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AG 19-153 - WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WA (3)AG 19-153 file 2 of 2 266( WM: Federal Way's Reliable Partner, Industry Innovator Driven to Serve Federal Way Residents and Businesses Garbage, Recyclables, & Compostables Collection I Submitted April 15, 2019 CITY OF Federal Way WASTE MANAGEMENT Centered on Opportunity n, I Watch the short video included with this proposal! See our new approach to customer service for Federal Way. we WASTE MANAGEMENT April 15, 2019 Mr. Rob Van Orsow City of Federal Way 33325 8` Ave. S. Federal Way, WA 98003 WASTE MANAGEMENT 701 2" Street NW Auburn, WA 98001 Re: City of Federal Way Request for Garbage, Recycling, and Compostables Collection and Disposal/Marketing Services Dear Rob: On behalf of Waste Management of Washington, Inc., we are pleased to present this proposal for Garbage, Recycling, & Compostables Collection to the City of Federal Way. We appreciate the opportunity to participate in this important procurement process. We pride ourselves on being Federal Way's reliable partner and industry innovator. We are eager to continue working with your city to implement the exciting new service enhancements described in this proposal. ✓ WM's new customer service approach, which is also featured in a short video attached to the proposal ✓ All new carts included in the Base Proposal at no additional cost ✓ Wage parity for South Sound collection drivers ✓ WM Green4Good grant program opportunity ✓ "Go Paperless" campaign with customer and community incentives ✓ Dedicated Public Education & Outreach resources ✓ A WM contamination reduction plan with incentives ✓ Four sets of solar compactor Bigbelly units for the Federal Way community Waste Management has been Federal Way's service provider for 29 years. We're uniquely qualified to continue servicing the community we call home. We've worked hard to bring you significant value with enhancements as requested, some extras because of our long history together, and even an option for a very modest rate impact for status quo services should you select those alternatives. We remain committed to exceptional service, proactive contract management, and responsive communication. Our service on the street is the best in the industry, because we are driven to serve. Should you have questions or require additional information, please contact us. Thank you for your partnership. Sincerely, Laura Moser Public Sector Solutions Manager 253-804-5730 Imoser@wm.com Marc Davis Senior District Manager 253-880-6479 mdavis35@wm.com Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE iii WJ,M, 0 Trusted partner and ethical industry leader PA, A worry -free implementation for Federal Way Financial strength = Peace of mind Making Federal Way clean & green All new service fleet offering the lowest emissions to date Value for Federal Way Residents & Businesses WM Recycle Right Road Map II The most comprehensive local staffing for contract fulfillment 12LISupporting Federal Way's diversion goals with new multifamily outreach approaches AT -A -GLANCE WM Proposal At -A -Glance The City of Federal Way can be confident WM will implement the new contract smoothly and accurately. ✓ Our deep bench of skilled professionals „ B.2 Resumes, PAGES 10-18 serving Federal Way ✓ Local team, national resources » B.5 Experience, PAGES 22-23, 31-32 ✓ A local leader in transitioning contracts in the » B.5 Experience, PAGE 26 Puget Sound » C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, PAGE 72 ✓ Excellent municipal and community references » B.5 Experience, PAGES 27-30 » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service ✓ As your incumbent, we offer Federal Way the Support, PAGES 59-60 smoothest transition and implementation » C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, PAGES 78-79 ion and With the new contract, WM offers innovative and creative services and programs. ✓ The power of people and technology with » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables WM's service delivery optimization (SDO) Collection and Handling, PAGES 34-35, 41-42 ✓ State-of-the-art fleet, routing and new carts » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables ------------------------------------------------------------------ Collection and Handling, PAGES 37-39 ®Solar-powered Bigbelly waste and recycling compactors exclusively „ CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables for Federal Way Collection and Handling, PAGES 40-41 ✓ Recycling ALL STARS Annual » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables Incentive Program Collection and Handling, PULLOUT PAGE 45 ✓ WM EnspireO Reporting System » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service, PAGE 59 ✓ $5,000 incentive reward and social media campaign to persuade C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, customers to go paperless PAGES 75-76 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE v I MUM AT -A -GLANCE Commitment• Customer Service (see more•'• Our customer service approach will be customized for Federal Way... and available to you a year before the new contract Federal Way dedicated subject » B.2 Resumes, PAGES 15-16 ® experts to oversee your » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service customers' service Support, PAGE 61 ✓ City Services team developed by WM to » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service deliver the best service to city staff ................... Support PAGES 62-63 ✓ Consistent, reliable PNW Customer Service » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service Center Support PAGES 60-62 Technology to ensure prompt, efficient, and ✓ attentive customer service through multiple » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service channels for convenience (text, phone, Support, PAGES 64-65, 67 email, web) Outreach,. • No company is more invested in outreach than WM. Our education team uses well - researched techniques to reach different customers in different ways to encourage them to divert more materials from landfills. ® Public Education and » B.2 Resumes, PAGE 14 ✓ Outreach Coordinator Denaya Shorter dedicates 40% of her „ C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, PAGE 71 time to Federal Way » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGE 93 Award winning Public Education team » C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, PAGE 74 ✓ recognized by SWANA, NWRA and WSRA for high impact programs that » Attachment 5: WM: Innovators and Leaders in create meaningful results. Waste Prevention and Recycling, PAGE 161 ✓ WM Recycle Corps recognized with » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGE 91 national awards from SWANA ✓ ®WM Think Green Recycling and » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGE 86 Reuse events Pioneers in the art of transcreation, ✓ moving beyond translation to offer » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGE 91 culturally relevant outreach for maximum results ✓ Data -driven recycling outreach » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGE 92 Results -oriented, multi -platform public ✓ information approach includes our » D. Implementation and Public Information, PAGES 87-88 websites and social media ✓ WM Recycle Right Road Map » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables (Our Contamination Reduction Plan) Collection and Handling, PULLOUT PAGE 45 •IrJ�Ju. PAGE vi Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services AT -A -GLANCE Experienced • Operations Our entire WM team is ready to implement our new contract, based on the foundation we have created together over the past 29 years. ✓ Our local operations team has 420 years of » g 5 Experience, PAGE 22 WM experience » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables ✓ Exceptional infrastructure for natural gas Collection and Handling, PAGES 39, 54 fueling and fleet maintenance » Attachment 1, Renewable