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AG 90-016 . .... ~. .. .- C! /1 G 9ð ../(, ,- ,. CONTRACT FOR HEALTH SERVICES Federal Way THIS AGREEMENT, made this February 28,1990, between King County (the "County") on behalf of the Seattle-King County Department of Public Health (the "Department") and the City of Federal Way (the "Municipality"). WIT N E SSE T H : WHEREAS, the parties to this contract recognize the responsibility of all cities and towns in Washington state of provide "basic public health services" to their residents or to purchase services under contract pursu- ant to Chapter 70.05 RCW, Chapter 70.08 RCW and Chapter 70.46 RCW; and WHEREAS, WAC 248-90-990 defines the "basic public health services" to be prov i ded to Wash i ngton s tate res i dents as well as "opt i ona 1 pub 1 i c health services" which may be provided; and WHEREAS, the Municipality desires to contract with the Department for public health services and agrees to reimburse the Department for the Municipality.s share of the cost of providing basic public health services, in order to assure an adequate standard for basic public health services throughout the County; and WHEREAS, the Department agrees to provide additional optional public health services throughout the County in order to preserve, promote and improve the public health of all residents of King County and the munici- palities therein; and WHEREAS, this Agreement is authorized and provided for under the terms of Chapter 70.05 RCW, Chapter 70.08 RCW, and Chapter 70.46 RCW; NOW Therefore, in accordance with the statutes above designated and any amendments thereto, and in consideration of payments, covenants and agree- ments hereinafter mentioned, to be made and performed by the parties hereto, the County and the Municipality covenant and agree as follows: 1. Defi n it ions. A. "Basic public health services" shall mean those public health serv- ices identified as basic public health services by the Washington State Board of Health as adopted on September 14, 1983 under WAC 248-990-990, the support for which should be furnished by all cities and towns. The programs currently provided by the Department which the parties agree qualify as basic public health services are set forth in Attachment 1 and are incorporated herein by reference. B. "Optional public health services" shall mean those additional services, not designated as "basic public health services," but which Page 1 ORIGINAL x; . ...-. 8 8 Federal Way Contract: Health January 1990 may be provided by the Department to promote and protect the public health. The programs currently provided by the Department, which qual- ify as optional public health services are set forth in Attachment 2 and incorporated herein by reference. C. "Net actual cost" shall mean the cost of providing the units of basic public health services (personal and environmental) actually used by, provided to or provided in behalf of the Municipality's residents during a given year, reduced by any fee or grant revenue attributable to such units of service. Net actual cost shall be determined by the Department in its Governmental, Unit-Cost Report prepared annually. Optional Public Health Services II. During the term of this Agreement, the Department will make available to the residents of the Municipality such optional public health services as are being provided by the Department and the County will cover the cost of any units of optional public health services actually used by, provided to or provided in behalf of the Municipality's residents. The County retains full and sole discretion to determine the service and funding levels, as well as the specific optional public health services the Department will provide. III. Basic Public Health Services Agreement. A. Services/Compensation. During the term of this Agreement, the Department will make available to the residents of the Municipality basic public health services, which are being provided by the Department. For the contract period in 1990, the Municipality will pay the County the net actual cost of the Municipality's basic public health services used in 1989 by residents whose addresses will be within the Municipal boundaries created by incorporation. The cost per unit will be discounted based upon the actual difference between the cost of pro- viding basic public health services to the suburban cities in 1988 as compared to 1989. Data for 1989 are expected to be available by June, 1990. Until the data are available, the City will be billed based on estimated costs of $401,250 for 10 months of service in 1990. The quarterly bill following the determination of actual costs for services used will be adjusted to reflect the difference between payments to date and the actual amount due to date for 1990. For each subsequent calendar year this Agreement is in effect, the Municipality will pay the County an amount stated as a percentage of the net actual cost of the Municipality's basic public health services pursuant to the following schedule: Page 2 . '. 8 8 Federal Way Contract: Health January 1990 Calendar Year Municipality Obligation The Municipality's obligation will be one hundred percent (100%) of the net actual cost of the Municipality's basic public health services during the most recent 12-month period for which the Department has data. B. Billing. The County will invoice the Municipality quarterly. The Municipality will pay the invoiced amount within thirty (30) days from receipt. 1991 (and subsequent years) By September 1 of each year this Agreement is in effect, the Department will notify the Municipality of the dollar amount of the Municipality's assessment for the following calendar year. This notification will include supporting data from the appropriate governmental, unit-cost report summary. A copy of the notification will be attached to this Agreement as an addendum and unless terminated by either party as set forth below in Section IV, shall constitute a modification to this agreement as to the amounts due hereunder for the appropriate calendar year. C. Advisory Committee. There has been established a Suburban Cities Public Health Services Advisory Committee, composed of eight members representing contracting municipalities. The contracting municipalities shall appoint the members by whatever means they deem appropriate, and shall thereafter advise the County Executive as to the appointments. The Committee shall appoint a chairman and shall stand prepared to advise the director of the department from time to time on positions or concerns of the contracting cities respecting policies, service levels and funding levels for basic public health services provided by the County to the contracting cities; as well as assessing the needs, appropriateness, effectiveness and legal requirements of such services as they affect the contracting municipalities. The Committee shall also stand prepared, at the call of the director of the department, to advise and confer with him and such other officers and staff of the County as it shall please the County Executive to appoint for such purpose. When the Committee meets with the director of the department and his staff, the director shall preside. The department shall provide such staff assistance as is necessary under the circumstances. Page 3 8 8 Federal Way Contract: Health January 1990 IV. Contract Conditions. A. Term. This contract shall take effect on February 28,1990. This contract shall extend through December 31, 1990, and shall automati- cally renew from year to year unless otherwise modified or terminated as provided hereinafter. The contract may be modified in writing, by mutual agreement, so long as notice of the proposed modification is provided at least ninety (90) days prior to the date on which such mod- ification is to become effective. B. Termination. This contract may be terminated by either party upon one (1) year written notice from the party seeking termination. In the event that the Municipality notifies the County that it intends to ter- minate this contract, said notification shall include the specific man- ner in which the City will provide mandated basic public health service providers. Said notification and plan shall also be provided to the Washington State Board of Health, and their receipt of such notifica- tion and plan must be transmitted to the County as an additional condi- tion precedent to the termination of this contract. C. Disputes. In addition to the advisory committee referenced above in Section III-B, the parties shall designate representatives for the purpose of administering this contract and resolving disputes arising therefrom, including disputes involving the municipality's financial obligation hereunder. Each party shall notify the other in writing of its designated representative. Each party may change its designated representative upon notice to the other party. Any dispute which can- not be resolved by negotiation between the parties' designated repre- sentatives shall be referred to the advisory committee described above in Section III-B. If the dispute cannot be resolved following consul- tation with the advisory committee, it shall be referred to the chief executive officer of the Municipality and the County executive for mediation and/or settlement. v. Indemnification. A. The municipality shall defend, indemnify and hold the County, its officers, employees and agents harmless from all costs, claims, judgements or awards of damages, arising out of or in any way resulting from the negligent acts or omissions of the Municipality, its officers, agents or employees. B. The county shall defend, indemnify and hold the municipality, its officers, employees and agents, harmless from all costs, claims, judgements or awards of damages arising out of or in any way resulting from the negligent acts or omissions of the county, its officers, agents or employees. Page 4 8 8 Federal Way Contract: Health January 1990 C. In executing this agreement, the County does not assume liability for or in any way release the municipality form any liability which derives in whole or in part from the existence or validity of municipal ordinances which differ from or are more stringent than standards adopted by the State of Washington or County. In the event that any cause, claim, suit or administrative proceeding is commenced in which the validity of such ordinances, are at issue, the municipality shall have responsibility to defend the same, and if judgement is entered or damages are awarded against the municipality, the County, or both, the municipality shall satisfy the same. VI. Ancillary Matters. A. Nothing in this contract shall be construed as prohibiting the County from charging user fees to partially or totally cover the costs of providing health services where so authorized by law. Furthermore, nothing herein shall be construed as prohibiting the County from estab- lishing income eligibility requirements for health programs subject to federal, state or local legislation or regulations, such that only those persons least able to pay are provided services free of charge or at a reduced rate. B. Nothing herein shall be construed as in any way divesting the Municipality of its policy powers within its boundaries with respect to the management and enforcement of health standards which are more stringent than those adopted by the State or the County, provided that the Municipality shall notify and file such health standards, enforce- ment procedures and amendments thereto with the Department, and pro- vided further that any additional costs incurred by the Department with regard to such health standards and enforcement procedures shall be reimbursed by the Municipality. VII. Entire Contract. The parties agree that this Agreement is the complete expression of the terms hereto and any oral representations or understandings not incorpo- rated herein are excluded. Further, any modification to this contract shall be in writing and signed by both parties. The parties recognize that time is of the essence in the performance of the provisions of this Agreement. It is also agreed by the parties that the forgiveness of the non-performance of any provision of this contract does not constitute a waiver of the provisions of this contract. Page 5 8 8 Federal Way Contract: Health January 1990 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have caused this Agreement to be exe- cuted this day and year first hereinabove written. KING COUNTY FEDERAL WAY B~ ~~~ Ïim Hi 11 /y/:~' By: ,/r(' ('//7 // ,~-c, . /.