Wr¡ makec no warranty 31 to itB 1cc1Ø'iC'f. A Federal Way Map I .m ~8/dac4I¡ """"p.atri F¡ f L¡ ~ I I' -r r~ \ 1 I City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Community Level Subarea Boundaries Legend: Potential Annexation Area - Community Level Subal'8lU!: 0 Redondo East (Redondo East) 0 Star Lake (Northeast) D Camelot (Northeast) 0 North Lake (Nortneast) D Jovita (Southeast) D Lak8land (SouIheut) 0 Parkway (Sou1he~ Other Areas: 0 Incorporated Area D Unincorporal8d Area Source: City 01 Federal Way, GIS Division & ) )8rtrnønt of Community Development Services, BWR. ECONor1hweat. PM Sœerlng Committee, December 2001 VIcinity Map Scale: 0 112 Mile ~ N ~ Map Dale: Døcørnbør, 201)3 CIty of Fedehl W~. 33S80 First Ww¡ S, Federal Way. WA 91003 (258) 681-4000 WHN.d .f8deral-way .WLUS Pleu. Note: This map Islnt8nd8d lor U8e u a graphical r8prtStntlllon ONLY. The City of Fedenl Way makes no warranty u tD itB acctnGY. A Fëdaral Way Map II ...I1n~m_p.anol City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area I Sensitive Areas LeglJl1d: . Lak8haven Utility Dlrtr1ct Well . PriYaIe Wall (All U691i, In Use and Un~.d) BluafGr8S'I Heron Breedng NII&t N Streams 1/ Anadromous FIsh Runs Raådllnt Fish Pnsent ¡'I Rlpar1an ARIaS N Urban Natural Opon Space IV Water Fo\o\r1 ..N D&8pAqulfer Eutom Upland Aquffor . . ¡V RlIdondo . Millon Channel Aqai1er ..N r.trror Laka Aquifer Susceptibility to GrollldNatar Contaminalion - Medium Sensitivity SuBceplibil ity to G rollldNatar Contaminalion - High SenslllVIIV 100 Yaar Flooq¡lain We1Iandc Sourœ: KIng County GIS Center, December 2001, CIty 01 Federal Way Col!1)rehenalve PliID, 2000, Labhaven Utility Dlrtr1ct, 2002 Sheldon and AllOCideB, April 2002 and SbtAI of Wlitlnrrtcn this documøntll not uubctltute for a 1Ield 8,"av. ADDITIONAl. SENSInVE AREAS MAY EXIST. CI. c.w :::e b c: u 5> Scale: 0 1/2 Mile Notð: WlJUands and l1roama ~ wore ldontlftad In a 199& CI~Federai Wf1!o/ stJ¡ . Wikllife N hatiIIat allan comIC from till SIne of WaahlngIXIn Please NoI8: Till, map Is llitendad for uae IS a gnptlcal npr888ntaUon ONLY. The CIty c:i Federal Wr¡ maJœs no warranty 18 to ita iIIòIiurac;y. ~ Map Dale: December, 2003 City of Fedenl W~, 33S80 Firat WtIt( S, Federal Wry. WA 91003 (258) 681-4000 w..wt.c;j .fedoral-wlY.wa.us A F8deral Way Map III .A8.~....1 .rtI.-4 ~lf VI ~.:; ~ Ii - 1.08 * DL -C- ~~ ~~II.. J,. . \ . 'ð'V-" ;~ '" ;¡:~ .. I i "'~ - - 1..1:. I , œIJ , ~ 'n:'t êI., .,! . .. l W : I ì E=7 . frrn - ¡,J/ i . !!I It- j~jrl I., i..l:ûAbdiL, :~ - !:. . . -. I,¡!, rp, I II . I M' I . . , r¡ Ir::J I LJR . \ ~Lßí1., !rrlBÎAvA~ I ' rlTf]:êm f-~ . j--.t1r~_)D! (He 'I i I=PHW:-f- Œ~! . Fttit.riITb . ~ ' ~,~ f-- r-iJH1i~~'.L¡ " Way ?"¡ =- .~i=2= . þ:i H I ~; Lok. ~ ~ I. ~-\)-j,u:~-~ I::j~ -.J LJ )~ ~ ~Fh 6'i. h ÑH . . i~¡Z ì ~~. ~ ~~H ~I¡() IT rTT:q 01 "'-~ I ~,~JIHÇ .~ -!À.~h.\ . .' \-l,~.'J;:r~ ~]I \:\, ),~\ qh í', ,j '7: ..m.ffi ¡' ',~ . . ~'-'~ ,//î L / /1 I "..Jj!~ './ , l-d.- CJJ.j j hFlLf ;ø;"'L: If-JI' ~\ (~= ~ ~~~.' LJE/,l . :b¡:1Æ*'T~~~J---j hilll. ~~~~j ,) Tr'J 0 ~~'.IJ¡ it~l~ -,-- uJ r-Y ~ -Ë h--I---- I j !-i '-'j' Iq:~ ~nl ~ þ-~J ~ ~ , , p .-i , r ~11Þ: 9 I ~lhU I! I b ~¿j - ~ . ~~ ~~ .. \\ IW- ~ HI H-+- :r II E 3\ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Geologic Hazards Legend: ISSJ landslide Hazard Areas Eroclon Hazard Areas c (Thera are NO coal ll'ine hazards or 511Ì5mic hazard5 in tni5 araa.) Potential AnntXition Am- Comml81ity LlIVe' Subareas: Redondo East (RedQndo East) D D Star LakII (Nartheasl) D Camlllot (Northea&t) D Norlll LaJœ (Northeast) D Jovtta (Southlllst) D Lakaland (Soult1ea&1) D Par1<way (Soutfleut) OItIðr Araas: D IncorpolilÚld Area D Unincorporated Area Sou roe: King Coul11y GIS Center, December20C1 1111s document 15 nat a sub&1itutø for a field 5UMIY- ADDITIONAL SENSmVE AREAS ÞM.V EXIST. .,. CI. .., :E ~ c;;;; u so: " , .' Scale: ~ 0 1/2 Mile ~ N Map Date: Dec&mbtr, 2003 PltaSeNo18: ~ at Federal Wit/. Thfs map Is IntendBd for ule 0 Firat W:¡; S, 18 a~~hlcaJ npr8l8ntrt1on Federal W~, A 9&003 ONl. e CIty of Federal (258) 661 000 Ware maims no watTInty W/NI.d .f8deraJ -wi'! .WLUS 18 0 1111 accurac;y. , '" ~ I AFëdaralWay Map IV .1IIo_b~oc4.VII1.....1 Figure V Potential Annexation Area 2002 Existing land Use Distribution (Based on Total Acres) 158.8 73.2 306 . Commercial 13 Easements iï lndustrial 13 No Data 0 Office iii Open Space. Common Areas & Drainage ¡¡¡ Public Park . Quasi-Public . Recreation 0 Residential, Multi-Family 13 Residential. Single-Family 13 Rights-aI-Way . Utilities 0 Vacant CJ Water I?~ Ie' (¡ tJ' -'rl.J. ,'J !7'\ ~ toàsldnH;r: J, ~~~ ,~ 'j I- Moln ,~b~Lab Ill/\) ~-j ~'id[2Ì\ ',\ L=U ~ ,'(8:: ~. "'- 7' ,I-,ÌJ 17ì. ~ -¡'II¡ L ~~~, ~ I ~ "~!x;=. -' "'11:= ~ \~Æ\..) ~ ~ rg~ ~~~ ~ M ~ -~~~ r, fI!r- /rclï:S1til mh ¿;. ~~ - i~, i~ -~~ r -t1 J- f-' ::::' - I .- - : 7 'l: -- .. ! A... ne t~ '- I t"c<','f:!- ~ ~ .' "~v\w -~I E (( ¡ Auburn VT Lr ~ - ....-:... I ~ rr 17J. I ,a,. J:..-- \ I I - \ I - LJ ( .= =,.. '- , ! - ~~ = ~ ~&J~~j'_-'Wð~ :,'.~ -1b ii( f if: ~~\ - I 1 U ~þ r ]I r¡ "---Y~ : ~:kfß ~ u. - ! ,;~ r\- I I......l..... ¡U 1 'V'1~) '-1 Æ 17 tJ I ()O' I /.~) ~ - ï - . 0 I \J ~' ~ f--. -lIT--, ) ~'~ h ) - I ¡ .:: I / I I' LJ ß> ~'", "'.!jI'\ 11 i ~ V t ~ ':0.' >d~~' ~ -~lD'!, l", ~ , ""'iI-' l' \;t _I r;) I m é =f :;ijì{i I~" LL Lr1 ( .)~ ~~r~ ~ -'In'f~ ~ bj I~ I \j ~ -------::: V L>'~ II~ !.olio ~ PT ~ I /( /. ~ ~ .J Ð .~ I- ,,!.olio I J ~ltIc ~ìt1 I~ t,'j A ~ IT 1 r'Mlnon ~---lJ-rn'....l_;¡ ~ I -< I II r ~ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Parks & Cultural Resou rces Legend: Recrelllonal Fac111les: 0 FIshing Ace888, We Geneva 0 Fishing Ace_. Lake Killamey G) Federal Way Sailor Centar ø NorthlaIcB Improvement Club CultlJraI RecolJn:e£ 0 Fancher House Ð Sutherland's Gas SUllen and GrooOIY 0 Westberg Hou.. Comm..,1ty Level Subuea Boundary . Public Pam D Incorpora:ted Area D Unincorponbld Area Sourœ: City of Fedoral Way GIS, lOng COlllty Department at NItur:II RIICOIJI'C8S, December 2001, Fed&nI Way Senior Center, FøbrullY 2002 and State of Wunnøton. Department of FIlii and W1lc1lfe, FebrualY. 2002 CI. <U 2 ~ c:;; u :> Scale: ~ 0 1ft! Mile ~ N Map Date: Decambtr, 2003 PllI3I!eNG18: ~ at Federal W~, Till, map I8lntend8d for use 0 FIr8t W:6 s, 18 I rn~caI nplt8entllfon Federal W~, A SaO03 ONL. e CIty cI Fede raI (258) 661 000 w~ maIœc no wamnty VMW.d .federal-wIY .wa.us IS i1I accuraw. ÂFedaraiWay Map VI /kfwgId<I8t I'IIIn ........... 00Vþ IIta.amI ~ .;--- ~ .,.. I . I . . I Auburn . I '-I ... -... , ,. ... . Millon City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Federal Way P AA Pre-A nnexation Comprehensive Plan Designations LlI lII1d: . Commll1itY BuliinB&6 ~ Multi family . N8igtmorhood BUliilUlK . PaIb and Open Space ~ OfIIce Park D SIngle FaniIy, Mec:lum Density D Single FamiIv, ligh DlII1lity SOUI'Ge: City of Federal W~ CI. ca ~ b ¡;;; u so: Scale: 0 1/2 Mile ~ N ~ Map Dale: Declllnbtr, 2003 Please Nom: Ctlv at Fed.nI W 11/. Till. map 1,lntended for Ulil 33SS0 Am Ww¡ S, 18 a grap~caI npr88entrt!on F8deralWay. WA 91003 ONLY. TheCllyii Fed8ra1 (258) 861-4000 Way maJœc no wamnty WNN.ci.f8deraJ-wI' .wa.ue 18 to ita lŒuracy. A Fëdaral Way Map VII-1 ../1- -~......I ~ 2th ST @ r----. . I Pnlftr: . . I . I llilon .;--- ~.". I . I . I Aubum . I '-I ... -... I I I J . I . City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Federal Way Pre-Annexation Zoning Map Legend: . BC (Communty Bu8lneel¡ !'ill BN (NllÎghbomDOd 8ulÌnllla) . OP (Office Part) D RS.\5.D (1 UnltJ35,ooo Sf) D 1\&8.11 (1 UnltJ9,lIOO Sf) D RS7.2 (1 Unltl7,200 SF) D RS5.o (1 UnitJ5,OOO SF) ~ RM3llOO {1 Unltl35OO Sf} D RM2400 (1 Unlt/2400 Sf) . RM1800 (1 Unlll1lOO SF) SoUrte: C~ of Federal Wr:¡ CL ... ::IE z:;. c u 5 Scale: ~ 0 1/2 Mile ~ N Map Dale: December, 2003 PlweNotB: ~ at Fedel'll w~. Thil map Is Imended for UI8 0 Firat w:t,. S, 18 a ~~hleal npr8lentl1 on Federal w~. A 9&003 OHL. e CIty of Federal (258) 661 000 W~ maJœs no warranty VMW.d .f8dltraJ -wI'j.wa.ua IS 0 ita ilŒuracv. A Fedøral Way Map VII-2 ..Aa.......~_........ \~ i I ~ "B77:mIlST ( 'I'~' -W-J T 'J ! I¡\'\ \..\j\ } ;¡ if ~. L'(I J ~ T ' \, ~ i4~ ~ ¡-,-,~ .""",..- ----Ë:-"Y I._' ,=---lP ~f--; ~~\ ~ ~1=a ~ '- ~..J' Das .~, r fí. I . ~~ - . MOln~ .....;, \§., T K-- - I I I r:;;¿, í ',' r ~ ... gff' "" ' ~ I !- ( -.J It ' ~ 1'ì ~ ~ I L.J <,;.b~"""""r\.. J~ r- ..,.. L ""';;--,' "~ ~ *t\1i&,I\ _(:f(~~\.i~ ' If1-u. FO£ .;;:]]:, AV <~~ r ~, f f-?!/T.. S,~;., ~-]_.-d lh@¿~1: =-) ~ \ ~ \ ~~, r~ I I. .. ~ t \ . l .~,.ft~\.. \~í~\ f~~ ~ "".,.~,.",.;"",,~t11... ~~ \ ~n '1 1 I- ~'\... ~----' . ~/:¡YA .'i , I ' j r r-' 1/]1 (, ~ ~eHfr~~.'É1ri!~ lr~ ~. . ~ --1, I "'~ -)- r~~ ~/~ ~~:i~ I .-.. .rt -I ~~15 ;,,~,;; r.. EJr~~~ I .'., H-1'H" ¡' l/.--gJ.'! ~,.,,~., r)- ... ~ I .---.." f ~ ~ Uk. - . '(....--' SIID'7 ',- I I--¡::- ,- r- ',1 ¡' Ii' :---- f¡¡ ~ I ,~:t:J~ ~ E / I, JMíe~ -~ I I, 1{Jz// I,' '--, '~ I c-, I' ','. .~ '8"" ~- ;I I Auburn [/ ,.-t---...J ..,~ - r~ ,I,J (Í. I I . --,~. . \- I \ ::':). I -¡ .r--- -=-~~--j ~ I --1~l ¡ ~-~ I ~LL. i ! I, U /,j -J, JY! ~,.~J 1 II I i- f-:' I .~T ~ /J -~ ' II'... ,;::. \\ I n ~;~f\j ( U lit; 1,1 ~~. R ¡ C5 rr hdlrar-; " i' 1 ¿, H . r '<, -{"" i>J 1 Wu-- ,--}- ,~" r'. / /" ! I ~~'--í I-=:'L\:¡ /' - I I r',. '... \ ct-, 10 / f \ ", ? ) ~ _.....J fa..! ~-- ¡/I,J ! - I ,L 1Þ, rj "'-- 'I ß1- ~1æ ,~ -'- . J \-- ! ' ,I-!r I-.",I~, I T~'~, ,) / ~",.I~",.' ~',"" ~~' I ~ 1" l i-:. '/¡' ri ~. I~I 1V II -1 8\ r - -. -" ~~/I~.. ~ .ß-:-: /') mt 01/1.' .f--Y} ¡" lJ ~..."~,r",!C;-~jJ~ \~I Jj~ ~L . ,,( \ ] r / ~.--fr-=;!,,~ J! I ", ~' II '\ I"'¡ -,J Ii: ~ ~~ --I I ~.. " ~ ~ 't:t -..... I", ,.-~' ~ _.. 'J ,,¿ . I ""1"- -\---, '_- ,'-- ~,. ~,- f r~~'I'~iT, ,'" 'LLJ./,:",I.".,',,6:,',!,~ /.,' , ¡'--' +.;t,>' "' A I. I ,. " " . ," ~~. ::;, .r.. /' i Lø.1if: / I ,to," : i LJ , JJ.TI,y¡ ":..~:~~ ~,r- ( " ".,." t:rl r.k", I v.~,' ~ ñ~. . .,ià ,,;Â, , i '11, ?1r- ~ ¡- I' --.y i I . f-...L.; i...LlJ ,.' 'I . ' .'-'. I --1--- _...J. <I I' I .~ i I / I I' 'I / h ~ +'------- 7' '/' / \ If'/ (\ ~-1 c_- ~~ i I I' iìrr---..) I I ¡U ~ ~i-- /" ': ;'.J..?~ ....,J /. i., ..LLJ . . -í ¡--;- - ~ /¡, I U, II /f . .. ~- ~.(~,' ,I, - ','[i'II! Y, j--' ¡ ~,ì. . I I ~ ""i~, j I~ '."~ ~- 'I]z~ i '1\ ~ ""~ ' ~~ÏÎ- II' . !~ R y -J ~~ . ',lA A'I ! II -c ~ ar~~ ./ j~ '~", 1% )1 e-IU2ClflC /. I ' - .. ~~ f-iJ t-. ~ -!. ì~-' I .j,~ It I h I Iu f I I Milton /- -ì-rffi~~ ~S¡ \ . ,'----' I ~ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Su rface Water Facilities Legend: . Conveyance FlClllty . Rllådential Surface Walar Facility  Commercial Suhct WatBr FaclII1y Regional StDrmwaJør FacIÐIII18: 0 Lab Dolloff Out!et a P-82 (Camalal Pari<) 0 Peasløy Canyon Culvert 0 Rllgðnc¡y Wood&, DIY 1 ø Ragancy Woods, DIY" 0 Regency Wood&, DIY" (2) 0 S 36Oth SI Embukmont 0 SW8et Bñar Drmaga IlT'CIrovamant 0 Regenc¡y Woods, Div 1 e Regency Woods, Div .. (8) D Problem, (In P AA) Sea 1&xl 0 Problam, (Outside P.AA) See text. N Shams 100 Villi" Floo~laln IJ] W81Iandc Hyftlbos Creek: B.ln Lower Greon RIver Buln Lower Pullet Sound Basin Mil Creek Buln WIitB River Basin Source: KQ County GIS Cen1er,'becember 2001, (jog County Department of NlluraJ RelOQ'ÇlI, December 2001 & January - ~ March 2002, :E KIng Coll1l¥ Asliet ~ Oevelopnnt and C Manaaam8llt Section, ëJ March 2002 > Scale: 0 112 Mile ~ NotIr. Wøtlands and mama ~ N wera idøntifilld in a 1998 CI~ of Fed.. W ¡r¡ It1J . Map Dlla: Decamber, 20D3 PI&a8aNO1B: ~ of Federal W IY. Tillt map Is Imendad for ute 0 Am W~ s, IS a ~1,ijcal npr88entrtlon Fadaral W~t A 11&008 ONL. e CIty Of Federal (258) 681 000 W?t maJœ8 no warmty VMW.d .fedar1l-wlY.WLUs 1& 0 ill acr;uracy. A Fedaral Way Map VIII ,kI-.,.aId.__.&1I1 Irl J I ~ /8:mnd1T ( \l¡' LL I 'J ~Î'-\..\ \ ~' i!- ~~t~-~ I~~ i: DISlp ~) J= ~ ~ I k"- ~~.277Ho ~'CMOID~ ,... ". \ ~ ~~- T~ I ...) Et. rr: I \ ~~ 1_-:= r- y p;;;~ ~ 11'~ ~l41T e-~~ .~ f?íKi . -~. :;: ~ ' ~ ~. r~ ~ i II i L ~,~ ~u~ !j~- JØ4T 1 Y ~~.Y i r, ~ ! ~"-1 í;Ç;-~ 11 ~82Hth \~ ~~ n -1 I ~ -' ! ~ r =-/ ~ /~ ~~b .,,¡"" ~ I n J 1:;.., ~ ' fh,~, '-R~§~~" Fr-~..vJ -~~ h= ~ S"~I ITI ~ . I '( ~ ~ ne(¡j{r ! ~ I VJ.: ! ~L j,.J -"'¡¡! Auburn r=:-L 'I: It.l I >- 7. ~ I \ >- I ~I II-- =- ~~. ~ -'lLLL- , J.J I ,.. r-g '~ .;' ~ I I;¡ ¡-'"'I .., r I- m. 'ì"'/ \ ;- *...; ø #L \:ret II! 'i( ~ l~;I I-X ~ = -1 ¡ f-t.~8T ß, r(Federa- ... -~ ~ =- r ~ts;: ~ I. W ! - - ~ ~ ~ r'~ ,. r.;., é". 0.. .-J ,...1 ItU:II1IItII Q ;>~ ~+ð ~ - I 'í I L.L ,U f H,/ . ,- i ~ 7 :J I g)O ~"/.~ ¡-_. 0 . -.- n- ( \J ~" ~, ~ J ;..i-. ffu Ie .,,~~ ~) ~~~: / i -I~ ~ I LJ ~- ! ~ I /:!! .-:. ~ \h I I .-' \J r: "- ,,-- ~ ¡~ ~= .r:-t ~..~ ,g' ~ 'Y'1:- ~~8JI~r? r)~ ;rt ~ i >- J 7 '=~ 1 - d1 /, f- -i :;; ) -, (]:-- A - - 1'- / i . l .. ~1 I t -1 ~S, IA dWJ:. ...r- I I T T f ~ V . ~rLL~ ~-~ T JJ T:411~ - _4I~ ~ .L.. ~) - I \ I .~ .~ ) I J ~Ift~ ~ ft" t t ~ -~". ll~ ~ I: I I ~11Io. þ. I I îJ. rn 7"'~-"" I \\ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Arterials & Local Streets Legllltd: Fedaral Way S1ro&t CI.sllcat!ons: N Pltnclpal Arterial N "'nor Arteñal N Principal Coltctor N NlnorCole~or Potential Ann8Xl1lon Area- Comm... ity LlIYal S ubareaa: D Rodondo Em (Redondo EI81) D Star Lak& (Norllleast) D Camelot (Northtut) D North laJœ (Northeast) D .Jovita (Southeast) D Lalœland (SouIt1eait) D Parkway (Southeast) O1f1ar Areas: D Incorporated Area D Unincorpormd kea Sourœ: KIna County GIS Center, December2DO1, City of Federal Wav C~rehensÎYII Plan, 2000 a. a; :E Ç:;o ¡;;; u 5 Scale: 0 112 Mile ~ N ~ Map Date: December, 20M Please No1B: CI\v of Federal W~, ThIs map II Intended for uae 33S80 FIr8t W", S, 18 a grap~caI npr8llentlt!on FedaraiWay, WA 91003 ONLY. TheCityCi Federal (258) 651-4000 Way malœc no warranty WHN.d.federal-wlY.wa.us 1& to ita II:CUI'ICV. A fedøral Way Map IX .hn~1 \ \J Ii:" 82721<1 aT (,J. ~L¡' ..I.-U, T . -.! ~ Î'- \. \ \ rJ :¡ [~~I ~ I-E~ (~ t¡ ~ --- C V Ii- ø..4=f J ~ ...;~ I fC.'----' .O""" .,!~ Molnh ~ I '!.- - ilLT\ 1_/ ~~rt\t 1'\ ~ T=-. - ~- - .,.., r'"' rL I ;- ~ ~~U" e .. .. ~ \ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ \ ~~ . ..;. U L r t== " g '.tS~.. ~ ~1J~- -:3~:_\, "I ~ . I..A'..Y i I rJ ~ ! -r ~~ ITI ~' 1 \AI I ( ti n -1- ~ , !~ ~ c-, I / ~ 2 - ~, ~ 'î ~.~ ......"" ~I n <.j i:;¡,¡,.. ~ ~-- --H -~ ~~ ~ ,'I I-~='" , / 1..[\lr 1-111 Ei:-' i -~ :-~_! TL ~ ubi aT' ~ ¡! ne(¡j{,j,! ~ I 77 ! r-~ ~ -----! Auburn ~ 8 If--.., I-- I ~I I ~ ~ 8th. ~ - -r-j 1 rr, r~ ,. I -(" - " ~'r 1-' --"', ~ I,.. ~ ~ l\~ I , \. 8$2181; 'U¡ ~i¡( > '- ~ ~ ..Ao.. \i1 - ~ .c I.. - .J 6 lHoUhIrr ~ ....... ,- ~a - ... ~ (~L'\7, Ffldlra ,.I .L~ CI ~ r W 1- £.' - I-- ,- ~~ . r j., '? 0.,. ,...1 81:taJ ~ ¡;,~. ;,. ~~ - f--J. Y c.! ," I' H~.-v>\'lt 7 ]" , g)O :+J~: /.!;,T ~ ï-- 0 ìr \J '~~ # ~-- . 5 J ;;;¡- -¡ 'I (u a: ,"' # rt ~ ) ..J ! ...... i --/ n 7'!,.J, ! ¡{;l / = rt~ ~ll J I""¡~ \J ~ " ~ it Ð~ ~ l . .IIL \( /-"~1W.!;.P1 L~ ;1 "r ;r '- ~? I, I fl. [!T I. I r ç ~ r- -) '-i éJ ~ UI' ...... ~,. y::-= /. 1 - .. . 'I t: ---š, ~~ r¡ ..L.U ~, I I' I ~ . P. ~ ! r rll\ (I -It ToVÜß ~ 1 ~I II ~~).J. Sl8ØltlaT ILl ; , l-W ü-1 'XJI - '£~ ---'V4 h ~ (I -~ . ..rl I rD ~~ ~= /~/ ;1 þ, -rf ~ ~. ~ +L ¡ I( /'v, ~ ".:rr-" .~ r- I Lhcltll: to. ~ ~~~ t .. J ">. G- I ~"'" A.° , r.ì ~J - - ~ '------- ~ I 1 J City of Federal Way- Potential Annexation Area Existing Roadway Level of Service Legend: LOYal of Sorvice Intersections: 0 Me8bi CftyLOS . Failed krtorseclion (Before Mitigation) Fedll~ Way SInIt CIa5sifications: N Pltne/pal Arterial N "'nor Artertll N Priltcipal Coleclor N "'nor Coloctor D Incorpor:rt.edArta D Unlnçorpormd Area Potential Annexlllon Area- Commll1lly Love'S ubareu: D Redondo Em (Redondo Eaø1) D Star Lab (Nortl!east) D Camalat (Northeast) D Hortl! LakII (Northeast) D Jovita (Southeast) D Lalœland (SouihtIast) D ParKway (South.1St) Source: King County GIS Center, December 2001, CIty of Fedenl WI¥ Cofl1)rehenBIV8 PIIII, 2000, Jones & Stoke" 2002 c:a. '" :E b ~ u so: Scale: ~ 0 1/2 Mile ~ N Map Dale: December, 20D3 PleaseNo1B: ~ of Fedel'll W~, Thla map 18 Intendad for U88 0 Am w~ s, 18 a ~~~caI npr888ntrt!on Fedoral W~. A 91003 ONL. 0 CIty or Federal (258) 661 000 W1t maJœc no wamnty VNNI Jj .fedoral "NIY .wa.us 18 0 ita accuracy. A Fëderal Way MapX ..hn---....I Ifj I~ J 8T(JI',-L,1 J,.-UL'I'J IÎ'-\.~,> { ¡ L ~~~¥~r-~ I~~ !¡~~;IH _/~Nf r~ I -~j.271th E ~ A ~~ - -' ~(¡fSJ ) ~\1L~ .~~ - I- :i r J U ~.]1411'" e.v- - 14 ~~ r - ~ Þ n ~ ~ ~ "' rf1J i L ,,~ ~- ~ ~ ~~;::: -~ ~~~ i- 1 ~~.. ~ ~~ ;~~- I~~" ì \--rl ~ ~ .ft . I J-- '\ ~. ~ :::rvç ~ l.r I ~ ~~"" il r I (î! f-r- ..J:nÍwlri'- ~ ITI ~.-J.. 2Hth ), \ I M n -1 j I ~ ~ !l--;.I '(:.It)I) N 3 b'fflÆ ~ ,.~~tr n~~ ~ ~,~ 1,çI rF1I.D1 ~ES ~;;~ ~ h: ~ ..~6tI.1 ~ .I: I '< ~ æneiõrr '-'- I P I tTJ ST : I ! ~ .J,.J ----- ~ Aubum ~, ì ~. ; II . " f- 7~ -:;;11 f- ¡( I VI r == ~ ~, _..*":"¡ î ' 1(: ~ ~'U' ~c~~ ~. r '"'(-If" \:rat! r;¡ ---, ~ oC r/ I l ~.....;;,~ - .-J ti J- . - ~ - r ... ~.. 'IE 7 ~dlnl ..1 - \ T"~ - Ì\..-., ~Ì\! ~ ! - ~ ~'~ .; \ -."..J¡;; 7 - ~~.. ~,. \- L J ,U IT H . .-¡ ! 7 J" ~ g)~ ~ # ~pJ '~I I f - - . 0 S -In-=¡ #u ~ I~#rb~). J! I , i / â .h -f ~ ~~ I ! Ie:! \J ~ "- #-- ~ i ~= .~ t..~ .....;- - \l r ;Z../- ~ I; r )~ ; . I U ¡ >- .,. -- ~ - 1 f--j :¡;; Iy-t ---f' ~ f JJ..L I I T ~ ~ \! r r1T\ ( T ~~ ToviúJ , X' II r-:~ f.-l-. U8atflaT lit I .. LL Lri LJ ¡ . .' ---, VJ §J<i (I /I, \j - - 'I "" -- I I l \E - f- ~ Ao°' -, A ~~I -j C- ILT I I ~llon .~---ìï-m.....~_,.7 I '----" I l\ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Vear2020 Roadway Level of Service LIIgIll1d: Level at Servico Intersections: 0 Me- CRy LOS . Failed Intersection (Ikrforo Miligalioo) Federal W æ¡ Strait CIKsífications: N Prtnclpal Artertal N "'nor Artella! N Principal Cohcfor N "'nor Coloctor D Incorporatad Area D Unlncorponl:8d Area Potential AnntXa1Ion Area- Comm 181!ty Laval S ubareu: D Redondo Eat (Redondo East) D Star LíIIœ (Nor1l1aast) D Camelat (Northeast) D Nor1l1 LaJg (Northeast) D Jovita (Soutl1ea&t) D LaIaIIand (SouihIIaãt) D Parkwa1 (SOutltla&t) SOUI'CI: King County GIS Center, DllClmber2001, CIty at Faden! Wav Co~rel1en81V8 P18II, 2000, .Ionos & Stokes, 2002 0. '" :::::E b I: U 5 Scale: ~ 0 1/2 Mile ~ N Map Dale: December, 2003 Please Nom: ~atFedenlW~. TIlle map Illmended for ute 0 Ant W~ S, 18 a ~~~caI npr988nt1t!on Federal W~. A 91003 ONL. eCllydF8deral (253) 661 000 W?t malœl no WIITIIrty YNIN.ci .federal "NIY.wa.us 1& 0 ita ilŒuracy. A fedaral Way Map XI ~.aml City of Federal Way- Potential Annexation Area 20 Year Proposed I nte rsecti 0 n Improvements ~UT:-~~ ,---' ILt L.&gsnd: ;-1 ~ _.. . Propoeed Inllllrsection Improvement I ~ I Auburn ,/. I . . I i .. '.-.l--r--+. ... i -----~...¡ . ,- '--, I i I ~ Ä- / '\ ,./ //\"1 \---- , i \ I , I , t'v." , Vicinity Map Scale: 0 1n Mile !:l N ~ Map Dale: December, 2003 Cltv of Federal WII(, 33S3O First Wæ( S, Federal Wr¡. WA 91003 (258) 6&1-1000 w.wv .ci.fed&raI~.wa.u8 Pleue Nots: This map Ie Intandlld for use as a graphical rtpl'tsentallon ONLY. The City of Federal Wtt¡ makec no Wlrranty as to itII accura1ò'. å Fëderaa Way Map XII .118 ~-mpm&p.amI i\~.!it .. " (, -:1r--w T .E~KWí'-\ ~ I, ~ ~ ~ /~ I ~ '-E ~~ t% --- ç: y 0.. 'M - ='>-=) f ~ I ~J Moll -, ~ 7i -1 ~l Qffi ,-- - L ",AN) - ~U 11' e Idrlct 4 ~~~. ;;:-?Jlii ~ .'- ~ ~i-ï, L ~ ~ r- rlfY t ~\~;: J - U L ~ ':õ.n.8è'11 ~.~ i Y ~ 1/1 I r I '\ ! -;- yr r=111 -. I I f': n .j 1\ ~ !I-- -~-]l. ~ h~ b '.~M -I nlo '~ ~ ~~ -Q;) ~Yr;Fh '-~ ~ I- ::: Dlctr1ct ~ b I- I \ I!- f- r-.. r 139 , n ~II '"-'-OTI1 E ; ~ ;;;æ ~~ I ~ I [Z ! c:- ~ (f I Aøbum 4 ~' '- - f- I ~ I J '>-- . - rl -'- fYl ~ 0'" -:".,";~ II I f- -~ l/ \f.. _\1 ~ ~ I J (l ! - """".\ := ~ ~j Fodl~\--' .~ ~ Ir W i - -rl a I-- ~ f-- ~ ~ . - ~ ~ -. h7 ¡; ~~ - W8 - ::::J \/;;; oIœ . rr L I ,u I H .-¡ I [) I F&f ( i\5 ~ .' . ~ ! ~- r- 0 . """ I ~ I >- - CI J" :;.-' II -f I LJ . -It: ~ ~ I I A-iJ 7, !~ J'-'>. I ~ v,l .[ ~_.--. ~ -~ \..J ~ ,,~~ r~~dL.' ç~ ~ ~ () -- ~# i. ~ 8e- I 88 ~ I' - ., I Î~ [LVi" LlJ ~.{~ ~n ~ (,~ ) I < ' D r---- 1ft I ~Ire r---- AlII J blliric Po -~ "@) -I I'I ~T I 'r--~ .~ >-- ~ II '111'~~ t~L ~fJ 1- f-- I! C~1f 1 1111101 1\,' '-.w ~r heme , ~\ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Fi re Department Facilities Legend: . Fir8 Station IV Fire Dletr1at Boundazy Comm~ity LIVII Subarea Boundary D Incorpormd Area D Unincorporated Aria Sourœ: FedmI W¡y Fin! Department, CIty of Federal Way GIS DMslon, FobrLm)' 2002 Q. <IS ::Ii! b I:: 5 Scale: ~ 0 1/2 Mile ~ N MaP Dale: December, 2003 PlweNo1B: :L of Federal W~, Tille map Illntned for uee 0 FIrcI w~;S, 18 a ~~~caI npr.errta1lon Federal W~. A 91003 ONL. e CIty or Federal (258) 6&1 000 W?; makBc no wamnty VNNI sj. f8deral-YR/.wa.JJ8 18 0 ita aŒUraCV.  fëdaral Way Map XIII . .Aam/m~dloUftll j\\-l I I C:" (b I -1 I '-1 -\~ :} K, j I ~ I Lu- I ---E : I 41'---.- \.P 0" ~- r::: Y I DISg/K-,1 '""~ NJ ~ I '~U ~. .01'1 -J f!1itf;:.A) D -'- .~C'" I) l'\ r~,^' rL '1)= b?I 11I4lT e1=-. Ii KfJIIl ~. 1'\ "",'[',I- J~ ~ ~- ':., .=-- 'J!" ,,;;.. I ~ UI~;='i£ u L f~ = ~_. St., ~\ I'~ ~J~J- ~~ 1 t ~ ~ ;--p-/-jl rl~~ !~'i ~1~ ( ,', ~~~-;-"'ð r "~:~~ h~'" L"I I: rnt...¡', ,.. ~,"~;":I:I." ~~ I'.i ~ -, ", --rG D ';~I,_.'..I,t f-I~: -.""", "Y-1LC I ~_lJTJ ! ::: ~ ~! Auburn ~:r,~ - . .' - F~;-~ in ! .~b ~ ¡l!:i:l ~, ,;' Scbo I JM-""f -':" ~ [t~ \ ;- ~ '-.; - ~-:~.l. - ;-- ..J - . -, ~~ - -t yc=r 7 Fed.rar--..I ~~~ ~.~ D ~ r -'--v, .l~ W I - - 'ôiiin ~ . ~ r .j 0 .~ - ~~' ~ - uS -0 1-'JIce. ;-/ r- L 1. ,u T H .-¡ l---':'L7 } \ g)\j #' ~ I ~ "-, . 0 J=f' r~~~ u ~~¡ i'~~ ~ / ~ ~~I 111'- I h ! ~_.:-~th¡(T~~ -- ~ l-r ¡- r-- r ~ ~ I ~ , 6 =f . b:-E () ~ ~- '- i. y ¡~ I II II' \ ~! r ~k' ",:,:,~" 1 ~ I ~4°vila ¡ É i)I~ LL 1 ~ LIJ:- (.oj ~! (, ) I ~ '~""" D ~!J=;J,~(,;I Vd{ Par~ay -' ~__Il~~<-- @) I j 1:111:, ~ I..' J ."~- ~r¡ I J Vll1IIon ~ ! ! r:'Î ~ Met L I I ! ,- ",,- --uï'T';".'-~.t7 I-- I .l\ I- City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area Public School Facilities legend: N School District Bollldary . ElemlllTtary School . Junior High School D Sanlor High Scholll Potlll1lial Annemion At8a. Carom II1Ity Lavel S ubareaa: D Radondo East (Redondo East) D Star Lake (Nortf1eas1) D Camelot (Northeast) D Nortl1 LaIcII (Northeast) D Jovita (Southllllij D lalœland (Southøas1) D Partwav (Southeut) OtI1or ArNS: D Incorpor;rted Arta D Unlncorpol'lted Area Sou roe: FodonI Way School DI5tr1Gt. CIty at Federal Wa:¡ GIS DIVIsion, 2001 Scale: ~ 0 1nMlle ~ N Map Dale: December, 2003 Pl8a.8eNO1B: ~ at Federal WtII, TIll, map 18 Intended for tile OAmW~s. 18 a~~caI npr8lerrta1lon Federal W~t A 9&003 ONl. Cllyót Federal (258) 651 000 W~ malœ8 no warranty WNN .c;i,fedor1l ~.wa.u8 1& 0 ita m:uracv. A~Way Map XIV ~ lea"""""'. 4/..,.klloI.&rnI ~mr;j~,~" '~~,:¡~H~' ~",~'¡,'" "r,' ""-4Þlt, c'~~\ ~~ ",¡,t! !"'-,,¡¡¡r¡¡';~~' ~~::!.: ~~~,- ,'cr.,o-:ç.t '-, _..- L~ ~}!: J -,' ,¡, . III !':'~~I:" Ll..L .~~. J' i 'é, 'r::r '?o"- t:~ø ':', ,",": .., 7' E'"" ,', [,m' ~lf;: , ' ,', í' -' "'--'-".'i. ,'- (..Li¡". 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" - t ' : i "'. Jj§Sl§ : r---....ø,P ... , f'o..~' , ' /==~~.._-- .- ,.f. ..:ï . ',' , ,- I,M'lt" i t~~ ~~~ ~ 1 ,,- ---- ~'--'-'l__._! !IOnl~":"'" """~-"'- '1,1. IC',¡\ City of Federal Way - Potential Annexation Area I Water Service legend: . Booster Pump Station ~ Intertie Vault W Tank . Well (lake haven Utility District water source) i-tii lakehaven Utility District Boundary '.Y ,,""'¡" Water Service Area Boundary N Water mains under 10" N Water mains over 10" Potential Annexation Area, Community level Subareas: D Redondo East (Redondo East) D Star lake (Northeast) D Camelot (Northeast) D North lake (Northeast) D Jovita (Southeast) D lakeland (Southeast) D Parkway (Southeast) Other Areas: D Incorporated Area D Unincorporated Area Source: Highline Water District, 2001, lakehaven Utility District, 2002 a. '" ~ .£ c:: '-' :> Scale: 0 1/2 Mile j N ~- Map Date: December, 2003 City of Federal Way, 33530 First Way S, Federal Way, WA 98003 (253) 661-4000 www,ci.federal-way,wa,us Please Note: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy, å Federal Way Map XV /uso"'mkoslpaafdoc4/w.tor,.ml '-:-::;',jt:è . -0.. :.;:: ." '. _~1.i!ton. - . ....." City of Federal Way- Potential Annexation Area Wastewater Service, Septic Repairs and Complaints Legend: . Septic Repairs (Complete/Pending) @ Septic Complaints .... Booster Pump Station ~~:;~'f lakehaven Utility District Boundary ;A'i Sewer Service Area Boundary N Sewer mains under 10" N Sewer mains over 10' D Incorporated Area D Unincorporated Area Potential Annexation Area- Community level Subareas: D Redondo East (Redondo East) D Star lake (Northeast) D Camelot (Northeast) D North lake (Northeast) D Jovita (Southeast) D lakeland (Southeast) D Parkway (Southeast) Source: Lakehaven Utility District, 2002 King County, 2002 a. ro :2: :£; c:: u :> 0 Scale: 1/2 Mile ~ N ~ Map Date: December, 2003 City of Federal Way, 33530 First Way S, Federal Way, WA 98003 (253) 661-4000 WWN.ci.federal-way.wa.us Please Note: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy. å Fè'derat Way Map XVI ./us",/mi<.slpaa/doc4/sowor.aml EXHIBIT ß l.lo. CHAPTER TWO - LAND USE 2.0 INTRODUCTION Through the CityShape and Vision process, the community produced a general concept of what the City should look and function like in the future. This general concept was used to form the basis ofthe Land Use chapter. The Land Use chapter serves as the foundation of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan (FWCP) by providing a framework for Federal Way's future development, and by setting forth policy direction for Federal Way's current and future land uses. Development of land, according to adopted policies and land use designations discussed in this chapter, should result in an appropriate balance of services, employment, and housing. The land use policies are supplemented by a Comprehensive Plan Designations Map (Map II-], maps are located at the end of the chapter) that provides a visual illustration ofthe proposed physical distribution and location of various land uses. This map allocates a supply of land for such uses as services, employment, parks, open space, and housing to meet future demand. 2.1 THE LAND USE CONCEPT Federal Way's existing land use pattern (the physical location of uses) exists as a result of development administered by King County until 1990 and subsequent development under Federal Way's jurisdiction. As shown in Map II-2 (Generalized Existing Land Use) and Figure II-] (Percent Gross Land Area By Existing Land Use, page 2), in September 2001, 42 percent of Federal Way's gross'land area was developed as single-family development, 11 percent as multiple-family development, and 12 percent for office, retail, and manufacturing uses. Updates to the FWCP will not substantially modify this land use pattern. What will change is how various pieces of the land use pattern interact to achieve common land use goals. Figure II-2 (page 3) depicts the land use concept. The land use concept should result in the following: . # Transformation of the retail core into an intensely developed City Center that is the focus of civic activity which provides a sustainable balance of jobs and housing; # Preservation and enhancement of existing residential neighborhoods; Figure II-] FWCP - Chapter Two. Land Use Percent Gross Land Area by Existing Land Use, September 2001 Commercial 5% Drainage 1% Office 4% Open Space 6% Par1<s 6% Note: Does not include right-or-way # Creation of a network of parks and open space areas; # Diversification of the City's employment base by creating distinct employment areas; # Promotion of new retail and service employment opportunities around the 1- 5/South 320th and I-5/SR 18 interchanges. # Promotion of new opportunities for residential development near transit centers; # Provision of community and commercial services to residential communities; # To the extent practicable, preservation of environmentally sensitive areas; # Promotion of convenient residentially scaled shopping for residential neighborhoods; # Promotion of housing in the City's commercial areas close to shopping and employment; # Promotion of redevelopment of "strip commercial" areas along major arterials into attractive, mixed-use corridors served by auto and transit; # Promotion of the development of well designed commercial and office developments; and # Accommodation of adopted growth targets for households and jobs and Puget Revised 2002 11-2 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Sound Regional Council (PSRC) growth projections within the proposed land use plan area. Revised 2002 11-3 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Figure 11-2 The Concept Plan Diagram Concentrate new development in the High_y 99/1-5 corridor. Develop infl'3$tructure to support' corridor devetopment. Transfonn retail core into a new mixed-use City Cenœr. , Preserve and enhance existing single- family neighborhoôds. Crea.t~ a netwOric of parks and open '.