Natural Gas Primer, PAGE 143 ✓ WM Waste WatchO has helped keep Federal » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables Way neighborhoods safe since 2004 Collection and Handling, PAGE 56 ✓ SmartTrucks for better service » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables Collection and Handling, PAGE 42 SDO improves safety, efficiency » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables Collection and Handling, PAGES 34-35 ......................... New carts for our Federal Way customers » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables as part of the base proposal Collection and Handling, PAGE 39 ✓ Sophisticated route management and logistics increase efficiency, reduce » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables environmental impacts Collection and Handling, PAGES 41 -42 Recycling and Composting With our state-of-the-art materials recycling facility (MRF) and material marketing expertise, Federal Way can be confident its recyclables will be reused for the good of our planet and economy. ✓ Seasoned MRF Team » B.2 Resumes, PAGES 11 -12, 1 8 ® Innovation in recycling processing with $6.5 million in upgrades » CA Garbage, Recycling and Compostables ✓ currently underway at JMK Fibers Collection and Handlings, PAGES 49-50, 52 Recycling ✓ As North America's largest recycler, » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables unparalleled commodity marketing expertise Collection and Handlings, PAGE 52 When emergencies happen, WM is ready. ✓ Inclement weather planning with frequent » C.1 Garbage, Recycling and Compostables updates for city staff and customers Collection and Handling, PAGES 43-44 » C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan, PAGE 76 ✓ Uninterrupted fuel contingency plan » C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service Support, PAGE 80 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE vii WJ,M, AT -A -GLANCE WM's Sustainability Performance and Financial Management We're the leading provider of environmental solutions in North America; that's experience you can count on to bring Federal Way the latest innovations. ✓ Diversity and inclusion for a better workforce >> B.5 Experience, PAGE 30 Leading provider of comprehensive ✓ environmental services; named to Fortune's list >> B.5 Experience, PAGE 32 of "World's Most Admired Companies" B.5 Experience, PAGE 25 ✓ Driven by local and national sustainability goals >> Attachment 9: WM Sustainability Report, PAGE 181 ✓ WM's financial strength provides Federal Way >> Attachment 9: WM Sustainability Report, peace of mind PAGE 181 VWPAGE viii Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WM: Federal Way's Reliable Partner, Industry Innovator Driven to Serve Federal Way Residents and Businesses Garbage, Recyclables, & Compostables Collection I Submitted April 15, 2019 Table of Contents SECTIONA: Executive Summary..................................................................................................................................1 SECTION B: Management and Qualifications 13.1 Proposer..................................................................................................................................................................... 7 B.2 Resumes..................................................................................................................................................................... 9 B.3 Litigation and Violations.......................................................................................................................................20 B.4 Subcontractors.......................................................................................................................................................21 B.5 Experience................................................................................................................................................................22 SECTION C: Collection and Management Operations CA Garbage, Recycling, and Compostables Collection and Handling.............................................................33 C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service Support...........................................................................................................58 C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan.................................................................................................................72 SECTION D: Implementation and Public Information.........................................................................................81 SECTION E: Base Contract Modifications...............................................................................................................95 ALTERNATIVES...................................................................................................................................................................97 FORMS Form 1: Cover Sheet and General Information.....................................................................................................99 Form2: Price Proposal..............................................................................................................................................105 Form 3: Contractor's Proposal Deposit Surety Bond.......................................................................................107 Form 4: Identification of Performance Security................................................................................................1 13 Form 5: Certification of Proposal — Declaration and Understanding...........................................................1 17 ATTACHMENTS Attachment 1: Renewable Natural Gas Primer.................................................................................................143 Attachment 2: Inclement Weather FAQs...........................................................................................................147 Attachment 3: Recycling News Bulletin.............................................................................................................151 Attachment 4: WM and the City of Newcastle Aligning Cart Color Standards.......................................157 Attachment 5: WM: Innovators and Leaders in Waste Prevention and Recycling..................................161 Attachment 6: WM RSA: Collaborate. Innovate. Repeat..............................................................................169 Attachment 7: An Easy -to -Understand Invoice..............................................................................................175 Attachment 8: Sample Public Education Materials.........................................................................................179 Attachment 9: WM 2018 Sustainability Report..............................................................................................181 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE IX 1IWJ1K. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK VWPAGE X Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION A SECTION A: Executive Summary WM: Federal Way's Reliable Partner, Industry Innovator We are your partner for environmental services and solutions, and _ we strive to go above and beyond, to serve and to solve every �� challenge with the right people, the right way. The City of Federal Way and WM have shared a successful partnership since 1990. We have worked together to continuously improve services for residents and businesses while striving to safeguard our planet. Over the years, we have become an important part of Federal Way, contributing to many causes. We value your community because Federal Way is our city, too. WM is the leading provider of comprehensive environmental services in North America, serving 21 million customers. With a focus on environmental sustainability, we offer services that range from collection and disposal to recycling and renewable energy generation. WM was named this year to Fortune's list of "World's Most Admired Companies." No company is better able to deliver the services Federal Way wants. We do this work one cart, one street, one community at a time. Really, we are a very local company thatjust happens to have a national footprint. We are excited about the new contract. We will refresh our services for Federal Way. Throughout the proposal, we have used the following graphics to highlight exciting aspects of our proposal. This graphic highlights contract -required services we already provide This graphic marks services we are on track to implementing with the new contract Why wait? We are so excited about some new services we'll deliver them a year early in September 2019! ® "New!" marks the many ways we are improving our existing services and implementing new ones Our Federal Way customers say it best Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 1 WYRK, SECTION A WM: Industry Innovator WM operations Our pioneering program, Service Delivery Optimization (SDO), Our 99.99% pickup has improved our collection and maintenance operations by linking rate means you get fewer technology and logistics management with the skills of our drivers. calls from the community Onboard computers, routing software, and cameras have improved about service concerns. safety and accountability, increased employee engagement, and delivered customer satisfaction on Federal Way collection routes. WM puts safety first! Safety is not a priority for WM because priorities often change. Safety is a core value for our company. We strive to make certain each task, piece of equipment, company policy and procedure reinforces safe actions. Our employees understand their responsibility to the communities we serve. WM's safety performance ranks among the best in the industry. Materials Recovery Facilities WM invests in the future now. We had been developing new markets and better materials recovery facilities well before China severely restricted imports of recyclables. As a result, in 2018, WM's Pacific Northwest Area did not send recyclables to the landfill, unlike our competitors. Currently, WM is adding $6.5 million in upgrades at our JMK Fibers Processing Facility where Federal Way's recyclables are processed. Turning waste into resources While other service providers may boast they are "not a landfill company," the fact is all companies collect materials that cannot be recycled or composted at this time. WM leads the industry in developing technologies and markets that turn waste into resources. SmartTrucks In the next contract, WM SmartTrucks will help us reduce contamination. Our SmartTruck collection vehicles will be equipped with proprietary technology that documents contamination. Communities may use this data to develop programs to increase diversion and improve recycling participation. WM values employees WM's service is excellent because we value and invest in our employees. With an employee -first culture, we provide ongoing training and opportunities for advancement within our organization. Our workplace is inclusive and welcoming, and reflects the diverse Federal Way community. Our retention rate for our South Sound drivers is an impressive 95 percent! When our new contract launches, our South Sound collection drivers will be paid equally, whether they collect garbage, recycling, or compostables. v�rli. PAGE 2 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION A You Asked, We Delivered We are honored you made mandatory many of the services we already LYou asked. provide. We've been happy to bring the Federal Way community many enhancements during our 29 years of service. Our locally based City Services team, acts as extra eyes and ears on your streets. launched in June 2016, gives your staff >> Our public education programs are diverse, personalized, immediate service. relevant, and targeted. WM has installed plastic, detachable containers >> Our inclement weather recovery plans are and slotted lids at many multifamily flexible and results -oriented. complexes and businesses to reduce contamination. » Our South Sound district is just six miles from City Hall. Waste Watch®, a WM community partnership which assists local police and fire departments, WM: Federal Way's Customer Focused Community Partner WM is actively involved with Federal Way's residents and community organizations. Since 2008, WM drivers have collected and delivered 141,255 pounds of food donations for the Mayor's Annual Day of Concern for the Hungry. We are active participants at the Farmers Market, the Composting and Gardening event, and community celebrations including Federal Way's 4th of July Red, White, and Blues Festival, and Flavor of Federal Way. New contract, big changes! Customer Service, Just for You In the new contract, we're pleased to offer even higher levels of customer service. We call it "Customer Service, Just for You." WM will designate a Federal Way team to oversee the needs of our customers who call the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Customer Service Center in Phoenix. This is the first time we have offered this city -centric approach to any municipal customer. Using Federal Way's dedicated phone number, (253) 833-3333, we will create a unique call system to manage and report Federal Way call volume. This will be a dedicated call queue, exclusively for Federal Way customers. Two seasoned customer service supervisors and two skilled team floor leads will oversee Federal Way calls. The four Federal Way subject experts will ensure our Federal Way and other PNW representatives know and understand the intricacies of your new contract! Customer service supervisors will travel to Federal Way several times each year to meet city staff and ride with our drivers to become fully acquainted with the city and customers. Federal Way customers will hear targeted local messages when they call. We will extend Customer Service Center hours to 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturdays for our Federal Way customers. In addition, Federal Way will continue to enjoy the services long offered by our PNW Customer Service Center, like Digital Chat and online automated services. Experience has taught us it's not the location of our Customer Service Center that's important, it is the service we deliver. Quality services today, Federal Way centric services as soon as September 2019. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 3 WJ,K, SECTION A WM's Improved Contamination Reduction Plan WM is eager to partner with Federal Way on its ambitious plan to reduce contamination in recycling. Our multifaceted program will blend education, monitoring, and technology to teach customers to Recycle Often. Recycle Right. WM's Public Education and Outreach Coordinator Denaya Shorter, based at our South Sound district, will dedicate 40% of her time to programs in Federal Way. We will bolster our efforts to reduce contamination, particularly at multifamily complexes, through targeted education and our award -winning, multilingual WM Recycle Corps, as well as creative materials, careful monitoring of containers by WM staff and technology, and consultations with the city. We will establish benchmarks, so we can measure the impact and overall value of programs, which will guide future efforts. WM drivers will use onboard cameras and computer technology to alert customers to contamination in their recycling, offering immediate feedback for improvement. ow Our Public Education and Outreach team will follow up with OFTEN. emails, phone calls, and visits to improve the quality of %41 , RECYCLE RIGHT' recyclables collected and reduce contamination. Public Education and Outreach - Focused on Outcomes that Matter Most to You Our award -winning Public Education and Outreach team uses creative messages delivered through many platforms to reach our customers with everything from collection guidelines to waste prevention tips to winter weather alerts. Public Education and Outreach Coordinator Denaya Shorter, guided