~:~:::./i":¿;' King County Executive Title (./.-~_/-I'_':~-"' <:J:;,:t) ". ,.. .--- '- ¿ u .¿:, l-,,¿,...:ý -../. _:--ï../ 1... Title) / Approved as to form: NORM MALENG King County Prosecuting Attorney By: ?ßJ:¿~ TH:JC:jwr Budget Division JC Disk: K.347/.3 1/90 Page 6 . . 8 8 Basic Public Health Services Federal Way WAC 248-990-990 defines "basic" public health services by reference to certain types of service. The corresponding programs offered by the Department which qualify as basic are: Persona 1 Health 0 Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Pediatrics Maternal Health Maternal Care - High Risk Immunizations Breast Feeding Promotion Day Care Screening Family Health Family Planning Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Parent & Child Health Tuberculosis Control (T.B.) Women, Infants, Children (W.I.C.)/Nutrition Muckleshoot Refugee Health AIDS Epidemiology Vital Statistics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Environmental Health 0 Water Qual ity Solid Waste Sewage Disposal Vector/Nuisance Living Environment Food Service Establishment Meat Inspection Chemical Plumbing, Gas Piping, Refrigeration Noise Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 JC:jwr Budget Division JC Disk K.347X 1/90 ~. ',' ~ . . 8 8 Optional Public Health Services Federal Way WAS 248-990-990 defines "optional" public health services by references to certain types of service. The corresponding programs currently offered by the Department which qualify as optional are: Personal Health 0 0 Geriatrics Renton Medical Services Dental Services for Division of Youth/Contract Dental Dental Health Dental Services for Older Adults Dental Disease Prevention Jail Health/Kent Jail 0 0 0 0 0 JC:jwr Budget Division JC Disk K.347X 1/90 ) 8 §@ 8 CII;>' .1 ~LI-~ 1'00.....008, H..",. Mo~o' ~ c."I;>' T"" HiU. £"""........ Seattle-KIng Count~-' Ðepartl:Oent or PubUc Health D""id M. Lurie. Ðu-ector September 13, 1991 Mayor Debra Ertel City of Federal Way 33530 First Way South Federal Way, W A 98003 Dear Mayor Ertel: Attached to this letter is your city's 1992 assessment for health services under the Health Services Agreement. The basis for the assessed cost is the utilization of heahh services by residents and businesses within your jurisdiction. This year the Department has again utilized 1989 King County Records and Election's compUterized data to accurately code addresses to incorporated and unincorporated areas of the County. In addition, demographic data is provided on individuals who have used health services to assist you with your own human services planning. Your city's 1992 assessment for health senices is $584,671. This representS the local tax support required for the support of basic health services to residentS of your jurisdiction. Your residentS utilized 22,721 unitS of Basic Health Services. The total cost of these units was $1,164,327. However, the Depanment offset this cost with outsiåe revenue from fees, contractS, and grantS. The remaining costS reflect the local tax support required to fund the basic services provided to your jurisdiction. In addition, your residents used 731 unitS of Optional Services. The County covers the 536,042 local tax support required to support these optional services. Details on the utilization and cost of services are provided in the appendices described below. Tne appendices provided to assist you in imerpre!Ïng this year's data are as fol]ows: 1. Utiiization data and demographic information ,on users of personal health services. The table indicates the number oÎ individuals using the service, their age, and income level. For prograrr'.s such as day care screening. the units noted represent institutions, rather than inàividua]s, and therefore demographic data is not pro\~àed. II. Task breakdov..-ì1 for use of environmental health services. In oròer 10 assist cities in understanåing the type of seT\~ce provided under each program. the t2.Sk and program are proviåed. 1)(1 Prd"n'~u < PI.c-< 5"'111.. Sui'. 1.110 !"'.l1k 't,¡.'¡""~I"r; '!\W4.2(,14 .F..",oc 0" "'00)"'0: FOO'" ;'2"('1 24/...¡.(,O(l 8 8 Mayor Ene! September 13, 1991 Page 2 III. Computer printout that indicates utilization, expenditures and local tax support required for both personal and environmental health services. A key is attached to assist you in reading the printout. IV. Key to computer printout noted in Appenàix ffi. It notes the codes used for programs, delivery sites, and an explanation of the expenditure data.. v. Current Poverty Guidelines as published by the Depanment of Health and Human Services. These guidelines are used by the Department in ca1culating the sliding fee assessed to individual patientS. They are also referenced in Appendix I under Income Level. VI. Description of Programs. This description is provided to assist you in understanding the scope of both the basic and optional services provided by the Department. Your city's assessment reflectS an overall increase in utilization of personal health services by your residentS. In panicular, parent and child health, family health, family plannÎllg, immunizations and WIC experienced growth in uti1.ization. Please let me know what additional data would be useful in your endeavors and any additionaJ topics you would 1ike covered by the Suburban Cities Health Advisory Board or other Suburban City Task Forces. If you have any questions on this assessment or the attachments please call Gloria Rodriguez at 296-4815. If you would like more infonnationon the personal health services available to your residents at our County Public Health Centers, please feel free to call Elise Chayet, County Division Manager, at 296-4612. For environmental health services available to your jurisdiction, please call Chuck KJeeberg, Chief of . Environmental Health, at 296-4731. DL:GR:yl Enc1osures City: FEDEnAL WAY NUMBER Or: CUßNTS SenN DY AGe -,- MSIC PEHS.ONAL/ŒAL1H [CLIENT-::j I 1-14115- 24 25-44145-6'\ SI:hVJCES'....'.'.'.. -'-'--'-'-' -,- -------- -,.-<-,- ^--dul!.!'!..~!ß~J' Heðr!~- - - - - _::Fnmiltlj_oolth 15 - 1 6 6 =!,nn~~y PlnnnlnQ___- ---~~?_-- ._-~ ~04 ~ -.!! ::!.'."mun~~lIClo~!.___--- ~I!~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ =-!,~_x~n.!lY Trn~mln_ed Dl5005e5 _160 - 2 63 66 -2 -Muddeshool 0 ------.---.--------. -- -- - - - -,-- -=!!efuQ!!.I:!!nUh ~~- --- ~ --.!!. ~ --3- - Tubnculo~ls 99 9 23 43 19 ~-- ------ -A.WS 29 5 20 4 .-- -- --- -".-...--- --- ---- --- 1 OIAL CUEN IS: 5.000 -----'---.------.. ----.- ... ---.------- eJr1l0Nl\L PEnSONAL HEALTI J SEnVICES ---------- 13erlnl11c5 -.---<.-. --.--.- ---,_.,--,----,--,- -,--,--,-,- PEAGENT AGE OF CLIENTS SEEN BY INCOME LEVEL. 'ill-11'_"-\ ,,",MOIlI:! lllEN 100')(, 100-2OO'JIo 1l1AN2OO'JIo 65+11 OFroV[!RTY Or-I'OVI'.IlTY or I'OVt!RTY ~2.0 21.3 44 63.4 100.0 29.3 MnleH\/IJ & Child HN\lIh; --\--'-1--1-'- - Pox/inh Ics{TImn H9!ll1h 520 40 446 10 13 1 63.3 ~!."'enVC¡~~~F'-ìMlîh -~ 177 170 312 242 21-I-GM -Ony Cnre Scrøønlng 44 =~i;;¡ë~ïOül~-- 1,2~~1 23~1 59~1. 2~:i 16:1 140 26.7 52.5 31.3 --- --- 32.0 31.6 54.4 25.6 5 100.0 75.0 I 9.1 24.1 31.0 -- -- -,-,-,-,._,- 131__[-I-----.!.I-L-~I~!__23.1 1-- 53.0 D'mlnl Sl'Ivices: ------------ -Oennl llNI!!h ------------------ -Soulh County Denhl -,-,--,.- 164 -I---E~ --!'I-!.I~I--.3.Q 55 9 24 15 4 3 --'-'-1-'-1- .'-1-'-- Renlon .1:111 Henl1h 1 ----- - Ken! .bH 2 fï~~k,~M;{~-- ------- .---0 I .Jð}it;;]:l/l_- ------------- ~i ==1-==1~61---n1--¡ TOTALCUENTS: 292 --------.--- ----' -,--,-,~ 1 1 -,._,-,-,- "REPRESENTED % FOR THOSE WITI-I KNOWN INCOME OlANK=NO ONE SEEN IN THIS PROGRAM o==NO ONE SEEN IN n-iiS PROGRAM UN I<NOW N '" INCa M E INFO NO T COLLECTED Fa A n liS r nOGRAM IN 1 990 56. 1_ _~~- 60.0 32.7 r-----;õ~- !---¡ 00.0 71.9 12.3 - 6.7 16_3 31.3 20.0 roV[!RTY --- I.EVEL l.'NJI'-m Wt'I 4.0 g.5 25 44 7.3 :8 10 05 11.1 tttt.O 4 . -- ---- 15.4 I VI 7.3 8 5.3 6 ~ "'d tT1 '/' tJ ..... >< CITY: FEDERAL WAY '" lJMslNó V'ÊCrrÖR id.uvlNo 1"",,',cHE~ ," '" ',,/i{,: ~ coMMiJN fTT£: "',' " , " Oi\SIC ENVlFtoNMENTAL WMER SOLIO SEWfoGÊ i,:}i'Wi,OI\Sf. t~ÛIS~- Ni¡IÄON,~ ':, ,')Foob ¡~T PHYS i:;_,iNOISE ,:: ,':',MEAT TAßNXX)' :', ENVIR SEWER QUALm ' , " .. ÞOOTÊCT; I--iAzAROS "åÀLEs HEAL1H HEAllH SERVICES: WMTE DISPOSAL ::,ÆF~ \?'ANCE :'j!:,:'MENt CONTROL NSPËCTION BArtm ~ ¡ PLAN REVIEWS 64 23 66 1 I1OVTINE INSPECTIONS 7 200 1,160 2M 546 160 71 RETURN INSPECTIONS 22 539 67 111 9 6 ----- ------- --- '- ENrorlCEMENT ACTIONS G I I 15 91 ~ 16 - ------------ -- -- CONSULT ^ T ION/EDUCA 110N 4 276 243 24 \I 109 172 31 6 8 I ------- COMPLAINT INVEST IGA TIONS 91 21 31 32 61 10 5 2 ----------- -- - SPECIAL INVESltGATIONS 9 1 2 9 2 -- -------- --- -- TEST ¡SAMPLES I 102 --" --n______----~ --- -- -- -- ILLNESS INVESllGATIONS 1 11 1O1AlSEFWICES ßASIC EH " 390 551 1,123 44 594 1,105 53 11 296 76 0 0 - -, ~Em:..~~S (by fJI~~l_- ---- -- -- -- - --- ----- n_____-------------- __n- --- ---- -- TO1 AL EXPENDITURES 301 15,070 20,953 49..105 2.767 21,585 57,205 6.928 842 9,211 - ___no_thy P'.?:!J""'-1_____n ---------- --_-no_, ------,.. '_n___--- - ------------- -----,-, ------ ---- -- -- --- FEES/GRANTS 100 12,714 14,027 50.232 380 22,271 40.245 2.416 90 6.615 - ---- ____no-' - - - - -,- ---- _n-- --- --- ---, -,-- ---- LOCAL CON I lllUUJ IONS 273 2,353 6,924 (021) 2.307 5,315 16,000 4,511 753 2.396 __n_______'n_--_'_- --- . "..,. ~. . ;.'--".: I : . --, .'" L ~' 04l'I "-""'-' e ~ '1j tT1 7.. t1 ...... X ..... ..... )rlS2...9-0::. :-.<:--<: SW PAKENTAL & CHILD FW PARENTAL C CHILD SE PARENTAL & CHILD =A PARENTAL & CHILD 50 PARE4TAL & CHILD ~O PA~ENTAL & CHILD ~C PARENTAL & CHILD ;:: :J P A ~ Ë In A L [; C rlI L D TùTAL ~A DAY CAQE SCQEËNI~G TOT AL HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH >:< HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH Ht:ALTH H~hLT¡; HEhLTY HEALTH HEALTH >,< >,< 5w MATERNAL CARE - JTHER ~J MATERNAL CARE - OTHER :0 ~AT~RNAL CARE - QTHE~ TOTAL * ~D FAMILY HEALTH TOTAL Slol FAMILY :;;¡ FAI..I,ILY S!: FA~ILY = A F AM I L Y :;3 FAMILY '~J FAMILY :E ~AHrLY ::: FAMILY iOT AL DLt.