("1 ""'"'~ Diversify employment base by creating distinct employment areas. '~,- rJJJ. Create new inteMive residèntiaf . communities supported by transit. Provide community and com'mercial services to residential comm~nities. Revised 2002 11-4 FWCP - Chapter Two. Land Use 2.2 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAND USE CHAPTERS The land use concept set forth in this chapter is consistent with all FWCP chapters. Internal consistency among the chapters of the FWCP translates into coordinated growth and an efficient use of limited resources. Below is a brief discussion of how the Land Use chapter relates to the other chapters of the FWCP. Economic Development Federal Way's economy is disproportionately divided. Based on PSRC's 2000 Covered Estimates by jurisdiction~ retail and service industries compose more than 70 percent of Federal Way's employment base. Covered estimates are jobs that are covered by unemployment insurance. Dependence on retail trade stems primarily from the City's evolution into a regional shopping destination for South King County and northeast Pierce County. Increased regional competition from other retail areas, such as Tukwila and the Auburn SuperMall, may impact the City's ability to capture future retail dollars. To improve Federal Way's economic outlook, the economic development strategy is to promote a more diverse economy. A diversified economy should achieve a better balance between jobs and housing and supports the City's quality of life. In conjunction with the Economic Development chapter, this Land Use chapter promotes the following: # A City Center composed of mid-rise office buildings, mixed-use retail, and housing. # CoIDfl'ffinity Business and Business Park development in the South 34Sth Street area. # Community Business development in the South 34Sth Street area and around the 1- 5/South 320th and I-5/SR IS interchanges. # Continued development of West Campus. # Continued development of East Campus (Weyerhaeuser Corporate and Office Park properties). # Redevelopment and development of the SR-99 corridor into an area of quality commercial and mixed use development. # Continued use of design standards for non-singleJamily areas. The land use map designations support development necessary to achieve the above (see Revised 2002 11-5 FWCP-ChapterTwo, Land Use the Comprehensive Plan Designations Map II-i). A complete discussion of economic development is set forth in the Economic Development chapter. Capital Facilities Capital facilities provided by the City include: transportation and streets, parks and open space, and surface water management. Infrastructure and Urban Services The amount and availability of urban services and infrastructure influences the location and pace of future growth. The City is responsible for the construction and maintenance of parks and recreation facilities, streets and transportation improvements, and surface water facilities. Providing for future growth while maintaining existing improvements depends upon the community's willingness to pay for the construction and financing of new facilities and the maintenance of existing facilities. As outlined in the Capital Facilities Plan, new infrastructure and services may be financed by voter-approved bonds, impact fees, grants, designated capital taxes (real estate excise tax, fuel tax, utility tax), and money from the City's general fund. To capitalize on the City's available resources for urban services and infrastructure, this Land Use chapter recognizes that concentrating growth is far more cost effective than allowing continued urban sprawl. Concentrating growth also supports the enhancement of future transit improvements. Water Availability Based on reports from the Lakehaven Utility District, the estimated available yield from the underlying aquifers is 10.1 million gallons per day (MGD, 10-year average based on average annual rainfall). The District controls which well to use, thus which aquifers are being pumped from, based on a number of considerations including water levels and rainfall. In order to reduce detrimental impacts to its groundwater supplies in the recent past, the District has also augmented its groundwater supplies with wholesale water purchased from the City of Tacoma through water system interties. In addition, the District has entered into a long-term agreement with the City of Tacoma and other South King County utilities to participate in the construction of Tacoma's Second Supply Project (a second water diversion from the Green River), which will provide additional water supplies to the region. As a result, the water levels in the aquifers have remained stable, and the District's water supply capacity will increase to 14.7 MGD on an annual average basis when Tacoma's Second Supply Project is completed in 2004. Concentrating growth, along with conservation measures, should help to conserve water. Water Quality Maintaining a clean source of water is vital to the health and livability of the City. Preserving water quality ensures a clean source of drinking water; and, continued health of the City's streams and lakes. Maintaining water quality is also important for maintaining the health of the aquifers that rely on surface water for recharge. Contamination of an aquifer, by contaminated surface water, could lead to serious health concerns and/or expensive treatment requirements. To address this concern and impacts of new Revised 2002 11-6 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use development, the City prepared a Surface Water Management Plan. The plan specifies actions to ensure water quality including the development of regional detention! retention facilities to control rate and quality of water runoff. Furthermore, development of a wellhead protection program with the Lakehaven Utility District should provide guidelines to avoid possible contamination. Policies contained in the Natural Environment chapter provide direction for development near wellheads and in aquifer recharge areas. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Capital Facilities chapter. Parks & Open Space One of the most important and valued elements of a high quality living and working environment is a parks and open space system. Providing parks and open spaces contributes to a reduction in environmental impacts such as noise and air pollution; increases the value of adjacent properties; provides areas for passive and active recreation; and helps preserve the natural beauty of the City. To maximize open space opportunities, the City will coordinate with adjacent jurisdictions to create a region-wide open space system as contemplated in the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs). Map II-1 depicts areas where existing and/or proposed parks and open spaces are located. This map is consistent with the City's Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. Potential Annexation Area To facilitate intergovernmental planning and policy coordination, the CWPPs require each jurisdiction to, ". ..designate a potential annexation area" (P AA). The City's P AA lies within unincorporated King County, generally east of the present City boundary. The boundary has been defined through cooperative agreements between the City and adjacent jurisdictions. In Noyember 2001, the The City of Federal Way, in partnership with King County, initiated the preparation of the Federal Way P f..A has prepared a Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study for the P AA. The P AA Subarea Plan has been incorporated as Chapter Eight, Potential Annexation. This 'Nark will produce two distinct blit interrelated products: a The Subarea Plan for integration in the F\VCP, containing contains policies and plans addressing the full range of land uses, capital facilities, public services, and environmental issues relating to the P AA. and an The Annexation Feasibility Study~ which has been incorporated by reference, that will guide the City and inform the citizens about the feasibility and phasing of any potential future annexations. A complete discussion regarding the City's PAA can be found in the Potential Annexation Area chapter. Natural Environment Federal Way's natural beauty is apparent. Lakes, streams, wetlands, and Puget Sound Revised 2002 11-7 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use provide a scenic backdrop as well as a source for active and passive recreation. The Land Use chapter seeks to protect Federal Way's unique natural resources through policies that support the preservation of these areas for future generations. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Natural Environment chapter. Housing Housing is a basic need and a major factor in the quality of life for individuals and families. An adequate supply of affordable, attractive, and functional housing is fundamental to achieving a sense of community. The central issue related to land use is supplying enough land to accommodate projected growth for a range of incomes and households. Presently, housing is provided primarily in single-family subdivisions or multiple-unit complexes. This plan devises strategies to increase housing options and choices. The Land Use chapter advocates changes to current development codes to increase flexibility in platting land and encourage housing as part of mixed-use developments in commercial areas. The latter provides an opportunity to locate housing closer to employment and shopping, and to create affordable housing. A complete discussion of housing can be found in the Housing chapter. City Center Map 11-1 depicts two City Center land use designations-the City Center Core and City Center Frame. The creation of an identifiable and vibrant "downtown" is one of the primary goals identified by the community during the CityShape planning process. The policies of the Land Use and City Center chapters envision a concentrated City Center comprised of mixed-use developments, pedestrian-oriented streetscapes, livable and affordable housing, a network of public spaces and parks, and development of superior design and quality. The City Center will provide a central gathering place for the community where civic and cultural activities and events take place. A complete discussion ofthe City Center can be found in the City Center Chapter. 2.3 POLICY BACKGROUND State and county land use policies provide a statutory framework for the development of City land use policies. It is important to briefly review state and county level policies to better understand historical conditions that have shaped the goals and policies in this chapter. Growth Management Act The Growth Management Act (GMA) acknowledges that, "...a lack of common goals Revised 2002 11-8 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use expressing the public's interest in conservation and the wise use of our lands pose a threat to the environment, sustainable economic development, and the health, safety and high quality of life enjoyed by residents of this state" (RCW 36.70A.OIO). The GMA provides a framework for content and adoption of local comprehensive plans. The GMA provides 13 goals to be, "... used exclusively for the purpose of guiding development of comprehensive plans and development regulations." A number of the GMA goals pertain to land use. They are as follows: Urban Growth - Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. Reduce Sprawl - Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. Housing - Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population of the state, promote a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock. Open Space and Recreation - Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks. Environment - Protect the environment and enhance the state's high quality of life, including air and water quality and the availability of water. Public Facilities and Services - Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. Historic Preservation - Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance. Property Rights - Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions pursuant to state and federal law. Regional Policies Vision 2020 and the CWPPs, both required by GMA, provide a regional framework to achieve the goals of the GMA. Vision 2020 is the long-range growth management, economic, and transportation strategy for the central Puget Sound region encompassing King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. It provides broad direction agreed to by member jurisdictions. Most notable is Vision 2020's direction for regional transportation. An important connection between Vision 2020 policies and the City's land use policies is development of an urban center, referred to as the City Center Core in the FWCP. Urban Revised 2002 11-9 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use centers are to accommodate a significant share of new growth, services, and facilities. The idea is to, "... build an environment in the urban centers that will attract residents and businesses" by concentrating residences, shopping, and employment in close proximity to each other and regional transit. The CWPPs are a further refinement of policy direction contained in the GMA and Vision 2020 and are a result of a collaborative process between King County and the suburban cities within. Policies contained herein have been prepared to implement the CWPPs as they apply to the City. CWPPs provide a framework for both the county and its respective cities. Adherence to these policies ensures that plans within the county are consistent with one another. These policies address such issues as the designation of urban growth areas, land use, affordable housing, provision of urban services for future development, transportation, and contiguous and orderly development. CWPPs have the most direct impact on land use policies in this chapter. By undertaking the following actions, the Land Use chapter is consistent with CWPP's direction: # Promoting phased development for efficient use of land and urban services; # Creating a City Center (urban center) as an area of concentrated employment and housing, served by high capacity transit, public facilities, parks, and open space; # Limiting growth outside the City Center to areas that are already urbanized; # Encouraging in-fill development; # Expanding business and office park development to include limited commercial; and # Establishing incentives to achieve desired goals. 2.4 PROJECTED GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY Projected Growth According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 83,259 people called Federal Way home. As of April 2002, the population had grown to 83,850 (based on the Washington State Office of Financial Management [OFM] population estimates). Most of the growth to date occurred during the decades of the 1960s and 1980s, during which time the City's population doubled. Federal Way is now the eighth largest city in the state and the fourth largest in King County. Future population and employment growth has been forecasted by OFM (Figure II-3, page 10). This future population and employment growth will be distributed between jurisdictions and unincorporated urban King County through a methodology that has been prepared by Revised 2002 11-10 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use the King County Planning Directors and approved by the Growth Management Planning Population Projection King County 2.5 """'. .".......................,.... """..." 2 ~ c 0 :.= ~ 1.5 ....... c 0 j 1 1.16 :) Q. 0 Q. 0.5 """"" """""""""""""""""'" ... """"""""""""""""""""""'" ... a 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2025 Council (GMPC). This methodology is more fully discussed in the next section. Figure II-3 Source: Office or Financial Management, 2002 Update to Growth Management Act Medium Review Population Projections Development Capacity The purpose of Buildable Lands is to measure capacity to accommodate projected growth and to evaluate the effectiveness oflocal plans and regulations. King County and five other cities must report to the state by September 1, 2002, and every five years thereafter, on their capacity to accommodate growth during the 20-year Growth Management period. In order to accomplish this, the Buildable Lands program requires annual data collection to determine the amount and density of new development, an inventory of the land supply suitable for development, and an assessment of each jurisdiction and the entire Urban Growth Area (UGA) to accommodate expected growth. In order to determine whether Federal Way has the capacity to accommodate future growth, City staff prepared a land inventory of buildable lands. Buildable lands are those parcels that are either vacant or redevelopable and are free of constraints to development, such as being environmentally sensitive. The capacity for future development in terms of number of new housing units and square footage of new commercial square footage is then derived based on densities achieved by development over the previous five year period, 1996 through 2000. King County Assessor's records were used to identify vacant and redevelopable land. In general, parcels were divided into three categories: fully-developed and parcels that were excluded from the capacity analysis; parcels that could be redeveloped; and parcels that Revised 2002 11-11 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use were vacant. With the exception of surplus lands owned by public agencies, such as the City, county, state, and utility, school, and fire districts-parcels owned by public agencies were excluded from the capacity analysis, as they are unlikely to be developed for private use. Common areas and open space in subdivisions were also excluded from the inventory. Commercial and industrial zoned parcels categorized as redevelopable are those where the ratio of improvements to land value is less than 50 percent. In residential zones, redevelopable parcels are those parcels which can be subdivided, or where the density can otherwise be increased, for example, redeveloped from single-family to multiple-family. The City has mapped environmental constraints (such as wetlands, streams, and geologically hazardous areas) and their respective setbacks, and therefore, critical areas were taken out at a parcel level. The remaining lands were then summarized by zoning designation. A series of discounts were then further applied. These discounts included right-of-way and public purpose factors. In addition to the reductions outlined above, a market discount factor was applied on a case-by-case basis depending on local conditions. Application of the market factor (discount) acknowledges that not all potentially developable parcels will be available for development and that some parcels may not be financially feasible to develop or redevelop. This year, the methodology for capacity analysis was modified to conform to the Buildable Lands requirements. In the past, capacity analysis was based on the theoretical maximum development allowed by zoning. In the current analysis, densities achieved over the last five years were used. For residential areas, the average number of units per acre achieved was used, and for commercial areas, average attained floor area ratios (FAR) were used. Densities and F ARs were then divided into the available land totals for residential and commercial land respectively, to estimate development potential. For redevelopable areas, the current existing building area or number of units were subtracted in order to determine additional capacity. Lastly, the number of units or the building square footage of pending projects was added to the subtotals, for a final estimate of capacity. Based on this methodology, Federal Way has the capacity for 5,538 new residential units and 16,194 new jobs. 2001 - 2022 Household and Job Targets During their September 25,2002 meeting, the GMPC adopted a motion to add targets for new households and jobs for the period 2001 - 2022. These targets were based on a methodology developed over a two-year period by the King County Planning Directors. This methodology is summarized in the following section. King County was divided into four subareas. These four subareas are SeaShore, East King County, South King County, and Rural Cities. The City of Federal Way is part of the South King County Subarea that includes Renton, Burien, SeaTac, Tukwila,_Normandy Park, Des Moines, Kent, Covington, Maple Valley, Black Diamond, Federal Way, Auburn, Milton, Pacific, Algona, West Hill PAA, East Renton PAA, Fairwoodl Soos Revised 2002 11-12 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Creek P AA, and Southwest King County P AAs. The PSRC's 2000 to 2020 small area employment forecasts were used as a basis for allocating population forecasts to these subareas by applying the employment percentages to the OFM countywide population forecast so that the proportion of housing to jobs is balanced at a certain ratio. The household size of the various subareas were then determined based on the 2000 census, and adjusted downwards for 2022 based on the assumption that household sizes would decrease in the future. The household size for each subarea was used to determine how many new housing units would be needed to accommodate new population in 2022. Next, the remainder of the current household target by subarea at the end of2000 was compared to the new households needed to accommodate new population. If South King County were to achieve their remaining household 2012 target, this would actually exceed the number of households needed to accommodate the 2000 to 2022 projected new households for the subarea (Table II-I). As a result, the methodology proposed that South King County receive no new targets for the 2012 - 2022 target extension period. However, because South King County's remaining target of 50,430 households exceeded the 42,355 new households needed to accommodate 2001 - 2022 growth, the methodology proposed to credit the sub-regions the difference, thus reducing remaining targets. Table II-2 (page 13) shows the 2001 - 2022 household targets by jurisdiction in the South King County Subarea with the adjustment made for the credit. As in the case of the household target extensions, the starting point for employment allocations was forecast from estimates derived for each city by the PSRC 2000 to 2020 small area employment forecasts. Future employment was then allocated to jurisdictions based on location of current employment, as well as location of commercial and industrial zones. The adopted 2001 - 2022 job targets are shown in Table II-2. Table II-] Household Targets by King County Urban Subarea Subarea 1992-2012 Target Remainder New Household Additional Total Households 20 Year Achieved of Current Targets to Households to Accommodate Target 1993-2000 Target at Accommodate Needed Beyond 30- Year Population End of 2000 New 2000-2022 Current Target (1992-2022) Population SeaShore 57,905 16,375 41,530 56,369 14,839 72,744 East King 48,348 25,665 22,683 47,645 24,962 73,310 County South King 73,387 22,957 50,430 42,355 N/A 65,312 County Rural Cities 8,828 3,265 5,563 2,255 Na 5,520 Surplus (11,585) N/A Total 188,468 68,262 120,206 148,624 28,418 216,886 Revised 2002 11-13 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use S hID c S b Table II-2 H h Id dJ bT 2001 2022 out n2 ounty u area ouse 0 an 0 ar2ets, - Jurisdiction Number of Households Number of Jobs Algona 298 108 Auburn 5,928 6,079 Black Diamond 1.099 2,525 Burien 1,552 1,712 Covington 1,173 900 Des Moines 1,576 1,695 Federal Way 6,188 7,481 Kent 4,284 11,500 Milton 50 1,054 Maple Valley 300 804 Normandy Park 100 67 Pacific 996 108 Renton 6,198 27,597 SeaTac 4,478 9,288 Tukwila 3,200 16,000 Unincorporated King County 4,935 2,582 Total 42,355 89,500 Development Capacity and Targets As discussed in the previous sections, in 2001 when the data for the Buildable Lands Study was prepared, the City of Federal Way had a capacity for 5,538 new residential housing units and 16,194 new jobs. In comparison, the adopted 2001 - 2022 targets are 6,188 new residential units and 7,481 new jobs. As a result, at that time the City had an 8,713 surplus capacity for jobs and a deficit capacity of 650 residential units in relationship to its targets. Based on residential units in the pipeline today, the City now has a deficit capacity of 41 0 residential units. In order to increase residential capacity to meet the adopted targets, City staff will propose that a definition of density for conventional subdivisions be added to Federal Way City Code (FWCC) Chapter 20, "Subdivisions." The definition of density will be based on gross acreage, which should result in relatively more lots than presently allowed, based on the requirement for minimum lot sizes. In addition, City staff will continue to monitor the City's progress towards reaching its targets, and will propose additional changes to the City Council, if warranted. 2.5 URBAN DESIGN AND FORM In addition to guiding development, the Land Use chapter also guides the quality and character of the City's future development pattern through goals and policies related to the form, function, and appearance of the built environment. These goals and policies, related to quality development, serve and will continue to serve as a basis from which to develop Revised 2002 11-14 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use appropriate implementation measures. Design guidelines, adopted in 1996 and 1999 are used as an integral component of the development review process. Design guidelines address location and type of pedestrian amenities and public spaces; pedestrian and vehicle circulation; building setbacks, orientation, form, and scale; landscaping; and mixed-use design. Goal LUGI Improve the appearance and function of the built environment. Policies LUPI Use residential design performance standards to maintain neighborhood character and ensure compatibility with surrounding uses. LUP2 Use design and performance standards to achieve a greater range of housing options in multiple-family designations. LUP3 Use design and performance standards to create attractive and desirable commercial and office developments. 