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HSC Minutes 09-20-2021HSC September 20, 2021 Meeting Minutes Page 1 HUMAN SERVICES COMMISSION MINUTES September 20, 2021 COMMISSION MEMBERS PRESENT: Ken Stark (Chair) Cynthia Ricks-Maccotan (Vice-Chair) Kathryn Scanlon Vivian Alexander Jack Walsh Betty Taylor Sofia Mayo Mary Schultz Eric Owen (alternate) COMMISSION MEMBERS ABSENT: Katherine Festa, Grace Ssebugwawo Namagga (alternate) STAFF PRESENT: Sarah Bridgeford (Community Services Manager) Brittany Julius (CDBG/Human Services Coordinator) Maria Smith (Admin. Assistant) GUESTS: Rick Shockley and Jaqueline Garcia (Highline College), David Harrison (FUSION) CALL TO ORDER Chair Stark called the meeting to order at 5:31 p.m. PUBLIC COMMENT None. COMMISSIONER COMMENT None. MEETING MINUTES OF JULY 19, 2021 Vice-Chair Ricks-Maccotan moved to approve minutes. Commissioner Walsh seconded the motion. Motion carried, 8-0. 2022 CERF APPLICANT PRESENTATIONS HIGHLINE COLLEGE Rich Shockley presented on the Economic Development Programs and their mission to start, grow, and create a sustainable and profitable business that will provide for the owner, bring value and meet the needs of the employees, customers, and communities. Reaching the undeserved communities through the StartZone program and assisting established businesses with growth through Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) program, Highline offers: • No cost one-on-one confidential advising • No cost workshop training in areas of Money, Marketing, and Management • Technical Support • Research to support the needs of the business • Referral services HSC September 20, 2021 Meeting Minutes Page 2 Below is a list of what Highline does: • Business idea - feasibility and assessment • Develop the business concept by: o Understanding the market o Understanding the financials o State registration, business license, and permits o Funding options • Ongoing Technical Assistance Jacqueline Garcia supports the Latinx community by providing an educational workshop in Spanish. During the workshop, information and resources about how to start their own business, h ow to buy an existing business, and what type of licensing they need are disseminated. One-on-one technical assistance is also offered in Spanish. The proposed project will serve at least 50 Federal Way low- and moderate-income households, help launch or stabilize 6-8 micro-enterprises, and help to create or retain 8-12 jobs. More qualitative benefits of the project include: • Learn about and explore self- employment and business ownership • Contribute to and become more self-sufficient • New businesses contribute to the tax base of the City of Federal Way • Owners engage with community and become more empowered After the presentation, Commissioners asked about engagement and connections businesses in the program have with the local chamber. This was also an opportunity for Commissioners to receive clarification on outstanding questions regarding the application. FUSION David Harrison gave an overview of FUSION’s mission, which is to, “provide housing and support services to families experiencing homelessness in our community.” After providing historical context of the program’s inception, Mr. Harrison highlighted the impact of FUSION’S program. FUSION has helped hundreds of families experiencing homelessness by providing safe, secure housing with an 85% success rate. In 2020, FUSION served 24 families and 84 individuals (46 children). In 2013, Décor Boutique was opened and currently generates more than $300,000 annually. In December 2020, the Pete Andersen FUSION Family Center opened. The center provides emergency shelter and support services to more than 115 families annually. Homes are fully furnished and decorated by volunteers. FUSION has a goal to add at least one new family home each year to their transitional housing program. With the use of CBDG funding and other sources, FUSION hopes to will purchase 2- or 3-bedroom single family home to be used for transitional housing in Federal Way. 86% of the families are people of color, 46% are from King County, and 36% are from Federal Way with minimum or no income. To get participants acclimated to paying rent, there is a minimal fee that increases as they earn more income. Once participants find permanent housing, they are given the items from the transitional home to start their journey. Commissioners discussed the lack of diversity on FUSION’s Board and Mr. Harrison expressed the ongoing conversations about recruiting a diverse Board, and trying to recruit individuals that were HSC September 20, 2021 Meeting Minutes Page 3 previously in their transitional housing. Commissioners also inquired about the type of housing FUSION looked to purchase, considering the amount of requested funding and the current housing market. 2022 CERF APPLICATIONS REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS Commissioner Walsh asked for the total amount available for the 2022 CERF. Ms. Bridgeford anticipates a total of $339,935.00, which exceeds the two requests. It also allows for additional projects. Ricks-Maccotan moved to recommend full funding for Highline’s Business Development Programs (SBDC and StartZone). Commissioners Walsh seconded the motion. Motion carried, 7-0-1 (Commissioner Mayo abstain due to Conflict of Interest). Ricks-Maccotan moved to recommend full funding for FUSION Transitional Housing. Commissioner Walsh seconded the motion. Motion carried, 8-0 2022 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN – ADDITIONAL PROJECTS AND CONTINGENCIES Ms. Bridgeford commented that during the October 18 Human Services Commission meeting, a public hearing will be held for the 2022 CDBG Annual Action Plan (AAP). The AAP will include the CERF projects from this evening, planning and administration, and housing repair. Ms. Bridgeford then explained the possible contingency plans that can be funded with the remainder of the 2022 CERF. First recommendation- Although CBDG funds cannot be used for government facilities, it can be used to support Public Facilities and Improvement projects that are integral to the quality of for community residents. The City has one elevator which needs to be serviced, allowing for ADA compliance. Ms. Bridgeford recommended including this project for funding. Commissioners discussed the costs of the elevator project and the overall benefit to the community, and if the City should repair the elevator versus utilizing CERF funds. Manager Bridgeford briefly discussed other contingency projects, which includes Housing Repair for seniors or a Down Payment assistance program for Homeowners. STAFF REPORT Ms. Bridgeford talked about rent assistance and stated that King County’s Eviction Prevention and Rent Assistance Program (EPRAP) is still taking applications. Tenants are encouraged to apply. Landlords are required to present a reasonable payment plan for renters to pay back any rent missed. Coordinator Julius thanked Commissioners for reviewing and evaluating the CERF applications in a timely manner, allowing for the timeline to move forward as scheduled. NEXT MEETING Regular Meeting 10/18/2021 at 5:30 pm. ADJOURN Chair Stark adjourned 6:23 pm.