~NING ÞLA~m!NG °L^~mIN~ PLANNING PL:"'I/N! :~G PL:.WH NG DL A "I'll I "IG PLA'II'n '.,¡G 5¡.¡ IM~U~dZHIJ~~S ~.¡ 1 H~1UI~ ¡ z/... T 1 ~:6 3E It-1"\Uf~IZt.TIO'~S ~:. IMMUN!Z~TI[\~S :;0 I""~U"'IZATIJ':S ~J IMMUNIZATIONS . - 1 M H U ~ I Z 4T I J t~ 5 rJTAL ';< .:< .;< ~A SEXUtLLY T~ANSMITTED D!SE rOT AL .:< .Ë TuaË~CULJSIS CJ~TRDL - JT A L ~, ~h' WIC :.¡ ~IC - - - - - -- -- -- - UNITS 86 1 , 1 84 1 7 7 189 24 4Q 1,'556 69 1,886 43 4 263 1 42 1 2,309 266 266 19 1 2 22 20 20 153 1,329 40 13 257 6 2~ 1 1 1 ,332 97 1,756 60 1 " 525 11 01., 2,529 2l..A ?46 221 221 '1'3 7,Q4"i APPE~DIX 1II.~ 00/13/91 PA:::'E. 107 EXPENDITR 7,635 166,484 1,574 904 24,727 1,118 5,458 207,900 LaCAL-TAX-SUPPO~T 5,')39 84,843 q58 ò51 1ó,269 667 3,2Bl 112.20A "-'TTL- "I,.,.8JJHTY .u--~""T""'-" ...- -" - 1,. ~LT ;:,~.. t.-"..u..... 1:"",,-,t."¡Jr-":J:3L-t~"" CJv'::."::'~M::~Tt._-v'nT-CûST ;.::::PO,,1 FJi< :>£;;'IJ:.1 E'"JIt.í.r 12/31/90 :;£D:;í<AL ...AY :>ËRSQNAL HEALTH SERVICES (BASIC SEi\VIC£S) SW PEDIATRICS t TËË~ FW~PEDIATRICS & TEEN SE PEDIATRICS & TEEN EA PEDIATRICS G TEEN SO-PEDIATRICS & TEEN ~O"PEDIATRICS & TEEN CO~PEDIATRICS & TEEN TOTAL 9,9t11 223,379 4,b38 616 38,402 104 6,650 170 283,920 4,tH6 117,BB2 2,304 35q 17,"'41 ~8 4,634 94 147,586 3?,89Q 37.899 23,893 23,.'31=13 1,133 134 211.. l,loRI 417 90 137 644 3,904 3,904 2,243 2,243 14,276 127,960 C;,OO4 1,339 32.171 5" 3 2,"42 1,190 18'1,04') 7,736 89,',';6 3,()lo'- 717 19,ó64 275 1,171 677 122,743 1,95 a 27,';13 1 ,211 305 11.A73 105 2,342 45,0:)1 1.117 11.371 _678 1'-8 7, ! "i 7 10 99" 21,475 27,507 ::'7,507 17,'J40 17,040 11,792 11,792 3,743 8,743 1 ,'3> 72 1'"6.199 e';4 7~,S"ì4 OTHE!< 2,096 81 , 61t 1 616 252 8.459 452 2,177 95,693 5,146 105,497 2,333 257 20,960 46 2,016 16 136,331 14,015 14,015 716 44 77 837 1,662 1,662 6,540 36,'52'- 1 ,96 o 622 12,507 264 1,371 513 62,301 841 16,042 534 157 ".51t< 95 1 , 348 23,533 10,465 10.1.,68 3,049 3.049 717 70,363 5~.:.TT:""E"',,1"'; I"'TY DE;>':';';THt.;.;T OF PUgi-IC I1E'TI1 ~':;>'::..N~.;;:;~T AL-..J~'¡ T-CJST ;';¡:PJRT F;j;.; DERIJU ENU1NG 1.::/31/90 ;~DcR~L ,jAY ~ERSJNAL Y~ALT~ SERVICfS (~ASIC SE~VIC¡:S) SE ¡. Ie :4 PlIC )J WIt O,HC CE WI C CO WIt TOT AL '>"S2,,'ì-Ùh APPE~DIX JIL2 O~1l3/91 PAGE 108 U"lIT5 109 13 562 12 31 22 8,792 EX:PENDITR 1,756 212 10,097 207 590 q9 161 ,041 LQCAL-TAx-suppnRT 989 116 5.397 122 366 237 83,915 OTHER 767 97 4.700 85 214 182 77,125 >:< f.E REFUGEE HEALTH 21 3,094 f:JTAL ~ 21 3,094 H AIDS c¡o 5,3'1a TOT AL >~ C¡O 5.390 rJT A L PHS .;. .;, 17,864 973,980 (3ASI: SERVICES) 916 916 2.179 2.179 2,228 2,226 3,162 3,162 543.626 430.355 -.--., .} rl S 2 D ?-Cd ~ SE SOLI 0 EA SOLID ËH SOLI 0 CESOLI0 TOT AL HASTE WASTE WASTE ~ASTË ~.. SE SE~AGE DISPOSAL :A SE~AGE DISPOSAL ~~ SEWAGE DISPOSAL TOTAL .. :~ PLUYBING/G4$ PIPING TOTAL .:< Sf VECTOR/NUISANCE roT AL ~< SE LIVPJG =A LIVING .;H LIVING 'W LIVING TOT AL Ë'JVl :¡ONI-\ËNT !:I~V I RONH::.NT ENVIRùNtlENT ENVIRONMENT .;. Sf FOOD P~OTECTION :H FOOD PROTECTION ~D FOOD PROTECTION - FDJD P~DTECT1DN rOT AL .:. :E !'lEA; IN~PEcrIa~i fùT AL .:< ~- NuISE CONTROL "orAL .:< ;E CHENIC~L/~~vSIC~L MAZA~n$ JJ CHSMICALJPHYSICA~ HAlA~DS -- CHËMICAL/?rlYSIC~L HAZARDS ':"OTAL .:< 'OT AL EH$ :SA$IC SEI\VICES) .:. .:< -JTAL ?HS/ËriS .BASIC SERVICES) .:<.:<.:< -------.-. UNITS 4 4 140 2 18 230 390 555 1 1 5"57 1,723 1,723 ~" "" 5f17 2 2'- 1 59" 1,065 37 2 1 1,105 29A 298 11 1 1 29 713 2" 131 4,857 22,721 A.PPE~DIX III.3 Dt>1l3/91 PA:;E 10'1 EX?ENDITR 381 381 LDCAl-TAX-SUPPù~T 273 273 SEt.TTL::-Klr.c..Û'~TY D::PH:T:-\::"'T J¡:' ¡'JadC .IT:-i C::v:O;~,'1:~.TAl-U'~IT-CJST i-:iPO;<T FJF: ?~¡"':IJ~ EI,DI'...~, 12/;119:;, ;EDER':'L HAY ~~VIRQ~~ENT~L ~EALTrl SERVICE (BASIC SERVICES) SE WATER QUALITY TOTAL 5,410 77 69b B,BB7 15,070 [jl.,5 12 108 1.388 2,353 20,877 38 38 ?0,953 6.900 U 12 6.924 "9,1.,05 49,405 827- 827- 2,767 2,767 2,387 2,387 26,331 93 1.115. 46 27,585 '5,')73 16 215 9 5,315 55,134 1,915 104 52 57,205 16,3"6 568 31 15 16,960 Q,211 9.211 2,3Q6 2,396 842 R"2 753 753 1 .'534 4,125 1,269 6,928 998 2.686 527 4.511 190,34i 41,045 1,16,,327 584.671 OTHER 108 108 4,564 65 587 7,£'98 12,71£' 13,977 25 25 14.027 50,232 50,232 380 380 21,259 75 900 31 22,271 38,788 1.348 73 36 40,245 6,815 6,815 90 90 535 1,440 443 2,418 11.,9.300 579,655 ::,~t,TTLé-r;¡\;:;~JNr'( 9~:::>:';.ç.T"":"T j¡": PJ~...IC 8.LT1 ':;'.I"~-.::.~:'\,T':'..-u"'11-CJST RE;>J~T FJ"': PERI:]) Er\D¡t.~ l.U31/9'J ~EJ.::"I.L ..AY ~ERSON4L HE~lTH S~rVIC~S (JP IO~AL SEDV!CES) SW GERIATRICS SE GERIATRICS TOTAL ~J RENTON JAIL HEALTH TOTAL )'1SZ£,9-Q:: .. .;. . ~J KENT JAIL HEALTH TOTAL .;. 5W DENT AL SE DENTAL =4 DENTAL 5;) DE~To\L .;:¡ DENT Al :::: DErH AL :0 9srJT AL TOT ilL HE t. L TH HEALTH HËALTH HEALTH H = A L If, HEALTH t-IEhlTH .:. SE SOUTH COUNT Y DE:H AL SO SOUTH CülJNTY DENTAL TOTAL * ~J JAIL H~AL HI TOT AL .:. T:JTAL PHS [JPTIJNAL SERVICES) .;. .:. T:JTAL :)HS/!:H$ [JPTI0~AL SERVICES) .:. .:< .;. ¡OrAL P~$/EHS **~* (BASIC 4 OPTIJNAL SERVICES) - ,- " - -. - U"IIT$ 2 58 60 ExP~~lDITP. 77 992 1,069 LOCAL-TAX-SUPPG~T 61 775 536 1 40 1 40 2 71 2 71 p~ 3.103 .36 5.782 1 9q 278 25.592 '5 526 5 667 14 1.20'5 357 36,974 6 654 1)6 9,156 1l.t2 9,810 159 4,961 169 4,961 731 52.925 731 '52,925 2.788 4,800 85 22..220 451 547 878 31,169 184 2,656 2,840 36,042 36,l)lt2 2.3,':'52 1,217,252 62:>,713 P"PPENDIX III.4 ,;):;,/13/91 ?AG£ 110 OTHER 16 217 233 4- 44 44 4- 15 15 56 56 315 982 14 3,:;72 7S 120 327 5,205 471 6,500 6,971 586 596 4.374 4.37l.t 16,a83 16,B83 596,538 8 8 APPENDIX IV.l ?~S269-0B SEÅTTLE-~ING COOH~I DtPAR!~~RT or POBlIC HEALTH ~ GOVEaHMENT~L-ONI1-COST REPORT fOR ?E~IOD ~XDIMG 12/Jl/37~ YOUR CITY ø '3' t7\5 f:\ r:-.. po f 1\5 0 !i A 1.- R"- H ! H. S j:..¿I v r c rs- \V \.V \2./ \!..I f9' ('9 !SI.C' Sf it V IC !S) ,~ ü}/ 115 'E"l"VtlfDTTR L-OCkL-"t"J.."X-S tŒ20R! \V s.~ p !..D.!.UJITCS ¡; l E!~' R! Å 1:T H 1 .3.7.9 217 ~..... 'PEcrIAT::.ICS -G T!r::i HEAL-TH@ l.S9 ~3_.1B3 1"1.,02tr ~O P!DIA!RICS G !!E~ R!ALTH 11 U56 275 ::.o..:..:.n:::JIÀ7RITS G T':: EX HZ">"1..!..:i. TO' 71'1: 3s::z:t TOTA'L.. ::: 18.7 15.,389- 11.,...930 ! 1: D.! 1. C".lÃE" S'- ::\1:: ~ s.r ì't.G. T"'O"7 ! 1. .~ !.-A.-' .!!.!.1'.!.3.X.k T r ~ FI P ::- -, a 'tH .E E ~O'~^1'ER}/ÅL CARE - otñER co '!SÀ:n:?-NU, CJ..,R..!:.. - OTHER IOT~ : XJ r^~!!.! H'::>.L!B" 10tAL ., sv rÅ~I!.T PLÅNHISG S!;flMILI PLANNING '::A~rAnI!.!PLÅNNTNG ~o:~rÅ:\I!.Y":,PLA!HIING :",:' C!}rl~ILr~;.PLJ..¡'¡NIN~,' . "1'0-11 ,,'- - ~' ,:::: -' - .I."..-.-,~ .0 S!{I~~QHIZA!IO¡'¡S - ;::}.~¡~r'.OH¡Zà1IO:iS '... ;"O}.Il1l1USIZA,1IONS .-"-' CEiI~~U~IZA1IONS.. ~!'O!A1- , " , - ::: .' R!;'.S!XOALLY: TRANSI'II7':!D DISE !O!).L" R! TOE~RCULOS!S CONTROL 70!lL ~ SZ \lIe: !.!.. ',/IC ÅU' \/1: so ',/1e: C:: ;jIC -:C'¡.~L :::: :! R!fUG~~ H::AL7~ 1'::>1'..1 ., 20 YI:AL S:A:ISTICS !:nAL ~. R! ,\::;:::>5 r_'J7 A L TO""':' ?!-IS @ (9AS:::: SE!\VIC::S) ',' -- .. 36 I.¡. ,.OJ'8 3~978 38 Q.,O38 3..978 Sl 5,819 !1.TS6 3u' 3~925 . T ,"""'õTY 6 SuO U,2u' 91 10,285" 7,1.:..03 39 U,761J. 3,087 39 u,764 3,0137 1 5u 32 7 630 401. 13 649 535 31 1,986 987 3 254 126 ,55 3,573 2,081 :' 2 35 25 129 2,136 1.,23-6- '50 508 170 .11J. 396 157 195 3,075 1,585 55 u,2u) 3,lUl 55 u,243 3,11.¡1 10 Ll79 372 10 u79 312 S 60 3S 377 S, 202 3,ou9 5 sa 51.1 ug 597 3u 5 12 201 119 uu') 5,lu~ 3,602 2 380 91 2 380 91 181 2,511 3112- 181 2,511 ]1.12- 26 1,305 1,1::13 26 1, .305 1,1::13 1.328 56,190 33,031.1 " <Ð 'OT"R.O' 103 2 , '1 5 9 18-0 '14.1-1 3':...Q. 59 fiT 61 J:-,:66Q. .t'l-O'¡¡ .. . ,116 2,.8.8 u 1.,677 2,677 22 228 11u. 999 128 1~!191 10 899 338 238 l;Q.$S 1.,103. 1,103 107 107 25 2,153 34 252 82 (.su6 289 289 2,853 2.85'3 202 202 19.157 8 8 APPENDIX IV.2 KEY TO GOVERNMENTAL UNIT REPORT 1. REPORT FOR PERIOD EÌ\TDING: Indicates the services rendered for the year noted, 2. CITY: The report reflects that data for the city noted. It records unhs of service rendered to residents for the noted jurisdiction. 3. PERSONAL (ENVIRONMENTAL) HEALTH SERVICES: It indicates the type of service rendered. 4. BASIC SERVICES/OPTIONAL SERVICES: It indicates the classification pursuant to WAC 248-990. 5. UNITS: The number of units of service provided. 6. EXPENDITURES: The total cost of providing the services.' 7. LOCAL TAX SUPPORT: The amount of tax support required to provide the services. 8. OTHER: The amount of revenue available from other sources (grants, contracts, fees, etc,) PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER: Code indicates which public health center provided the service. 9. SW - Southwest Public Health Center, 10821 8th Avenue S\V, Seattle, W A 98146 SE - Southeast Public Health Center, 3001 NE 4th Street, Renton, WA 98055 ,- EA - East Public Health Center, 2424 156th NE, Bellevue, W A 98007 AU ~ South Public Health Center (Auburn), 20 Auburn Avenue, Auburn, \V A 98002 NO - North Public Health Center, 10501 Meridian Avenue N., Seattle, \VA 98133 CO - Columbia Health Center, 4400 37th Avenue South, Seattle, \VA 98118 RE - Regional Health Services: EpidemiologyjTB Control, 12th Floor Public Safety Building, Seattle, \VA 98104 Sexually Transmitted Disease Control, Harborview Medical Center, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 AIDS Prevention Project, 1116 Summit, Seattle, \V A 98101 EH - Environmental Health, 2nd Floor, Smith Tower, Seattle, WA 98104 8 8 APPENDIX IV.3 KEY TO GOVERNMENTAL UNIT REPORT (Continued) 10. PROGRAM: The heading indicates the program under which services were rendered. 11. TOTAL PHS: - (BASIC SERVICES) The total units, expenditures and revenue for Basic Personal Health Services. TOTAL EHS: The total units, expenditures and revenue for Basic (BASIC SERVICES) Environmental Health Services. TOTAL PHS /EHS: (BASIC SERVICES) The total uruts, expenditures and revenue for Basic Health Services. The same headings are provided for Optional SeT\~ces. TOTAL PHS/EHS (BASIC AND OPTIONAL SERVICES); The final heading reflects the total units, expenditures and revenue for services provided to residents of your jurisdiction. :',~--~-- ..8 --.' '.,- .' ", -8----- u APPENDIX V H..S'poverty bU'IJ<:IIIIC;:':' Eff. 7/1/90 S~IDING FEE SCALE FOR 1990 July - December F ami 1 y 0 - 100% 101 - 150~ 151 - 200% 201 - 250% 251% + Size A 8 C D E >i ~ 1 0 - $ 6,280 S 6,281 - 9,420 S 9,421 - 12,560 512,561 - 15,700 515,701 U) 2 0 - S 8,420 S 8,421 - 12,630 512,631 - 16,840 $16,841 - 21,050 521,051 ...:¡ 3 0 - 510,560 $10,561 - 15,840 515,841 - 21,120 $21,121 - 26,400 526,401 .::::; 4 0 - 512,700 $12,701 - 19,050 $19,051 - 25,400 525,401 - 31,750 531,751 ::> ~ 5 0 - 514,840 $14,841 - 22,260 522,261 - 29,680 529,681 - 37,100 $37,101 .::: 6 0 - $16,980 S16,981 - 25,470 525,471 - 33,960 $33,961 - 42,450 542,451 tj') 7 0 - $19,120 519,121 - 28,680 528,681 - 38,240 $38,241 - 47,800 547,801 ~ 8* 0 - 521,260 521,261 - 31,890 $31,891 - 42,520 542,521 - 53,150 $53,151 t.:> *For each addit i ona 1 famiìy member add $2, 140/Y!:ër F amil y 0 - 100% 101 - 150% 151 - 200% 201 - 250% 251% + Size A. B C D E >< ~ 1 0 - S 523 S 524 - 785 $ 786 - 1 , 046 $, 1,047 -. 1,308 S 1,309 2 0 - S 702 S 703 - 1,053 5 1,054 - 1,404 $ 1,405 - 1,755 $ 1,756 ~ 3 0 - S 880 S 881 - 1,320 S 1,321 - 1,760 S 1,761 - 2,200 S 2,201 4 0 - $ 1,058 $ 1,059 - 1,587 S 1,588 - 2,116 $ 2,117 - 2 , 645 5 2,646 ~ 5 0 - S 1,237 $ 1,238 - 1,856 S 1,857 - 2,474 $ 2,475 - 3,093 $, 3,094 6 0 - $ 1,415 $ 1,416 - 2,123 $, 2,124 - 2,830 S 2,831 - 3,538 $, 3,539 tf) 7 0 - $ 1,593 $ 1,594 - 2,390 $ 2,391 - 3,186 $ 3,187 .. 