by community - based social marketing, will lead behavior -change programs in Federal Way to reduce contamination in recycling, prevent waste, and divert food waste to compost. WM Recycle Corps collegiate interns will reinforce those messages in many languages to multifamily residents and businesses each summer. ®In the new contract, we will set benchmarks to evaluate the effectiveness of our outreach programs in Federal Way. In collaboration with the city, this data will help determine future education and outreach, ensuring we are providing impactful programs to your community. WM Green4Good Grants — Potentially $ 50K Annually! WM runs the largest natural gas fleet of any service provider. It's part of our commitment to help our customers breathe clean and reduce the environmental footprint of our operations. Congress may reinstate the federal alternative fuels tax credit. Though not required in the new contract, if these credits are reinstated at their prior level, WM proposes sharing the proceeds by reinvesting up to $50,000 per year through a new program offering — WM's Green4Good community grants. These funds could be used for projects or programs the city considers innovative, exciting, and necessary to support the community's vibrance and wellbeing. Perhaps playground equipment for a park or encouraging education with scholarships for post -secondary technical training or college. Maybe an economic development program for small businesses. We'll work collaboratively with the city to determine the recipients. What would you do with $50,000 per year? Imagine the possibilities! v�rli. PAGE 4 Federal Wav Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION A WM: Environmental Solutions Leader We measure our environmental footprint and aggressively work toward sustainability goals to increase waste -based energy production, raise the volume of recyclable materials we process, invest in cleaner technologies, and protect more wildlife habitat across North America. We have the knowledge, resources, and experience to provide Federal Way with the best services to achieve your goals. » Our new Federal Way natural gas collection » We are the largest marketer of recyclables in trucks will have engines that reduce emissions the industry, which means program stability for to nearly zero. New near -zero (NZ) emission Federal Way. natural gas engines are the cleanest neavy » WM works with its vendors to encourage duty engine ever certified by the California increased use of post -consumer content in Air Resources Board (CARB) and the USEPA. the products we purchase, including carts and This means Federal Way will enjoy the lowest paper. nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions commercially available for a heavy duty fleet. " » Our South Sound vehicles run on renewable natural gas manufactured from naturally occurring gas inside WM landfills, providing the ultimate closed -loop solution. » We are North America's largest residential recycler with 143 material recovery facilities. We have three MRFs in Washington. WM is the only provider that can offer Federal Way recycling infrastructure redundancy for processing assurance. Morning launch at the South Sound district Our state-of-the-art routing technology reduces our environmental impact and increases the quality of service. Nationally, we have decreased 8.9 million miles driven by our collection fleet per year since 2017. » WM supports The Recycling Partnership's push for federal funding for more recycling infrastructure, so less plastic ends up in landfills and more is reused. » Our 127 landfill -gas -to -electricity facilities create enough energy to power 460,000 homes, the equivalent of replacing nearly 2.5 million tons of coal annually. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 5 WrRK, SECTION A WM: Provides Value to Federal Way Our proposal includes the services you already appreciate plus enhancements to serve Federal Way residents and businesses better than ever, all at a competitive price. With WM, you can continue to depend on a quality team that has dedicated itself to the city's goals. Laura Moser, WM public sector manager, has worked at our South Sound district for more than two decades. She is an active member of the community and is attentive to city staff. Marc Davis, WM senior district manager, has overseen collection operations in Federal Way for nine years, delivering safe, reliable service. They, along with our City Services team and other managers, respond with eagerness to the city's special requests. Our enhanced customer service approach, including the addition of Federal Way customer service supervisors and managers, as well as adding Denaya Shorter, WM public education and outreach coordinator, to the Sound Sound team ensures you have a robust and committed team of professionals to address your needs. Other ® services include: All new carts for garbage, recycle, and A $5,000 incentive =0 reward and social media New solar -powered Bigbelly compactors 0 O compost —a fresh, campaign to increase for recycling and clean, new look included in paperless communications with garbage in downtown our base proposal customers Federal Way We have been your partner for environmental services and solutions for almost 30 years. That's a long time and we are grateful for your partnership. We know you —your staff, your elected officials, your city streets, your community and most importantly, our customers. With our next contract, we will take a fresh approach, but will continue to be good listeners, engaged partners, and a trusted service provider for the city we have come to call ours, too. At Waste Management, we're driven to serve. And we can't wait to continue serving you in the next contract! v�Jrli. PAGE 6 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.1 SECTION B: Management and Qualifications B.1 Proposer State the name of your entity, home office address, Washington business address, Washington agent's name, address, e-mail address and telephone number, and the name, address, phone number, fox number, e-moil address, website address and title of the person to be contacted concerning the Proposal. If Proposer is o subsidiary, state the name of the parent company, the home office address, telephone number and website address of the parent company, and describe the parent company's relationship to the Proposer. State whether the person signing the Proposal has the authority to sign on behalf of Proposer. State also the names of companies that will shore significant and substantive responsibilities with you, os joint venture partners or in another manner, in performing under the Contract. Include documentation that Proposer is duly organized and validly existing business in good standing, and licensed to do business in the City. If Proposer is not licensed to do business in the City, then the Proposer shall provide o sworn statement that it will become licensed if selected os the Successful Proposer prior to executing the Contract. Company Name Waste Management of Washington, Inc. and Location 720 Fourth Ave., Suite 400 Kirkland, WA 98033 wmnorthwest.com/federalway Contact for this Proposal Laura Moser (253) 804-5730, phone Public Sector Manager (253) 804-6654, fax 701 Second St. N.W. Imoser@wm.com Auburn, WA 98001 Parent Company Waste Management Holdings, Inc. (713) 512-6200, phone 1001 Fannin, Suite 4000 (713) 512-6299, fax Houston, TX 77002 www.WM.COM Waste Management of Washington, Inc., a Delaware corporation, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Waste Management Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation, which in turn is wholly owned by Waste Management, Inc., a Delaware corporation. Authority to Sign Mary S. Evans, area director public sector solutions, has the authority to sign this proposal on behalf of Waste Management of Washington, Inc. See Form 5. State also the names of WM currently uses Cedar Grove Composting to process companies that Will share compostables collected in Federal Way. See Section C.1 for significant and substantive additional information. responsibilities With you, as joint venture partners or in another manner, in performing under the Contract. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 7 MUM, SECTION 3.1 Include documentation that Proposer is duly organized and validly existing business in good standing, and licensed to do business in the City. Delaware I. .ryFd'R82' H. ptR,GOf 5__. _ wY OF -- DF ifs sIAIF:. as x8lAAAAP, WHEREBY tTiRTIFP ",lMd'E IfANAce^!! r OF WASNffiG1VN, INC. ,• IS WLY INcofaOnnisO OafDFn IfIS LAMB OS — .-M OF DC2A»' YANG Y3 SN OCDD sYANDINO AND Nas A Lanni DVBPOnAaa exiN—CE SO sAN A:: MU aNtDllpa Ce 0RI5 —TM — Or fYaE lxarex DAY Or sePleefBsN, A.O. 1014. AND I ✓b f>&aNBY i'mB Bart fT�itr2Fy 7biAs Ti¢ AfmRiu RBPWt'Is 1fnYa 9aaty SIL6fJ m aeAFE- ANO I Lb HiN®Y FVA2'HER CERTIFY 1LAY 15S [FAl1CN256 TAXES NAlT kccVir PAID av Dwze. 0s. a, kh; . and L, - V 13D9999 9300 V,� §"�� A,Ihcnil-1 :203339299 sap Ml9fidfi91d5 eau y.ndy thnttrr,lic+te oolk.�t<npuxau„e awlaa[M1.er=.litrnt Gate: 09�10�19 0 STATES or Aft ryx %e *we of ���fjittgtot� Secretary of State I, NIM WYMAN,s—w ofsrxe ofthe Ste cfw,wnrcnend oacbn irix acal, hereby-cihh CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION OF W—E MANAGEMENT OF WASHINOTnN, INC. 1 CERTIFY,lu therxnrdeau M, in dde N.cd— tbu kcabout wecdent"wasrc,k1,W—Icrdrelawsof Ntc starof Wickcq[ atd OIL pbku E ii; cna —filed in Wohinglw aad heea,ea nRlunwae 0511911999, I FARTHER CERTIFY th,tAeWW,dmrino a Nt—I, and th,t v ofthe dale ofthis cutifircN, they ,e,fthe s .kc orSkk tlo nN r[NectfialNisentityhubeendinnNed- 1 FURTHER CERTIFY that all ici , ir—C, and pc,1— owed end eekkemd ihic4h Ilse Stt,arary of stale haw bem paid. 1F dig$RCERTIFYiw themvel— aaawdtspealhu been dslivcted to the aw;scwyaFSrpro fe, hNtry and Ibc1 pmadia8a rut dralnlstn6w Naselninn ere mt peeaiet_ I—d Dmm Cll moll, 0131 Nemkr. 6C l al f 216 Nm.d .th- DE STATE o,wn.odx e,>he,d xd the seaterft ware �� o,G of Wsshinitm x DlYmpia, the sldc Calmat a x syp7 Rim wlntan, setranry nestam J1 ��'L I989 �O o,a Issued, 03l30ROk8 CITY of .-� Federal Way BUSINESS REGISTRATION License Number 19-63-000001-00-111, Non -Resident Business Registered: WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON INC 701 2ND ST NW AUBURN WA 98001 Expires: 1213112019 Category: 4950 - Utilities- Sanitan. Services Conditions: This license is non -transferable. Please nctiFy the City Clerk's office of any change in your business such as a new location or business name. FEO6TN' 've� y: 6pnppRUL .4' �- SEAL - Thn earlihea Nat 0a eMve anlil` has been iss�xd the regiswtion or li�nsc IisN1 City of Federal Wry-1.--ng FM.3L\L WAY WA 9M N#~ b` af,,Ilite City Clerk. City b Federal Way �IrJ�Ju- PAGE 8 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.2 B.2 Resumes Supply the names and resumes of the principal officers, partners or other officials of each entity involved in performing substantive responsibilities required under the Contract, and provide the names and resumes of the individuals who will be directly responsible for implementation of the Contract. At o minimum, include the general manager, operations monoger(s), financial officer, education and customer outreach manager, customer service monoger(s) and other personnel with whom the City will have regular contact with during the administration of the Contract. Describe the ownership, managerial and/or fiduciary role of each of the participating companies. Include the names, entity affiliation, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key individuals integrally involved in the Proposal. Provide on organizational chart or other means of explaining the interrelationships between the team members. WM is dedicated to continuing to provide excellent, efficient and safe collection services to the City of Federal Way. Many of our team members have worked with you for years, so they have the experience needed to keep giving your residents, businesses, and city staff the best possible service. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 9 WJ,UrIi. SECTION B.2 WM South Sound Operations, MRF and Dispatch Team Marc Davis oversees operations for WM's South Sound district, which serves the cities of Auburn, Algona, Enumclaw, Federal Way, Pacific, and parts of unincorporated King County. Marc has worked for more than 37 years in truck and rail industries, and has experience with customer service, safety, dispatch, finance, labor relations, environmental Marc Davis stewardship, and Customer Service Center operations. He is a key Senior District Manager contact for our municipal customers. He is responsible for ensuring our (253) 804-6760, office operations are safe, reliable, and customer -oriented, while complying with (253) 880-6479, mobile contractual and regulatory obligations. Marc has been with WM for nine mdavis35@wm.com years. He has an associate degree in transportation and business. Dian Young supervises the industrial team, which handles drop -box containers, in WM's South Sound district. Commercial customers often require specific collection windows, unique access procedures and fluctuating set -out volume. Dian works closely with customers and drivers to deliver ideal solutions. He assists drivers with their morning Dian Young launch and confirms each vehicle is properly inspected. He monitors Route Manager, drivers throughout the day with a focus on safety and customer service. Commercial Dian joined WM in 201 1 as a driver at our North Sound district. In 2014, (253) 804-6815, office (253) 455-0355, mobile he was promoted to a supervisor position in the South Sound district. dyoung 1 5@wm.com As a residential route manager, Marklus Henley provides support, expertise, and guidance to our drivers and first-rate service to our customers. Daily duties include managing operational, safety, and Marklus Henley efficiency performance for residential customers. Marklusjoined WM in Route Manager, 2014 after serving 19 years in the U.S. Air Force. Residential (253) 804-6816, office (253) 255-7044, mobile mhenley@wm.com Jason Shea Route Manager, Commercial/ Residential (253) 804-6817, office (253) 455-0486, mobile jsheal@wm.com Jason Shea joined WM three years ago as an experienced driver and route manager with a record of outstanding customer service. He is a route manager, overseeing residential and commercial collection drivers. He is a contact for municipal solid waste staff and residential customers. Jason makes sure drivers have the resources, equipment, and training to provide safe, reliable, and efficient collection services. VW PAGE 10 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.2 Sunny Lawrence began her career with WM in 2002 as an operations specialist in Texas. A year ago, she moved to Washington's South Sound district as the senior operations specialist. Sunny helps the managers ensure daily tasks run smoothly. She is responsible for clerical tasks, including data entry, filing, records management, and billing; coordinates Sunny Lawrence daily route scheduling; maintains databases; and provides an accurate flow Senior Operations of information to all involved in daily operations. Sunny has an associate Specialist degree in real estate from Texas Tech University. (253) 804-681 2 slawren4@wm.com Teresa Chavez joined WM in 2017 and is an operations specialist at WM's South Sound district. Teresa helps check route drivers in and out, verifying the accuracy of tonnage records. She manages documentation for drivers, including maintaining records of their licenses and medical Teresa Chavez exams. Teresa plays an essential role in making communications flow Operations Specialist smoothly through all levels of our daily operations. (253) 804-6758 tchavezl@wm.com Tom Repass ensures all WM vehicles dedicated to the South Sound district, which includes more than 70 collection and support vehicles, are in excellent operating condition. With 18 years at WM