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09-21-2021 01-04-2022 3 - FWPS Levy Information (2)Police Department Proposing Additional Personnel and Resources City Council Report September 21, 2021 Andy Hwang, Chief of Police Steve Groom, Finance Director g�~,Gs ��ERAL�p� POLIO- 1 Overview Changes in Public Safety Historical Staffing Background Police Chiefs Recommendations ERAL Changes in Publ'ic Safety The United States is experiencing an increase in gun violence, and the greater Seattle -Tacoma region is caught up in it. Recently in Federal Way we experienced several shootings in a short span of time. In Washington State, there were 302 murders in 2020 in comparison to 206 in 2019, an increase of 46%. In King County, there were 102 murders in 2020, and 69 fatal shooting victims, an increase of 27%. In the first six months of 2021, there has been 42 fatal shooting victims in King County, which is up 46%. In Federal Way, we have experienced six murders year to date. Violent crime is on the rise in Washington and in King County. One of my responsibilities as your law enforcement leader is to inform you, the elected policy makers and our residents, why this is happening. Second, you have a right to expect me to recommend strategies to keep our community safe. poz�c� x Changes in Public Safety ont.1 d) Changes in our public environment compel us to commit more resources to public safety now in order to ensure Federal Way remains a safe place to live, work, shop and play. Significant changes include a rising population, rising violence throughout the region, and reduced offender accountability. As of April 2020 (U.S. Census), City of Federal Way population was 101,030. Based on that figure, our police officer ratio is 1.36 per 1,000 residents. There was rapid growth of nearly 5,000 people in a single year (96,289 people in 2019). With other significant developments underway, the rapid growth will continue in the foreseeable future. Major projects such as Light Rail and The Commons will significantly bring more visitors and residents to our downtown area. ��ERAL�p� pQzt�� Changes • in Publ'ic Safety (cont'd) Less accountability for criminal offenses creates more feelings of immunity among offenders, emboldening their actions to harm others. Crimes are becoming increasingly more brazen and frequent. King County has jurisdiction over felonies and juvenile crimes. With funding reduced at the prosecutor's office, many felonies and crimes by juveniles are simply not prosecuted. Jails are accepting fewer arrestees and judges are quicker to release them. The same is true of our state prisons. poz�c� x Changes in Public Safety (cont'd) Significant new policing reform laws in the state add to this mixture (HB 1054 and HB 1310). More offenders are, literally, getting away with crime. These bills have "tied our hands" from doing good police work and now we are starting to see its impacts. One of the impacts to the community is the new state law on police tactics (HB 1054), which changed the requirements for vehicle pursuits by police officers. The restrictions virtually eliminate police pursuits in Washington State. Since its effective date (July 25, 2021), the Federal Way Police Department has recorded 17 criminal escapes (as of September 15) due to non -pursuit. When police emergency lights were activated, the suspects fled and the officers could not legally pursue them. Our former ability to pursue, particularly in the middle of the night, was a deterrent to fleeing in the first place; now criminals are more willing to simply drive away. Changes in Pu blis Safety c ont d Stealing a vehicle is often a precursor for committing violent crimes. Apprehending car thieves was a powerful method for preventing violence and apprehending dangerous offenders. Now, however, we cannot legally pursue stolen vehicles. Earlier this year the Washington legislature passed ESB 5476, which essentially de -criminalized possession of dangerous drugs (including heroin, cocaine, meth, Fentanyl and so forth). Drug use is more rampant and blatant than ever. Previously, physical arrest initiated a process in which courts could compel treatment. Now, police officers are virtually prohibited from making arrests for drug use or possession. Offenders walk away with a referral card in their pocket, with no obligation to take any corrective action. Fatal overdose is an increasing plague to Washington's communities. poz�c� x Changes in Public Safety ont.1 d) Much of gun violence in Federal Way has nexus to drugs. Shootings often stem from drug use, drug transactions and drug rips. Drug activity is a primary contributing factor for gun violence and other crimes in our community. Auto theft numbers are significantly increasing in King County: June 805; July 981; August 1,154. In Federal Way: June 48; July 54; August 66. We are projected to between 80 and 90 auto thefts in September. There are several factors as to why certain crimes are on the increase, but in regards to auto theft, one of the factors is directly correlated to the new state reform law. It is the offenders belief that they will not be apprehended and held