3,983 S 3,984 § 8 0 - S 1,772 S l,ï73 .. 2,658 $ 2,659 - 3,544 5 3,545 .. 4,430 S 4,431 L?. each additional famiìy member add S178/month *ror - '0 >- ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ J5 :=-4 >< - 9 .. .. 0":::' :J ;2 .,.....::.:: 6 ~ :;: ~ ~ 7 ~ 0 ro"1 ) 'ü.;.8 .i) Q)- ;;) VJ 3 Æ*For each additional fömiìy member add S42/~eek F amil y Size 0 - 100% 101 - 150% 151 - 200% A B C 0 - $ 122 $ 123 - 183 S 184 - 244 S 0 - S 163 S 164 - 2c,S $ 246 - 326 S 0 - S 205 S 206 - 308 S 309 - 410 S 0 - S 246 S 247 - 369 S 370 - 492 S 0 S 288 S 289 432 S 433 576 S 0 - S 329 $ 330 - 494 $ 495 - 658 S 0 - S 370 S 371 - 555 S 555 - 740 S () - S 412 S 413 618 S 619 824 S 201 - 250% 0 251% + £ 245 - 327 411 - 493 - 5ïï 659 741 825 305 $ 305 408 5 409 513 S 514 615 S 616 720 S 721 823 S 824 925 $ 926 1,030 S 1,031 Discount Cateoory Gr 0 s s Income Fee 100% Discount 4 0-100% HHS Poverty No Charge 75% Discount B 101-150% ¡..;¡..;S Poverty 25% Fun Charge + Supplies 50% Discount C 151-200r. HHS Poverty 50% Fun Charge + Suppìies 25% Discount D 201-250% ¡..;¡..;S Poverty 75% Fun Charge + Suppìies 0% Discount ~ 251+% HHS Poverty 100% F uì ì Charge + Supplies 8 8 APPENDIX VI.l KEY TO PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES PROGRAMS BASIC PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES Maternal and Child Health: Pediatrics/Teen Health: Provides screening for hearing, vision, growth and development, chronic illness, and acute medical conditions; and information and referral to other sources of care. Focus is on prevention of health problems through early detection and early intervention. Targeted at low income and geographically isolated children. Parent/Child Health: Public health nursing services to children and families provided through home and field visits. The focus is on maternal/child health, parenting and prevention of health problems through early intervention. Dav Care Screening: Provides dental, hearing and vision .screening for children and iI'iants enrolled in licensed day cares throughout King County. Screens children and infants for abnormal growth and development. Provides education to day care staff on [lIst aid, safety, and preventing communicable disease transmission. works with day care center staff to ensure immunization requirements are met. MaternaLHealth (Other): Provides: Pre-natal screening clinics to determine patients' risk levels, pre-natal care for low-income women, referral to other sources of care, follow-up care for infants to ensure early identification of problems and referrals to other sources of care as needed. Services are provided through clinic and office visits. \VIC/Nutrition: A USDA supplemental nutrition program providing nutritious food and nutrition education to eligible pregnant and breastfeeding women and their infants and children. Eligibility is based on income and nutritional status, determined by a medical expert. Participants receive monthly vouchers to purchase supplemental nutritious foods at contracted vendors. Participants' nutritional status and related pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight, anemia, and failure to thrive are evaluated regularly. Adult and Familv Health: Familv Planning: Reproductive health care including annual physical examination and health screening tests, prescription and supply of contraception, pregnancy detection and referral, infertility screening and treatment, sterilization referral, and community heahh education. Health education focuses on reproductive anatomy and physiology, contraception, related nutritional issues, sexllally transmitted diseases, pregnancy, hygiene and assistance with family planning decisions. . 8 APPENDIX VI.2 Key to Personal Health Services Programs Familv Health: General medical services for adults and children provided at the Department's North Service Center. Includes family planning, sexually transmitted disease, and maternal and child health services. Immunizations: General, childhood, influenza, and travel immunizations and certifications, information on immunization laws and requirements, and follow-up on referrals on communicable diseases and TB. Sexuallv Transmitted Diseases: Diagnosis, treatment, counseling, and follow-up for patients infected with a sex'l1alIy transmitted disease. 'Tu berculosis Control: Screening and treatment services for TB patients not served by the private medical sector, including x-rays, TB skin tests, medication, and home and hospital visits. Also provides contact investigation with preventive therapy for contacts, monitoring of TB treatment in the private medical sector, and outreach to high incidence areas. Muckleshoot Health: General medical care for infants, children, and adults, including family planning, maternal and child health, STD, and immunization services provided on the Muckleshoot Reservation. Refugee Health: Health screening and referral to needed services for newly arrived refugees. Focuses on preventing spread of communicable diseases. AIDS: Assessment, education and counseling services. Provides information to the public on AIDS for people at risk. OPTIONAL PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES Dental Health: Services for early identification of dental disease, referral for dental treatment, and low cost treatment for those who cannot afford full private sector fees. Targeted for children (ages 3-18), the elderly (age 60 and older), and households ,-"rith incomes of less than 200% of poverty. Dental Services for Division of Youth /Contract Dental: Dental services for King County Youtb Detention Center. South CountY Dental: This program provides primary dental care to low income individuals (below 200% of poverty) age 13 and above. Services are available at the Health Departments South, East, and Southeast dental clinics. 8 8 APPENDIX VI.3 Key to Personal Health Services Programs Geriatrics: Provides physical assessments; review of medications, diet, and weight; urine testing, oral health screening; foot care; general health appraisals; and counseling regarding physical and psychosocial concerns. Serves persons 55 years and older. Renton Medical Services: Provides health services to the elderly including health assessments; counseling on nutrition, diet, foot care, daily living issues; education on stroke risk factors, breast self-exam, and other health issues of concern to the elderly; referrals to primary care providers; and foot care. Jail Health /Kent Jail/Renton Jail: Provides health services to inmates in the King County Correctional Facility, the Kent Jail and the Renton Jail. 8 8 APPENDIX VIA KEY TO Et-.'VIRO1\TJ\1E1\'TAL HEALTH SERVICES PROGIUMS BASIC ENVIRONJ\1ENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Water Qualitv: MonitOrs and regulates approximately 1,500 sma]] public drinking systems to prevent bacterial and chemical contamination. Solid \Vaste: MonHors and regulates 72 public and private solid \vaste operations amounting to 1.5 million tons of solid waste annually. Investigates several thousand megal dumps per year. Conducts routine inspections of landfills, transfer stations, incinerators, recycling sites, and col1ection vehicles, Regulates the handling, storage, collection, transportation, treatment, utilization, processing, and final disposal of solid waste. (Solid waste is distinguished from clean fi]] {administered by Building and Land Development-BALD} and from dangerous waste {administered by the Department of Ecology}.) Sewage Disposal: Monitors and regulates approximately 90,000 on-,site sewage systems (septic , tanks). Approximately 1,000-2,000 new systems are constructed each year in King County. Plumbing. Gas Piping. Refrigeration: Inspects and'regulates cross-connections between drinking and waste water; detennines whether toxins are present in piping and leaks. Inspects all new and remodeled plumbing. Inspects refrigeration systems and gas piping to prevent health problems related to hazardous refrigerants and dangerous gas leaks and ex'Plosions. There are 8,000-12,000 plumbing, 200-300 refrigeration, a nd 4,000-6,000 gas piping installations per year in the County. Vector ¡Nuisance Control: Responds to public complaints and prO\rjdes community education about rodents, insects, wild animal bites, odors, side sewer breaks, unkempt properties, pet-related diseases, and other community health "nuisances". Living Environment: Regulates and inspects recreational, commercial, and educational facilities such as public swimming pools, spas, water parks, mobile home parks, tattoo parlor, swimming beaches, primary and secondary schools, and youth camps for conformance with health codes. Food Sezvjce Estab1ishments: ReguJates and inspects an restaurants and temporary food service establishments in the County. Inc1udes plan review, inspections, complaint investigations, consultations, sampling, and enforcement actions. There are over 6,000 restaurants and 2,000 temporary food establishments in King County; most receive at least 3 inspections per year. Meat Inspections: Enforces meat code to prevent disease transmission and consumer fraud for approximately 1.100 meat, poultry, rabbit and fish establishments in King County. Also supports state paralytic shellfish poison program. 8 8 APPENDIX V1.5 Key to Environmental Health Services Programs Chemical Hazards; Regulates fumigators and exterminators, screens questionable wastes, operates collection centers for household pesticides and PCBs, surveys abandoned landfills, monitors superfund sites, responds to inquiries about the transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. Noise Control: Consultations are provided to the public or governmental agencies about noise problems, not addressed by local ordinances. Noise tests are performed to document problems which may lead to subsequent enforcement actions. Assistance and technical advice are provided for the development of local ordinances. Moderate Risk Waste: To significantly reduce the volumes of smal~ quantity hazardous waste . being disposed in the local solid waste stream, sewers and environment. Assist in completing the Draft Seattle-King County Local Hazardous Waste Management Plan. Participate in orientation workshops and public meetings to ÎIúorm agencies, businesses, and the public. Survey businesses for proper waste handling practices. Tobacco Sales: To reduce the availability of cigarettes and tobacco products to minors. Inspect establishments selling tobacco products to ensure that code requirements are being met. Investigate complaints and initiate enforcement actions when necessary. E!\ìVIRONMENTAL HEALTH TASKS (within service programs) Inspections: Routine: Regular facility inspections to determine health code compliance; field reviews to approve/disapprove land development and construction applications; "rough-in" plumbing, gas piping, and refrigeration inspections prior to installations and "final" inspections after installations; "conditions reports" surveying operations of existing water supplies (by request); "stub-out" inspections to review homeowner on-site sewage disposal systems; "pre-occupancy" inspections of new or remodeled facilities prior to opening to determine compliance with approved construction plans and health codes; "Review Board" visits for appeals cases related to sewage disposal. Return: Re-inspections to check on correction of violations found on a previous inspection. Plan Reviews: "Office" and "field" reviews of land use development and construction plans and documents for environmental health implications, e.g. proposed water supply or soil enhancement sites, Environmental Impact Statements. 