2.6 DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS The Land Use chapter provides the policy foundation for implementing zoning and development regulations. In developing policy concerning future land use regulations, or revisions to existing regulations, every effort has been made to instill certainty and efficiency in the development process. State legislation has focused on developing streamlined and timely permit processing. The City has conducted Developer Forums to solicit input regarding the City's permit processing system. Comments received during the Forums provided invaluable information to evaluate the City's permit system. In 2002, the City formed a stakeholders group that reviewed the City's permitting process and made recommendations on how to improve or modify the regulations and processes. Through the following policies, the City continues to strive to provide an efficient and timely review system. Goal LUG2 Develop an efficient and timely development review process based on a publici private partnership. Revised 2002 11-15 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use 2.7 Policies LUP4 LUP5 LUP6 LUP7 LUP8 Maximize efficiency of the development review process. Assist developers with proposals by continuing to offer preapplication meetings in order to produce projects that will be reviewed efficiently. Conduct regular reviews of development regulations to determine how to improve upon the permit review process. Integrate and coordinate construction of public infrastructure with private development to minimize costs wherever possible. Increase efficiency in the permit process by responding to state legislation concerning development review processes. CITYWIDE POLICIES Citywide policies apply to all FWCP designations. These general policies are intended to maintain the quality of the living and working environment and ensure that the interests, economy, and welfare of the community are considered. Policies LUP9 LUPI0 LUPll LUP12 LUP13 Designate and zone land to provide for Federal Way's share of regionally adopted demand forecasts for residential, commercial, and industrial uses for the next 20 years. Support a diverse community comprised of neighborhoods that provide a range of housing options; a vibrant City Center; well designed and functioning commercial areas; and distinctive neighborhood retail areas. Support the continuation of a strong residential community. Evaluate household and employment forecasts on a periodic basis to ensure that land use policies based on previous assumptions are current. Distribute park and recreational opportunities equitably throughout the City. Revised 2002 11-16 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use 2.8 LAND USE DESIGNATIONS The land use designations in the FWCP recognize the relationships between broad patterns of land uses. The designations set forth locational criteria for each specific class of uses consistent with the long-term objectives of the FWCP. These designations provide the purpose and intent for specific zoning districts. The location of comprehensive plan land use designations are shown on the Comprehensive Plan Designations Map (Map II- i). Residential Areas Single Family Federal Way is known for its quality single-family neighborhoods. This section contains goals and policies that will shape future development and protect or improve the character and livability of established neighborhoods. The demand for and development of single-family housing is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. Single-family development will occur as in-fill development of vacant lots scattered throughout existing neighborhoods and as subdivisions on vacant tracts of land. To address future housing needs, the Land Use chapter encourages new techniques for developing single-family subdivisions. Such techniques include clustering, planned unit developments, lot size averaging, zero lot line development,ßccessory dwelling units and special needs housing. Single Family Low Density The Single Family Low Density designation retains larger urban lots in order to avoid development pressure on or near environmentally sensitive areas and to retain areas that have unique area-wide circumstance. There are two notable locations: Spring Valley, located in the southern portion of the City; and along Puget Sound near Dumas Bay in the vicinity of Camp Kilworth and the Palisades Retreat property. The Single Family Low Density designation continues the historic application of low density zoning in areas that lack urban services and infrastructure. Moreover, the application of large urban lot zoning is appropriate to avoid excessive development pressures on or near environmentally sensitive areas as well as to serve as a buffer between adjacent land use designations of higher densities. Upon provision of urban services, such as water and sewer, an increase in density may be warranted. The Single Family Low Density designation in the Spring Valley and Dumas Bay areas have numerous environmentally sensitive features including, but not limited to: wetlands, flooding potential, geologically hazardous areas, streams (including salmonid habitat), and wildlife habitat, and groundwater infiltration potential. Due to the sensitive nature of this area, the Draft Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound Plan recommends zoning of one Revised 2002 11-17 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use lot per five acres. Single Family Medium Density The Single Family Medium Density designation creates urban lots with a density range of one to three dwelling units per acre to avoid developing on or near environmentally sensitive areas. The Single Family Medium Density designation can be found along the Puget Sound shoreline and south of South 356th Street, both east and west of SR 99. Lot sizes of 35,000 and 15,000 square feet provide for a transition in density between land designated as Single Family High Density Residential and Single Family Low Density Residential. Some areas designated as Single Family Medium Density Residential still lack urban services and infrastructure. Upon provision of urban services, such as water and sewer, an increase in density may be warranted. The relatively large lot sizes along the Puget Sound shoreline areas are appropriate due to geological features including steep slopes and landslide hazards commonly associated with marine bluffs. As with the Single Family Low designation, the Single Family Medium designations south of South 356th are located in the West Branch Hylebos Creek Sub- Basin. As noted in the Single Family Low Density description, this sub-basin contains a number of environmentally sensitive areas. Single Family High Density A majority ofthe single-family residential land in the City is designated as Single Family High Density. Urban densities of approximately 4.5, 6.0, and 8.7 dwelling units per acre in the RS 9.6, RS 7.2, and RS 5.0 zoning districts respectively, provide for a range of housing densities. Single Family High Density residential designations are located within close and convenient proximity to neighborhood business centers, areas of existing or future employment, transit, and existing urban infrastructure and services. Future Single Family High Density development should have good access to collector and arterial streets. Goal LUG3 Preserve and protect Federal Way's single-family neighborhoods. LUG3.1 Provide wide range of housing densities and types in the single-family designated areas. Policies LUP14 Maintain and protect the character of existing and future single-family neighborhoods through strict enforcement of the City's land use regulations. LUP15 Protect residential areas from impacts of adjacent non-residential uses. LUP16 Revise existing land use regulations to provide for innovation and flexibility in the design of new single-family developments and in-fill. Revised 2002 11-18 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP17 Encourage the development of transportation routes and facilities to serve single-family neighborhoods. Special attention should be given to pedestrian circulation. LUP18 Encourage the development of parks and the dedication of open space in and adjacent to residential areas to preserve the natural setting of Federal Way. LUP19 Consider special development techniques (e.g., zero lot lines, lot size averaging, and planned unit developments) in single-family areas, provided they result in residential development consistent with the quality and character of existing neighborhoods. L UP20 Preserve site characteristics that enhance residential development (trees, water- courses, vistas, and similar features) using site planning techniques such as clustering, planned unit developments, and lot size averaging. Multiple Family The multiple-family residential land use designation represents an opportunity to provide a range of housing types to accommodate anticipated residential growth. The increase in population, decline in average family size, and increased cost of single-family homes have created heavy demand for new housing types. The Land Use chapter encourages the development of housing types, such as duplexes, townhouses, and condominiums in existing multiple-family areas and within mixed-use development in commercial areas. During the 1980s, the City's landscape changed, as a number oflarge apartment complexes were constructed. These apartments, often built without regard to scale or amenities, created a general dissatisfaction with the appearance of multiple-family development. In 1999, the City amended its Community Design Guidelines to address the appearance and scale of multiple family dwelling units. Incentives for creating desired development such as duplexes and townhouses should be considered. Multiple Family Multiple Family uses in large part are in areas currently zoned for multiple-family development. Designations of 3600, 2400, and 1800 square feet per dwelling unit, corresponding to densities of 12, 18, and 24 dwelling units per acre respectively, will continue to be used. Opportunities for new development will occur through redevelopment and build-out of remaining parcels. Residential design guidelines that address design and appearance of multiple-family developments were adopted in 1999. The primary goal of residential design guidelines is to develop multiple-family housing that is reflective of the community's character and appearance. Goal LUG4 Provide a wide range of housing types and densities commensurate with the Revised 2002 11-19 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Policies LUP21 L UP22 LUP23 LUP24 LUP25 community's needs and preferences. Allow and encourage a variety of multiple-family housing types in designated commercial areas, especially in the City Center Core and City Center Frame areas. Use design and performance standards for multiple-family developments to achieve integration in commercial developments. Performance standards should focus on scale, appearance, and compatibility. Support multiple-family development with transportation and capital facilities improvements. Multiple-family residential development should be designed to provide privacy and common open space. Variations in facades and rooflines should be used to add character and interest to multiple-family developments. Encourage the establishment of street patterns and amenities that encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use. Commercial Designations Existing commercial areas are auto-oriented and characterized by one-story low intensity development. In the future, these areas will become more intensively developed and pedestrian oriented, and in some designations, accommodate housing. Transforming existing areas into places where people want to live, shop, and work requires changes. Commercial areas should contain street furniture, trees, pedestrian shelters, well marked crosswalks, and buildings oriented to and along the street to provide interest and allow easy pedestrian access. General Policies for Commercial, Office, and Business Park The following general policies apply to all commercial, office, and business park designations. In some instances, specific goals and policies may follow a specific land use designation Policies LUP26 LUP27 LUP28 Provide employment and business opportunities by allocating adequate land for commercial, office, and business park development. Encourage development of regional uses in the City Center. Provide for a mix of commercial and residential uses in commercial areas. Revised 2002 11-20 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP29 L UP30 LUP31 LUP32 LUP33 LUP34 Use Community Design Guidelines to promote common open space, public art, and plazas in commercial and office developments. Ensure compatibility between mixed-use developments and residential areas by regulating height, scale, setbacks, and buffers. Use Community Design Guidelines to encourage quality design and pedestrian and vehicle circulation in office, commercial, and business park developments. Use Community Design Guidelines to encourage commercial development to locate along street edge (where deemed appropriate) to provide pedestrian street access. Provide pedestrian access between developments and to transit stations. Identify and designate streets where on-street parking can be safely provided without unduly slowing traffic flow or jeopardizing traffic safety. Provide developer incentives for inclusion of housing in commercial projects. Business Park The Business Park designation encompasses the uses found in areas where large undeveloped and underdeveloped parcels, having convenient access to Interstate 5 and Highway 18, provide a natural location for business park development. The Business Park designation is intended to capture the demand for higher quality, mixed-use business parks which permit a mixture of light manufacturing, warehouse/distribution, office, and limited retail uses to serve the immediate needs in the area. In the past few years, the City has observed a marked increase in requests to change parcels from the Business Park designation to another comprehensive plan designation. As a result, the City should explore potential changes to the allowable mix of uses in the Business Park zone in order to meet changing market conditions. Goal LUGS Policies LUP3S LUP36 LUP37 Develop a quality business park area that supports surrounding commercial areas. Encourage quality, mixed-use development for office, manufacturing, and distribution centers. Develop business parks that fit into their surroundings by grouping similar industries in order to reduce or eliminate land use conflicts, allow sharing of public facilities and services, and improve traffic flow and safety. Limit retail uses to those that serve the needs of people employed in the area. Revised 2002 11-21 FWCP - Chapter Two, land Use Commercial City Center Core The intent of establishing the City Center Core is to create a higher density, mixed-use designation where office, retail, government uses, and residential uses are concentrated. Other uses such as cultural/civic facilities, community services, and housing will be highly encouraged. City Center Frame The City Center Frame designation will have a look and feel similar to the Core and will provide a zone of less dense, mixed-use development physically surrounding a portion of the City Center Core. Together, they are meant to complement each other to create a "downtown" area. A more detailed description, along with goals and policies regarding the City Center Core and Frame, can be found in the City Center chapter. Community Business The Community Business designation presently encompasses two major retail areas of the City. It covers the "strip" retail areas along SR-99 and the large "bulk" retail area found near the South 348th Street area, approximately between SR-99 and 1-5. Community Business allows a large range of uses and is the City's largest retail designation in terms of area. The Community Business designation generally runs along both sides of SR-99 from South 272nd to South 348th. A wide range of development types, appearance, ages, function, and scale can be found along SR-99. Older, single-story developments provide excellent opportunities for redevelopment. It may be appropriate to extend the Community Business designation to areas adjacent to the I-5/South 320th and I-5/SR 18 interchanges as part of the initial adoption of the PAA Subarea Plan or as part ofthe annual comprehensive plan amendment process. Due in part to convenient access and available land, the South 348th Street area has become a preferred location for large bulk retailers such as Eagle Hardware, Home Depot, and Costco. Due to the size of these facilities, the challenge will be to develop these uses into well functioning, aesthetically pleasing retail environments. To create retail areas that are aesthetically and functionally attractive, revised development standards, applied through Community Business zoning and Community Design Guidelines, address design quality, mixed-use, and the integration of auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Site design, modulation, and setback requirements are also addressed. Through regulations in the Community Business land use chart, the size and scale of hotels, motels, and office uses have been limited in scale so as not to compete with the City Center. Goal LUG6 Transform Community Business areas into vital, attractive, mixed-use areas that appeal to pedestrians and motorists and enhance the community's image. Revised 2002 11-22 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Policies LUP38 LUP39 Encourage transformation of Pacific Highway (SR-99) Community Business corridor into a quality mixed-use retail area. Retail development along the corridor, exclusive of the City Center, should be designed to integrate auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Integration of public amenities and open space into retail and office development should also be encouraged. Encourage auto-oriented large bulk retailers to locate in the South 348th Street Community Business area. Neighborhood Business There are a dozen various sized nodes of Neighborhood Business located throughout the City. These nodes are areas that have historically provided retail and/or services to adjacent residential areas. The FWCP recognizes the importance of firmly fixed boundaries to prevent commercial intrusion into adjacent neighborhoods. Neighborhood Business areas are intended to provide convenient goods (e.g., groceries and hardware) and services (e.g., dry cleaners, dentist, bank) at a pedestrian and neighborhood scale close to adjacent residential uses. Developments combining residential and commercial uses provide a convenient living environment within these nodes. In the future, attention should be given to design features that enhance the appearance or function of these areas. Improvements may include sidewalks, open space and street trees, and parking either on street or oriented away from the street edge. The function of neighborhood business areas can also be enhanced by safe pedestrian, bicycle, and transit connections to surrounding neighborhoods. The need to address expansion or intensification may occur in the future depending on population growth. Future neighborhood business locations should be carefully chosen and sized to meet the needs of adjacent residential areas. Goal LUG7 Policies LUP40 LUP41 LUP42 Provide neighborhood and community scale retail centers for the City's neighborhoods. Integrate retail developments into surrounding neighborhoods through attention to quality design and function. Encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to neighborhood shopping and semces. Encourage neighborhood retail and personal services to locate at appropriate locations where local economic demand and design solutions demonstrate compatibility with the neighborhood. Revised 2002 11-23 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP43 Retail and personal services should be encouraged to group together within planned centers to allow for ease of pedestrian movement. L UP44 Neighborhood Business centers should consist of neighborhood scale retail and personal services. LUP45 Encourage mixed residential and commercial development in Neighborhood Business designations where compatibility with nearby uses can be demonstrated. LUP46 Neighborhood Business areas should be served by transit. LUP47 The City shall limit new commercial development to existing commercial areas to protect residential areas. Commercial Recreation The Commercial Recreation designation acknowledges the unique recreational opportunity associated with the Enchanted Park property. Enchanted Park is an indoor/ outdoor amusement facility most noted for its water park. A pre annexation concomitant development agreement has established the comprehensive plan designation and zoning (Office Park-4) particular to Enchanted Park. Office Federal Way is well known for its quality office parks. Developments within the East and West Campus areas embody good design and are representative of desired future office park development. Office park development in West Campus is complemented by the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Headquarters in East Campus. Together, office and corporate park development will provide new job opportunities within the community. Professional Office The Professional Office designation is intended to allow for well-designed small-scale office development compatible to adjacent residential neighborhoods. Office Park The Office Park designation emphasizes high quality office development that allows for a mix of office and compatible manufacturing type activities. This classification also permits a limited amount of retail support services, along with the current mix of office and light manufacturing uses. Corporate Park The Corporate Park designation applies to the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Campus, generally located east of Interstate Highway 5. The property is a unique site, both in terms of its development capacity and natural features. Office Park designations with OP-l, 2, and 3 zoning and some residential designations Revised 2002 11-24 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use north of Highway 18 surround the Corporate Park designation. The Corporate_Park zone is currently being developed as corporate headquarters, offices, and ancillary uses. These types of developments are characterized by large contiguous sites containing landscaping, . open space, and buildings of superior quality. Development standards and conditions for the Corporate Park designation is unique to Weyerhaeuser's property and are outlined in a preannexation concomitant development agreement between the City and Weyerhaeuser Corporation. Goal LUG8 Create office and corporate park development that is known regionally for its design and function. Policy LUP48 Continue to encourage quality office development in the East Campus Corporate Park designation. 2.8.5 SHORELINE MASTER PROGRAM Purpose The Shoreline Management Act (SMA) identifies seven land and water use elements that, if appropriate to the community, are to be dealt with in the development of area-wide shoreline goals. They include: shoreline use, economic development, public access, conservation, recreation, historical/cultural, and circulation. Master programs are also encouraged to include any other elements which, because of present uses or future needs, are deemed appropriate to effectuate the policy of the SMA. Residential land use of shorelines of the state within Federal Way makes up the largest share of the developed shorelines in the City. Much of the undeveloped shoreline is in private ownership, subdivided into small lots and presently zoned to allow for residential use. Because of present and future needs of residential shoreline use, goals and policies have been formulated as part of a residential element to guide and plan for that development. The following comprehensive set of shoreline goals provide the foundation and framework on which the balance of the master program has been based. These goals and policies are reflective of the level of achievement believed to be intrinsically desirable for all shoreline uses, needs, and developments, and establish a program policy commensurate with the intent and objectives of the SMA. The policies contained herein should be enforced through the applicable chapters of the FWCC. Revised 2002 11-25 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Shoreline Use Element An element which deals with the distribution, location, and extent of: 1) the use of shorelines and adjacent areas for housing, transportation, office, public buildings and utilities, education, and natural resources; 2) the use of the water for aquaculture and recreation; and 3) the use of the water, shoreline, and uplands for other categories ofland and water uses and activities not specified in this master program. Goal LUG9 Policies LUP49 LUP50 LUP51 LUP52 LUP53 LUP54 LUP55 LUP56 Preserve or develop shorelines, adjacent uplands, and adjacent water areas in a manner that assures a balance of shoreline uses with minimal adverse effect on the quality of life, water, and environment. Shoreline land and water areas particularly suited for specific and appropriate uses should be designated and reserved for such uses. Shoreline land and water uses should satisfy the economic, social, and physical needs of the regional population, but should not exceed the physical carrying capacity of the shoreline areas. Where appropriate, land and water uses should be located to restore or enhance the land and water environments. Like or compatible shoreline uses should be clustered or distributed in a rational manner, rather than allowed to develop haphazardly. Multiple uses of shoreline should be encouraged where location and integration of compatible uses or activities are feasible. Unique and fragile areas of the shoreline should be protected from uses or activities that will have an adverse effect on the land or water environment. Non-residential uses or activities that are not shoreline dependent should be encouraged to locate or relocate away from the shoreline. Federal Way shall consider the goals, objectives, and policies within the shoreline master program in all land use management actions regarding the use or development of adjacent uplands or the water areas, adjacent uplands and associated wetlands or streams within its jurisdiction where such use or development will have an adverse effect on designated shorelines. Revised 2002 11-26 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Public Access Element An element making provision for public access to publicly-owned shorelines and assessing the need for providing public access to shoreline areas. Goal LUGIO Increase public access to shoreline areas provided that private rights, public safety, and the natural shoreline character are not adversely affected. Policies LUP57 Development of public access should respect and protect the enjoyment of private rights on shoreline property. a. Shoreline access areas should be planned to include ancillary facilities such as parking and sanitation when appropriate. b. Shoreline access and ancillary facilities should be designed and developed to provide adequate protection for adjacent private properties. LUP58 Public access should be maintained and regulated. a. Public access should be policed and improved consistent with intensity of use. b. The provision to restrict access as to nature, time, number of people, and area may be appropriate for public pedestrian easements and other public access areas where there are spawning grounds, fragile aquatic life habitats, or potential hazard for pedestrian safety. c. Facilities in public shoreline access areas should be properly maintained and operated. LUP59 Design of access should provide for the public health, safety, and enjoyment. a. Appropriate signs should be used to designate publicly owned shorelines. b. Within the shoreline environment, pedestrian and non-motorized access should be encouraged. c. Public access to and along the water's edge should be available in publicly owned shorelines that are tolerant of human activity. LUP60 Priority for access acquisition should consider resource desirability, availability, Revised 2002 11-27 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP61 LUP62 LUP63 and proximity of population. a. A shoreline element in the parks acquisition and development program should be encouraged so that future shoreline access is acquired and developed by established criteria and standards as part of an overall master plan. Public access should be provided in new shoreline developments. a. There should be incentives to encourage private property owners to provide shoreline access. b. Public pedestrian easements should be provided in future land use authorizations, and in the case of Federal Way projects along lakes, streams, ponds, and marine lands, whenever shoreline features are appropriate for public use. Shorelines of the City that include, but are not limited to, any of the following conditions should be considered for pedestrian easements: 1. Areas of significant, historical, geological, and/or biological circumstances. 