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ORD 16-811• • ORDINANCE NO. 16 -811 AN ORDINANCE of the City of Federal Way, Washington, relating to the City Center Planned Action established pursuant to RCW 43.21C.440 and amending FWRC 14.15.130. (Amending Ordinance Nos. 14 -779, 10 -659, 07 -552, and 07 -547) WHEREAS, the State Environmental Policy Act ( "SEPA ") and its implementing regulations authorize cities planning under the Growth Management Act ( "GMA ") to designate planned actions that have had their significant impacts adequately addressed in an environmental impact statement (EIS) prepared in conjunction with a comprehensive plan, subarea plan, fully contained community, master planned resort, master planned development, or a phased project; and WHEREAS, RCW 43.21C.440 and WAC 197 -11 -164, -168, and -172 allow and govern the application of a planned action designation; and WHEREAS, the City of Federal Way is located within an urban growth area and has adopted a Comprehensive Plan that addresses the City Center subarea and has prepared an EIS and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement ( "SEIS ") that consider a planned action designation in a portion of the City Center subarea; and WHEREAS, Chapter 7 of the City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan addresses the City Center subarea and contains policy CCP5 that states the City should "[u]tilize the SEPA Planned Action to provide streamlined permit review in the City Center in order to accelerate progress towards meeting the vision "; and WHEREAS, designation of a project as a planned action streamlines subsequent review of the project by eliminating the need for preparation of a threshold determination or EIS; and Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 1 of 11 • • WHEREAS, the City Council enacted Ordinance No. 07 -547 on February 20, 2007, establishing the City Center Planned Action, pursuant to RCW 43.21C.031; and WHEREAS, the City Council enacted Ordinance No. 14 -779 on December 2, 2014, approving a short-term extension of the designated development timeframe for a period of nine (9) months. During that time the city conducted a detailed transportation analysis, as part of a plan to subsequently extend the EIS for a longer period of time; and WHEREAS, renewing the designation of a portion of the City Center subarea as a planned action with appropriate standards and procedures will help achieve permit processing efficiency and promote environmental quality; and WHEREAS, on October 16, 2015, the City issued a Draft Supplemental EIS to the 2006 City Center Planned Action EIS; and WHEREAS, on November 9, 2015, the City held a public meeting to receive comments regarding the Draft SEIS; and WHEREAS, the City considered comments received and issued a Final Supplemental EIS on December 30, 2015; and WHEREAS, proposed development within the City Center planned action area is subject to the mitigation measures identified by the Supplemental EIS; and WHEREAS, the Land Use and Transportation Committee ( "LUTC ") of the Federal Way City Council considered these procedural code amendments on January 5, 2016, and recommended adoption of the text. NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FEDERAL WAY, WASHINGTON, DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 2 of 11 • • Section 1. Chapter 14.15.130 of the FWRC is hereby amended to read as follows: 14.15.130 City center planned action. (1) Purpose. The city of Federal Way declares that the purpose of this section is to: (a) Combine environmental analysis with land use planning; and (b) Set forth a procedure designating certain project actions in a portion of the city center subarea as "planned actions" consistent with state law RCW 43.21C.440; and (c) Streamline and expedite the land use permit review process by relying on completed and existing environmental analysis for the planned action area; and (d) Apply the Federal Way Revised Code together with the mitigation framework in subsection (3) of this section for the purpose of processing planned action development applications. (2) Findings. The city of Federal Way finds that: (a) The city of Federal Way is required to prepare and implement plans in accordance with the provisions of the Growth Management Act, Chapter 36.70A RCW; (b) The city of Federal Way has adopted a comprehensive plan and city center subarea plan in compliance with the GMA; (c) The city center planned action environmental impact statement and supplemental environmental impact statement identif}esy and addresses all significant environmental impacts associated with the preposed- planned action as defined in subsection (3) of this section; (d) The mitigation measures contained in Exhibit B, "Planned Action Mitigation Document," adopted by ordinance on January 19, 2016 of Ordinance 07 517 , together with applicable city development standards, are adequate to mitigate the significant adverse environmental impacts of planned action development as defined in subsection (3)(c) of this section, subject to project review; (e) The expedited permit review procedures as set forth in this section are and a benefit to the public, protect the environment, and enhance economic development; and (f) Opportunities for public involvement and review have been provided, and comments considered as part of preparation of the draft and final planned action environmental impact statement and supplemental environmental impact statement. (3) Procedures and criteria for evaluating and determining projects as planned actions. Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 3 of 11 • • (a) Planned action site. The planned action designation shall apply to the approximately 700215 -acre site generally bounded by South 312th Street on the north, South 324th Street on the south, Pacific Highway South on the west and 23rd Avenue South on the east, Additional area is located east of 23rd Avenue South, bordered on the north by South 317th Street and on the south by South 319th Place and shown in Exhibit A, "City Center Planned Action Area Map," adopted by ordinance on January 19, 2016 of Ordinance 07 547. (b) Environmental document. A planned action designation for a site - specific application shall be based on the environmental analysis contained in the city center planned action environmental impact statement (EIS) completed by the city ein September 8, 2006 and the supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) completed in 2015. "EIS" means the city center planned action environmental impact statement composed of the draft EIS (June 2006) and the final EIS (September 2006) and "SEIS" means the supplemental environmental impact statement composed of the draft SEIS (October 2015) and the final SEIS (December 2015). The planned action mitigation document (Exhibit B of Ordinance 07447) is based upon the analysis of the EIS and SEIS. The mitigation document, together with applicable city codes, ordinances and standards, shall provide the framework for the decision by the city to impose conditions on a planned action project. (c) Planned action qualifications. (i) Land uses. The following uses are the primary uses analyzed in the SEIS. (A) Retail goods and services. (B) Office. (C) Lodging. (D) Residential. (E) Civic. (F) Structured parking. (ii) Development thresholds. The planned action designation applies to future development proposals that cumulatively do not exceed the development envelope established by the SEIS, as and shown in the city center summary planned action development envelope table below: City CenteF Summary Planned Action Development Envelope Table Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 4 of 11 Uses Development Envelope Retail 750,000 175,000 sf Office 350,000 100,000 sf Lodging 600 rooms Residential 749 -2,400 units Civic 500,000 sf Structured Parking 750 stalls The planned action designation also applies to demolition of existing parking facilities development (no limitation on square footage). If proposed plans significantly change the the environmental determinations of the SEIS, additional SEPA review may be required. Additional SEPA environmental review may be conducted a or supplement to the planned action EIS consistent with city SEPA procedures and state law. Shifting the total build -out of development among uses, or similar uses that may not be specifically listed in the above table, may be permitted so long as the total build -out does not exceed the aggregate amount of the development envelope; or trip generation and parking thresholds reviewed in the SEIS, and so long as the impacts of that development have been identified and mitigated in the SEIS and mitigation document. (iii) The project is located within the planned action area. (iv) Transportation (A) Vehicle trip ranges generation. The ranges of vchielc trips generation alternatives reviewed in the SEIS are as follows: Tittle-Period Total rips AM Peak Hour '7224 Saturday Peak Hour 2,816 PM Peak Hour 2,727 Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 5 of 11 • • Time -Period Total-Trips AM Peak Hour 919 1,073 Total Tri i s Total Tri I s AM Peak Hour Saturday Peak Hour 2,537 2,552 6,919 6,792 PM Peak Hour 2,360 2,370 Trip Generation by Alternative Time Period 2025 No Action 2025 Action Alternative Alternative Total Tri i s Total Tri I s AM Peak Hour 3,040 3,617 PM Peak Hour 6,919 6,792 The SEIS conducted quantitative analysis on a per- intersection basis of impacts and mitigation through 2009 2025 (or the equivalent time, based on the cumulative totals of projected vehicle trips). EIS analysis of 2010 2014 vehicle weflEs-direeter. (B) Trip threshold. Proposed development that would result in a cumulative total of trips that exceeds the maximum trip levels shown above would not qualify as a planned action. (C) Public works discretion. The public works director shall have discretion to determine incremental and total trip generation, consistent with the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE) General Manual (latest ed.), for each fiction project permit application (v) Elements of the environment analyzed in the SETS A project that would result in a significant change in impacts to any of the elements of the environment identified in the SEIS would not qualify as a planned action. Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 6 of 11 • • (vi) Time horizon. The planned action designation is intended to be applicable until all development shown in the city center summary planned action development envelope table (subsection (3)(c)(ii) of this section) is constructed or until the total trips in the trip generation by alternative table (subsection (3)(c)(iv) of this section) are exceeded, or until September 30, 2015 December 31, 2025, whichever occurs first. I" addditi n3 sShould environmental conditions significantly change from those analyzed in the SEIS, the city's SEPA official may determine that the planned action designation is no longer applicable unless additional, supplementary- environmental review is conducted, regardless of the date. (d) Planned action review criteria. (i) Uses and activities described in the SEIS, subject to the qualifications described in subsection (3)(c) of this section and the mitigation measures in the planned action