8 8 APPENDIX VI.6 Key to Environmental Health Services Programs Enforcement Actions: "Closures" and permit suspensions of public facilities for health code violations; initiation of legal action to achieve code compliance (including notice and order, civil penalty, administrative hearing, court action); "permit investigations" into accuracy of applications, delinquency of permit renewal, or establishments operating without permits. Complaint Investigations: "Initial" and "follow-up" site investigations in response to citizen complaints. Consu1tationjEducation: Oral or written communication providing environmental health education, information, or advice to the general public, industry, or other agencies; "group education" sessions (counted as sessions rather than individuals). Illness Investigations: "Suspected food-borne illness" investigations, including interviews and samples form suspected and "confmned individuals" and tally of "confirmed illnesses". Tests/Samples: Collection of laboratory specimens for testing frozen desserts, rabies, road-side herbicide spraying, marine beach shellfish, chemical contamination. (Only coded when not included as part of inspection or investigation coded elsewhere.) Special Investigations: Non-routine investigations of potential health problems in the community. Has included such activities as the Tylenol capsule investigation, waste screening at landfill sites, the Abandoned Landfill stUdy. Done by technical Environmental Health Specialists. 8 8 APPENDIX VI.7 KEY TO PROJECTS NOT DISTRIBUTED IN GOVER1\'MENTAL UNIT REPORT These projects can be divided into 2 categories: 1. Short term research projects and contracts - services for which special funding exists. Buckle Baby First: Raises funds from donations to purchase approved infant car seats and lends car seats to families who cannot afford them. Has served over 600 families thus far. 2. Pass-thru Funds/Services Provided to Conununity Agencies. Services Provjded Bv and To Others: Includes "pass-thm" funds for contracts with community clinics (includes Block Grant, Survival Services {Federal shared revenue}, \VIC, Current Expense), language bank, transfer of funds with Alcoholism Division, sales of drugs and supplies to clinics and other health facilities. Laboratorv: Includes lab services provided to community clinics and other non-profit agencies. 8 8 APPENDIX \11.8 HEALTH SERVICES NOT ELSE\\'HERE CODED (I.E., not coded to individual jurisdictions) These are service components that affect people from more than one jurisdiction. These services are covered by King County. Pediatrics. Dav Care Screenin~. Maternal Care (Other). 'VIc. ÞJDS. Geriatrics: 0 Group education sessions on childbirth, parenting, nutrition, dealing with chi1dren with handicapping disabling conditions, AIDS prevention and education, etc. 0 Telephone contacts related to patients served by the program for case management, referral, fol1ow.up. School Health: Provides contractual nursing services to schqols lacking such resources, Staff provides screening for auditOry and visual acuity and scoliosis~ rescreening and referral for care for children failing the initial screening; and assists in compilation of State immunization reports. There were 4.825 units of service provided in these programs to County residents. Environmental Health: Educational activities for community groups on hazardous wastes, vector/nuisance control, and related environmental concerns. Consultations regarding waste screening to determine appropriate disposal of hazardous wastes are also provided. There were 4.908 units of service provided to County residentS for these services. Services which affect more than on jurisdiction are not coded to a particular jurisdiction. They are listed as "not elsewhere coded" on the Department's statistical reports, , CITY OF FED ERAL WAY {} Il 6 d-Y -'- . tJ -~ -/J/.""i I .. Ij"C,,'/;, ' '-' 7'ð ,.../{p t' /1 ' ! j t Mayor Debra Ertel 33530 First Way South Federal Way. WA 98003 (206) 661-4000 Council Members Mary Gates Jim Handmaeher Joel MMks Bob Stead Lynn Templeton Jim Webster City Manager J. Brent MeFall December 7, 1990 Ms. Judy Chapman King County Budget Office King County Administration Building 500 4th Avenue Seatatle, WA 98104 Re: Contract Renewals Dear Judy: The City of Federal wishes to renew its contracts with King County for services outlined below for 1991. The contracts should contain the same terms as those for 1990. Public Health Animal Control Private Security Taxicab Services Steel Lake Fire Station Lease Indigent Defense I realize these renewals are somewhat late, and I apologize for their delay. I would, however, appreciate your assistance in seeing that they are renewed for the new year as soon as possible. Sincerely, {)j¡z¡d~(I . Stephen L. Anderson ,.- Assistant City Manager a: sla \903-092/j ah §<!) ,.. (i)n.. '),. -. ( C '- .... -( lien ~~c ." c; (\: (y¡ h , -/lr; (6 - I~ s:~ì"{l' 14- ç,-,:. }'Î') ,.9'.-i"l, -', ¡ ¡ l",- t . City of Seattle KJIl ( County Norman B. Rice, Mayor Tim Hill, E,Y.eClll;vt: Seattle-Iûng County Department of Public Health Hud Nicola, M.D., M.H.S,A" Director November 5, 1990 Mayor Debra Ertel City of Federal Way 31132 - 28th Avenue South Federal Way, W A 98003 Dear Mayor Ertel: Attached to this letter is your city's 1991 assessment for health services under the Health Services Agreement. The basis for the assessed cost is the utilization of health services by residents and businesses within your jurisdiction. This year, the Department has utilized 1989 King County Records and Election's computerized data to accurately code addresses to incorporated and unincorporated areas of the County. In addition, demographic data is provided on individuals who have used health services to assist you with your own human services planning. Your city's 1991 assessment for health services is $468,430. This represents the local tax support required for the support of basic health services to residents of your jurisdiction. Your residents utilized 23,053 units of Basic Health Services. The total cost of these units was $1,000,343. However, the Department offset this cost with outside revenue from fees, contracts, and grants. The remaining costs reflect the local tax support required to fund the basic services provided to your jurisdiction. In addition, your residents used 543 units of Optional Services. The County covers the $18,805 local tax support required to support these optional services. Details on the utilization and cost of services are provided in the appendices described below. The appendices provided to assist you in interpreting this year's data are as follows: I. Utilization data and demographic information on users of personal health services. The table indicates the number of individuals using the service, their age, and income level. For programs such as day care screening, the units noted represent institutions, rather than individuals, and therefore demographic data is not provided. II. Task breakdown for use of environmental health services. In order to assist cities in understanding the type of service provided under each program, the task and program are provided. 110 Prefonlaine place South, Suite 600 Seattle, Washington 98104.2614 (206) 296-4600 . 8 Mayor Ertel November 5, 1990 Page 2 III. IV. V. VI. Computer printout that indicates utilization, expenditures and local tax support required for both personal and environmental health services. A key is attached to assist you in reading the printout. Key to computer printout noted in Appendix III. It notes the codes used for programs, delivery sites, and an explanation of the expenditure data. Current Poverty Guidelines as published by the Department of Health and Human Services. These guidelines are used by the Department in calculating the sliding fee assessed to individual patients. They are also referenced in Appendix I under Income Level. Description of Programs. This description is provided to assist you in understanding the scope of both the basic and optional services provided by the Department. Please let me know what additional data would be useful in your endeavors and any additional topics you would like covered by the Suburban Cities Health Advisory Board or other Suburban City Task Forces. If you have any questions on this assessment or the attachments please call Gloria Rodriguez at 296-4615. If you would like more information on the personal health services available to your residents at our County Public Health Centers, please feel free to call Elise Chayet, County Division Manager, at 296-4612. For environmental health services available to your jurisdiction, please call Chuck Kleeberg, Chief of Environmental Health, at 296-4731. Finally, I apologize for the late timing and inconvenience in getting this information to you. This information has been delayed so that we could recheck our new programming of demographic identification using the Records and Elections program. Due to the accuracy of the program we anticipate that preliminary 1992 numbers will be available in May and the bills in September. We look forward to working with you in the coming year. Sincerely, {'Z;)-vj)'rl. c\.t-L Bud Nicola, M.D. Director of Public Health BN:yl Enclosures CITY: FEDERAL WAY 8 8 APPENDIX I NUMBER OF CLIENTS SEEN BY PERCENT AGE OF CLIENTS SEEN BY INCOME LEVEL'" % LESS THAN 100% % 100-200% LlNEL 13.'\SIC PERSONAL HEALTH 25-44 45-64 65+ Of POVERTY Of POVERTY UNKNOWN SHRVICE:S: Maternal & Child Health: -PediatricslTeen Health 495 69 394 20 10 61 % 4% -Parent/Child Health 617 125 130 201 159 70% 22% 7% 1% -DaYc;are,Scrcening"" 55 100% -Maternal Care/Other 196 3 9 129 55 2% -WIC 1041 223 488 187 142 Adult ,~,Family ,lIealth:" ~Farn~Y,lIeaIth""" 12 1 75% -Family Planning" 603 3 8 58% 29% 13% -Immunizations 1598 144 135 89 30% 33% 33% 4% ~Scxu;uly Transmitted 135 6 1 59% 16% 25% Diseases -Refugee Health 1 1 100% -Tuberculosis Control 30 14 7 41% 15% -AIDS 25 31 % TOT AL BASIC PH UNITS: OPTIONAL I'HRSONAI. II[AL I'll SERVICES Dental Services: .Dental Health 105 4 3 7 14 -South Dental 11 21 9 5 2 Geriatrics 2 7 50% 42% 8% Kcnt Ja.iI Health 100% ., Ja.iI Health 26 85% 5% 2% 7% TOT AL OPTIONAL PH UNITS: . *~epresented, 91>" for those\Vith . kn°\Vn income . ,Blank, ,""" ~o, one, seen, in , this ,prograill.", , 0 "" No one seen in this program of this category "" . """'" ,,', " UNKNOWN "" Income info not collected for this programin1989 CITY: FEDERAL WAY BASIC ENVIRONMENT AL ........ ."..........--.........-.. ..... _. ........ HEALTH SERVICES: . PLAN REVIEWS ........... ............---..--.---. ... -.-....... . ROUTINE INSPECTIONS . .... . ................. ...-. . RETURN INSPECTIONS .............'...........- . --.. ... . ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS ............". ........... . . CONSULTATION/EDUCATION .. . ......................-.-.... - - . COMP AINT INVESTIGATIONS ..... ... ."