2. Areas presently being legally used, or historically having been legally used, by the public along the shoreline for access. 3. Where public funds have been expended on or related to the water body. Shorelines of the City should be available to all people for passive use and enjoyment. a. Viewpoints, lookouts, and vistas of shorelines of the City should be publicly accessible. b. New developments should minimize visual and physical obstruction of the water from shoreline roads and upland owners. General policies. a. Where appropriate, utility and transportation rights-of-way on the shoreline should be made available for public access and use. b. Publicly-owned street ends that abut the shoreline should be retained and/or reclaimed for public access. c. Shoreline recreational facilities and other public access points should be connected by trails, bicycle pathways, and other access links where Revised 2002 11-28 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use appropriate. d. Public pedestrian easements and access points should be of a nature and scale that would be compatible with the abutting and adjacent land use as well as natural features, including aquatic life. e. Access development should respect and protect ecological and aesthetic values in the shorelines of the City. Conservation Element An element which deals with the preservation of natural shoreline resources, considering, but not limited to, such characteristics as scenic vistas, park-ways, vital estuarine areas for fish and wildlife protection, beaches, and other valuable natural or aesthetic features. Goal LUGll Assure preservation of unique and non-renewable natural resources and assure conservation of renewable natural resources for the benefit of existing and future generations and the public interest. Policies LUP64 Shorelines that are of unique or valuable natural character should be acquired for public benefit, commensurate with preservation ofthe ecosystem. a. Unique and fragile areas in shoreline areas should be designated and retained as open space. Access and use should be restricted or prohibited when necessary for their preservation. b. When appropriate, Federal Way should acquire those shoreline areas which are unique or valuable. Subsequent use of such areas should be governed by their ecological carrying capacity. LUP65 All renewable natural resources should be managed so that use or consumption does not exceed replenishment. a. Through policies and actions, Federal Way should encourage the management and conservation of fish, shellfish, wildlife, and other renewable resources. LUP66 Resource conservation should be an integral part of shoreline planning. a. When feasible, Federal Way should initiate programs to reverse any substantial adverse impacts caused by existing shoreline development. Revised 2002 11-29 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP67 LUP68 LUP69 b. All future shoreline development should be planned, designed, and sited to minimize adverse impact upon the natural shoreline environment. Scenic, aesthetic, and ecological qualities of natural and developed shorelines should be recognized and preserved as valuable resources. a. When appropriate, natural flora and fauna should be preserved or restored. b. In shoreline areas, the natural topography should not be substantially altered. c. Shoreline structures should be sited and designed to minimize view obstruction and should be visually compatible with the shoreline character. d. Wildlife and aquatic habitats, including spawning grounds, should be protected, improved, and, if appropriate, increased. Resources should be managed to enhance the environment with minimal adverse effect. a. Aquaculture in shoreline areas should be conducted with all reasonable precautions to insure the preservation of the natural character and quality of the shoreline. b. Shoreline activity and development should be planned, constructed, and operated to minimize adverse effects on the natural processes of the shoreline, and should maintain or enhance the quality of air, soil, and water on the shoreline. c. Any structure or activity in or near the water should be constructed in such a way that it will minimize adverse physical or chemical effects on water quality, vegetation, fish, shellfish, or wildlife. d. Use or activity which substantially degrades the natural resources ofthe shoreline should not be allowed. Salmon and steelhead habitats support valuable recreational and commercial fisheries. These habitats should be protected because of their importance to the aquatic ecosystem and the state and local economy. a. Salmon and steelhead habitats are: 1. Gravel bottomed streams used for spawning; 2. Streams, lakes, and wetlands used for rearing, feeding, and cover and refuge from predators and high waters; Revised 2002 11-30 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use 3. Streams and salt water bodies used as migration corridors; and 4. Shallow areas of salt water bodies used for rearing, feeding, and cover and refuge from predators and currents. b. Non-water-dependent or non-water-related uses, activities, structures, and landfills should not be located in salmon and steelhead habitats. c. Where alternative locations exist, water-dependent and water-related uses, activities, structures, and landfills should not be located in salmon and steelhead habitats. d. Where uses, activities, structures, and landfills must locate in salmon and steelhead habitats, impacts on these areas should be lessened to the maximum extent possible. Significant unavoidable impacts should be mitigated by creating in-kind replacement habitat near the project where feasible. Where in-kind replacement mitigation is not feasible, rehabilitating degraded habitat may be required. Mitigation proposals should be developed in consultation with the affected local government, the Department of Fish eries, the Department of Wildlife, and affected Indian Nations. e. Developments which are outside salmon and steelhead habitats but which have the potential to significantly affect these habitats should be located and designed so they do not create significant negative impacts on salmon and steelhead habitats. f. Bioengineering is the preferred bank protection technique for rivers and streams used by salmon and steelhead. g. Open pile bridges are preferred for crossing water areas used by salmon and steelhead. h. Impervious surfaces shall be minimized in upland developments to reduce stonnwater runoff peaks. Structures and uses creating significant impervious surfaces shall include stormwater detention systems to reduce stormwater runoff peaks. 1. The discharge of silt into waterways shall be minimized during in-water and upland construction. J. Adopt-A-Stream programs and similar efforts to rehabilitate salmon and steelhead spawning streams are encouraged. k. Fishery enhancement projects are encouraged where they will not significantly interfere with other beneficial uses. 1. Project proponents should contact the Habitat Management Division ofthe Revised 2002 11-31 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Department of Fisheries, the Habitat Division of the Department of Wildlife or affected Indian Nations early in the development process to determine if the proposal will occur in or adjacent to a salmon and steelhead habitat. m. When reviewing permits for uses, activities, and structures proposed for salt water areas, streams, wetlands, ponds connected to streams, and shorelines adjacent to these areas; staff should contact the Habitat Management Division of the Department of Fisheries or the Habitat Division of the Department of Wildlife to determine if the proposal will occur in or affect an adjacent salmon or steelhead habitat. Staff should also contact affected Indian Nations. Recreation Element An element for the preservation and expansion of all types of recreational opportunities through programs of acquisition, development, and various means of less-than- fee acquisition. Goal LUG12 Provide additional shoreline dependent and water oriented recreation opportunities that are diverse, convenient, and adequate for the regional population consistent with the carrying capacity of the land and water resources. Policies LUP70 Areas containing special shoreline recreation qualities not easily duplicated should be available for public use and enjoyment. a. Opportunities should be provided for the public to understand natural shoreline processes and experience natural resource features. b. Public viewing and interpretation should be encouraged at or near governmental shorelim: activities when consistent with security and public safety. LUP71 Shoreline recreational use and development should enhance environmental quality with minimal adverse effect on the natural resources. a. Stretches of relatively inaccessible and unspoiled shoreline should be available and designated as low intensity recreational use areas with minimal development. Service facilities such as footpaths, periphery parking, and adequate sanitary facilities should only be allowed where appropriate. b. Beaches and other predominantly undeveloped shorelines already popular should be available and designated as medium intensity recreational use Revised 2002 11-32 FWCP-ChapterTwo, Land Use LUP72 LUP73 areas to be free from expansive development; intensity of use should respect and protect the natural qualities of the area. c. Small or linear portions of the shoreline suitable for recreational purposes should be available and designated as transitional use areas that allow for variable intensities of use, which may include vista points, pedestrian walkways, water entry points, and access from the water; utilizing stream floodplains, street ends, steep slopes, and shoreline areas adjacent to waterfront roads. d. At suitable locations, shorelines should be made available and designated as high intensive use areas that provide for a wide variety of activities. e. Overall design and development in shoreline recreational areas should be responsive to the site characteristics of those areas and be consistent with the level of use in the area concerned. f. Recreation areas on the shoreline should have adequate surveillance and maintenance. g. The public should be provided with additional off-site and on-site guidance and control to protect shoreline resources. h. Where a wide berm is needed for dry beach recreation, and physical conditions permit sand retention, consideration should be given to creating a Class I beach 1 when such development does not destroy valuable biota or unique physical conditions. 1. Access to recreational shoreline areas afforded by water and land circulation systems should be determined by the concept of optimum carrying capacity and recreational quality. J. Non-water oriented recreational facility development should be kept inland away from the water's edge, except where appropriate in high intensive shoreline use areas. The provision of adequate public shoreline recreation lands should be based on an acquisition plan with a clear public intent. A balanced variety of recreational opportunities should be provided for people of different ages, health, family status, and financial ability. a. Appropriatespecialized recreation facilities should be provided for the developmentally disabled, or others who might need them. 'Pursuant to Federal Way City Code Chapter 18, Article III, Section 18-163, a "Class I beach means a beach or shore having dependable, geologicaIly fuIly developed, and normaIly dry backshore above high tide." Revised 2002 11-33 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use b. Shoreline recreation areas should provide opportunities for different use intensities ranging from low (solitude) to high (many people). c. Opportunities for shoreline recreational experiences should include developing access that accommodates a range of differences in people's physical mobility, capabilities, and skill levels. d. Shoreline recreational experiences should include a wide range of different areas from remote/outdoor undeveloped areas to highly developed indoor/ outdoor areas. e. Recreational development should meet the demands of population growth consistent with the carrying capacity of the land and water resources. Circulation Element An element dealing with the location and extent of existing and proposed major thoroughfares, transportation routes, and other public facilities; and coordinating those facilities with the shoreline use elements. Goal LUG13 Circulation systems in shoreline areas should be limited to those that are shoreline dependent or would serve shoreline dependent uses. The physical and social environment shall be protected from the adverse effect of those systems on the quality of water, life, or environment. Policies LUP74 New surface transportation development should be designed to provide the best possible service with the least possible infringement upon the shoreline environment. a. New transportation facilities and improvements to existing facilities that substantially increase levels of air, noise, odor, visual, or water pollution should be discouraged. b. Transportation corridors should be designed to harmonize with the topography and other natural characteristics of the shoreline through which they traverse. b. Surface transportation facilities in shoreline areas should be set back from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary such protective measures as rip-rap or other bank stabilization, landfill, Revised 2002 11-34 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP75 LUP76 LUP77 LUP78 bulkheads, groins, jetties, or substantial site regrade. Circulation systems should be located and attractively designed so as not to unnecessarily or unreasonably pollute the physical environment or reduce the benefits people derive from their property; and they should encourage alternative routes and modes of travel. a. Motorized vehicular traffic on beaches and other natural shoreline areas should be prohibited. b. Transportation facilities providing access to shoreline developments should be planned and designed in scale and character with the use proposed. c. Circulation routes should provide for non-motorized means of travel. Circulation systems disruptive to public shoreline access and other shoreline uses should be relocated where feasible. a. Transportation elements disruptive to the shoreline character that cannot feasibly be relocated should be conditioned or landscaped to minimize visual and noise pollution. Shoreline circulation systems should be adaptable to changes in technology. a. Federal Way should promote and encourage modes of transportation that consume the least amount of energy while providing the best efficiency with the least possible pollution. General policies. a. New transportation developments in shoreline areas should provide turnout areas for scenic stops and off road rest areas where the topography, view, and natural features warrant. b. Shoreline roadway corridors with unique or historic significance, or of great aesthetic quality, should be retained and maintained for those characteristics. c. New transportation facilities crossing lakes, streams, or wetlands should be encouraged to locate in existing corridors, except where any adverse impact can be minimized by selecting an alternate corridor. Residential Element An element dealing with housing densities, residential subdivisions, shoreline access, necessary support services, and locations of single-family dwellings (including Revised 2002 11-35 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use manufactured homes) and multiple-family dwellings without distinction between part-time or full-time occupancy. Goal LUG14 Shoreline residential areas shall permit a variety of housing types and designs with densities and locations consistent with the ability of physical and natural features to accommodate them. Policies LUP79 Residential developments should be excluded from shoreline areas known to contain development hazards or which would adversely impact sensitive areas as identified in Chapter 18, Division 6 of the FWCc. a. Residential development should be prohibited within the 100-year floodplain. b. Residential development should be prohibited in areas of severe or very severe landslide hazard. c. Residential development should be regulated in shoreline areas with slopes of 40 percent or greater. d. Shoreline areas containing other potential hazards (e. g., geological conditions, unstable subsurface conditions, erosion hazards, or groundwater or seepage problems) should be limited or restricted for development. e. The burden of pro oft hat development of these areas is feasible, safe, and ecologically sound is the responsibility of the developer. LUP80 Residential developments should have minimal impact on the land and water environment of the shoreline and minimize visual and physical obstruction. a. Residential development should be regulated in identified unique and fragile areas as required under the City's sensitive areas regulations. b. Residential development on piers or over water should not be permitted. c. Landfill for residential development which reduces water surface or floodplain capacity should not be permitted. d. In residential developments the water's edge should be kept free of buildings and fences. e. Every reasonable effort should be made to insure the retention of natural shoreline vegetation and other natural features of the landscape during site Revised 2002 11-36 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use development and construction. LUP81 Residential use of shorelines should not displace or encroach upon shoreline dependent uses. LUP82 Residential densities should be determined with regard for the physical capabilities of the shoreline areas, public services requirements, and effects such densities have on the environment. a. Subdivisions and new development should be designed to adequately protect the water and shoreline aesthetic characteristics. b. New residential development should only be allowed in those shoreline areas where the provision for sewage disposal and drainage ways are of such a standard that adjoining water bodies would not be adversely affected by pollution or siltation. c. Residential development along shorelines should be set back from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary such protective measures as filling, bulk heading, construction groins or jetties, or substantial regrading of the site. d. Residential developments should be designed to enhance the appearance of the shoreline and not substantially interfere with the public's view and access to the water. Shoreline Environments Purpose In order to more effectively implement the goals, objectives, and policies of this master program and the SMA, the shorelines of the state within Federal Way have been categorized into four separate environment designations. The purpose of these designations is to differentiate between areas whose geographical features and existing development pattern imply differing objectives regarding their use and future development. Each environment represents a particular emphasis in the type of uses and the extent of development that should occur within it. The system is designed to encourage uses in each environment which enhance the character of the environment while at the same time requiring reasonable standards and restrictions on development so that the character of the environment is not destroyed. The determination as to which designation should be given to any specific shoreline area has been based on, and is reflective of, the existing development pattern; the biophysical capabilities and limitations of the land; and the goals and aspirations of the local citizenry. Each environment category includes: (1) a definition describing the development, use, Revised 2002 11-37 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use and/or features which characterize the area; (2) a purpose which clarifies the meaning and intent of the designation; and, (3) general policies designed to regulate use and development consistent with the character of the environment. Urban Environment The urban environment is an area of high-intensity land use including residential, office, and recreational development. The environment is particularly suitable to those areas presently subjected to intensive land use pressure, as well as areas planned to accommodate urban expansion. The purpose of designating the urban environment is to ensure optimum utilization of shorelines within urbanized areas by permitting intensive use and by managing development so that it enhances and maintains the shoreline for a multiplicity of urban uses. The environment is designed to reflect a policy of increasing utilization and efficiency of urban areas, promote a more intensive level of use through redevelopment of areas now underutilized, and encourage multiple use of the shoreline if the major use is shoreline dependent. Policies L UP83 LUP84 LUP85 LUP86 LUP87 LUP88 LUP89 Emphasis should be given to development within already developed areas. Emphasis should be given to developing visual and physical access to the shoreline in the urban environment. To enhance the waterfront and insure maximum public use, commercial facilities should be designed to permit pedestrian waterfront activities consistent with public safety and security. Multiple use of the shoreline should be encouraged. Redevelopment and renewal of substandard areas should be encouraged in order to accommodate future users and make maximum use of the shoreline resource. Aesthetic considerations should be actively promoted by means of sign control regulations, architectural design standards, landscaping requirements, and other such means. Development should not significantly degrade the quality of the environment, including water quality and air quality, nor create conditions that would accentuate erosion, drainage problems, or other adverse impacts on adjacent environments. Rural Environment The rural environment is intended for shoreline areas characterized by agricultural uses, low density residential (where most urban services are not available), and areas which Revised 2002 11-38 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use provide buffer zones and open space between predominantly urban areas. Undeveloped shorelines not planned for urban expansion or which do not have a high priority for designation in an alternative environment, and recreational uses compatible with agricultural activities are appropriate for the rural environment. The purpose of designating the rural environment is to preserve agricultural land, restrict intensive development along undeveloped shorelines, function as a buffer between urban areas, and maintain open spaces and opportunities for recreational uses within the ecological carrying capacity of the land and water resource. New developments in a rural environment should reflect the character of the surrounding area by limiting density, providing permanent open space, and maintaining adequate building setbacks from the water to prevent shoreline resources fÌ"om being destroyed for other rural types of uses. Policies LUP90 LUP91 Recreational access to the shorelines should be encouraged. Recreational facilities should be located and designed to minimize conflicts with other activities. New development should reflect the character of the surrounding area by limiting residential density, providing permanent open space, and maintaining adequate building setbacks from the water. Conservancy Environment The conservancy environment consists of shoreline areas that are primarily free from intensive development. It is the most suitable designation for shoreline areas of high scenic or historical values, for areas unsuitable for development due to biophysical limitations, and for commercial forest lands. Conservancy areas are intended to maintain their existing character. This designation is designed to protect, conserve, and manage existing natural resources and valuable historic and cultural areas. The preferred uses are those which are nonconsumptive of the physical and biological resources of the area. Policies LUP92 LUP93 LUP94 LUP95 New development should be restricted to those that are compatible with the natural and biophysical limitations of the land and water. Diverse recreational activities that are compatible with the conservancy environment should be encouraged. Development that would be a hazard to public health and safety, or would materially interfere with the natural processes, should not be allowed. The flood hazard overzone regulations shall apply to development within flood plains. Revised 2002 11-39 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP96 Structural flood control devices should be strongly discouraged in the conservancy environment. LUP97 In areas with poorly draining soils, development should not be allowed unless connected to a sewer line. LUP98 Development should be regulated so as to minimize the following: erosion or sedimentation, the adverse impact on aquatic habitats, and substantial degradation of the existing character of the conservancy environment. Natural Environment The natural environment consists of areas characterized by the presence of some unique natural features considered valuable in their undisturbed or original condition and which are relatively intolerant of intensive human use. Such areas should be essentially free from development or be capable of being easily restored to natural condition, and they should be large enough to protect the value of the resource. The purpose of designating the natural environment is to preserve and restore those natural resource systems existing relatively free of human influence. These systems require severe restrictions of intensities and types of uses permitted so as to maintain the integrity of the natural environment. Policies LUP99 Natural areas should remain free from all development that would adversely affect their natural character. LUPIOO The intensity and type of uses permitted should be restricted in order to maintain the natural systems and resources in their natural condition. LUPIOI Limited access should be allowed to those areas in the natural environment. LUPIO2 Uses which are consumptive of the physical and biological resources, or which may degrade the actual or potential value of the natural environment, should be prohibited. LUPIO3 Uses and activities in locations adjacent to natural areas should be strictly regulated to insure that the integrity of the natural environment is not compromised. Shoreline Use Activities Purpose Shoreline use activities are specific uses, or groups of similar uses, that have been outlined by the Department of Ecology Final Guidelines as being characteristic of the shorelines of the state. They have been formulated as implementing tools to further carry out the intent Revised 2002 11-40 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use and policy of this master program and the SMA. They also represent a major criterion to be used in evaluating proposed development and alterations to the shoreline environment; with their ultimate influence, to a large extent, dependent upon how well they are enforced. The policies that make up each use activity have been founded on the premise that all reasonable and appropriate uses require regulatory control. Other provisions such as a view enhancement, public access, erosion control, water quality, long term benefits, and aesthetic considerations have also been reflected in policy statements. Shoreline uses and activities not specifically identified, and for which policies have not been developed, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and will be required to meet the intent of the goals and objectives of this master program, the policy of the SMA, and shall be consistent with the management policy and character of the shoreline environment in which they propose to locate. Aquatic Resource Practices Of all facets of economic shoreline activity, production from fisheries is the most vulnerable to massive destruction from an error in environmental control. Close monitoring of water quality and an aggressive policy of pollution abatement and control are mandatory for full realization and sustenance of this economic base. Aquaculture addresses state hatcheries, commercial hatcheries and beds, and natural hatcheries and beds within Federal Way shorelines. Underwater aquaria are considered as aquaculture although the use is principally recreational. Aquaculture has two modes: I. The harvest of uncontained plant and animal populations that exist on the nutrients and foods available in the environment restock themselves according to the fecundity ofthe population, and survive as the food and nature allow. 