mitigation document Exhibit B of Ordinance 07 -54'7, may be designated planned actions pursuant to RCW 43.21 C.440. (ii) The SEPA official or designee is authorized to designate a project application as a planned action pursuant to RCW 43.21C.440, if the project meets all of the following conditions: (A) The project is not otherwise exempt from SEPA; and (B) The project is consistent with the city of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan adopted under Chapter 36.70A RCW; and (C) The project is subsequent to-or is-implementing a project which has had its significant adverse environmental impacts that have been adequately identified in the SEIS; and (D) The project falls within the planned action qualifications identified in subsection (3)(c) of this section; and (E) The SEPA official has determined that the project's adverse impacts are able to be mitigated through the application andief4nelusion of mitigation measures detailed in the planned action mitigation document in Exhibit B of Ordinance 07- 547, as well as other applicable city, county, state, and federal requirements and conditions, which together constitute sufficient mitigation for the significant ; and (F) The proposed project complies with all applicable local, county, state, and federal regulations, and Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 7of11 • • (G) The proposed project is not an essential public facility, as defined in RCW 36.70A.200, unless an essential public facility is accessory to or part of a development that is designated a planned action under this subsection. (e) Effect of planned action. (i) Upon designation by the SEPA official that the development proposal within the planned action area qualifies as a planned action pursuant to this section and WAC 197 -11 -172, the project shall not be subject to a SEPA threshold determination, an environmental impact statement (EIS), SEPA appeal or any other additional review under SEPA. (ii) Being designated as a planned-action or planned action project means that a the EIS. SEPA. However, as stated under subsection (3)(d)(ii)(F) of this scction, in order to identified in the city center planned action EIS, as outlined in this document and (iii) Additionally, projects will be subject to applicable city, state and federal regulatory requirements. The planned action designation shall not exempt a project from meeting the city' -s code and ordinance requirements apart from the SEPA process. This includes paying applicable transportation impact fees (Chapter 19.91 FWRC) and making development improvements, includingthose for safety and access purposes (Chapter 19.135 FWRC). Projects that qualify as Planned Actions are not exempt from the Transportation Concurrency Management Program (Chapter 19.90 FWRC). (f) Planned action permit process. The director of community development services or designee shall review projects and determine whether they meet the criteria as planned actions under applicable state, federal, and local laws, regulations, codes and ordinances. The review procedure shall consist, at a minimum, of the following: (i) Development applications will meet the requirements of the Federal Way Revised Code (FWRC) Titles 4, 8, 11 (Division 141), 13, 14, 15 and 19 and Chapter 1.35 FWRC. Applications shall be made on forms provided by the city and shall include a Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 8of11 • (ii) The director of community development cervices will determine whether the application is complete as provided in FWRC 19.15.0485. (iii) After the city receives and reviews a complete application, the SEPA official shall determine, utilizing the criteria and procedures contained in subsection (3)(d) of this section and WAC 197 -11 -172, whether the project qualifies as a planned action. If the project does qualify as a planned action, the director of community development services shall notify the applicant, and the project shall proceed in accordance with the appropriate permit procedures, except that no additional SEPA review, threshold determination or EIS will be required. (iv) For projects that qualify as planned actions, public notice shall be provided as specified in FWRC 14.15.060(3). (v) If a project is determined not to be a planned action, the director of community development services shall notify the applicant and prescribe a SEPA review procedure consistent with the city SEPA procedures and state laws. The notice to the applicant shall describe the elements of the application that result in disqualification as a planned action. (vi) Projects disqualified as a planned action may use or incorporate relevant elements of the environmental review analysis in the SEIS prepared for the planned action, as well as other environmental review documents to assist in meeting SEPA requirements. The SEPA official may choose to limit the scope of the SEPA review to those issues and environmental impacts not previously addressed in the SEIS. (4) Planned action area monitoring. The city center planned action section shall be reviewed periodically by the director of community development services to determine its continuing validity with respect to the environmental conditions of the project area and vicinity and applicability of planned action requirements, to ensure continued applicability of the transportation analysis and impacts. Based upon this review, this section may be amended as needed, and another review period may be specified. (5) Conflict. In the event of a conflict between this section or any mitigation measures imposed pursuant thereto and any ordinance or regulation of the city, the provisions