............ .. . SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS ... ......................-... . TEST/SAMPLES . ..................... . ILLNESS INVESTIGATIONS . TOT AL SERVICES BASIC EH SE~VICES. (by progral1l) TOT AL EXPENDITURES .. (by program) . FEES/GRANTS .. ..- ....... ...........- . LOCAL CONTRIBUTIONS I W..HEIl QL:AIXIY SCUD WAST!:; 0 ]2625 ] ]580 ]045 SEWAGE DISPOSAL 71 4 14 ]97 ]06 9 330 29342 ~90g5 10256 PLl~1mSG GAS' RLFRIG. 385 4075 72 ]220 ... L ]1 63 óO4 5342 137685 1ì2561 -34877 VF..cTOR SU5-- lJVING roo\) ANCE "'iVIROS- PRm-r,¡:- TlO~ 3 5 3] 8 4629 6]8 40]2 Mf."T II 76 2 89 ]7082 ]7775 10] 25] 22 ]4 13 16 ., L 4]9 16 1126 53226 .697 39521 13706 ~E."T IS5I'H:-- TIOS CHE!>i' PIIYS HAZARDS CO~TROL MUSI: 63 707 i64 4] 86 48 ] 7498 6754 172 3 ...... L¿. 7 16 44 264 2:)86 744 608 1478 25 3 29 MUD. RISK W.AS11, 3 3 223 40 183 TOBACCO SALI_~ ]0 10 46 38 9 -- h- . h h - - hh !;OMM. j¡(:~-1m"4-f E.w. --;;~:rr;rr~:-~; 1l1.A1:11I i'~'llÆf?t _::; 23!(:- -:5594--: --:t4S1 -: - -- 99 ~ 336 -14- - - ---- - - h - -- _h --- -- ----- -A":- -:::-;¡I¡¡¡:: ~~Ii 111 264442 ' 4 4 ., .. 2 2685~1 ! -4141 . 8 8 ~ "'C tr:I Z t; - :>< - - '>cA rrLE-KlNG !UNTY JEPA<TM"NT OF PùôLlC 'ALTH GUŸt:KNI'¡i:ÎHAL-UrHT-CUST REPORT fOR PEkIOù ENDING It/31/89 FEDEKAL riA'! PERSONAL HEALTH S~~~ICcS (BASIC SER,,¡Ct:Sì SH PEDIATRICS & TEEN SE PEDIATRICS & TEEN EA PEDIATRICS & TEEN SO PEDIATRICS ~ Tt¿N NO PEOIATRIC~ ~ TclN CO PEDIATRiCS ~ T¿c~ TOTAL PHS¿t.9-Ü8 SW PARENTAL & CHILD SE PAR~NTAL & CrtILJ SO PA~ENTAL ~ CHILD NO PA~¿NTAL ~ CMiLD CE PARENTAL & CHILD CO PARENTAL & CHILD TOTAL EA DAY CAR~ SCREENIN~ TOTAL HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH HEALTH rtEALIH HeALTH -1,< HEALTH HeALTH HEALTH HeALTH HEALTH HEALTH >:< >'.< SH MATERNAL SE MATERNAL SO MATERNAL CE MATii<.NA... CO ¡"'I A TERNAl TOTAL CARE - OTHER CARE - OTHËR CARe - ûTHt:I~ l.AKI: - uTlitK \..ÁKC - OTI1;':I( NO FAMILY HEALTH TOTAL Sw FAMILY SE FAMILY EA FAMILY SO FAMILY NO FAMiLY CE FAMILt CO fAMILY TOTAL PLANNiNG PLANNING PLANNING PLANN ING PLANNU..G PLANNiNG PLAN!~ l!\ll> SW IMMUNIZAT!O~S SE IHHUNIlATiuNS fA iMMUNILATIJNS so IMMUNl¿ATluNS NO IMMUNIZATIONS CE IMMUNIZATIONS TOTAL ,;< >jc '1..< >:< RA SEÀUALLY TkANSMITTEu ul~E TOTAL * RE TUBFRCULOSIS CONTROL TOTAL * SW rilC SE toIlC EA WIC SO HIC NO WIC APPENDIX III.1 (j'1I¿o/9Q PA~E 107 UNITS 36 23 4 1.53:> 9 34 1.641 EXPENDITR 2.933 1,770 428 156.767 2.(,7 ¿,bUt! 165,003 LJCAL-TAX-SUPPU~T 2.117 1,316 349 ¡¿a,lo1 132 1,<to:> 131,640 20 1,937 3¿ ~,jI7 1,653 loo.YÖd 1:; 1,270 47 2,729 5 551 1,772 175,792 269 3~,11O 209 J:J,llO 16 1,709 18 2,024 ¿(;7 4<t,O4U '.' j,4j~ <- 9 917 252 54,184 12 2,158 12 ¿ , i ')d 1')2 10,639 39 4,233 5 373 1,10"5 109,178 1 dtj 32 ¿,ôJ9 Y a"j 1,343 128,393 97 1,354 44 95b .3 1.32. 1,785 29,i:Uo 11 121 SA 1,615 2,001 34,014 218 Lv,71." ¿IS 2û,1¿0 196 9,764 196 9,764 17 2<t6 ill .L,7a:> 1 15 6,94'5 112,843 16 277 1,172 i,4i¿ 99,;>'jo 7\;5 1,R51 320 104,816 34,iS:> 3'1,i55 1,223 211 21,)79 ¿ . .;do! bj:> 25,9130 1,118 I,Ud 5,0'.11 2,432 2.32 58,075 :H 1,101 ~o~ 68,132 515 007 04 14.b't¿ 29 520 16,317 12,412 1¿,41¿ 6,717 6,717 1':>7 ¡,udO 9 71,684 167 OTHER 817 454 79 30,506 104 1,343 33,363 765 9J5 61,633 565 878 231 70,977 '154 95't 486 1,813 22,461 3,122 323 28,205 1,039 1,039 :>,1..1 1,801 141 51,103 51 1,679 338 60,260 839 3~9 67 15,193 92 1,095 17,635 6,314 a,314 3,046 3,046 91 7iJ3 6 41,160 110 itA TTÜ-KIN" !UNTt ûCPAKTMENT OF ?UdLlC 'ALTH iJûvËk.NMt:NTAL-uNIT-CliST REPORT fUR PERIGO éNûING 12!3¡/i99 FEiJERAL riA.. PERSONAL H~AlTH SEPVICES (BASIC SERVICES) CO WIC TOTAL PHS2ó9-0d APPENDIX 111.2 09/¿6/90 PAGE 103 ~< UNITS 35 7,125 EXPENOIH' 641 115,blJ7 LOCAL-TAX-SUPPORT 347 13,l.t'i"t OTHER 294 42,364 CE REFuGEE HEALTh TOTAL TOTAL PHS (BASH.. SêRIJICi:S) ¿ ¿bb >:< 2 268 >Ì' >:. 14,833 741,219 l4 14 254 254 474,805 266,411 ADJUSTMENTS CE MATERNAL CARE - OTHER CE PARENTAL & CHILD HEALTH (2) 2 (5,434) 116 (2,312) 78 (3,122) 38 TOTAL PHS (BASIC SERVICES) 14,833 735,901 472,571 263,327 .8 StATTL~-KING COuNTY DEPARTMeNT OF PUBLIC H~ALTrl GOVt:RNl'1tNTAL-UNIT-COST RtPOKT FUR PERlûJ i.:N¡JHiG IZÝ31/fJ9 FEDERAL 'tiAi ENVIRONMENJAL HEALTH 5ER~ICE (8A~IC SERviC...Sj Sri SOLID WASTE SE SOLID WASTE EH SOLID WASTE NO $GLiJ wASTE CE SuLLO WA;>Tc TOTAL PHS2b9-0d ... SW SEWAGE SE SEWAGE EA SEWAi.ol::: EH SEWAGE nnAL DISPOSAL DISPOSAL OISP¡J:::;AL D1~P¡J~AL .;( EH PLUM~ING/GAS PIPING TOTAL * $w VcCTOR/NJiSANCE C£ VECTOK/NUlSANC~ TOTAL >:< Sri LIVING ENVIRON~ENT Sf: LIVING ENViRONMENT EH LIVING ENVlxJNHcNT TOTAL >:< Sri FOOD PROTECTION SE FOOD PROTECTION EH fOLD PROrECTluh TOTAL >:< CE MEAT INSPECTION TOTAL .;< CE NUI~E CONTROL TOTAL >j< CE HAZARDOUS WASTE PLAN TOTAL * Sf CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL EH CHEMICAL/~HY~lCAL NO CrlEMICAL/?H1S1CAL CE CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL TOTAL HAIAi<OS HAIArWS HAIAi<¡)j HAlA~DS .:. TOTAL EHS (8A~IC SExvICcS) :... >;< TOTAL PHS/EHS (BASIC SERVICES) ADJUSTMENTS TOTAL PHS BASIC SERVICES ';";0:< TOTAL PHS/EHS 8 UNITS 118 5 6 j 198 3jJ 23,053 23,053 APPENDIX 1I1.3 û'U 20/90 PAvE 109 t::XPENOITk 4,514 191 230 II? 7,57'.; 1.¿,6¿5 LCCAL-TAÁ-SUPPUKT 374 16 19 Y b¿7 1,045 592 28,759 4 194 7 340 1 't'i 00.., ¿'i,3..,¿ 5,342 137,685 5,342 137,685 j? 4,4¿1 .., LOB 89 4,629 319 13,005 1 41 99 4,0..>6 419 l',Od¿ 1 , 102 52,092 1 47 23 l,Od7 1,1 26 5:>,226 264 7,498 264 7,498 3 ¿¿3 3 2¿J 10 46 10 46 1 0..> b ..>71 't Z5..> 2;,2 1,391 33 2,086 d,220 ¿b't,44¿ 10,052 68 li9 i 7 10,¿?ò 34,877- 34.877- j,bj¡ 161 4,012 530- ¿- loS- 097- 13.414 12 ¿öO 13 .7Jb 744 744 163 1d3 9 9 4' ,¿o'J 179 985 1,418 4.141- 1.005,661 470,664 0 (5,318) (2,234) 1,000,343 468,430 aThER 4,141 175 211 105 6,948 11,580 18,706 126 221 32 l'i,OdS 172,561 172,561 510 2ö 618 13,534 42 4,¿vO 11 , 71 b 38,679 35 807 39,521 6,754 6.754 ita 40 38 38 ld 111 1't 405 608 ¿od,5dl 534,992 (3,084) 531,908 PHS2ò9-0d SeA TTLE-Kl No !UNTY DEPAR TMtNT OF PU¡,UC 'HUH - .. uUVfKNM[NI~L-ÍJ \ Ir-CûST REPORT FOR PtKIUU eNDING 1213//89 FEOf:RAL itA Y /- i PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES (OPTIONAL SERVICES) SW GERIATRICS Sf: í.ÍEt<.IATRI\..~ SO GEKIAfkH':S TOTAL APPENDIX IlIA 09/26/90 PAGE dO i.' UNITS 2 36 .3 41 EXPENDITR 5f:, 4'ib 79 6jj LOCAL-TAX-SUPPORT 48 jj5 14 477 OTHER 10 141 ~ 156 RJ KENT JAIL HEALTH TOTAL >:. 1 37 1 37 20 2, b -11 12 l,t>3ö 202 16,554 B 912 242 21,773 1 09 db ?,lJö 87 5,225 0 0 0 Ù 172 "..:,!:iO 172 4,3AO 543 32,04~ 543 3¿,O4ö 10 10 27 27 SW DENTAL HEALTH SE JENTAL riéA1...1H SO DENTAL HEALTH CE DENTAL HEALTH TOTAL >:. ¿,]:>4 1, ..ß.,. 13,572 704 17,984 317 2.iJ2 2,982 209 3,789 SE SOUTH CJUNTY JcNfAL SO SOUTH CJuNTt DENfAL TOTAL * 15 14 29 74 5,122 5,196 NO TOBACCO SALES TOTAL 0 0 0 >;. () RJ JAIL rltALTd TOTAL TOTAL PHS (OPTIONAL SEkVjL¿~) >:< JO:> 305 4,0'75 4,075 .;. >;' 18,805 13,243 TOTAL P~S/¿HS (OPTIONAL SERVICES) >;< if.- >,< 18.60':> 13,2,,3 8 SeATTLE-KING COUNTY DEPARTMeNT UF PUdLIC rlEALTH GJVl..rÜ..MdHAL-UNIT-CUST REPORT FJR PERIJD t:NDING IZ/3í/a!J FEDERAL \"fAY CITY EH PROGRAMS (CITY FH SERVS) CE COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENTAL H TOTÀl * 8 APPENDIX In.5 û9/2ö/90 PAGE 111 PHS2ó9-0d UNITS 2 ¿ EXPENOITR 60 60 LDCAL-TAX~SUPPORT 10 10 OTHER 51 51 TOTAL CITY ,;;.11 >;0:< 2- oJ (CITY EH SERVS) TOTAL PHSIEHS >;< >:< >:< 2 60 (CITY Eii SEKVS) TOTAL PrlS/t.Ii:) **>:<'Î< 23,598 1,037.709 (BASIC £ OPTIONAL SERVICES) 10 51 10 51 489,..-"1 S4ô,¿d6 8 8 ?~S269-08 StA~L¡-~ING COON7I D!PART~~N! or PUBLIC Ht1L!R ~ GOYE!UII1 tN!A.L-ONI!-COS! RtPORT roB. Pt~IOD tNDIMG 12/31/87\V p-;o~:~~g>~^L!H' sRvrer:s CD @ G) ø Œ> (B lSLe' St R v Ie::S) ,\v (I Ii ITS -~1JTT:R L'OC'A-L-'!".U-SUllOR"r s.. E" P t..D.I..!.::LJO:c5 ¡;"'T ~ ~ ~. R::"" l:T H 7 ..3...7-9 1.77 t"""P!:ITIA,'!R'Ic.s,,¡;. 'T!E~ HEAL-n!@ 1-59 .13..783 1'1.,0214 ~O P!DIATRIes ¡;. T!!~ H!lLTM 11 u56 27~ Co..:...:.Pt:DIA'I'RrcS 1; TEEN HrAì:1:"!r 1:0' 7-"1"1' -- 3SJ¡. ,:--- rOTA'L". :: 18,7 15,,389- 11..,....93e !: 1 D-l r ,C".1.E~ .s-... RE ~ s.I J(..C. !"tr'r ! L ' 38 4,..0-3'8 3,978 38 u,038 3..978 51' 5,819 t¡,"!56 , n' - 3i¡ 3~926 '-T,""3'7T""-' 6 Suo i¡24' 91 19,285" 7 , u.O 3 39 4,76u 3,087 39 4,764 3,087 1 54 32 7 630 lI.O1' 13 6l1.9 535 31 1,986 987 3 2Sll. 126 "55 3,573 2,081 .. 2 3S 25 ~29 2,136 1,236' - So 508 170 ,lU 396 157 195 3,075 1,566 55 u, 2u 3 3,lU1 55 U,2U3 3,141 10 u79 37:2 10 u79 372 S 60 3S 377 5,202 3,049 6 sa 54 U9 597 3Us 12 201 119 uu') 6. 1 u '3 3.602 2 380 91 2 380 91 181 2.511 3112- 181 2.511 342- 26 1.305 1,1~3 26 1.305 1.1~J 1.328 56,190 38,03U .. ~J..'.LSJ..T-!:.R.lL"" r ê' R P ::- - 0 'tH tB - ~O'I1ATtRNAl CARt - OTHER CO ' IS .1..'HR.N 1.1. CA.,R.1:. - OT!i E B rOTLL = KJ r AtHl! H!! LTH TOT.¡L .. SV fA~IL! PLÅNNI~G StrA~IL! PLANNING ~^~rAMIL! PLA~N!NG ~o:-'rÅ~I!.Y~.Pl...\!'INING :,' : CZ ~:T A~ILI;~ PLAN HI NG :: .,~~.~~~~~:~~;~}~,~,~,.:'. ...,.".-",-; ::,:"',--~:', 5.~:~Il1MUNI:ZA!IOHS, - ;tA~U¡I'!UNIZ;"I'IOHS ',~, . - iIlOfIl1l1i::rNIZ)'1'IOHS;,-':-::: --,': CE~I~NUHIZAIIOHS: . ~1'OiAI:'t'~' :.c":'_::-' '~-. ' ,-,- " -. - - , - RE:~SZ:XO""LL!: TRANSI'II1':::;:D DISE !O'!).L--' = RE TOB!RCULDSIS CON1'RDl TOTAL . SZ IlIC f,~ Il I C }'U'IlI:: ~ 0 'JIC C! .IC ':'01'.r" L ::: :~ R!rUG!~ H~ÀLTH raTll .0 20 VI~ÀL S!l:IS!ICS 10I;.L ::: RE lIDS !_D! A L TOTAL PHS @ (9),.S IC SEE VIe !S) :;: -- APPENDIX IV - 1 hl- .. . <Ð '0 no- , ~O3 - 2 '-15 9' , 18-0:- 'tU.1 . -,~ 3":,..Q 59_:. 6:1 -, 6~' !""",.:66tt "1:;'1"0'4- .. .. 116 2,..,8.8 u 1,677 1, 677 22 228 l1LL 999 128 1,1191 10 899 338 238 1;qa5 ~,103, 1,~O3 101 107 2S 2,153 34 252 82 2.51.16 289 289 2,553 2.853 202 202 19.157 8 8 APPENDIX IV.2 KEY TO GOVERNMENTAL UNIT REPORT 1. REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING: Indicates the services rendered for the year noted. 2. CITY: The report reflects that data for the city noted. It records units of service rendered to residents for the noted jurisdiction. 3. PERSONAL (ENVIRONMENTAL) HEALTH SERVICES: It indicates the type of service rendered. 4. BASIC SERVICES/OPTIONAL SERVICES: It indicates the classification pursuant to WAC 248-990. 5. UNITS: The number of units of service provided. 6. EXPENDITURES: The total cost of providing the services. 7. LOCAL TAX SUPPORT: The amount of tax support required to provide the services, 8. OTHER: The amount of revenue available from other sources (grants, contracts, fees, etc.) 9. PUBLIC HEAL 1H CENTER: Code indicates which public health center provided the service. SW - Southwest Public Health Center, 10821 8th Avenue SW, Seattle, WA 98146 SE - Southeast Public Health Center, 3001 NE 4th Street, Renton, WA 98055 EA - East Public Health Center, 2424 156th NE, Bellevue, W A 98007 AU - South Public Health Center (Auburn), 20 Auburn Avenue, Auburn, WA 98002 NO - North Public Health Center, 10501 Meridian Avenue N., Seattle, W A 98133 CO - Columbia Health Center, 4400 37th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98118 RE - Regional Health Services: EpidemiologyjTB Control, 12th Floor Public Safety Building, Seattle, WA 98104 Sexually Transmitted Disease Control, Harborview Medical Center, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 AIDS Prevention Project, 1116 Summit, Seattle, WA 98101 EH - Environmental Health, 2nd Floor, Smith Tower, Seattle, WA 98104 8 8 APPENDIX IV.3 KEY TO GOVERNMENTAL UNIT REPORT (Continued) 10. PROGRAM: The heading indicates the program under which services were rendered. 