2. Artificial stocking or raising of stock in feedlots or pens using selective breeding and controlled feeding programs for increasing production and rearing a uniform product. Pen culture requires confinement and the presence of fixed structures that compete for space. Pens, rafts, and hatcheries require certain environmental conditions to assure the survival of their contained populations. Some of these conditions are small wave forces, good flow, good water quality, temperature limits, good anchoring ground and accessibility, and, possibly, good natural food and nutrient supply. The confinement of fish or shellfish in concentration imposes an extreme biological load in a small area. Dense populations degrade water quality and deposit heavy fecal sediments below the pens or on the floor of embayments. The principal impacts of aquacultural activity within the shoreline are: Revised 2002 11-41 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use I. Pollutants in the water body such as fish, organic wastes, and additives for feeding and disease control. 2. Navigation hazards such as holding pens, rafts, nets, and stakes. 3. Watercourse alteration to supply water. 4. Netting and flooring of riverbeds for spawning channels. 5. Shoreline access limitations where shellfish are being protected and contained. Policies LUPIO4 Federal Way's support should be given to the State Departments of Fisheries and Game to improve stream conditions, open new spawning areas, and establish new fish runs. LUPIO5 Pens and structures for commercial aquaculture should not be located on Class I beaches, or swimming beaches. LUPIO6 Aquacultural enterprises should be located in areas that would not significantly restrict navigation. LUPIO7 In aquaculture enterprises, development of multiple aquaculture systems should be encouraged. LUPIO8 Aquacultural structures should use open pile construction where significant littoral drift occurs. LUPIO9 Prior to use of an area for aquacultural enterprises, consideration should be given to the capability of the water body to absorb potential wastes. L UPll 0 Shoreline areas having extremely high natural potential for aquaculture should be preserved for that purpose. Commercial Development Commercial development pertains generally to the use or construction of facilities for transaction and sale of goods and services as opposed to industrial development (treatment together with ports) which pertains to the design and fabrication of products. The principal impact factors upon the shoreline from commercial development are pollutants (e.g., erosion, sedimentary, chemical, and microbial) and aesthetic destruction. Erosive pollutants from commercial development are generated from surface runoff and both surface and sub-surface subsidence. Chemical pollution is derived from fuel spillage. Microbial loading arises from poor containment of organic wastes associated with human habitation and recreational activities. Revised 2002 11-42 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Policies LUPIll Consideration should be made ofthe effect a structure will have on scenic value. L UPII2 Commercial structures and ancillary facilities that are not shoreline dependent or water-oriented should be placed inland away from the immediate water's edge. LUP113 The use of porous materials should be encouraged for paved areas to allow water to penetrate and percolate into the soil. Use of holding systems should be encouraged to control the runoff rate from parking lots and rooftops. LUPl14 Commercial enterprises locating within shoreline areas should be constructed to withstand normal rain and flooding conditions without contributing pollution to the watercourse or shoreline. LUP115 Commercial development that is not shoreline dependent should provide a buffer zone of vegetation for erosion control. Utilities Few, if any, utility systems could be installed completely without coming under the jurisdiction of this master program. The focus of the policies in this section is on how these utility facilities within the shoreline environment can be planned, designed, constructed, maintained, and rehabilitated to be consistent with the intent of the SMA. Types of utility facilities in Federal Way vary from regional transmission by trunklines, pipelines, and transmission lines to subregional distribution facilities. These are essentially pipes and wires. Regional facilities generally are high voltage or high pressure systems with substantial potential impact in case of failure. Their impacts on the environment are also generally greater because of their scale and safety requirements. The types of utilities covered are communications (radio, TV, and telephone), energy distribution (petroleum products, natural gas, and electricity), water, sanitary sewers, and storm sewers. Policies LUP116 Utilities that lead to growth should not be extended into or along shorelines without prior approval of such extension by appropriate land use authority. LUP117 Utilities located in shoreline environments inappropriate for development should not make service available to those areas. LUP118 In developed shorelines not served by utilities, utility construction should be encouraged to locate where it can be shown that water quality will be maintained or improved. Revised 2002 11-43 FWCP-ChapterTwo, Land Use LUPI19 Federal Way should be consulted prior to, or at the time of, application for construction of regional utility facilities to be located in or along shorelines. LUP120 Utility corridors crossing shorelines ofthe state should be encouraged to consolidate and concentrate or share rights-of-way where: a. Public access (including view) would be improved. b. Concentration or sharing would not hinder the ability of the utility systems to be installed, operated, or maintained safely. c. Water quality would be as good or better than if separate corridors were present. LUP121 Public access consistent with public safety and security should be encouraged where rights-of-way for regional utility facilities cross shorelines of the City. LUPI22 New utility facilities should be located so as neither to require extensive shoreline protection nor to restrict water flow, circulation, or navigation. LUP123 Utility facilities and rights-of-way should be selected to preserve the natural landscape and minimize conflicts with present and planned uses of the land on which they are located. LUP124 New utility routes should be designed to minimize detrimental visual impact from the water and adjacent uplands. LUPl2S New freestanding personal wireless service facilities are discouraged from locating within the shoreline environment. Shoreline Protection Shoreline protection is action taken to reduce adverse impacts caused by current, flood, wake, or wave action. This action includes all structural and nonstructural means to reduce these impacts due to flooding, erosion, and accretion. Specific structural and nonstructural means included in this use activity are bulkheads, rip-rap, bank stabilization, and other means of shoreline protection. The means taken to reduce damage caused by erosion, accretion, and flooding must recognize the positive aspects of each, so that the benefits of these natural occurrences will be retained, even as the problems are dealt with. Erosion does not exist without accretion of material eroded, be it a bench or a sandbar. Likewise, accretion cannot occur unless material has been eroded. Policies LUP126 Structural solutions to reduce shoreline damage should be allowed only after it is demonstrated that nonstructural solutions would not be able to reduce the Revised 2002 11-44 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use damage. LUPI27 Planning of shoreline protection should encompass sizable stretches of lake or marine shorelines. This planning should consider off-site erosion, accretion, or flood damage that might occur as a result of shoreline protection structures or activities. LUP128 . Shoreline protection on marine and lake shorelines should not be used as the reason for creating new or newly usable land. LUP129 Shoreline protection structures should allow passage of ground and surface waters into the main water body. LUP130 Shoreline protection should not reduce the volume and storage capacity of rivers and adjacent wetlands or flood plains. LUP131 Whenever shoreline protection is needed, bioengineered alternatives such as natural berms and erosion control vegetation plans should be favored over hard surfaced structural alternatives such as concrete bulkheads and sheet piles. LUP132 The burden of proof for the need for shoreline protection to protect existing or proposed developments rests on the applicant. LUP133 Shoreline protection activities that may necessitate new or increased shoreline protection on the same or other affected properties where there has been no previous need for protection should be discouraged. LUP134 New development should be encouraged to locate so as not to require shoreline protection. LUP13S Areas of significance in the spawning, nesting, rearing, or residency of aquatic and terrestrial biota should be given special consideration in reviewing of shoreline protection actions. LUP136 Shoreline protection actions should be discouraged in areas where they would block beach parent material. LUP137 Multiple uses of shoreline protection structures or nonstructural solutions should be encouraged. Transportation Facilities The circulation network use category addresses transportation facilities such as roads, railroads, bridges, trails, and related facilities. The impact of these facilities on shorelines can be substantial. Some existing facilities were constructed to serve transportation needs of the moment with a minimum expenditure and very little assessment of their primary or secondary impacts on shoreline aesthetics, public access to the water, and resultant effects on adjacent properties and water quality. Planning for new transportation facilities within Revised 2002 11-45 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use the shoreline area today requires a greater awareness of the environmental impacts transportation facilities will have on shorelines, in addition to the necessity for integrating future shoreline land use plans with the transportation system that serves developments on the shoreline. Policies LUP138 Pedestrian access should be built where access to public shorelines is desirable and has been cut offby linear transportation corridors. New linear facilities should enable pedestrian access to public shorelines where access is desirable. LUP139 New surface transportation facilities not related to, and necessary for the support of, shoreline activities should be set back from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary protective measures such as rip rap or other bank stabilization, land-fill, bulkheads, groins, jetties, or substantial site regrade. LUP140 Shoreline transportation facilities should be encouraged to include in their design and development multi-modal provisions where public safety can be assured. LUP141 Shoreline transportation facilities should be planned to fit the topography and minimize cuts and fills; and should be designed, located, and maintained to minimize erosion and degradation of water quality and to give special consideration to shoreline aesthetics. LUP142 Transportation and utility facilities should be encouraged to coordinate joint use of rights-of-way and to consolidate crossings of water bodies when doing so can minimize adverse impact to the shoreline. LUP143 Transportation facilities should avoid shoreline areas known to contain development hazards (e.g. slide and slump areas, poor foundation soils, marshes, etc.). LUP144 Transportation facilities should minimize shoreline rights-of-way by orienting generally perpendicular to the shoreline where topographic conditions will allow. LUP14S Shoreline roadways should have a high priority for arterial beautification funds. LUP146 Abandoned road or railroad rights-of-way that contain unique shoreline amenities should be acquired for public benefit. LUP147 Federal Way should extend its trail and bicycle trail system, particularly as it relates to shorelines, to western Federal Way. LUP148 All transportation facilities in shoreline areas should be constructed and maintained to cause the least possible adverse impacts on the land and water Revised 2002 11-46 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use environments, should respect the natural character of the shoreline, and should make every effort to preserve wildlife, aquatic life, and their habitats. Piers and Moorages A pier is a structure built over or floating upon the water extending from the shore. Some are used as a landing place for marine transport or for recreational watercraft. Piers are designed and constructed as either water (floating) or pile supported, both of which have positive and negative environmental aspects. Floating piers generally have less of a visual impact than those on piling and they provide excellent protection for swimmers from boat traffic. Floating piers however, interrupt littoral drift and can starve down current beaches where pile piers do not. Pile piers can provide a diverse habitat for marine life. Both types can create impediments to boat traffic and near-shore trolling. Pier construction requires regulation to protect navigation rights, preserve shoreline aesthetics, and maintain the usable water surface and aquatic lands for life forms characteristic and important to those areas. Policies L UP149 Open pile pier construction should be preferred where there is significant littoral drift, where scenic values will not be impaired, and where minimal alteration to the shoreline and minimal damage to aquatic resources can be assured. LUP1S0 Floating pier construction should be preferred in those areas where scenic values are high. LUP1SI Piers should be discouraged where conflicts with recreational boaters and other recreational water activities would be created by pier construction. LUP1S2 The random proliferation of single purpose piers should be discouraged. Preference should be given to shared use of piers in all shoreline areas. LUP1S3 Temporary moorages should be permitted for vessels used in the construction of shoreline facilities. The design and construction of such moorages shall be such that upon termination of the project the aquatic life can be returned to their original condition within one year at no cost to the environment or the public. LUP1S4 Shoreline structures that are abandoned or structurally unsafe should be abated. LUP1SS Substantial additions or alterations, including but not limited to substantial developments, should be in conformance with the policies and regulations set forth in the master program. LUP1S6 Piers, docks, buoys, and other moorages should only be authorized after consideration of: a. The effect such structures have on wild-life and aquatic life, water quality, scenic and aesthetic values, unique and fragile areas, submerged lands, and shoreline vegetation. Revised 2002 11-47 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use b. The effect such structures have on navigation, water circulation, recreational and commercial boating, sediment movement and littoral drift, and shoreline access. LUP1S7 Moorage buoys should be preferred over floating and pile constructed piers on all tidal waters. LUP1S8 Floating structures and open pile structures are preferred over landfills or solid structures in water areas used by salmon and steelhead. Recreation Recreational experiences that depend on, or utilize, the shoreline include: harvesting activities offish, shellfish, fowl, minerals, and driftwood; various forms of boating, swimming, and shoreline pathways; and watching or recording activities, such as photography, painting, or the viewing of water dependent activities. Principal focal points are at parks and access beaches, road ends, viewpoints, features of special interest, water- access points, and destination points for boaters. Facilities at these focal points may include fishing piers, swimming floats, paths, parking areas, boat ramps, moorings, and accessory recreational facilities. The management of recreational land is determined by balancing the recreational carrying capacity (or impact of the environment on people) and the ecological carrying capacity (the impact of people on the environment). Measures to accomplish this are by designation of areas for use-intensity, interpretation, and regulation. These different recreational use areas coincide with the four environmentsCnatural, conservancy, rural, and urban. There are multiple benefits derived from the park program, for example: recreational lands contribute substantially to open space by conservation of land, preserving historic sites, offering aesthetic relief and variety, contributing to a healthful environment, and shaping and preserving the community form. In addition to the provisions of recreational opportunities, Federal Way coordinates with other governmental agencies, commercial, and volunteer groups to provide these opportunities for the public. The policies are directed toward providing shoreline dependent and water oriented recreational opportunities. They are also directed at protecting health and safety by separating incompatible activities and channeling them into their most appropriate environments. Policies LUPIS9 The development of recreational acquisition plans should give emphasis to the acquisition of prime recreation lands prior to their being preempted for other uses. LUP160 In open spaces having an established sense of nature, improvements should be limited to those that are necessary and unlikely to detract from the primary values of the site. LUP161 The siting of all developments should aim to enhance and protect the area Revised 2002 11-48 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use concerned. LUPI62 Structural forms should harmonize the topography, reinforce the use area, minimize damage to natural resources, and support recreation with minimal conflict. LUPI63 New buildings should be made sympathetic to the scale, form, and proportion of older development to promote harmony in the visual relationships and transitions between new and older buildings. LUP164 Whenever possible, natural materials should be used in developing shoreline recreational areas. LUP16S Artificial irrigation and fertilization should be restricted to high-intensity use areas. LUP166 Existing buildings that enhance the character of the shoreline should be used for recreation wherever possible. LUP167 Underwater parks should be extensions of shoreline parks, or be created or enhanced by artificial reefs where natural conditions or aquatic life could be observed with minimal interference. LUP168 Public recreational shoreline areas should serve as emergency havens of refuge for boaters. LUP169 Physical and/or visual access to the water should use steep slopes, view points from bluffs, stream valleys, and features of special interest where it is possible to place pathways consistent with public safety without requiring extensive flood or erosion protection. LUP170 The acquisition of public easements to the shoreline through private or quasi- public shorelines should be encouraged. LUP171 Existing public recreation shorelines should be restored where it is possible to revegetate; resite roads and parking areas that are close to the shoreline; and remove stream channelization and shoreline protection devices when the facility has either deteriorated or is inconsistent with the general goals of this program. LUPIn Prime-fishing areas should be given priority for recreational use. L UP173 Boating activities that increase shore erosion should be discouraged. L UP17 4 Effective interpretation should be provided to raise the quality of visitor experiences and provide an understanding of the resource. Residential Development Revised 2002 11-49 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use The shorelines in Federal Way are more widely used for residential purposes than for any other use. Much of the undeveloped shoreline is privately owned, subdivided into small lots, and zoned to permit residential development. The pressure to develop shorelines for residential uses has continued to result in property subdivision and escalating waterfront land values. Residential development of shorelines is accomplished in a variety of ways from large plats and subdivisions to single lot development for housing; any of which, if poorly planned, can culminate in the degradation of the shoreline environment and water resource. . The SMA generally exempts, ".. . construction on shorelands by an owner, lessee or contract purchaser of a single-family residence for his own use or the use of his family..." from its permit requirements. However, even though single-family homes are not considered substantial developments, the intent of the act has established the basis for planning and regulating them. Policies LUP17S Residential developments should be permitted only where there are adequate provisions for utilities, circulation, access, site layout, and building design. LUP176 Subdivisions should be designed at a level of density, site coverage, and occupancy compatible with the physical capabilities of the shoreline and water body. LUP177 Residential development plans submitted for approval should contain provisions for protection of groundwater supplies, erosion control, landscaping, and maintenance of the shoreline integrity. LUP178 Residential subdivisions should be designed so as to protect water quality, shoreline aesthetic characteristics, vistas, and normal public use of the water. LUP179 Subdivisions should provide public pedestrian access to the shorelines within the development in accordance with public access element of this master program. LUP180 The established velocity, quantity, and quality of stormwater discharge should be considered in terms of the sensitivity of the proposed receiving environment. The disposal mode selected should minimize changes in infiltration, runoff, and groundwater recharge. LUP181 Developers of recreational projects such as summer homes, cabins, campgrounds, and similar facilities should satisfactorily demonstrate: a. The suitability of the site to accommodate the proposed development without adversely affecting the shoreline environment and water resource. Revised 2002 II-50 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use b. Adequate provisions for all necessary utilities, including refuse disposal, and the compatibility of the development with adjacent properties and surrounding land uses. c. That recreational opportunity exists on the site and does not depend on adjacent public land to furnish the activity. 2.9 ESSENTIAL PUBLIC FACILITIES Pursuant to the GMA, no comprehensive plan can preclude the siting of essential public facilities and each should include a process for siting essential public facilities. The GMA includes these provisions because siting certain public facilities has become difficult due to the impacts many of these facilities have on the community. In Chapter 22 of the FWCC, the City has defined essential public facilities and provided a land use process for siting them. Essential public facilities include those facilities that are typically difficult to site, such as airports, state or regional transportation systems, correctional facilities, and mental health facilities. Policy LUP182 The FWCC shall include a list oflocally defined essential public facilities that shall include the list of essential state public facilities maintained by the office of financial management. 2.10 PHASING Phasing focuses growth to those areas where public investments for services are targeted. By doing so, these areas become more attractive for development. Consistent with the CWPPs, Federal Way proposes to use a tiered system for accommodating future growth. The primary purpose of this technique is to assure a logical sequence of growth outward from developed areas. Future growth will be directed to the City Center and other areas with existing infrastructure and urban services. This will be followed by focusing growth to areas where in-fill potential exists. Lastly, growth will be directed toward areas of undeveloped land or to the City's P AA. For those areas of the City that are lacking services, these lands should be retained or reserved until build out has occurred in developed areas. Based on the phased growth concept outlined above, the City should develop criteria for a phasing plan over the next 10 and 20 years. Phased growth will promote efficient use of Revised 2002 II-51 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use land by: # Reducing taxpayers costs by locating new development nearest to existing urban servIces; # Adding predictability to service & facility planning; # Reducing commuter miles and protecting air quality by locating housing and jobs near each other; # Encouraging in-fill and redevelopment where environmental impacts have already occurred; and # Reserving land for future parks and open space. Policies LUP183 Establish priority areas for public facility and service improvements, especially for transportation. Priority areas should be located where public facility and service improvements would effectively advance Federal Way's growth vision. Priority areas will shift over time as improvements are installed and an acceptable level of service is attained. LUP184 When and where service deficiencies are identified, the City, along with service providers, will develop capital improvement programs to remedy identified deficiencies in a timely fashion or will phase growth until such programs can be completed. LUP18S Work with King County through the development of an interlocal agreement to assign phasing to the City's P AA. LUP186 The City should limit spending on capital facilities in those areas of the City and P AA that are not designated as priority areas for capital projects. 