and 23 years of military service, Tom has in-depth knowledge of CNG equipment. Tom Tom Repass manages a team of highly skilled technicians who perform daily preventative District Fleet Manager maintenance, and repair vehicles as necessary. His shop has had a perfect (253) 804-6813, office safety record for more than 10 years. (206) 391-91 18, mobile trepassI@wm.com Dan Knight is the district manager for WM's regional recycling facility, JMK Fibers. Dan is responsible for certifying the integrity of inbound and outbound recyclable materials, while managing 119 employees and overseeing daily operations at the facility. Under Dan's management, JMK processes more than 15,000 tons of single stream recycling each Dan Knight month. Dan joined WM in 2010 through an acquisition. He became a District Manager project manager for the Pacific Northwest Area and was assigned to the JMK Fibers Recycling JMK Fibers acquisition and retrofit project. Dan's extensive knowledge Center and experience with state-of-the-art equipment at JMK is vital to the (253) 620-3287, office (253) 431-2425, mobile success of our recycling facility. dknightl@wm.com Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 11 �IYJtJ1�. SECTION 3.2 Mike Range, WM's senior materials recovery facility manager, has more than 30 years in the recycling industry. He oversees the safe and efficient operation of WM's three MRFs in Washington, including JMK Fibers Recycling Center. Prior to joining WM in 2012, he was operations director at SP Recycling, responsible for processing, and marketing 25,000 tons per month of recycled materials generated at SP's facilities. Mike also Mike Range spent 16 years with Weyerhaeuser's recycling division, honing his skills Senior Materials in major markets. Mike is adept at understanding marketplace conditions Recovery Facility and driving process improvements that maximize efficiency. He has a Manager Bachelor of Science in business administration and logistics from the (253) 620-3286, office g (253) 344-8594, mobile University of Colorado, and a Master of Business Administration from the mrange@wm.com University of Nebraska. Erin Malanche is the dispatch supervisor for drop box for the Pacific Northwest Area. She oversees the dispatch department, ensuring productivity and quality goals are met while focusing on safety and exceptional service. Erin works with dispatchers and routers daily to resolve concerns and optimize efficiency on routes. She drives operational improvement and implements best practices within dispatch and Erin Malanche throughout the area. Erin joined WM in 2013. Dispatch Supervisor (971) 678-9340 emalanch@wm.com Erin Wakefield joined WM in 2014 and is the residential/commercial dispatch supervisor for the Area. She leads a team of skilled dispatchers who support our area by managing driver routes, resolving customer concerns, and ensuring delivery of the best service. Erin reviews efficiency, safety, service, and other operational matters with sales, Erin Wakefield Dispatch Supervisor customer service, and operations to maintain a high level of customer (971) 678-9367 satisfaction. ewakefie@wm.com WM Public Sector Team Laura Moser manages municipal contracts for WM in South Puget Sound and Kitsap County. She works closely with our municipal customers as their contract liaison, ensuring all aspects of our contract performance meet and exceed expectations. Laura has expertise in operations, Laura Moser customer communications, new service launches and municipal contract Public Sector Manager implementations. She represents WM at the Federal Way Chamber of (253) 804-5730, office Commerce. Laura joined WM in 1999, and has 24 years of solid waste (206) 391-91 1 2, mobile experience. Imoser@wm.com vwJu. I PAGE 12 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION 3.2 Robin Freedman manages municipal contracts for WM in the Puget Sound Area. She works closely with a team of contract managers, our municipal partners, and elected officials, serving as a critical resource to facilitate all aspects of our contract performance. Robin has expertise in creating and implementing award -winning public relations and Robin Freedman public affairs strategies, and has extensive professional management Senior Manager, experience in the public and private sectors. After supporting WM as Public Sector Solutions, a senior manager for communications, she now manages WM's Public Western Washington Sector Solutions team for Western Washington. Robin has a Bachelor of (425) 825-2033 rfreedma@wm.com Arts in political science from The Ohio State University. Contract Compliance Team Mindy Rostami is WM's senior manager of strategic contracting and municipal legal affairs. Mindy has over 20 years of invaluable public service experience in various litigation and prosecution experiences with public entities and private law firms. Leading the contract compliance and public education team, Mindy supports resolution of contract issues, fulfillment of contractual obligations, and customer education and Mindy Rostami outreach efforts. Mindy also develops new contracts and amendments in Senior Manager, Strategic Contracting and addition to serving as a direct resource for municipal staff. Mindy holds Municipal Legal Affairs a Bachelor of Arts in sociology from the University of Washington and (425) 825-2034 a Juris Doctorate from Seattle University. She is an attorney at law, mrostami@wm.com bar certified in the State of Washington, and a 2018 graduate of Leadership Eastside. Cory Caldwell, who joined WM 16 years ago, spent his early years in customer service, then billing. Now a contract compliance administrator, Cory is responsible for assisting with monthly municipal report Cory Caldwell obligations, including reports to the City of Federal Way. Cory has Contract Compliance expertise in reporting, pricing, and extracting customer data. Administrator (425) 825-0069 corycaldwell@wm.com Dawn Prewett manages data for WM reports to our municipal partners, including Federal Way. She maintains WM's internal knowledge database, Y I 'A Green Pages, for the Pacific Northwest. Green Pages includes local, contract -specific information such as services, rates, collection schedules, s} ` maps, special events, and activities. Dawn joined WM six years ago, starting Dawn Prewett in customer service, then promoted from agent to managing Green Pages Contract Compliance beforejoining the Contract Compliance team. Her customer service Administrator background, in addition to her problem -solving acumen, drives her goal to (425) 814-7839 exceed our city partners' expectations. Dawn holds a Master of Business dprewett@wm.com from Pacific Lutheran University. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 13 WJ,UrIi. SECTION 3.2 Outreach and Education Team Hannah Scholes is manager of education and outreach for WM's Pacific Northwest Area, leading a team that collaborates with municipalities, " businesses, and communities to improve materials management practices. Previously, Hannah was an outreach coordinator in Federal Way where she partnered with city staff to create comprehensive recycling, composting, and waste -reduction education programs tailored for the city. She used her Hannah Scholes Spanish language skills to advise customers about the Clean Cart program, Public Education and Outreach Manager encouraged multifamily residents to recycle, helped a Mexican restaurant set (425) 825-2013, office u composting service, and conducted outreach at events. Her experience p p g p (425) 213-3505, mobile in program management and community -based social marketing have led hscholes@wm.com to many nuanced and effective behavior -change campaigns. Hannah was formerly a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay. She has a Bachelor of Science in environmental systems from the University of California, San Diego. Denaya Shorter, WM's public education and outreach coordinator for South Sound district, is dedicated to supporting