11. TOTAL PHS: (BASIC SERVICES) The total units, expenditures and revenue for Basic Personal Health Services. TOTAL EHS: The total units, expenditures and revenue for Basic (BASIC SERVICES) Environmental Health Services. TOTAL PHSjEHS: (BASIC SERVICES) The total units, expenditures and revenue for Basic Health Services. The same headings are provided for Optional Services. TOTAL PHSjEHS (BASIC AND OPTIONAL SERVICES): The final heading reflects the total units, expenditures and revenue for services provided to residents of your jurisdiction. 8 8 APPE:¡WIX v HHS pover:y Gu~aelines Eff. 6/:/89 SLIDING FE~ SCALE FOR 1989 June - December F ami ly 0 - 100% 101 - 150% 151 - 200% 201 - 250% 251% + Size A B C D E :>-. c:: ~ 1 0 - $ 5,980 $ 5,981 - 8,970 S 8,971 - 11,960 11,961 - 14,950 14,951 (J) 2 0 - S 8,020 S 8,021 - 12,030 12,031 - 16,040 16,041 - 20,050 20,051 ~ 3 0 - $10,060 $10,061 - 15,090 15,091 - 20,120 20,121 - 25,150 25,151 ~ 4 0 - $12,100 $12,101 - 18,150 18,151 - 24,200 24,201 - 30,250 30,251 2 5 0 - $14,140 514,141 - 21,210 21,211 - 28,280 28,281 - 35,350 35,351 .::; 6 0 - S16,180 S16,181 - 24,270 24,271 - 32,360 32,361 - 40,450 40,451 (J) 7 0 - $18,220 S18,221 27,330 27,331 - 36,440 36,441 45,550 45,551 § - - 8* 0 - $20,260 $20,261 - 30,390 30,391 - 40,520 40,521 - 50,650 50,651 L:J *For each addit i onal family member add 12,040/year .' ! F amil y 0 - 100% 101 - 150% 151 - 200% 201 - 250% 251% + Size A B C 0 E ~ ~ 1 0 - $ 498 $ 499 - 747 5; 748 - 996 $ 997 - 1,245 $ 1,246 2 0 - $ 668 $ 669 - 1,002 $ 1,003 - 1,336 $ 1,337 - 1,670 $ 1,671 (J) 3 0 - $ 838 $ 839 1,257 $ 1,258 1 , 676 $ 1,677 2,095 $ 2,096 - - - ~ 4 0 - $ 1,008 5; 1,009 - 1,512 5; 1,513 - 2,016 5; 2,017 - 2,520 5; 2,521 ~ .... 5 0 - $ 1,178 $ 1,179 1,767 $ 1,768 2,356 $ 2,357 2, 945 $ 2,946 t-< - § 6 0 - $ 1,348 5; 1,349 - 2,022 $ 2,023 - 2,696 $ 2,697 - 3,370 5; 3,371 7 0 - 5; 1,518 5; 1,519 - 2,277 5; 2,278 -' 3,036 $ 3,037 - 3,795 $ 3,796 (J) 8 0 -$ 1,688 $ 1,689 2,532 $ 2,533 3,376 $ 3,377 4,220 $ 4,221 8 - - - ~ L:J*For each additional family member add Sl70/month F am i 1 Y 0 - 100% 1'01 - 150% 151 - 200% 201 - 250% 251% + Size A B C D ¡::' ... >< ~ 1 0 - $ 116 S 117 174 '$ 175 232 $ 233 290 S 291 c:; QJ - - - .:::; QJ 2 0 - $ 155 S 156 233 S 234 310 $ 311 388 $ 389 ~ ~ - - - t!J~~3 0 - $ 195 $ 196 - 293 $ 294 - 390 S 391 - 488 $ 489 ..cg 0 - S 234 S 235 351 S 352 468 S 469 585 $ 586 ~ - 4 - - - .....,0- 0 - S 274 S 275 411 S 412 543 S 549 $ ~~~5 - - - 685 686 L:J 3: ~ t:: 6 0 - $ 313 S 314 - 470 S 471 - 626 S 627 - 783 S 784 ,-or;7 0 - $ 353 S 354 - 530 S 531 - 706 S 707 - 883 $ 884 (J)ð:i'=' 0 - S 393 S 394 590 S 591 786 $ 787 933 $ 984 c/) - 8 - - - 0 U) c:::: r\) t)ç:¡ Discount Cateqory Gross Income Fee 100% Discount A 0-10010 HHS Poverty No Charge 75% Discount B 101-15010 HHS Poverty 25% Full Charge + Supplies 50% Discount C 151-200~ HHS Poverty 50% Full Charge + SuDplies 25% Discount 0 201-250% HHS Poverty 75% Full Charge + Supplies 0% Discount E 251 +~; Hî-!S Poverty 100% Full Charge + Supplies 8 8 APPENDIX VI. 1 KEY TO PERSONAL HEALTII SERVICES PROGRAMS BASIC PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES Maternal and Child Health: Pediatrics/Teen Health: Provides screening for hearing vision, growth and development, chronic illness, and acute medical conditions; and information and referral to other sources of care. Focus is on prevention of health problems through early detection and early intervention. Targeted at low income and geographically isolated children. Parent/Child Health: Public health nursing services to children and families provided through home and field visits. The focus is on maternal/child health, parenting and prevention of health problems through early intervention. Day Care Screening: Provides dental, hearing and vision screening for children and infants enrolled in licensed day cares throughout King County. Screens children and infants for abnormal growth and development. Provides education to day care staff on first aid, safety, and preventing communicable disease transmission. Works with day care center staff to ensure immunization requirements are met. Maternal Health (Other): Provides: Pre-natal screening clinics to determine patients' risk levels, pre-natal care for low-income women, referral to other sources of care, follow-up care for infants to ensure early identification of problems and referrals to other sources of care as needed. Services are provided through clinic and office visits. WIC/Nutrition: A USDA supplemental nutrition program providing nutritious food and nutrition education to eligible pregnant and breastfeeding women and their infants and children. Eligibility is based on income and nutritional status, determined by a medical expert. Participants receive monthly vouchers to purchase supplemental nutritious foods at contracted vendors. Participants' nutritional status and related pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight, anemia, and failure to thrive are evaluated regularly. Adult and Family Health: Famny Planning: Reproductive health care including annual physical examination and health screening tests, prescription and supply of contraception, pregnancy detection and referral, infertility screening and treatment, sterilization referral, and community health education. Health education focuses on reproductive anatomy and physiology, contraception, related nutritional issues, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, hygiene and assistance with family planning decisions. 11/5/90 8 8 APPENDIX VI. 2 Key to Personal Health Services Programs Family Health: General medical services for adults and children provided at the Department's North Service Center. Includes family planning, sexually transmitted disease, and maternal and child health services. Immunizations: General, childhood, influenza, and travel immunizations and certifications, information on immunization laws and requirements, and follow-up on referrals on communicable diseases and TB. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diagnosis, treatment, counseling, and follow-up for patients infected with a sexually transmitted disease. Tuberculosis Control: Screening and treatment services for TB patients not served by the private medical sector, including x-rays, TB skin tests, medication, and home and hospital visits. Also provides contact investigation with preventive therapy for contacts, monitoring of TB treatment in the private medical sector, and outreach to high incidence areas. Muckleshoot Health: General medical care for infants, children, and adults, including family planning, maternal and child health, SID, and immunizations services provided on the Muckleshoot Reservation. Refugee Health: Health screening and referral to needed services for newly arrived refugees. Focuses on preventing spread of communicable diseases. AIDS: Assessment, education and counseling services. Provides information to the public on AIDS for people at risk. OPTIONAL PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICES Dental Health: Services for early identification of dental disease, referral for dental treatment, and low cost treatment for those who cannot afford full private sector fees. Targeted for chiJdren (ages 3-18), the elderly (age 60 and older), and households witb incomes of less than 200% of poverty. Dental Services for Division of Youth/Contract Dental: Dental services for King County Youtb Detention Center. Geriatrics: Provides physical assessments; review of medications, diet, and weight; urine testing, oral health screening; foot care; general health appraisals; and counseling regarding physical and psychosocial concerns. Serves persons 55 years and older. 11/5/90 8 8 APPENDIX VI. 3 Key to Personal Health Services Programs Renton Medical Services: Provides health services to the elderly including health assessments; counseling on nutrition, diet, foot care, daily living issues; education on stroke risk factors, breast self.exam, and other health issues of concern to the elderly; referrals to primary care providers; and foot care. Jail Health/Kent Jail/Renton Jail: Provides health services to inmates in the King County Correctional Facility, the Kent Jail and the Renton Jail. 11/5/90 8 8 APPENDIX VI. 4 KEY TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES PROGRAMS BASTC ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Water Quality: Monitors and regulates approximately 1,500 small public drinking systems to prevent bacterial and chemical contamination. Solid Waste: Monitors and regulates 72 public and private solid waste operations amounting to 1.5 million tons of solid waste annually. Investigates several thousand illegal dumps per year. Conducts routine inspections of landfills, transfer stations, incinerators, recycling sites, and collection vehicles. Regulates the handling, storage, collection, transportation, treatment, utilization, processing, and final disposal of solid waste. (Solid waste is distinguished from clean fill {administered by Building and Land Development-BALD} and from dangerous waste {administered by the Department of Ecology}.) Sewage Disposal: Monitors and regulates approximately 90,000 on-site sewage systems (septic tanks). Approximately 1,000-1,000 new systems are constructed each year in King County. Plumbing. Gas Piping, Refrigeration: Inspects and regulates cross-connections between drinking and waste water; determines whether toxins are present in piping and leaks. Inspects all new and remodeled plumbing. Inspects refrigeration systems and gas piping to prevent health problems related to hazardous refrigerants and dangerous gas leaks and explosions. There are 8,000-12,000 plumbing, 200.300 refrigeration, and 4,000-6,000 gas piping installations per year in the County. Vector ¡Nuisance Control: Responds to public complaints and provides community education about rodents, insects, wild animal bites, odors, side sewer breaks, unkempt properties, pet-related diseases, and other community health "nuisances". Uving Environment: Regulates and inspects recreational, commercial, and educational facilities such as public swimming pools, spas, water parks, mobile home parks, tattoo parlor, swimming beaches, primary and secondary schools, and youth camps for conformance with health codes. Food Protection: Regulates and inspects all restaurants and temporary food service establishments in the County. Includes plan review, inspections, complaint investigations, consultations, sampling and enforcement actions. There are over 6,000 restaurants and 2,000 temporary food establishments in King County; most receive at least 3 inspections per year. Meat Inspections: Enforces meat code to prevent disease transmission and consumer fraud for approximately 1,100 meat, poultry, rabbit and fish establishments in King County. Also supports state paralytic shellfish poison program. 