2.11 INCENTIVES In certain designations, incentives allowing more development than otherwise permitted should be used to encourage features that provide a public benefit and/or contribute to the mitigation of growth impacts. For example, development in the City Center that provides common open space or affordable housing units, may gain additional floors or a reduction in the number of parking stalls. In addition, in order to encourage development in the City Center, the City is in the process of discussing a Housing Tax Exemption for multiple Revised 2002 II-52 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use family housing and is considering preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a portion of the City Center. Incentives can play an important role in the development of the City Center and must be substantial enough to influence market conditions by making them attractive to the development community. Policies LUP187 Develop incentives to encourage desired development in commercial areas, especially in the City Center Core and Frame. LUP188 Consider incentives for desired multiple-family residential development (townhouses, duplexes, etc.). 2.12 HISTORIC RESOURCES Historic preservation involves the identification, maintenance, renovation, and reuse of buildings and sites important to a community's history. Buildings or sites may be associated with a particular style or period in the community's past, or with historic or significant historic events or persons. Historic preservation to date has largely been undertaken by the Historical Society of Federal Way. Historic preservation is listed as the 13th goal in the GMA which encourages jurisdictions to, "Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance. " Goal LUGIS Use historic resources as an important element in the overall design o/the City. Policies LUP189 Identify vista points and landmarks such as major trees, buildings, and land forms for preservation. LUP190 Develop a process to designate historic landmark sites and structures. Use developer incentives or other mechanisms to ensure that these sites and structures will continue to be a part of the community. L UPI91 Recognize the heritage ofthe community by naming (or renaming) parks, streets, and other public places after major figures and/or events. LUPI92 Zoning should be compatible with and conducive to continued preservation of historic neighborhoods and properties. Revised 2002 II-53 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use LUP193 Safeguard and manifest Federal Way's heritage by preserving those sites, buildings, structures, and objects which reflect significant elements of the City's history. LUP194 Catalog historic sites using the City's geographic information system. LUP19S Undertake an effort to publicly commemorate historic sites. LUP196 The City shall continue to work with the Historical Society of Federal Way towards attainment of historic resource policies. 2.13 IMPLEMENTATION The following actions are recommended to implement the policy direction outlined in this chapter. Implementation will occur over time and is dependent on resources available to the City and community. The following items are not listed in order of importance or preference. Establish Comprehensive Planning and Zoning for Potential Annexation Area Comprehensive planning and the assignment of zoning designations should be completed for the City's P AA. This will provide the City with needed direction relating to future annexations and growth. Planning for this area pursuant to WAC 365-195 requires a considerable planning effort and policy development. An interlocal agreement between King County and the City regarding planning actions should be prepared. Residential Code Revisions for Multiple Family Residential code revisions to implement design standards for multiple-family residential development were adopted in late 1998. Subdivision Code Revisions Amendments to the subdivision code have been adopted to bring the code into compliance with state law and recent state legislation. Revisions to the subdivision code have provided platting options for single-family development, such as clustering and zero lot line development. Area-Wide Rezone Following adoption of the 1995 FWCP, a new zoning map was prepared and adopted to support the comprehensive plan designations. This update includes some site specific requests for changes to comprehensive plan designations. The zoning map will be amended to conform to the changes in land use designations. The Land Use Plan and Zoning Code Revised 2002 II-54 FWCP - Chapter Two, Land Use Implementation of policies and goals of the Land Use chapter is done in large part through the zoning code. Following adoption of the 1995 FWCP, the City made revisions to the zoning code, consistent with FWCP direction. The zoning conversion chart, Table II-3 (page 55), shows the connection between the various zoning designations and the comprehensive plan designations. Phasing Plan A phasing plan shall be prepared to prioritize areas of new growth based on available and proposed infrastructure improvements. Project Environmental Impact Statement for City Center To facilitate growth in the City Center and Frame, the City should complete Planned Action SEP A (PAS). By doing so, development consistent with the direction outlined in the PAS will not have to go through prolonged environmental review. This can be a powerful incentive for private development in the City Center. Subarea Plans Over the years, citizens from various areas of the City have come forth to testify before the Planning Commission and City Council regarding their neighborhood or business area. Development of subarea plans can lead to area specific visions and policies. This type of specific planning, developed with citizen input and direction, can lead to improved confidence and ownership in the community. Areas where subarea planning should be considered include: SR-99 Corridor, South 348th Street area, and Twin Lakes neighborhood. Incentives Develop an incentives program, for both residential and commercial development. Incentives should be substantial enough to attract development and should be used to create affordable and desired types of housing and to encourage development within the City Center. u Comprehensive Plan Classification Zoning Classification Single Family - Low Density Residential Suburban Estates (SE), one dwelling unit per five acres Single Faniily - Medium Density Residential RS 35,000 & 15,000 Single Family - High Density Residential RS 9600, 7200, 5000 Multiple Family Residential RM 3600, 2400, 1800 City Center Core City Center Core City Center Frame City Center Frame Office Park Office Park, Office Park 1, 2, & 3 Professional Office Professional Office Community Business Community Business Business Park Business Park Table II-3 Land Use Classifications Revised 2002 II-55 FWCP-ChapterTwo, Land Use Neighborhood Business Neighborhood Business Corporate Park Corporate Park-l Commercial Recreation Office Park-4 Open Space & Parks A variety of zoning is assigned. Revised 2002 II-56 ~ir' PugetSound CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN DESIGNATIONS REVISED MARCH, 2003 LANDUSE ELEMENT ¡\' Federal Way City Umils 1\' Potential Aonexation Area - City Center Core - City Center Frame - Corporate Park IiIIIIIIII Office Park ~ Professional Office ~ CommerciaJlRecreation c:::a Business Park - Neighborhood Business - Community Business - Parks and Open Space - Multi-Family c::::J Single Family-High Density IiE1 Single Family-Medium Density c::::J Single Family-Low Density -SCAlE- 1 Inch equals 3,750 Feøt ~ Federal Way MAP 11-1 NOTE: This map is inten~ed Ie r use as a graphical representation anI)'. ibe CIIy '" Fi!deral Way mat!18 no warranty sa 1D hi aœur3CY Mo, "'",d Febrlllry '000 r_I>8"""'..."".","" .-:t~' PugetSound CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN GENERALIZED EXISTING LAND USE lANDUSE ELEMENT ,., Federal Way City Umits /'" Potential Annexatlon Area ",' Other City Limits N County Boundary ",' Federal Way City Center iOrS Agriculture - Commercial - Industrial - Olllce I!I!!!!I!II Public Pcuk IüiII R861denllal - Multi-Family c:J R86idential. Single Family Œ33TI Open Space, Common Areas, and Drainage - Quasi Public (i.e. så1ools. govemmentservlces. ate.) ITIJIJ Vacant ~ Recreation .. UtiUties -""."'-"Y"-~. ".........don"" ""_... ~_Mo_h""'- 1:".~:t!:."o::..WD_n -SCALE- 1 .ch ....,.11 4.000 Flot ~. F'ëderal Way MAP 11-2 NOTE: This map is inten~ed f1H use as a graphical representation anly. 1111 CIIy at f!dlral Way maleos no wMranty ,&m hi IIXUracy U'p prl"" Apll2lJO2 '_bl"","""",~..1 EXHIBIT c CHAPTER FOUR - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 4.0 INTRODUCTION The Growth Management Act (GMA) includes economic development as one of its basic goals and it is a theme that runs throughout the GMA. It considers the need to stimulate economic development throughout the state, but requires that these activities be balanced with the need to protect the physical environment. It encourages the efficient use of land, the availability of urban services, and the financing strategies necessary to pay for infrastructure. Finally, the GMA mandates that communities do their planning and then provide the zoning and regulatory environment so that appropriate development can occur. It recognizes that while the public sector can shape and influence development, it is the private sector that generates community growth. The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) has also adopted region-wide goals and objectives to guide multi-jurisdictional transportation and land use policies that will be implemented through local comprehensive plans. Economic development is implicit in many of the goals and objectives of VISION 2020. The VISION 2020 strategy emphasizes that continued economic stability and diversity is dependent upon public and private sector collaboration to identify needs, such as infrastructure and land, and to invest in services that will promote economic activity. VISION 2020 also emphasizes that the stability of the regional economy increases when it develops and diversifies through the retention and strengthening of existing businesses and the creation of new business. King County, through its growth management planning policies and process, re- emphasizes the economic development implications of growth management. The Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) promote the creation of a healthy and diverse economic climate. The CWPPs describe the need to strengthen, expand, and diversify the economy. They encourage protection of our natural resources and enhancement of our human resources through education and job training. The CWPPs also speak to the need to make an adequate supply of land available for economic development by providing necessary infrastructure and a reasonable permitting process. Within this policy framework, Federal Way has outlined a vision of its economic development future. Its vision is to transform itself from largely a bedroom-community of Seattle into a diversified, full-service, and self-contained city (Map IV-I, located at the end of the chapter). However, in doing so, it is important to remember that Federal Way is part of the larger Puget Sound economy, and therefore, this transformation will depend in large part on the market forces at work within the greater region. To achieve this vision, the City must diversify its employment base by adding more professional and managerial jobs, and by increasing the overall number of jobs in order to improve the balance between jobs and households in the City. The potential is there. Federal Way's unique location between the two regional centers of Seattle and Tacoma, both with large concentrations of population and large, successful ports, and its relationship within the FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Central Puget Sound region represent significant opportunities. The City is also home to Weyerhaeuser's Corporate Headquarters, located within East Campus, and the West Campus Office Park, two of the premier office park areas in the region. In addition, the City holds unique regional attractions for entertainment and recreation, such as Celebration Park, King County Aquatic Center, and Six Flags Enchanted Parks/Wild Waves. The City's economic development vision is based on the following: 1) economic and demographic analysis; 2) market analysis oflong-term real estate development in Federal Way; 3) synthesis ofreal estate and development trends in the Central Puget Sound area; and 4) review and comment from the Planning Commission. 4.1 SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND TRENDS Overview Since the last update to this chapter of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan (FWCP), there have been significant changes in the local, regional, national, and international economic conditions. Previously riding a sustained, strong economic wave associated with extraordinary growth in the high-tech industries, strong growth in the airline industry, and generally positive national and international perceptions of the Pacific Northwest, the Seattle- Tacoma metropolitan region, and the State of Washington, Washington began to show early signs of an economic downturn by mid-200 I. Riots in nearby Seattle, first associated with the meeting of the World Trade Organization in November 1999, and later with the 200 I Mardi Gras festivities, had begun a series of negative publicity images of Seattle and the Seattle area. This negative publicity was exacerbated by the February 28,2001, Nisqually Earthquake, and later in 2001 by the Boeing Company's announcement that it was moving its corporate headquarters to Chicago. In addition, by mid-200 1, the national economy had begun to slow down, the "dot-com" industry had suffered a generalized melt-down, and the Pacific Rim countries, upon which so much of this state's trade depends, continued to slide further into their own recessions. The effects ofthe September 11,2001, terrorist attacks on this country jolted the economies of most of the world's countries and regions, but had a particularly hard impact on the Puget Sound region. As air-travel-related commerce plummeted worldwide, the Boeing Company, its affiliates, and related industries, saw sharp drops in orders, and Boeing announced its intentions to lay off tens of thousands of workers over the ensuing two years. By the beginning of 2002, lay-offs around the Puget Sound region became a commonplace occurrence, stemming from cutbacks at Boeing, other companies related to the airline and travel industries, and numerous "dot-com" and high-tech companies. However, according to the 2002 King County Annual Growth Report, the King County Revised 2002 IV-2 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development economy remains strong despite severe shocks. Unemployment has risen to 6.2 percent as of June 2002, but that level is no worse than the historical average. Aerospace employment in the Puget Sound region now stands at 72,000, with about 47,000 ofthat in King County. Although well below its record employment levels, the aerospace sector continues to provide high wages to local workers. High tech continues to expand despite the shakeout of a few companies. Other services, wholesale, and retail lost employment before the recession hit aerospace, so they may be ready to grow again in the coming year. The significant overall income growth in software and other sectors propelled King County into eighth place among all 3,100 counties in the United States in total payroll paid during 1998. Measured at $41 billion by the Census Bureau, King County's total business payroll exceeded that of 26 states, including Oregon, which has twice as many people as King County. Among other issues raised by such large numbers is that ofthe disparity of wealth and income between King County and the other parts of Washington State outside the Puget Sound region. In 1998, more than 52 percent of wages paid in the state were in King County, in contrast to our 29 percent share of the state's population. Some of that difference reflects high tech jobs in Seattle and the Eastside, as well as high wage manufacturing jobs in South King County. Long-range prospects are mixed. Boeing forecasts production of around 250 airplanes this year and next. Sale of those planes will bring in billions of dollars, much of which will be reinvested in the Puget Sound economy. But with the move of Boeing headquarters to Chicago, long-term prospects for aerospace are less certain, although the company has continued to emphasize its investment in the Puget Sound region. Sales tax and other government revenues are declining at a time when public investment is needed. The area is doing remarkably well so far, but if these underlying issues are not addressed, there could be lasting consequences to King County and the Puget Sound region. Due to the markedly weaker economic conditions now in the Puget Sound region than during most ofthe past decade, economic development efforts in Federal Way will have to become more creative, innovative, and broader in scope. The traditional focus on retaining and attracting businesses will not be enough. New efforts, reaching into other economic sectors and using new and innovative strategies, will be necessary. General Patterns of Existing Development Previous development trends indicate that the non-residential areas of Federal Way reflect a community that has the ability to absorb higher density (more compact) uses and greater development as growth in the Central Puget Sound region continues. And even though Federal Way is a new city in a suburban area, much of its future will be tied to redevelopment and transformation. Federal Way is characterized by: # High-quality single- and multiple-family residential areas # A range of housing that includes very modest tract homes, manufactured dwellings, and large luxury waterfront homes Revised 2002 IV-3 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development # Auto-oriented, suburban scale regional and community shopping centers and strip centers # Corporate headquarters # Two high-quality business and office parks-West Campus and East Campus # Little developed space for quality business, flex-tech, and office parks # Semi-rural areas, wildlife areas, truck stops, areas without utilities, and much vacant open space # Recreation/amusement parks # A waterfront primarily occupied by high-quality homes, but not particularly accessible to the public # Many marginal commercial areas with redevelopment potential along Pacific Highway South (SR-99) that are vestiges of a prior era Demographics Federal Way historically has been primarily a suburban, bedroom community. It has more households than jobs and as a result, provides more workers to the region than it attracts. However, since the City's incorporation, this balance between homes and jobs has shifted. Based on US Census data, the City's residential population grew by 23 percent from 67,554 in 1990 to 83,259 in 2000, while the City's covered employment has grown by 44 percent from 21,756 in 1990 (as reported by the 2001 King County Annual Growth Report) to 31,315 in 2000 (PSRC's 2000 Covered Employment Estimates). These figures indicate that during the past decade the City has begun to shed its "bedroom community" status, with more opportunities for residents to stay within Federal Way for their employment, as well as becoming more of an employment destination for residents from beyond Federal Way. The 2000 Census information shows that Federal Way's median income levels have grown substantially since 1990, with the City leading the South King County cities in the percentage of wage-earning households, as well as median household income. The 1990 Census reported median household income at $38,311. The figure grew by 29 percent over the decade leading to the 2000 census, with a median household income reported of $49,278, which is higher than the median household incomes of any ofthe other major South King County cities (Renton, Kent, Burien, Auburn, Tukwila, and SeaTac), as well as Seattle. Revised 2002 IV-4 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Moreover, it is interesting to note that the median household income of wage-earning households (which comprise 87.3 percent of all Federal Way households) was reported at $57,748. This median household income figure is also higher than that of any of the other major South King County cities, as well as higher than the South King County's average of $55,637. Similarly, Federal Way's percentage of wage-earning households (87.3 percent) is higher than any of the other major South King County cities (which range from 79.9 to 86.8 percent). As a result, and given the City's large population, Federal Way has the highest annual gross income of any of the South King County cities. However, Federal Way and the South King County cities continue to lag behind the East King County cities in terms of median household income, which range from $60,332 in Kirkland to $66,735 in Redmond. Federal Way's Regional Role Federal Way is optimally located at a mid-point in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan region at the intersection ofI-5 and SR-18, with easy access to the Port of Tacoma, Port of Seattle, and SeaTac International Airport. Federal Way's location is a prime asset as traffic congestion and concerns over personal and freight mobility within the region become paramount issues for commerce and industry, as well as commuters. Nevertheless, the economic boom of the past decade has largely been concentrated in the Eastside communities, Downtown Seattle and South Snohomish County. However, with changes in the high-tech industry, increasing traffic congestion, soaring housing prices, and increasing limits to growth in those areas, the "Southend bias" may become a thing of the past, leaving Federal Way in an even better position from a regional perspective. Economic Base Federal Way's retail base is diverse and attracts customers from outside the City limits. Its market share, however, is relatively low compared to other Southwest King County communities. Although Federal Way retailers capture a good deal of the City's primary and secondary market expenditures for general merchandise and food trade, a high percentage of the local populace goes elsewhere to shop for automobiles, apparel/ accessories, miscellaneous retail purchase, building material, and furniture. Overall, the capture rate for retail sales as a function of the City's primary and secondary trade area total retail expenditures is relatively low, about 51 percent (Federal Way City Center Market Analysis, prepared by ECO Northwest, July 2002). PSRC's 2000 Covered Employment Estimates reported that in 2000, covered employment (those jobs covered by the state's unemployment insurance program) within Federal Way and throughout King County could be broken down as shown in Table IV-l (page 6). As can be seen from this data, in 2000, Federal Way's strongest employment sectors were Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate, and Retail, which exceed the countywide averages considerably. The City had noticeably fewer jobs than average in the Manufacturing and Wholesale, Transportation, Communications, and Utilities sectors. Based on recent events in the employment sector, these numbers may be lower today. Revised 2002 IV-5 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development e era ayan n2 ounty Employment Category Federal Way Employees Countywide Employees (Percenta2e) (Percenta2e) Construction and Resources 1,029 (3.3%) 69,949 (6.1%) Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate 13,947 (44.5%) 440,364 (38.3%) Manufacturing 3,103 (9.9%) 147,933 (12.9%) Retail 8,158 (26.1%) 189,457 (16.5%) Wholesale, Transportation, 1,606 (5.1%) 158,307 (13.8%) Communications, and Utilities Education 2,042 (6.5%) 64,454 (5.6%) Government 1,431 (4.6%) 80,542 (7%) Total 31,315 1,151,006 Table IV-I 2000 Covered Employment Estimates Fd lW dID C Market Share Industrial and business park space available to rent in Federal Way is a minuscule share of the Southend/Green River/Seattle market area. The South King County industrial area (including industrial parks, business parks, and flex-tech hybrid business/office parks) is currently the strongest real estate market in Western Washington. The industrial areas of south Seattle, Green River Valley, and FifefTacoma constitute one of the strongest markets for industrial, warehouse, wholesale, distributing, etc., businesses in the Western United States. The City of Federal Way is in a strategic position to capitalize on these markets by providing prime office space and room for new office development, as well as quality housing. Retail and Lodging Development Developed and opened in 1975, the SeaTac Mall was the primary force behind the growth of retail in Federal Way during the 1980s. After a period of some decline in recent years, SeaTac Mall is currently a prime candidate for updating, redevelopment and/or repositioning to acquire a stronger market position. In 1995, Pavilons Centre replaced the old Federal Way Shopping Center, and in 2001 the Pavilions Center Phase II came on line, with more development at that location yet to come. In 1998, SeaTac Village was given a complete face-lift incorporating the City's commercial design guidelines. In addition, in the late 1990s, a new Walmart store moved into the City Center Frame, and there have been several renovations and remodeling of existing retail structures, including the conversion of the old Safeway building at the southwest corner of South 320th and Pacific Highway into Rite Aid and the old K-Mart into Safeway. Within the last two years, a 45,000 square foot Best Buy has opened in the City Center Frame and a 52,000 square foot Albertson's remodel has occurred in the Community Business zone along Pacific Highway South. Revised 2002 IV-6 FWCP - Chapter Four, Eoonomic Development Between 1995 and 2000, four hotels/motels have been constructed in and around the City Center. These include Holiday Inn, Courtyard Marriott, Extended Stay, and Comfort Inn. In addition, a Holiday Inn Express and Sunnyside Motel (Travel Lodge) have been built south of the City Center along Pacific Highway. Hawthorne Suites, a 65 unit Country Inn, has been recently constructed along Pacific Highway South in the Community Business zone south of the City Center. Office Development Federal Way's East and West Campus Developments set a standard in the region as two of the best examples of master-planned office campuses in the Pacific Northwest. The quality of development in this area is decidedly different than elsewhere in Federal Way and Southwest King County. Within the last two years, the majority of new office development has been located within Federal Way's East Campus which has seen the following development: Foss Office Building at 108,000 square feet; Capital One Office Building at 143,000 square feet; and Federal Way Office Building and Warehouse at 70,767 square feet. The West Campus area has seen little new office development. Although permits have been issued for additional office development in the West Campus, rising vacancy rates there have stalled additional development for the near term. In the City Center no new additional office development has occurred since the last comprehensive plan update, and office buildings continue to constitute a minority of the City Center's development. Other commercial areas within the City have seen limited amounts of office development, such as the recent Lloyd Enterprises building at 34667 Pacific Highway South. Business Park (Light Industrial) Development There has been no substantive Business Park development since the City's incorporation. This lack of recent Business Park development suggests the influence of market forces outside of the City limits, where cheaper land and established industrial parks act as a draw for prospective business park development. Residential Development One of Federal Way's strengths is the range and quality of its housing stock. The quality, quantity, and range of options for housing are major factors in business siting decisions. According to the 1990 US Census data, the median value of owner-occupied homes in Federal Way was $118,800. In contrast, the average sales price of Federal Way owner- Revised 2002 IV-7 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development occupied homes in 200 I, as reported by the King County Office of Regional Policy and Planning, was $194,092, with single-family homes averaging $213,060 and condominiums averaging $112,135. These figures contrast with other King County cities, as outlined in Table IV-2. 