of this section shall control. Section 2. Severability. Should any section, subsection, paragraph, sentence, clause, or phrase of this chapter, or its application to any person or situation, be declared unconstitutional or invalid for any reason, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this chapter or its application to any other person or situation. The City Council of the City of Federal Way hereby Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 9 of 11 • • declares that it would have adopted this chapter and each section, subsection, sentence, clauses, phrase, or portion thereof, irrespective of the fact that any one or more sections, subsections, sentences, clauses, phrases, or portions be declared invalid or unconstitutional. Section 3. Corrections. The City Clerk and the codifiers of this ordinance are authorized to make necessary corrections to this ordinance including, but not limited to, the correction of scrivener /clerical errors, references, ordinance numbering, section/subsection numbers and any references thereto. Section 4. Ratification. Any act consistent with the authority and prior to the effective date of this ordinance is hereby ratified and affirmed. Section 5. Effective Date. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force five (5) days from and after its passage and publication, as provided by law. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Federal Way this 19th day of January, 2016. CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ATTEST: AP OVED AS TO FORM: CITY A / gRNEY, AMY JO PEARSALL FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK: 01/15/2016 Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 10 of 11 • • PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL: 01/19/2016 PUBLISHED: 01/22/2016 EFFECTIVE DATE: 01/27/2016 ORDINANCE NO.: #16-811 Ordinance No. 16 -811 Page 11 of 11 �. ►_it '[• - r � �� Edi � w'-. w k - l� � � . • 3 �- ..* %` .: `• """ as ° .,i �. � FFF LJ •• �: - t iry AWA „ , ,'� / • :."---. ; � � 1 jilt! i ^e .... 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'> : ��� �..3 Exhibit B Planned Action Mitigation Document The City of Federal Way issued the 2016 City Center Planned Action Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement on October 16, 2015, and Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement on December 30, 2015. The Draft and the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statements are referenced collectively herein as the "SEIS." The SEIS has identified probable, significant impacts that would occur with the future development of the Planned Action area, together with a number of potential measures to mitigate those significant impacts. USE OF TERMS The Planned Action area may be referred to as the "City Center Planned Action area," "project site," or "project area" in this document. Unless stated specifically otherwise, the mitigation measures that require preparation of plans, conduct of studies, construction of improvements, conduct of maintenance activities, etc., are the responsibility of the applicant or designee. MITIGATION Mitigation measures identified in the SEIS are listed here for use in conjunction with proposed projects to mitigate related impacts and to qualify as Planned Action projects. Consistency review under the Planned Action and other permit approvals will be required for specific development actions under the Proposed Action pursuant to WAC 197-11-172 and Federal Way Revised Code (FWRC) 14.15.060. Additional project conditions may be imposed on Planned Action projects based upon the analysis of the proposal in relationship to requirements of the city, state, or federal requirements or review criteria. Compliance with FWRC 14.15.130 (City center planned action) is required. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES Chapter 3 of the SEIS identifies significant impacts, unavoidable adverse impacts and mitigation measures for potential impacts associated with air quality, land use, aesthetics, light and glare, transportation, public services, and utilities. Please refer to the Final SEIS for complete text associated with each element of the environment. Following are the mitigation measures identified in the SEIS: Air Quality Mitigation Measures • Construction activities related to development approved under the Planned Action Designation could generate fugitive dust, which could be mitigated using the following best management practices: o Use water sprays or other non-toxic dust control methods on unpaved roadways. o Minimize vehicle speed while traveling on unpaved surfaces. o Prevent track -out of mud onto public streets. o Cover soil piles when practical. o To the extent practical, minimize work during periods of high winds. • Burning of slash or demolition debris is not permitted without express approval from PSCAA. No slash burning is anticipated for any construction projects in the City Center. • Mobile construction equipment and portable stationary engines would emit air pollutants including NOx, CO, and PM10. These emissions would be temporary and localized. It is highly unlikely that the temporary emissions would cause ambient concentrations at adjoining parcels to approach the NAAQS limits. Typical mitigation measures to minimize air quality and odor issues caused by tailpipe emissions include the following: o Maintain the engines of construction equipment according to manufacturers' specifications. o Minimize idling of equipment while the equipment is not in use. Land Use Mitigation Measures Existing development standards along the edges of the Planned Action area appear to be adequate to