accountable. FWPD Historical Background 1 October 2006 the population of Federal Way was 86,350. • FWPD had 15 records specialists and 118 police officers. November 2006, Proposition #1 (Public and Community Safety Service Improvement Package) added 18 police officers (to 136 total) and one additional records specialist. • Prop 1 brought the officer ratio to increase from 1.37. Recession 2008-2011 1.59 officers per 1,000 residents, an • May 2009 the police department stopped filling vacancies. Staffing dropped to 122 police officers. • Eliminated criminal intelligence detective, some regular detectives, two pro - act officers, traffic officers (from 8 to 3), and records personnel (15 to 10). • Accordingly, some police services were de -prioritized. Since 2014 we have steadily increased the officer numbers: • 137 police officers 9 Records remains at 10 9 ��ERAL�A Police Chiefs Recommendation 1 Changes in our public environment compel us to commit more resources. Providing the Police Department with additional staffing and resources will enhance public safety to impact gun violence and other crimes. These enhancements will send a strong message to our community that public safety is a priority and criminal conduct will not be tolerated. Police force of 150 police officers • 13 new positions will give us 1.49 officers per 1,000 residents • 13 police vehicles added to our fleet to accommodate each new position. Police force of 12 records specialists • Two new positions 15 additional police vehicles • Recruiting new -hires, retaining tenured officers. ��ERAL�p� p�xG-D�eploVinelit na ncements Deployment of 13 Officers: • 6 patrol officers, one to each squad • 4 pro -act officers • 2 officers to SOU • 1 officer to Traffic g�~'Gs O PP, � ��ERAL�p� POLIO- 1 Estimated Costs Salary +benefits for 13 police officers: $1,275,378 per year Salary +benefits for two records specialists: $126,386 per year Equipment &uniforms + BLEA registration: $183,000 one-time Hiring bonuses: $98,000 one-time 28 equipped patrol vehicles: $2,072,000 initially, $259,000 per year replacement Can We Fund It.? Yes we can, but... ... four questions should be answered .. . ... two feasible options emerge ]' AV Quest*ions to Answer 1. How do we find "extra money?" • No such thing as "extra money" • The formal budget process allocates all our resources to our top priorities • Intermediate course correction obligations must contemplate citywide needs and consider future budget consequences Budget Integrity (A Policy -level Balancing Act Budget Integrity vs. Course Corrections Our adopted, fully -vetted budget allocates our limited resources to our highest prinrit;oc _Quest*ions to Answer 2. Are there any current -year savings? • 2021-2022 estimated jail cost savings $1.5 million • $1.0 million in 2021 • $0.5 million in 2022 • Existing vacancies $123,000 (2022 forecast) • Savings decline as openings are filled • Savings will actually fund most of 2022 cost }� it _Quest*ions to Answer 3. Is there any new revenue? • Sales Tax revenue was forecast cautiously due to COVID and has been coming in favorably • Committing $478,000 in projected 2022 Sales Tax Revenue will fill that gap $2010001000 $18, 000,000 $1 6, 000, 000 $1410001000 $12, 000,000 $10,000,000 $8,000,000 $6,000,000 $4,000,000 $2,000,000 $0 Revenue City of Federal Way - Sales Tax Revenue Received Current Year Actual vs. Budget and Prior Year ----------------------- ----------------------- ----------------------- pp , ]' AV Quest*ions to Answer 4. How are future years impacted? • Adding vehicles increases annual reserve funding • Adding staff increases annual budget commitment • Both obligate future revenue — an estimated $1,660,764 per year on -going Two Options Without ARPA (the hard way) • Savings (already budgeted) • Sales Tax Revenue (budget amendment) • ARPA remains available for true one-time costs • Establishes trajectory now for future budgets With ARPA (the easier way) • Vehicle costs of $2.1 million (ARPA is already budgeted but not committed or restricted yet) • Sales Tax Revenue would be freed up for now Two Options Budget Budget Budget Fund 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 OOption 1- ARPA vehicles GF Commit ARPA revenue $ 1,702,000 $ 370,000 $ - GF Add'I Sales Tax Revenue $ 108,275 $ 478,275 OOption 2 - No ARPA Cap Add'I Vehicle Cost $ 1,702,000 $ 370,000 GF Add'I Sales Tax Revenue $ 478,275 $ 478,275 $ 478,275 Cap Add'I Vehicle Cost $ 1,702,000 $ 370,000 9 5 � f "%' Finance Director's Recommendation Either way, but with a "master plan" ARPA — every dollar spoken for General Fund Budget —every department, every program considered 2023-24 budget consequences Next Steps Next Budget Amendment • Commit Increased Sales Tax Revenue • Increase expenditures —capital (vehicles), personnel, equipment equal offsetting amount AND ARPA Master Planning Update 4o4�G-E dFFf��� A�LiGY Conclusion ✓ Enhancing public safety ✓ Improving recruitment/retention ✓ Anticipating population growth ✓ Considering entire citywide budget ✓ Anticipating future priorities ✓ Spending within our means i ot Prp-qpntati-c Jupstic 'pie' •. � _ : - - v a - - E ,tea MOW jotiflop+ r `