2001 A S I P" Table IV-2 fO 0 " dH "Ki c vera2e a es rIces 0 wner- ccuple omes m n2 ounty Place All Homes Single-Family Condos Federal Way $194,092 $213,060 $112,135 Auburn $197,965 $216,549 $124,089 Renton $215,341 $248,271 $149,608 Kent $198,844 $222,580 $142,577 Des Moines $206,379 $207,302 $202,142 Seattle $318,671 $342,922 $240,619 King County $295,158 $321,700 $198,822 As one can see ftom the above data, homes in Federal Way are generally more affordable than in the immediately surrounding communities and are far more affordable than homes in Seattle and the Eastside communities. While single-family houses remain Federal Way's dominant housing type, the majority of housing starts since the late 1980s were multiple-family. Multiple-family units as a percentage of all housing units increased from less than 10 percent in 1970 to nearly 40 percent in 1990. During the late 1980s, there were twice as many multiple-family housing units constructed in Federal Way than single-family housing units. From 1990 to 1992, permitting of multiple-family construction stopped, and single-family construction slowed to about one-third of late 1980 levels. It is interesting to note than in 1990 median monthly rental rate for Federal Way was $476, while the median monthly rental rate for King County communities varied between $398 and $458. That is, Federal Way's multifamily housing stock was on the higher end of cost within the region. Since then, Seattle and some Eastside locations have become particularly expensive, and Federal Way's multifamily housing stock is substantially more affordable than those locations, while averaging competitively with nearby communities, as seen in Table IV-3 (page 9). Since 1996, the vast majority of multi-family housing development has taken place in the senior/assisted living market. During that time approximately 792 senior or assisted housing units have been added in the City, in addition to 240 skilled-care beds. This is compared with approximately 135 non-senior multifamily housing units. The lack of multi-family construction beyond this sub-market speaks to the recent market forces that appear to have discouraged investment in market rate multi-family development that commands lower rents than the King County average, as seen above. In order for the City to successfully encourage multi-family housing at a rate commensurate with the long range housing targets established under the GMA, City policy must address the market factors unique to this type of development activity. Revised 2002 IV-8 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development A Table IV-3 M If F 1 R t S 2002 vera2e U 1- amllY en s, I' rIn~ Place Two Bedroom! All Units One Bath Federal Way $710 $749 Auburn $684 $716 Renton $811 $869 Kent $712 $747 Des Moines $701 $686 North Seattle $852 $787 Queen Anne $1,104 $923 Bellevue-West $1,129 $1,200 King County $839 $869 Institutional, Educational, Cultural, and Recreational Development Federal Way enjoys a variety of affordable, high-quality health care. The City boasts three outstanding health care facilities, St. Francis Hospital, Virginia Mason Clinic, and Group Health. These facilities continue to grow and expand in the services they offer the region. In the last two years, Virginia Mason has developed a 30,000 square foot building addition, and St. Francis Hospital is currently constructing a 62,000 square foot addition. Built in 1998, the Knutzen Family provides a venue for professional theatre and the symphony. The Federal Way Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services Department offers a summer concert series at Steel Lake Park, which is also home to the annual Family Fest celebration. Each year, Federal Way's July 4th Red, White, and Blues festival is held at Celebration Park, where the nationally acclaimed tournament soccer and baseball facilities draw additional tourist activities. Federal Way offers a number of collegiate and vocational opportunities. Highline Community College operates a local branch campus in Federal Way. The Eton Vocation College, located in the heart of Federal Way, is a vocational college focused on job training for today's competitive market. In 2001, the DeVry Institute of Technology opened their first Northwest Campus in Federal Way. This 100,000 square foot facility provides technology training customized to increase employee workplace skills. Summary In summary, Federal Way's role in both the Central Puget Sound area and Southwest King County has been defined by its inventory of prime office space in campus-like settings, wide variety of retail and services, and large stock of quality housing. These basic sectors are enhanced by Federal Way's regional role as a center for amateur Revised 2002 IV-9 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development athletics. Much of the highway oriented commercial space that was developed in the 1970s and 80s in response to rapid population growth has been starting to undergo redevelopment, and this trend will continue. The West Campus and East Campus areas serve as models for the quality of modern commercial, office, and business park space Federal Way will need in order to attract its share of future regional growth. Urban design and infrastructure in other areas of Federal Way must be brought up to these standards. In addition, the existence oflarge parcels ofland ownership in the 344th/356th area and 31ih/324th area of the core corridor will give Federal Way a development advantage. Federal Way will continue to foster the development of institutional and cultural amenities designed to enhance the City's regional image as a desirable community offering a high quality environment for living and working. Federal Way's Competitive Position in Southwest King County Subregion While many of the development patterns are set in the Southwest King County subregion, Federal Way and five other cities have seen, or will see, significant change. These additional five cities are Auburn, Kent, Renton, SeaTac, and Tukwila. Table IV-4 (page 11) encapsulates each of these cities' current market niches, as well as their opportunities and challenges, in order to help understand how Federal Way relates to its neighbors. As can be seen in the table, much of the area surrounding Federal Way is dedicated to industrial, light manufacturing, low-scale office parks, wholesale/warehouse, distribution, etc., especially in Auburn and Kent. Much of this is not in direct competition with Federal Way. Tukwila is the major retail center for South King County and provides the region's stiffest competition for regional retailers and retail establishments, such as department and furniture stores, specialty apparel, etc. While the trade area for Tukwila's retail sector is large, Federal Way lies at the most distant point in South King County from the Tukwila/Southcenter retail center, and its trade area overlaps or competes the least with Tukwila. The City of SeaTac provides little competition in the office, industrial, and retail sectors, but has successfully captured the airport-related lodging industry, with several higher-quality establishments, including conference facilities. Renton has historically had a strong economic base tied to the Boeing Company, with both healthy manufacturing and office sectors; however, both of these sectors have seen a substantial weakening with the Boeing Company headquarters relocation, work force lay- offs, and space consolidation. Auburn and Kent have also experienced a substantial increase in vacant light-industrial building space due to Boeing Company reductions. Notwithstanding relative levels of competition from other communities in specific commercial sectors, Federal Way does experience a "competitive" relationship with several nearby municipal governments that must be taken into account. The City of Renton is a recognized leader in the county with respect to economic development, with a particular focus on downtown redevelopment and economic diversification. That city has invested public funds in land assembly projects that have attracted substantial residential, mixed-use, and auto dealership developments. Following Renton's lead are the communities of Kent and Tukwila, which have also targeted key redevelopment opportunities, acquiring/assembling land and attracting desired mixed-use development. Revised 2002 IV-10 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Similarly, Renton and Kent provide tax incentives for certain residential development and provide other financial incentives to desired redevelopment projects. In addition, Tukwila, Renton, and Kent have made substantial personnel and facilities investments in improving customer service and turn-around times associated with development permits. In addition to these five cities in Southwest King County, Tacoma is an important competitor to Federal Way. Tacoma is an older city that has made many efforts to improve its downtown and image for more than a quarter century. Tacoma city government has an aggressive economic development mission and is recognized regionally and nationally as a leader in the field. It has continually devoted its own funds, as well as state and federal grants, to stimulate economic development. Tacoma has a strategic location on the highway system and a strong port with much unrealized potential. In addition, both the city and suburbs have vacant and redevelopable land, as well as relatively cheap accessible land for residential development. Table IV-4 Summary of Economic Conditions in Southwest King County Cities Auburn Federal Way Kent Renton SeaTac Tukwila Current -Industrial areas -Regional mall -Industrial land -Business parks -Airport related -Regional retail Niche -Vacant land -West Campus -Boeing -Mid-rise office -Redevelopable land -Boeing -Regional mall -East Campus -Business parks -Mid-rise office -Redevelopable light -Weyerhaeuser Hdq -Vacant land -Mid- and high-rise industrial -Vacant land & lodging and -Mid-rise office redevelopable land conference centers -Mid-rise and high- rise lodging and conference centers Opportunities -Commuter rail -Weyerhaeuser -Boeing facilities -Boeing & -Adjacent to SeaTac -Strong retail identify -Established office, -West Campus -Commuter rail PACCAR~s mfg. & Airport & concentration business parks, & -East Campus -Established office, office complex -Major HCT -Redevelopment industrial areas -Large concentration business parks & -Mid-rise buildings Stations planned potential -Cross-valley hwy of retail industrial areas -Potential -One large strategic -Location at cross- connector planned -Land assembled for -Cross-valley hwy redevelopment parcel assembled roads 1-405/1-5 redevelopment connector planned areas -Future hwy - cross- -Boeing office/mfg -Central location -Strengthening -Strengthening roads (1-5 & complexes between downtown downtown SR509) from -Proximity to SeaTac Tacoma & Seattle -New Pennit Center -Strong economic Seattle will open Airport & to Port of -1-5/SR 18 and investment in development focus acres for office and Seattle crossroads development -City partnership business parks -Commuter rail -HCT stations revIew resources with private sector unanticipated -City partnership in redevelopment -Pern1Ît process rec- with private sector ognized for speed in redevelopment ofturnaround -City partnership with private sector in redevelopment Challenges -Distance from 1-5 & -Dispersed -Industrial image -Limited retail -Adjacent to SeaTac -Limited vacant land major economic development -No prospect for attractions Airport for business & concentrations pattern HCT -Limited land for -Massive office parks -Low-scale -Not on commuter -Off-center location business & office redevelopment -Freeway access not development rail on SR 167 parks required easy or obvious -OfT-center location -Weak downtown -Small land holdings -Not anticipated to -Land assembly -Limited vacant land -Wetlands inCBD be on HCT line required -No obvious center or -Reduction in Boeing -Wetlands -Off-center cross- -Not on commuter focal point within presence; vacant -Reduction in Boeing roads (1-405 & SR rail Tukwila buildings presence; vacant 167) -Limited quality -Limited quality buildings -Reduction in Boeing -residential supply -residential supply presence; vacant -No obvious center buildings or focal point Revised 2002 IV-11 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development In summary, any program of economic development for Federal Way must monitor conditions and trends in Tacoma and Southwest King County, and act decisively and aggressively to increase the City's strategic position. Summary of Achievements Although the City of Federal Way's economic development efforts are relatively new, several important accomplishments in formulating the City's economic development strategy have already been accomplished. # The City of Federal Way/Federal Way Chamber Economic Development Committee meets monthly to discuss and develop economic development strategies and maintain a close and cooperative working relationship. # The City has developed Celebration Park which, in addition to the recreational amenities for City residents, includes tournament-quality soccer and softball facilities that attract players and tournaments from throughout the Pacific Northwest, thereby contributing substantial economic activity to Federal Way through expenditures for lodging, shopping, dining, and other services. # In 2001 the City officially incorporated an Economic Development Division within the Community Development Services Department and hired a Director. # With increasing lodging tax revenues, the City of Federal Way Lodging Tax Advisory Committee has expanded its work plan to include more direct efforts to stimulate tourism and visitorship to the City. # The City has co-founded and co-manages the South King County Technology Alliance, a working committee of various municipal entities and businesses within South King County dedicated to fostering further development of the technology sector within South King County. # The City has embarked on a concerted effort, led by senior management, to improve permit processes and reduce regulatory hurdles to development. In 200 I, the City worked collaboratively with the Federal Way Chamber and other stakeholders to raise the thresholds that trigger right-of-way improvements associated with redevelopment, remodeling, and reuse of existing buildings. In 2002, the City has embarked upon a permit-process improvement effort that includes a public stakeholder advisory committee and study of best practices from around the region, and is intended to place Federal Way at the forefront of regional municipalities in regulating land use and construction effectively and efficiently. Revised 2002 IV-12 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development 4.2 THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT VISION FOR FEDERAL WAY The vision for economic development in Federal Way can be encapsulated into four basic areas: I) to retain existing businesses and attract new businesses in order to build a diverse economic base; 2) to increase the number of jobs within the City relative to the population of City residents within the labor force; 3) to foster redevelopment of the City Center from a low-scale, suburbanized commercial area to a full-service, high-density, mixed-use, and more pedestrian-fuendly urban core and community focal point; and 4) to build upon and expand the City's recreational and cultural assets to increase visitors to the City and encourage greater visitor spending within the local economy. The strategy encourages or accelerates the trends and transformations that are already occurring in this community. The major objectives of the strategy include the following: # Provide a better balance between housing and jobs by increasing the number of jobs within the City relative to the number of households. # Diversify the economic base by encouraging higher paying white collar and technical jobs while preserving and enhancing the strong retail base. # Generate more demand for hotel room-nights through growth in office and business part space. # Foster horizontal mixed-use employment sector growth in the South 34Sth Street area in the near term (2000-2005). # Foster continued Corporate and Office Park employment sector growth in East and West Campus in the mid-term (2000-2010). It should be noted that East Campus has recently been experiencing a high rate of growth and may reach build out during this time period. # Emphasize private redevelopment and land assembly through the I-5/SR-99 corridor, especially in the City Center, as well as the 34Sth and 336th areas. # Redevelop and improve the quality of the mixed use development along Pacific Highway South from South 272nd Street to South 356th Street (2000-2010). # Foster mid-rise, mixed-use employment sector growth in the City Center (2000- 2020). # Encourage quality development throughout the City to attract desirable economic development in Federal Way. # Maintain and improve the quality and character of the existing residential neighborhoods. Revised 2002 IV-13 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development # Promote high quality, higher density residential neighborhoods in the City Center and Highway 99 corridor in close proximity to jobs and good public transportation. # Continue to work with the lodging providers to promote year-round vistorship to the City to encourage visitor spending as an important component of a growing local economy. # Work with other agencies to provide services for education and training, as well as social services and other remedial programs for the underemployed and the unemployed. Future Regional Role for Federal Way # Encourage greater diversity in the economic base by aggressive pursuit of a broader range ofthe components of the regional economic activity, as well as greater participation in international/Pacific Rim economic activity. # Increase its share of local resident-serving retail and services, and increase its share of regional, national, and international oriented business firms. # Increase its capture of region-serving office development. # Emphasize private redevelopment and land assembly through the I-5/SR-99 corridor, especially in the City Center, as well as the 348th and 336th areas. # Strengthen the City Center as the City's focal point for commercial and community activities. Transform the City Center into a regional commercial destination, as well as a major transit hub. # Generate more demand for hotel room-nights through growth in business park and office space, as well as recreational and cultural amenities that draw visitors from throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond. # Take advantage of its location with respect to the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, as well as the SeaTac International Airport. # Public and private sectors in the Federal Way area act cooperatively and . aggressively to attract firms from throughout the region, the nation, and other countries. # Actively pursue relationships with areas in other parts of the Pacific Rim region for trade, commerce, and cultural advantage. # Actively pursue cooperation and collaboration with other nearby municipalities, organizations, and firms to market Federal Way and South King County for technology-related enterprises. Revised 2002 IV-14 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Retail Areas # SeaTac Mall and other regional retailers within the City redevelop/reposition to meet changing consumer demand and become more competitive with other regional retailers. # High-volume retail in Federal Way increases faster than population. # Growth in resident-serving retail occurs in the City Center, existing commercial nodes, new nodes around the 1-5/South 320th and 1-5/SR 18 interchanges, and in redevelopment areas along SR-99. # Neighborhood scale retail development keeps pace with population growth and to an increasing extent, is accommodated within mixed-use buildings in more concentrated neighborhood villages. # Pedestrian-oriented retail development emerges gradually in the redeveloped City Center. # Small amounts of retail use occur on the ground floor of offices, residential buildings, and parking structures. # Neighborhood scale retail development in concentrated neighborhood villages emerges in response to growth in multiple-family concentrations in the I-5/SR-99 corridor and new single-family development on the east side ofI-5. # Old, outdated strip centers along the SR-99 corridor redevelop as a mix of retail, office, and dense residential uses. # The large truck-stop facility at the intersection of Enchanted Parkway and South 348th Street is redeveloped into a retail or mixed-use commercial center. Office Development # Offices of regional, national, and/or international firms locate in West Campus, East Campus, and the City Center. # Garden, high-rise, and mid-rise office space, and modem light-industrial buildings increase rapidly in areas with land assembled for business parks and in redeveloped retail areas. # Office development is integrated with retail, residential, and business parks. # Federal Way attracts more corporate regional headquarters and regional offices. Revised 2002 IV-15 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development # Smaller, older, outdated office structures are replaced with newer uses. # Integrated, campus-like high amenity areas are encouraged for corporate headquarters and modem research/development of high technology uses east ofl-5. # Development of technical and research space increases in East and West Campus. # Federal Way attracts more high-tech firms and firms whose business is related to high-tech industries. Business Park (Light Industrial) Development # Business parks contain a mix of uses in and among buildings as dictated by the market for high quality spaçe. # The City should explore potential changes to the Business Park zoning designation to meet changing market conditions and make the development of Business Park-zoned land more economically viable. Residential Areas # High quality residential areas are important for attracting and retaining businesses. # A range of housing types, densities, and prices allow the broad spectrum of employees to live near their work and recreation. # The City of Federal Way encourages integration of high density housing with retail and other uses, especially along SR-99 and in the City Center. Institutional, Educational, Cultural, and Recreational Development # The City of Federal Way will continue to work closely with existing institutional entities (such as St. Francis Hospital, Federal Way School District, King County Library, etc.) as important components of a full-service local economy. # Federal Way's reputation as an important center for amateur sports competition and participation grows stronger, leading to potentially new facilities and venues, as well as increased visitorship and visitor spending in the local economy. # Federal Way's cultural assets increase in both scope and number, gaining greater patronage and attracting visitors from beyond the City limits. New cultural establishments are developed in Federal Way, such as museums, exhibitions, and Revised 2002 IV-16 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development performance venues. Likewise, new cultural events become established in Federal Way, such as music festivals, art shows/festivals, etc. # # Stimulate quality development of region-serving institutional and technical facilities. Existing recreational amusement facilities continue to develop as regional tourist attractions. # The City of Federal Way creates working partnerships with institutions of higher education in order to encourage and support their expansion and further integration within the Federal Way economy, as well as to identify and exploit increasing opportunities for economic development. 