allow for a compatible transition from more intensive to less intensive uses. However, as development occurs this transition area should be evaluated to confirm that long- term land use compatibility impacts are not being created. If necessary, new development standards for edge areas should be considered. Techniques could include site and building lighting limits, requirements for landscaping, noise control, and other measures. Aesthetics, Light and Glare Mitigation Measures • Continued use of the city's Community Design Guidelines and review/approval process to monitor and mitigate potential impacts associated with light and glare, shadows, and aesthetic impacts resulting from new development, including structured parking. • Increased building height for multi -unit structures in the City Center Core zone would be permitted only with review through the city's design review process, as set forth in the Community Design Guidelines. • Monitor shade conditions as development occurs and amend the city's Community Design Guidelines to require site-specific shadow analysis in public places as needed. Transportation Mitigation Measures This section summarizes the proposed mitigation anticipated to be required beyond the roadway improvements assumed to be constructed by 2025. These projects are listed on the City Transportation Improvement Plan and Capital Improvement Program. Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 2 of 8 Existing Roadway Network Both the No Action and Action Alternatives would increase the density and activity within the Federal Way City Center area. The increased density could increase traffic congestion; however, these increases may be offset by reduced vehicle travel demand resulting from mixed-use development, improvements to pedestrian facilities, and improved transit services. The Action Alternative results in a decrease in average vehicle delay at all study area intersections during the PM peak hour except for 3 intersections that experience an increase of approximately 3 seconds of average vehicle delay. For all intersections, the level of service (LOS) grade does not degrade between the No Action and Action Alternatives. Because the level of service grade does not change, the transportation impacts of the Action Alternatives are less than significant and no mitigation is proposed under the Transportation Impact Analysis. While there are no impacts and thus no mitigation required for the Action Alternatives, Federal Way, Sound Transit, and WSDOT are making and planning significant investments in the area's transportation network to increase the capacity of the transportation system. These projects include the following: • Interstate 5 — SR 161/SR18 Triangle Project: the reconstruction upgraded ramps and improved connections to and from 1-5, SR 18 and SR 161. The benefits of this project are increased travel capacity and safety improvements. • Pacific Highway (SR 99) Phase V High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane improvements, which widened the existing 5 -lane roadway to a 7 -lane section including center median, curb, sidewalk and streetlight. The project is planned for construction in 2016. • Federal Way Link Extension project with plans to extend light rail from Downtown Seattle to the Federal Way Transit Center. • The City's adopted Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan, which proposes projects to add capacity for walking and bicycling and enhance accessibility in the area. These types of projects also -reduce vehicle trip making by making it easier for people to park once and walk to multiple destinations. • The City's ITS Plan, which when implemented, will provide better traffic signal coordination and operations, improved corridor management during incidents, and increased vehicle capacity. Parking Additional parking spaces will be required on site for both the No Action and Action Alternatives. These spaces may be provided on the site or as part of parking garages assumed as part of the City Center development. The number of parking spaces required could be reduced through shared parking arrangements or transportation demand management programs. This reduction could vary from 10 to 20 percent based on the effectiveness and robustness of the programs implemented. Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 3 of 8 Additional Mitigation The mitigation identified in this section is focused on additional improvements that could be required to meet the expected travel demand on area roadways associated with the proposed development in the project area. Development will need to meet the requirements of applicable codes at the time of application. Such requirements might include the dedication of right-of-way; installing curbs, gutters, and sidewalks; drainage improvements; and other requirements of the city. Additional mitigation may be required for individual development applications within the project area to reduce area traffic impacts, or improve on-site circulation and to meet city and state requirements for Commute Trip Reduction and Transportation Demand Management. Actions to be considered include: On -Site Improvements Includes driveway and circulation action/improvements to minimize impact on area roadways. Actions may include management of access points, traffic control measures, construction of internal roadways, turn lanes, pedestrian and bicycle improvements, and connections to adjacent developments. Non -Motorized Mode Improvements Mitigation may be required per site specific and land use development proposals to address pedestrian, bicycle, and transit improvements to support the