11/5/90 8 8 APPEND IX VI. 5 Key to Environmental Hea1th Services Programs Chemical Hazards: Regulates fumigators and exterminators, screens questionable wastes, operates collection centers for household pesticides and PCBs, surveys abandoned landfills, monitors superfund sites, responds to inquiries about the transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. Noise Control: Consultations are provided to the public or governmental agencies about noise problems, not addressed by local ordinances. Noise tests are performed to document problems which may lead to subsequent enforcement actions. Assistance and technical advice are provided for the development of local ordinances. Moderate Risk Waste: To significantly reduce the volumes of small quantity hazardous waste being disposed in the local solid waste stream, sewers and environment. Assist in completing the Draft Seattle-King County Local Hazardous Waste Management Plan. Participate in orientation workshops and public meetings to inform agencies, businesses, and the public. Survey businesses for proper waste handling practices. Tobacco Sales: To reduce the availability of cigarettes and tobacco products to minors. Inspect establishments selling tobacco products to ensure that code requirements are being met. Investigate complaints and initiate enforcement actions when necessary, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH TASKS (Within service programs) Inspections: Routine: Regular facility inspections to determine hea1th code compliance; field reviews to approve/disapprove land development and construction applications; "rough-in" plumbing, gas piping, and refrigeration inspections prior to installations and "final" inspections after installations; "conditions reports" surveying operations existing water supplies (by request); "stub-out" inspections to review homeowner on-site sewage disposal systems; "pre- occupancy" inspections of new or remodeled facilities prior to opening to determine compliance with approved construction plans and health codes; "Review Board" visits for appeals cases related to sewage disposal. Return: Re-inspections to check on correction of violations found on a previous inspection. 11/5/90 8 8 APPENDIX VI. 6 Key to Environmental Health Services Programs Plan Reviews: "Office" and "field" reviews of land use development and construction plans and documents for environmental health implications, e.g. proposed water supply or soil enhancement sites, Environmental Impact Statements. Enforcement Actions: "Closures" and permit suspensions of public facilities for health code violations; initiation of legal action to achieve code compliance (including notice and order, civil penalty, administrative hearing, court action); "permit investigations" into accuracy of applications, delinquency of permit renewal, or establishments operating without permits. Complaint Investigations: "Initial" and "follow-up" site investigations in response to citizen complaints. Consultation/Education: Oral or written communication providing environmental health education, information, or advice to the general public, industry, or other agencies; "group education" sessions (counted as sessions rather than individuals). Illness Investigations: "Suspected food-borne illness" investigations, including interviews and samples from suspected and "confirmed individuals" and tally of "confirmed illnesses". Tests/Samples: Collection of laboratory specimens for testing frozen desserts, rabies, road-side herbicide spraying, marine beach shellfish, chemical contamination. (Oilly coded when not included as part of inspection or investigation coded elsewhere. ) Special Investigations: Non-routine investigations of potential health problems in the community. Has included such activities as the Tylenol capsule investigation, waste screening at landfill sites, the Abandoned Landfill study.k Done by technical Environmental Health Specialists. 11/5/90 8 8 APPEND IX VL 7 KEY TO PROJECTS NOT DISTRIBUTED IN GOVERNMEl\'TAL UNIT REPORT These projects can be divided into two categories: 1. Short term research projects and contracts - services for which special funding exists. Buckle Baby First: Raises funds from donations to purchase approved infant care seats and lends car seats to families who cannot afford them. Has served over 7600 families thus far. 2. Pass-thru Funds/Services Provided to Community Agencies. Services Provided By and To Others: Includes "pass-thru" funds for contracts with community clinics (includes Block Grant, Survival Services {Federal shared revenue}, WIC, Current Expense), language bank, transfer of funds with Alcoholism Division, sales of drugs and supplies to clinics and other health facilities. Laboratory: Includes lab services provided to community clinics and other non- profit agencies. 11/5/90 8 . APPENDIX VI. 8 HEALTH SERVICES NOT ELSEWHERE CODED (Le., not coded to individual jurisdictions) These are service components that affect people from more than one jurisdiction. These services are covered by King County. Pediatrics. Day Care Screening. Maternal Care (Other). WIC AIDS. Geriatrics: . Group education sessions on childbirth, parenting, nutrition, dealing with children with handicapping disabling conditions, AIDS prevention and education, etc. . Telephone contacts related to patients served by the program for case management, referral, follow-up. School Health: Provides contractual nursing services to schools lacking such resources. Staff provides screening for auditory and visual acuity and scoliosis; rescreening and referral for care for children failing the initial screening; and assists in compilation of State immunization reports. There were 5,118 units of service provided in these programs to County residents. Environmental HeaJth: Educational activities for community groups on hazardous wastes, vector/nuisance control, and related environmental concerns. Consultations regarding waste screening to determine appropriate disposal of hazardous wastes are also provided. There were 1,066 units of service provided to County residents for these services. Services which affect more than one jurisdiction are not coded to a particular jurisdiction. They are listed as "not elsewhere coded" on the Department's statistical reports. 11/5/90 .c,,'.' : " " i " ~~(~9õ . ~aJ~/ z3 ..yd- ~~ / ~s 70-:5 / otflJ :7Ò- d? ~~-a~(AR- {JetO C¡DdO ~i~C¡cJ - 7 Ie:¿ /.:5 /tr /5.- ~... "{'?~ (7 (F I y- /9 ¡t; c>J I d'S e::;; s- c9(o 5::< ,-, .~ FEPERAL WAY CITY arNC IL SPECIAL MEETING. 1/23/90 . QLD BUSINESS COMMITTEE REPORTS (cont.) Land Use & Trans- portation Committee Vesting ßtatus of Projects in Process Human Serv ic e s Committee to meet with Parks & Ree. Committee, 2/7/90 at 7:30 a.m. Budget Committee Meeting 1/25/90 7:30 a.m. Budget Adoption set for 2/6/90 Human Services . Committee - No Meeting 2/1/90 Will meet 2/7/90 Eu bl ic Serv ic e s Committee 8 Interloeal Agreements completed Meeting at 1:00 a.m. due to AWC meeting 1. Campus Crest Multi-Family Project, South side of Campus Way. 2. Campus Highlands Multi-Family Project, South side of Campus Way. 3.Kits'Corner Apartments, 356th/Enchanted Parkway 4. Campus Park Business Plat 5. Palisades Plaza, 320th and Hoyt Road Report back to Council was requested. Funding for consultant to continue under present budgetary allocation. Cóüri6il~ari Mätks,eàllêd attention to development at 7th and 323rd near wetlands area, much concern by residents of that area expressed. (Campus Ridge) This not under review at present but may be considered as study proceeds. PENDING MOTION CARRIED TO RETAIN CONSULTANT AND INVESTIGATE VESTING STATUS. Couneilmember Templeton, Chairman of the Ruman Services Committee, reported joint meeting on 2/7/90 at 7:30 a.m. with the Parks & Recreation Committee to discuss vision for the future Senior Center, Yvonne Sullivan, Director of the center to be present. Also, a Draft Inter- local Agreement with the Community Development Block Grant Office of King County is approved and ready for execution by the City Manager. The Committee plans include a Citizens Advisory Committee. Councilmember Gates, Chairman of the Budget, Finance and Insurance Committee, announced a meeting on Thursday, January 25, at 7:30 a.m. to review council committee and public budget requests. Budget adoption set for 2~3/90. The committee will also review an Ordinance creating budgetary funds. It was noted the gambling taxation ordinance does not create new tax but transfers funds colle~ted by King County to Federal Way. Councilmember Templeton, Chairman, Human Services Committee, announced regular meeting of 2/1/90 cancelled and 2/7/90 meeting, 7:30am set in lieu thereof. Councilmember Marks, Chairman, Public Services Committee, reported eight Interlocal A~reements have been approved with King County, C1ty Manager Locke commended for tremendous efforts in correlating the cont;act documents: Meeting as set for 1/26/90 at j~OO a.m. to d1scuss ¥ublic Works and Police Contracts. - ~ll- . FEDERAL WAY CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING 1/23/90 OLD BUSINESS COMMITTEE REPORTS (cont.) Public Services.. Committee - Inter- local Agreements with King County 1?e-rSQnne~ a,nd J? ac it it ie:s ComtRittee:- Meeting 1/24/90,1:30 a.m. Salary Schedule and Organizational Chart completed Larger facility needed to house personnel Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Committee - Meetin~ 2/7/90, 7:30 a.m. re Sr. Center program- also acquisition of airport property Open Space Projects 363'L'd P'L'oject Hylebos wetlands Spring Valley Adelaide/Lakoda Beach Properties -, . Councilmember Marks, Chairman, Public Services Committee submitted Inte'L'";"' . local Agreements ready for execution. MOVED BY MARKS, SECONDED BY TEMPLETON, TO AUTHORIZE CITY MANAGER AL LOCKE TO ENTER INTO tllr'1HiRLOCAL CONTRACT ÅG&E.&K~N'IJï$ "11TH KING COUNTY AS FOLLOWS: (1) He..J..thServices (2) Federal Way District Court, including Violations Bu!ieau, (3) jail Services, (4) Community Development Block Grant Services, .(5) Solid Waste Services, (.6) Animal Control, (J) Taxi Licensing and (81 Security 13uat:'d Licensing. MOTION CARRIED. Councilmember Stead, Chairman of the Per- sonnel and Facilities Committee, reported the committee has fi'L'med up the salary schedule and organizational chart and will meet again on 1/24/90 at 7!30 a.m. to look at additional facilities that may be required in view of projections that the present facility will not accommodate staff within the next 1-3 months. Alternatives will be explored with ~eport back to council. Councilmember tolebster, Chairman of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Committee, announced meeting 2/7/90 aé 1:30 a.m. witn the Human Services Committee to discuss the Senior Citizen Center Program and potential ways to acquire property known as the Evergreen Airport property, for public use. Chairman Webster advised that King County has five projects resulting from the Open Space Bond Issue. One is the 363rd project being acquired by the staff of Open Space Office per our request; the two projects relating to the Hylebos wetlands are going to be acquired by the Washington State Parks and Recreation staff as soon as the legal documents are completed lea~ing to additional projects~ Spring Valley and Adelaide/Lakota which are the responsibility of the City. MOVED BY WEBSTER, SECONDED BY HANDMACHER, THE CITY ADMINISTRATION BE AUTHORIZED TO EXPEND UP TO $15,000.00 FROM- THE COUNCIL CONTINGENCY'-FOR TITLE REPORTS AND APPRAISALS ON THOSE TWO PROPERTIES KNOWN AS ADELAIDE- LAKOTA PROJECT S . CARR rED. (Bond is sue will reimburse the City.) -' " -