4.3 FORECAST OF ECONOMIC GROWTH IN FEDERAL WAY The growth forecasts used in this chapter are derived from the 2000 Market Analysis and 2002 City Center Market Analysis, prepared by ECONorthwest, while other chapters are based on the PSRC regional forecasting model. In summary, probably the strongest sector in the near-term (five years) will be the retail/ services sector. About 1.5 mì1lion additional square feet of retail tenant space may be expected during the next 20 years, with commercial areas throughout the City and the City Center alike sharing in the development. One particular sector that appears under- represented is the quality restaurant sector, in which the City will likely see additional development. Demand for new office development will likely be somewhat low in the near term, as office vacancies have risen substantially and rents have correspondingly fallen, region- wide. In addition, several office buildings, particularly in the West Campus area, exhibit substantial vacancies that can readily absorb near-term demand in the City. Nevertheless, the long-term picture looks good, with continued demand for and interest in office space in Federal Way, particularly in the East and West Campus areas. City Center office development will likely lag behind for most of the planning horizon. However, generous zoning, panoramic views, and proximity to the freeways and transit may start to make the City Center a more attractive location for mid- to high-rise office development in the 10 to 20-year time frame. With regard to housing, only a small amount ofland remains in the single-family zoning districts to accommodate new single-family dwellings. As a consequence, the vast majority of new residential development will have to take the form of townhouses, walk- up apartments, mid-rise apartments, and mixed-use buildings and/or high-rise residential buildings. As with the condition for single-family development, the majority ofthe multi- family-zoned land is also already developed, leaving primarily the commercial zones and City Center as the potential location of a great deal of the future residential development. Nevertheless, higher land values and construction costs, and lower relative rental rates compared with other communities in the region, act as barriers to residential development Revised 2002 IV-17 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development within the City Center in the near term, unless public-sector actions create financial incentives, reduce development costs, or otherwise create conditions attractive to housing developers. Therefore, in the short term, most multi-family housing developments will continue to be seen in the remaining multifamily-zoned areas and in the neighborhood commercial areas or other commercial areas along Pacific Highway South. While multi- family housing is generally not permitted in the Business Park zones, this zone will continue to accommodate senior housing developments, as has been seen in recent years. In the longer term, assuming no public-sector incentives, as rental rates rise and demand increases, housing developers will likely respond to the opportunities for development within the City Center, and begin to add multi-family housing there, as well. Substantial new lodging development in Federal Way is not anticipated in the near term, unless actions are taken to increase demand substantially. With business travel somewhat cut back due to increasingly burdensome airline-travel procedures since September 11, 200 I, the demand for hotel rooms has dropped. Business-related travel may be slow to return to earlier levels. Sports-related lodging demand during the late Spring, Summer, and early Fall has been solid over the past few years and is expected to increase, although development of new lodging facilities will likely not follow increased demand during only a few months of the year. If sports- or event-related facilities are developed within the City that could accommodate off-season events, it is likely that more near-term demand for lodging would rise and could occasion development of new facilities within the five-year timeframe. Like all forecasts, these should be periodically monitored relative to the real estate market and economic conditions in South King County, the Central Puget Sound region, and Federal Way. In addition, the economic development policies and underlying assumptions related to local and regional decisions concerning infrastructure, transportation systems, and land use regulation should be carefully monitored. 4.4 IMPLEMENTATION Attributes of Successful Economic Development Programs Successful economic development programs typically have the following attributes. First, they receive material support and leadership from the mayor, City Council, and senior City staff. Second, the municipal leadership is willing to work creatively and cooperatively with private sector leaders and businesses to accomplish economic development goals. They have the ability and find the resources to target infrastructure projects and programs to encourage development or redevelopment of specific areas. To do this, they work aggressively to secure state and federal funds for local public and private assistance. Likewise, City staff is empathetic toward economic development goals and knowledgeable about working within City legal constraints, budget constraints, and community tolerances to assist businesses and the real estate development process. The staff also has the ability to react and make decisions quickly and consistently to provide Revised 2002 IV-18 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development assistance for private sector dealings with the public planning and regulatory processes. The staff s ability to link several programs, team up with other departments, and leverage limited funds allows them to take meaningful and effective action. In addition, the City should be creative and open to exploring and adopting innovative regulatory and incentive programs to attract and retain businesses and development projects, such as SEP A planned actions and developer agreements. Key among such programs should be any feasible efforts aimed at predictable and streamlined permitting processes. The City's Role in the Economic Life of a Community In the State of Washington, the direct actions that cities can take to encourage economic development have historically been more limited than in other states. Nevertheless, in the past few years several new and important tools have been made available to local communities to help encourage redevelopment, retain/attract jobs, and foster "smart growth." These tools include: # Community redevelopment financing (similar to tax increment financing) # Limited tax abatement for multifamily development # Community empowerment zone designation # Community renewal act (updated and expanded version of former urban renewal) # Tax deferrals and exemptions for high technology businesses and investment, as well as manufacturing investment # Industrial revenue bonds Notwithstanding these state programs, there are still substantial constraints on the scope of actions a city government can do with respect to economic development activities. However, one of the most significant direct actions a city can take is to provide the necessary infrastructure. This includes: 1) developing long term facilities expansion plans; 2) designing the specific systems and projects; 3) raising or borrowing local funds to finance the projects or act as a conduit for state, federal, and intergovernmental funds; and, 4) forming public-private partnerships to jointly construct projects. Second, a city can deliver high quality and cost effective urban services. These necessary services include police and fire protection; parks, recreation, and cultural services; social services and job training; and a well-run land use planning and regulatory process. In addition, a city can actively participate in public/private groups designed to help businesses and the development community as they work their way through the state and federal regulatory processes. Third, a city can directly impact economic development by doing market research or by being a landowner and developer. For example, a city could develop, maintain, and disseminate data and analysis on local development conditions and trends, as well as Revised 2002 IV-19 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development monitor important trends and assumptions upon which plans, programs, and strategies are based. In addition, a city can buy land, aggregate parcels, and make necessary improvement so that it is ready for new development or redevelopment. For some projects, a city can issue industrial revenue bonds or other tax-free municipal bonds. This also allows a city to joint venture with a private sector partners for appropriate development. In terms of indirect roles, a city can act as a facilitator to convene public and private entities to work on issues of local importance and reach consensus. Preparation of a comprehensive plan is an example of this important indirect action. A city can act as a representative oflocal resident's and business's interests in resolving regional and countywide problems such as traffic congestion, housing, and human service issues. A city can also mobilize local community support for important projects and problem solving; and work to improve the overall image of the community and in doing so, make the community more attractive for economic development. Lastly, a city's public investment in municipal facilities, such as city administrative offices, judicial/court facilities, community centers, and cultural and recreational venues can be a factor in inducing further economic development. By targeting a subarea for an infusion of redevelopment investment and daytime population, nearby businesses not only may see a greater captive market, but may also be encouraged to remodel, renovate, and/or improve their establishments. Cultural and recreational facilities can have a wide range of economic impact, from simply attracting residents to a particular part of the city (e.g., city center) more frequently where they may patronize other businesses, to attracting visitors from around the region and country who will bring new revenue to the local economy through lodging, restaurant, and goods/services expenditures. General Approaches to an Economic Development Strategy There are basically four local economic development strategies that impact the level of private business growth in a community. # First, studies of employment growth experience in local communities in the United States show that the large majority of new jobs are generated by expansion and retention of businesses that are already located in the community. A city's role in this strategy is to help businesses resolve problems so that they can expand locally rather than move to another community. Problem resolution includes helping a business find a larger more suitable site, work through a land use or zoning regulation problem, or access necessary infrastructure. This strategy typically has low to moderate cost implications and a high probability of success. # Second, the relocation of firms from other parts of the country or new plant locations are rare and do not account for a significant share oflocal employment growth relative to overall employment growth in the United States. However, when new firms do relocate to the community, the boost in the local economy can be great and the "press" can attract the attention of other firms. Local governments can attract new business to their community through aggressive marketing strategies (websites, brochures, etc.), close collaboration with regional Revised 2002 IV-20 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development economic development councils and chambers of commerce, and through financial incentives. This strategy has high risk for the number of successes and has a high cost. # Third, new businesses that are the result of new business start-ups, spin-offs from existing local firms, and new business ideas and technologies are another effective way that communities increase employment and businesses within a local area. Local government encourages new business formation usually through indirect methods. These strategies can have moderate-to-high costs depending on the specific actions and low-to-moderate degree of success. # Fourth, tourism and visitorship can be very important components of a local economy. A city with recreational or cultural assets that draw visitors can build upon these assets to increase the numbers of visitors, the length of their stays, and the amount of money they spend in the local economy. Local government can work to market the community and its assets beyond the immediate region to bring in new economic activity and can invest in recreational or cultural infrastructure to attract more events and/or visitors. Human Resource Programs In addition to the economic development strategies discussed in the previous section, human resource development programs are another general way whereby cities can support economic development. These programs are often not included as parts of an economic development program because they focus on assisting people-the human resource for businesses. However, improving and remediating human resources is an important long run approach. The previous four general approaches to economic development strategies try to raise revenues, reduce costs, or reduce risks for business location, facility investment decisions, and operating decisions of businesses. Human resource programs make a community attractive to new and existing businesses by improving the local labor force. Components of a human resources program may include: I) providing temporary support for underemployed workers, unemployed workers, and their families; 2) providing job training and retraining to improve an individual's ability to enter or remain in the work force; 3) creating referral and other programs that allow labor resources to become more mobile and to respond to information about job openings; and, 4) by providing social service programs that meet the needs of community residents who are temporarily not able to participate in the economy. In many instances a City's human resources program addresses some, if not all, ofthese human resource development objectives. Economic Development Strategy For Federal Way As with many cities, Federal Way will have limited funds with which to pursue its economic development goals. The City will have to use its resources in a focused and prioritized manner to have a positive impact on the local economic base. Table IV-5 Revised 2002 IV-21 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development (page 22) summarizes how Federal Way will implement an appropriate economic development strategy. Table IV-5 Economic Development Areas and Actions Sub Area of Who Initiates What Land Uses Are How Are They Federal Way Action Encouraged Encouraged Reasons Timing PRIMARY ECONOMIC AREAS City Center Public wi Midlhigh-rise office. Sound Transit Station. To increase capture of Emphasis 5-IO private support. High-density MF In-fill infrastructure. regional growth. (20) years. residential. Public amenities. To provide community Civic/cultural, Market amenities and assets focal point/core. recreational, Potential tax incentives. To obtain more full-range Pedestrian-oriented SEPA Planned Action~ of goodsl services in City~ retail. 344thto Public wi Mix oflow-rise office Regulations that encourage Large parcels allow this Emphasis 0-5 356th/SR99 private support. & light industry. high-quality design. subarea to respond to the (10) years. "Big box" retail. Aggressive infrastructure market for business & Investment. industrial park uses in Large land assembly. Southwest King County. West Campus Current Buildout & maintain Facilitate buildout through One of the City's prime Ongoing in landowners. quality. predictable, efficient commercial amenities as response to perrmttmg process. one of the highest quality market. Assist maintenance of master planned infrastructure and public developments in the areas. Pacific Northwest. East Campus Weyerhaeuser High-quality corporate Predictable, efficient One of City's prime In response to Corp. & office parks. permitting process. commercial amenities. market & Assist maintenance of Large landownership with corporate infrastructure and public vision, resources, & track actions. areas. record can attract major Investors. 336th linkage: Public wi High density MF. Land use & capital Provide housing & su- As appropriate four primary private support. Low rise office. improvements for gradual pport services for for market. economic dvpt Supportive retail. redevelopment/in-fill. economIc areas. areas. Public amenities. Transportation infrastructure. Old Hwy 99 Public wi High capacity & Land use & capital Provide a range ofho- As appropriate outside of main private support. business related. improvements for gradual using & support services for market. economic areas. High density MF redevelopment & in-fill. & retail for economic & residential. Aesthetic improvements residential areas. Low rise office. through sign code and urban Auto-oriented retail. design guidelines. Neighborhood commercial. High densitv MF Predictable, efficient Areas around 1- residential. permitting process. Provide a range ofho- 5/South 320th Current Low rise office. Aesthetic i1T1Provements using & support services As appropriate and I-5/SR 18 landowners. Auto-oriented retail. through sign code and urban & retail for economic & for market. interchanges. Neighborhood design guidelines. residential areas. commercial. Revised 2002 IV-22 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Economic Development Goals The City of Federal Way will not wait for market forces to create the future, but will act to shape and accelerate the evolving market trends in the direction of its vision. The City will pursue the following goals to implement economic development. Goals EDGI EDG2 EDG3 EDG4 EDG5 The City will emphasize redevelopment that transforms the City from a suburban bedroom community to a full-service community with an urban core. The City will encourage concentration of non-residential development into four pnmary areas: P High-density mixed-use development in the City Center (3lih and 3201\ SR-99 to 1-5) P Mixed-use development in the area around 348th and SR-99 and around the 1-5/South 320th and 1-5/SR 18 interchanges P High-quality office park development, including corporate headquarters, continued in and around West Campus P High-quality office development, including corporate headquarters in a park-like campus setting east of 1-5 The City will help facilitate redevelopment of existing neighborhood commercial centers in the SR-99 corridor and the 336th area between West and East Campus. The City will channel further residential growth into existing multi-family and commercial-zoned areas, with a particular goal of encouraging residential development in the City Center. The City will encourage and support the development of recreational and cultural facilities and/or events that will bring additional visitors to Federal Way, and/or increase visitor spending. EDG6 The City will encourage and support existing businesses to remain and/or expand their facilities within Federal Way. Economic Development Policies EDPI EDP2 Redevelopment of the City Center will receive special attention in the FWCP. The City will explore the feasibility and utility of a process to master plan the City Center, jointly funded by public and private entities, to encourage appropriate redevelopment. Revised 2002 IV-23 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development EDP3 EDP4 EDP5 EDP6 EDP7 EDP8 EDP9 The City will continue to seek high-quality urban design and infrastructure standards for these areas. The City will prepare a SEP A Planned Action for the City Center so that compliant development proposals may receive permit approvals with a minimum of environmental review. The City will complete designs for public infrastructure to be jointly funded by the City and private landowners. The City will work actively to formulate ways for joint public/private funding of infrastructure. The City will develop zoning, permitting, and potential financial incentives that encourage prioritized development consistent with comprehensive and subarea plans and orderly, phased growth. In order to encourage efficient and desired development and redevelopment of existing land designated and zoned for various types of commercial uses, when considering proposals for comprehensive plan amendments and rezones to commercial designations and from one commercial designation to another, the City will consider development trends in commercially zoned areas, market demand for various types of commercial land, and amount of vacant commercial land. The City will utilize innovative planning techniques such as Planned Unit Developments, and developer agreements to aid in efficient and predicable permitting for large developments. EDPIO The City will explore innovative financing techniques such as Local Improvement Districts, Industrial Revenue Bonds, and other innovative financing tools to encourage desired redevelopment. EDPll The City will work with the private sector to actively encourage the retention and expansion of existing businesses, as well as bring in new development, businesses, and jobs to the community. EDP12 The City will promote the community by working with the Federal Way Chamber and the private sector to develop marketing tools that attract new businesses, visitors, and investments. EDP13 The City will develop and manage an economic development web page that promotes business and development within the community, provides an interactive database of information of value to businesses and developers, and involves the participation of the Federal Way Chamber and other stakeholder groups. Revised 2002 IV-24 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development EDP14 The City will fund its portion of the public/private groups to allow them to do an effective job in marketing the community. EDP15 The City will continue to utilize design guidelines to enhance the urban environment to retain and attract businesses and residents. EDP16 The City will adopt streamlined permitting processes consistent with state and federal regulations to reduce the upfront costs oflocating businesses in the City. EDP17 The City will continue to pursue aggressive public safety programs designed to protect residents, businesses, and their investments. EDP18 The City will encourage strong public and private leadership to solicit community support for internal and external funding assistance. EDP19 The City will periodically monitor local and regional trends to be able to adjust plans, policies, and programs. EDP20 The City will actively work with representative groups of business and property owners, including the Federal Way Chamber and other local business associations, to enhance citywide and subarea improvements and planning. EDP21 The City, in conjunction with the local business community, will actively pursue ties to Pacific Rim nations and businesses to stimulate related business activity. EDP22 The City recognizes the importance of cultural and recreational activity to its economy and through the Arts Commission and Parks Department will pursue joint ventures with private groups and individuals in developing cultural and recreational opportunities. EDP23 The City will encourage the expansion of existing and development of new multi-purpose facilities to host cultural and recreational activities in order to increase the number of visitors to Federal Way and resultant visitor spending. EDP24 The City will continue to market the community for, and encourage development of, businesses in the high-tech sector. This effort will include exploration of regulatory and/or financial incentives to attract high-tech businesses and collaboration with regional communities, businesses, and local institutions of higher education to promote Federal Way and South King County. EDP25 The City of Federal Way will strive to create working partnerships with institutions of higher education in order to encourage and support their expansion and further integration within the Federal Way economy, as well as to identify and exploit increasing opportunities for economic development. EDP26 The City will consider opportunities to partner with local human-service organizations to assist in providing human resources development programs for unemployed or under-employed workers. Revised 2002 IV-25 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development The foregoing policies will assist the City of Federal Way to pursue an accelerated transformation toward the community's vision of its future. Table IV-6 (page 27) describes the four major employment, economic activity areas of the City that will receive the bulk of future commercial and industrial development. The table summarizes the characteristics, location, and planning process required as well as the major transformation required. The major public and private actions required for each area are listed. The Land Use and City Center chapters of the FWCP describe these four areas in more detail. Table IV-6 describes the current ownership pattern and major activities where the City will act affirmatively to transform these areas so that an increased share of regional growth will be attracted to the City. In the areas of multiple ownership, control and implementation of the community's vision will require more explicit effort and resources . from the City government. Both West and East Campus have, or will develop, their own high standards for quality of the new development. The type of development expected to occur in each of the four major economic sectors important to Federal Way's vision is related in Table IV-7 (page 28). Also related in the table are who the main competitors will be for each of these four areas. The land use policies and regulations for each area should accommodate and encourage these activities. These policies and regulations are discussed in the Land Use, City Center, and Transportation chapters of the FWCP. U Revised 2002 IV-26 Vertical Mixed City Center Master-Planned Mixed Master Planned Corporate Horizontal Mixed-Use Campus Campus Business Parks Area 31zth1320th West Campus East oft-S 344th13S6th Ownership Diverse Diverse Single Diverse Planninl!: Joint PubliclPrivate Private emphasis Private Emphasis Joint Public/Private Major Transformation Activity Increase office and residential Infill and continue trend Vacant to high quality corporate Scattered industrial retai I sectors in mixed-use buildings since 1974. headquarters & high tech. to qualitv mixed used. Maior Public Actions Comprehensive Plans C C C C Subarea Plans C Private Private C Design Standards C C C C Environmental Impact Analvsis C C C C Infrastructure Planning C C C C Infrastructure Design C Private Private C Financing Joint Private Private Joint Examples Seattle CBD West Campus Redmond Willows Road High Tech Corridor Burnaby BC High Tech Corridor Harbor Pointe Renton Bellevue Tukwila Vancouver, W A Kent Walnut Creek, CA Auburn Scottsdale, AZ Lynwood FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development C~City initiates and leads action D Table IV-6 t Zones: D I Revised 2002 IV-27 FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development Market Segment Characteristics Current Competitive Vertical Mixed Master-Planned Master-Planned Horizontal Mixed- Examples City Center Mixed Camnus Cornorate Park Use Business Parks RETAIL High Cube Freeway access Moderate amenities 348th & SRI8 High Volume Cheap land/space X Locates retail or light industrial areas Festival High density population & employment Pike Place Market Regional draw Bellevue Square X Retail & restaurants Westlake Center Mall stores Edmonds LaConner Employment & Resident High auto or pedestrian traffic Southcenter X X X X Supporting Tacoma Mall Auburn Mall Rapidly growing population Southcenter X Mall-like Freeway access Tacoma Mall Hotel Serves employmen't centers SeaTac Tacoma X Only at freeway Provides meeting space Tukwila intersection OFFICE Garden $Heavy landscape $Low pedestrian levels Older Bellevue $Low/moderate inlout traffic Redmond $Small businesslprofessional & business Renton & Tukwila X X services, FIRES $Serves local & regional business along arterials $Auto oriented $Residential areas close Mid-rise $Larger tenants, sub-regional & regional Bellevue Tukwila $Moderate landscape $Moderate in & out Renton Lynnwood $Small/medium business services, medial/dental Queen Anne Factoria X X X Occasionally if part of FIRES Lake Union Tacoma Master Plan $Branch offices $Some transit Elliott Way $Surface parking or on deck Freeway interchanges High RiselHigher $ Pedestrian traffic $High amenities SeattJe $Public transit $ Larger businesses Bellevue $Moderate traffic $Professional services Tacoma $Headquarters, branch offices X X $Regional serving F.l.R.E.S. $Underground or deck parking BUSINESS PARKS $Auto/truck oriented $Warehouselretail High Tech Corridor $Cheap land $Govemment offices Eastside $Employment density Renton $Manufacturing assembly Tukwila X X $Office local/regional Kent $Professional & business service Lynn wood $Distribution & service D I Table IV-7 Zones and L dU Revised 2002 IV-28 ENUM~W ---, CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY AND NORTH PIERCE COUNTY SUB-REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT N State Boundary .:".: County Boundary N State Highways N Federal Way City limits +. -SCALE- 11""" &qUols 21.000 FolII: ,~ Federal Way MAP IV-1 NOTE: Tills map Is InœnUeclltJr ~S8 a:¡ a graphical representation only. The City of Federal Way mabc no warranty IS In hi aa:uracy U.pprl""" "'rua'l'2!"D _bllho_p1loubroo.unl