plans, policies, and goals as noted within the City of Federal Way Transportation Element. Grid Roadway Development Part of the City Center Plan is to develop a number of internal roadways to create smaller blocks that will improve the grid network and improve the access for pedestrians and vehicles. Right-of- way dedication and street improvements shall be a component of the development submittal phase of a proposed project within the project area. Roadways within the project area must meet specific "City Center" design standards as specified in the Transportation Element (Chapter 3) of the City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan. Right -of -Way Dedication Right-of-way dedication and frontage improvements may be required in conjunction with proposed developments. Roadways within the project area must meet specific "City Center" design standards as specified in the Transportation Element (Chapter 3) of the City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan. Transportation Demand Management (TDM) TDM actions can be used to reduce the impact of the project and as a mitigation action. These actions may include provision of transit passes to tenants and employees, ridesharing programs, priority carpool parking, and guaranteed ride home programs. TDM actions are designed to primarily address commute trips and may not be applicable as mitigation for all developments. The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan summarizes TDM alternatives by their functional grouping and potential effectiveness, implementation difficulties, and expected cost Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 4 of 8 effectiveness. These strategies include: telecommuting; parking management and pricing; flexible work schedule; rideshare programs; traveler information; public relations; and marketing. Following is a list of recommended mitigation measures that can be considered in conjunction with individual development projects within the project area: 1. Encourage voluntary expansion of the CTR Program to employers of less than 100 employees. The encouragement by employers may be as diverse as subsidized bus passes, car pool space priority, bike racks, shower facilities, van pools, car pool information access, telecommuting, variable work hours, etc. 2. Encourage the formation and expansion of area -wide ride -sharing programs. Such programs operate with little direct cost to the city and are highly cost effective. 3. Support the enhancement of park and ride facilities and transit centers to supplement the regional system, either directly through physical development or enhancements, or indirectly through development conditions where employer vans are required to shuttle employees to park and ride facilities or transit centers. 4. Facilitate enhancements to the HOV system. This may include the dedication of property for HOV lanes, construction of arterial HOV lanes within existing city right-of-way, and priority treatments for buses at traffic signals. At the very least, where feasible, opportunities to enhance access to the state system of HOV lanes should be considered. 5. Achieve increased densities and mix of uses to support public transportation, decrease trip generation and parking impacts. 6. Encourage facilities (shelters, loading spaces, etc.) to accommodate City Center shuttle service in association with development projects, together with enhanced pedestrian and bicycle access and security. 7. Improve pedestrian and bicycle access to bus routes and transit centers. This can be a requirement of subdivision, development, and redevelopment. The city may need to acquire easements and construct trail connections. Development incentives could be granted for providing such amenities that are pedestrian, bike, and transit friendly. While bicycle, pedestrian, and bus transit services and facilities may be desirable for other reasons; they should not be looked on as highly cost-effective strategies to the exclusion of those actions listed above. Neighborhood Traffic Control Development within the project area may be required to include actions to reduce the impact of cut through traffic on residential areas. Examples of neighborhood traffic control actions include: turn restrictions, speed controls, traffic enforcement, and parking restrictions. Parking Mitigation actions that reduce the parking requirements within the project area should be encouraged. Examples include shared parking, employee parking programs, parking time restrictions, and paid parking programs. Shared parking strategies focus on looking at Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 5 of 8 opportunities where adjacent uses have parking demand profiles that can support the sharing of a smaller amount of parking spaces. For example, an office building with an 8 am to 5 pm demand could share its parking with evening dominated uses such as restaurants or a cinema. A parking demand study, which shows the hourly parking demand profiles for adjacent uses and the potential for joint parking opportunities within a mixed-use development, can be used to reduce the number of parking spaces. In addition, contained in the above TDM mitigation are strategies that overlap with parking mitigation plans for development. A development may propose a plan and management system to the city for approval upon submittal of the development permit. Those items may contain the following in support of the City of Federal Way and state Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) requirements: Alternative Mode Support Measures Public education and promotion may increase the effectiveness of these other strategies up to three percent. Area -Wide Ride Matching Services May result in a 0.1-3.6 percent reduction in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and an up to 2.5 percent VMT reduction in transit services. Reductions in parking required may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Vanpool Service May result in an up to 8.3 percent in commute VMT, as well as a reduction in transit and vanpool fares up to 2.5 percent. Reductions in parking required may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Non -Motorized Modes Plan and Implementation May result in an up to 0-2 percent regional VMT reduction. Reductions in parking required may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. HOV Facilities May result in an up to 1.5 percent VMT reduction and 0.2 percent vehicle trip reduction. Reductions in parking required may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. On Site Development of Park and Ride Program May result in up to 0-0.5% VMT reduction. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Employer -Based TDM Measures Parking Mitigation Monetary incentives may result in an up to 8-18 percent trip reduction at the site. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 6 of 8 Alternative Work Schedules May result in as much as a 1 percent regional VMT reduction. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip generation rates. Commute Support Programs May result in up to 0.1-2.0 percent regional VMT reduction. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip generation rates. Parking Management May result in up to a 20 to 30 percent reduction in SOV trips to/from the site. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Telecommuting Up to 10 percent commute VMT reduction. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Other Strategies Parking Tax May result in up to a 1 to 5 percent reduction in regional VMT and trip generation, but requires City Council and/or legislative action. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Development Parking Impact Mitigation Requires City Council approval to allow for payment of parking -mitigation funds towards long term investments in structured parking solutions in lieu of full parking requirement. Reductions in required parking may be calculated on the basis of these lower trip -generation rates. Mixed Land Use/Jobs Housing Balance May result in VMT reductions up to 10 percent. Parking stall credit is given based on overlapping shared usage of mixed facility, per city code provisions. Transit -Oriented and Pedestrian -Friendly Design Site and building design that encourages transit usage and/or walking may reduce overall parking requirement. Requires design review and staff approval. Employment Center Density Achievement of sufficient density within the City Center to constitute a regional employment center may reduce SOV work trips to individual development projects by up to 50 percent. Parking stall reductions may also apply to developments. Other Parking Management Plans May mitigate 1 to 5 percent region -wide VMT, provided enforcement issues are addressed in the mitigation plan. Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 7 of 8 Transportation Impact Fee Under 2006 EIS Addendum #3 (November 2010), the transportation impact fee (TIF) program (FWRC 19.91), was to replace the established pro -rata mitigation fee per PM vehicle trip identified in Exhibit B to Ordinance 07-547, the Planned Action adoption ordinance. Development within the Planned Action area will be required to pay the required transportation impact fee as prescribed in FWRC 19.91 and the adopted city fee schedule. This practice complies with the state's Growth Management Act (GMA) intent that new growth would pay a proportionate share of the cost of new facilities needed to serve the new growth, and also mitigate the adverse impact of future development within the Planned Action area. The transportation impact fee is collected and spent for system improvements included within the list of transportation capital facilities in the city's comprehensive plan transportation element. Public Services Mitigation Measures • Coordinate with the Police Department and South King Fire & Rescue during final design, construction, and operation of future development to ensure that reliable emergency access is maintained. • Coordinate with the Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Services Department to identify opportunities for increased recreational open space for general public use throughout the project area, and within new development proposals. • Reduce public safety impacts through adherence to crime prevention through environmental design (OPTED) design standards. • Provide emergency service providers with advanced notice of construction schedules and any planned street closures or blockages. • Avoid or, minimize street closures or blockages during construction to avoid impact to emergency response times. Utilities Mitigation Measures • Ensure that all new development complies with local, state, and federal standards for energy conservation. • Encourage drought -tolerant landscaping (xeriscaping) for new development. • Encourage new development to incorporate appropriate water conservation measures into their operations. • Plan with service providers to minimize impacts of utility relocations (equipment procurement times, relocate in advance of construction, etc.). • Inform utility customers of any planned temporary service disruptions. • Coordinate with all utility companies on the design of the new services and connections. Planned Action Mitigation Document Page 8 of 8