the City of Federal Way's efforts to reduce waste and increase recycling. She recently completed a Master of Education in urban environmental education and ` - has a Bachelor of Science in biology and ecology. She formerly worked Denaya Shorter for the U.S. Forest Service. Denaya is passionate about environmental Public Education and Outreach Coordinator advocacy and sustainability, and she hopes to inspire diverse urban (425) 457-101 5 communities in the quest for a healthy planet. dshortel@wm.com Communications Team Jackie Lang leads WM's public affairs and communications work in ` the Pacific Northwest. Jackie started her career in Spokane as a TV news producer and reporter at KXLY-TV before transitioning to issue management and media relations in Washington, D.C., and across the Pacific Northwest. She joined WM in 2009, inspired by the opportunity Jackie J. Lang to pursue her passion for community building through effective local Senior Area Manager, Public government and strong, local businesses. Today, Jackie helps our local Affairs & Communications government partners achieve their goals and share their success stories. jjlang@wm.com (503) 493-7848, office Jackie graduated from Gonzaga University in Spokane. (503) 705-0007, mobile �t Gary Chittim, communications manager for WM's Pacific Northwest Area, has a passion for environmental storytelling. Previously, he worked for two decades for television news channels in Oregon and Washington, specializing in reporting on the environment. Gary leftjournalism in 2015 to join an environmentally conscious LED lighting company in Gary Chittim Federal Way. He is new to WM this year. Gary graduated from Arizona Communications Manager gchittim@wm.com State University, Phoenix. (425) 247-6940 �IrJ�Ju. I PAGE 14 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.2 Billing and Customer Service Advocacy Team Tammy Lane manages WM's City Services team, located in Kirkland, and is the billing liaison for municipal contracts. Tammy enjoys ` developing new contracts and overseeing acquisitions. She is a billing specialist and is adept at problem -solving and providing results - Tammy Lane oriented customer service. She has been with WM for 26 years. Billing Liaison Manager, Pacific Northwest Area Tammy has an associate degree in accounting. (425) 814-7880 tllane@wm.com Joyce Wilson is the Revenue Management Center liaison senior manager for WM's Pacific Northwest Area. She is the communication link for sales, billing, and accounts receivable teams, investigating and resolving issues that arise between departments. Joyce joined Joyce Wilson WM in 2010, and has more than 20 years of experience supervising Revenue Management Center Liaison Senior Manager, customer service representatives and dispatchers in the shipping and Pacific Northwest Area logistics industries. (425) 814-7836 jwilso16@wm.com Denie Covert's priority as WM's customer service manager for the Pacific Northwest Area is to ensure her customer service representatives are knowledgeable about our customers and cities. She also works with operations and dispatch to ensure WM is delivering world -class service. Denie draws on experience from 30 years in management and 10 years with WM to make this happen. Denie Covert Denie previously was an operations analyst, supervisor, lead agent, Customer Service Manager, and customer service representative. She spent 45 years in the Pacific Pacific Northwest Area Northwest Area raisin five children, so it will always be her home, (60e 906-5053 although Phoenix is where she offices, only steps away from our dcovertl@wm.com 9 Y P Y Y Federal Way Ambassadors and customer service team. �tiiiiilii� • - ' Robin Krueger, a Pacific Northwest native, started her WM career in Oak Harbor, WA, in 2014, before moving to Phoenix to join the PNW Customer Service Center. She has been a supervisor for three years and has managed agent groups ranging from residential to commercial. Robin Krueger She is responsible for our commercial teams in Kirkland and Phoenix, and Customer Service Supervisor, the PNW Digital Care team. In her new role as a Federal Way ambassador, Federal Way Ambassador Robin will visit Federal Way several times a year to meet with city staff (602) 906-7548, office and ride with WM drivers to gain the "street smart" knowledge of your (602) 319-0740, mobile community. Robin is a passionate environmentalist who enjoys working at rkruege2@wm.com WM because it makes her a good steward of our planet. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 15 SECTION B.2 Josh Pilkington Customer Service Supervisor, Federal Way Ambassador (602) 906-7447, office (480) 244-0896, mobile jpilking@wm.com Marcella Manibusan Billing Supervisor, City Services (866) 713-0480 (425) 825-0026 PNWMunicipalAffairs@wm.com Josh Pilkington, a PNW customer service supervisor, has been with WM since 2014. He has a variety of experience within our company, which helps him communicate all aspects of our business to customer service representatives. Josh has worked as a PNW commercial agent in our Phoenix Customer Service Center; a member of our City Services team in Kirkland; and a route manager. Josh is now a supervisor for the PNW residential team in Phoenix. As a Federal Way ambassador, Josh will serve as an expert to the Federal Way contract, meet city staff and become acquainted with the area and customers. Josh is a PNW native, having home roots in Boise, ID. Marcella Manibusan leads WM's City Services team, managing daily operations to make sure our city staff partners receive exceptional service. She supports the team in providing timely, efficient, and professional responses to all inquiries. The team is an easily accessible direct link between city staff and all departments, including addressing questions about customer accounts and service histories. Marci, who has been with WM for nine years, previously served as a customer service supervisor, managing 20 customer service representatives. She was a team lead, customer digital care representative, resource lead, and customer service representative. Marci has an associate degree from Skagit Valley Community College. WM Pacific Northwest Area Leadership Team Jason Rose, president, has been with WM for 25 years. His passion for environmental stewardship and helping customers attain their sustainability goals is at the heart of every company initiative. Jason has gained local and national recognition for his leadership. He has set standards to make WM facilities across the country more environmental) sustainable. He helped reduce WM's carbon emissions Y P Jason Rose by converting our fleet to natural gas. He has overseen the creation Waste Management of Washington Washington President n President of an extensive network of processing infrastructure in the Pacific 8t Northwest Area. Previously, he led WM's Southern California Area. He jrose@wm.com earned a Master of Business Administration degree and is currently in the Harvard Business School's program for presidents. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 16 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION 3.2 Mary Evans is the Public Sector Solutions director for WM's Pacific Northwest Area. She is responsible for municipal contracts in +. Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, and British Columbia. While working for WM in the Northern California Bay Area in the 1980s and 1990s, she helped cities develop and implement groundbreaking recycling programs in response to state mandates. Since returning to WM in Mary S. Evans the Pacific Northwest, she has built a robust Public Sector team, Area Director, Public Sector Solutions focused on deploying meaningful programs and outreach to advance (425) 814-7844 communities' goals and celebrate their diversity. Mar has a wealth g y' y mevans4@wm.com of industry, public sector, and customer service experience. She is passionate about providing innovative yet pragmatic solutions for municipalities. Her background includes marketing, operations, and finance experience with a major metropolitan newspaper and a national information technology project management firm, in addition to public accounting. She graduated from Georgetown University with a Bachelor of Science in business administration. She is a certified public accountant, licensed in California. Mary has been involved for 30 years with P.E.O. International, a philanthropy dedicated to advancing educational opportunities for women. Joe Krukowski is director of finance for the Pacific Northwest Area. He oversees all financial functions, including the preparation of financial statements, reporting, internal controls, accounts payable and billing. His team works closely with our municipal customers on the billing requirements of each contract, ensuring timely, accurate billing and rate adjustments. Joe has 24 years of experience in the waste industry and Joe Krukowski more than 30 years in accounting and finance. Joe is president of the Director of Finance (425) 814-7856 board of directors for Jubilee Women's Center, a Seattle organization jkrukowski@wm.com that helps women experiencing poverty build stable and fulfilling futures. He has a Bachelor of Science in finance from California State University at Long Beach. Adam Winston is the director of operations for Western Washington and the Portland metro region. He manages the operations, financial, safety, and efficiency performance of 10 collection districts and three transfer stations. Adam began his career in the waste industry more than 30 years ago as a sales representative and supervisor in Los Angeles. Since joining WM in 1999, Adam has been a district manager in Portland Adam Winston and Sacramento, and a market general manager for Oregon. Adam's Director of Operations (503) 493-7858 extensive knowledge of all aspects of the industry helps him lead a team awinston@wm.com of highly motivated district managers to develop and maintain strong safety programs, efficient operations, and customer -focused service delivery. Adam graduated from California State University Long Beach with a Bachelor of Arts in political science. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 17 �IYJtJ1�. SECTION 3.2 Matt Stern is WM's director of recycling operations for the Pacific Northwest Area. His responsibilities include management of recycling processing facilities for single stream recycling, and construction and demolition materials. Matt also oversees business development activities related to recycling and green energy technology. He has 30 years Matt Stern of experience in the integrated waste industry, in both the public and Director of Recycling private sectors. Matt earned a Master of Urban and Regional Planning Operations from the University of Oregon. (503) 894-1160 mstern@wm.com Aaron Alvarado, WM's area director of fleet, is responsible for the procurement and maintenance of all vehicles and equipment at 53 locations throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, and British Columbia. He joined WM last year after a long career in the military. While a U.S. Marine, Aaron's postings included Japan, South Korea, and Operation Desert Storm. He then became a U.S. Army warrant officer in the Arizona National Guard Aaron Alvarado and supported many units as a maintenance officer. Aaron retired from Area Director, Fleet the military in 2010 after a deployment in support of Operation Iraqi (425) 365-6189 Freedom. Post military, Aaron's experience includes fleet manager for the aalvara2@wm.com city of Tempe, Ariz., and regional operations manager for Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) in California, which has a fleet of over 14,000 vehicles and equipment, 350 mechanics, and 65 garages. Aaron has an auto/ diesel technology degree, a Master of Business Administration in public administration, and was Six Sigma Green Belt certified in 2018. Jerry Ginter, area safety director, provides safety compliance, services, and training to WM facilities in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska, and British Columbia. He is responsible for creating and implementing safety and compliance programs and processes, training, injury/accident investigation and prevention, OSHA/DOT compliance, area safety communication and recognition, worker's compensation and auto liability claims management, Jerry Ginter trending and analysis, and site inspections. Jerry oversees five safety Area Director, Safety specialists, 76 sites, and approximately 2,800 employees. Prior tojoining (503) 331-2261 WM in 2014, Jerry worked for United Parcel Service for over 25 years as gginter@wm.com operations supervisor, operations manager, and safety manager for Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. He has a Bachelor of Science in management and communications from Concordia University in Portland. Jim Apostolos is the human resources director for WM's Pacific Northwest area. Jim, who has 25 years of experience, is responsible for talent acquisition and development. He created groundbreaking internal leadership development programs, including the Leadership Forum for the Area, and the Leadership Summit for the corporation. Jim leads our employee and labor relations team. He has been instrumental in creating stronger partnerships with local union Jim Apostolos leadership and developing engagement strategies that have increased employee Area Director, Human retention within WM. Jim serves on the board of directors for the Everett Gospel Resources (425) 814-7852 Mission, the largest homeless and rehabilitation center in Snohomish, Skagit, and japostol@wm.com Island counties. Jim holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration with a concentration in human resources management and organization behavior from the University of Washington. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 18 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.2 WM PNW Organization Chart Jason Rose WM of Washington President Aaron Alvarado Joe Krukowski Adam Winston Jim Apostolos Mary Evans Jerry Ginter Matt Stern Area Fleet Director of Director of Area Director Area Director Area Safety Director Director Finance Operations Human Public Sector Director Recycling Resources Solutions Operations Tom Repass Mike Range District Fleet Marc Davis Jackie J. Lang Robin Mindy Rostami Senior Materials Manager South Sound Sr. Sr. Area Public Freedman Sr. Manager, Recovery Facility District Manager Affairs & Sr. Manager Strategic Manager Joyce Wilson Tammy Lane Revenue Billing Liason Management Manager PNW Center Liason Sr. Manager Marcella Manibusan Billing Supervisor City Services I David Bednar Leila Salsbery Monica Danko Samantha Griffiths City Services Jason Shea Marklus Henley Dian Young Route Managers Sunny Lawrence Teresa Chavez Operation Specialists Erin Malanche Erin Wakefield Dispatch Supervisors "I've lived here for 23 years and I do not believe that I have ever had a problem with WM." —John P. Communications Public Sector Contracting & Solutions Municipal Legal Gary Chittim I Affairs Communications Laura Moser Manager Public Sector Manager L I Hannah Scholes Cory Caldwell Manager, Public Dawn Prewett Education & Contract Outreach Compliance Administrators Denaya Shorter Public Education & Outreach Coordinator "Prompt and efficient. Customer service is friendly and willing to accommodate my needs." —Marsha S. 1 Dan Knight District Manager JMK Fibers MRF Denie Covert Customer Service Manager PNW Robin Krueger Josh Pilkington Customer Service Supervisors, Federal Way Ambassadors Bryan Larson Robert Neugebauer Customer Service, Federal Way Champions "My husband was always nice to your workers, gave them water on hot days, talked with them as they went by. Since my husband passed away they bring my cans to the garage for me. The treatment you get is what you give. Thanks fellows!" —Barbara B. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 19 WINUM, SECTION 3.3 B.3 Litigation and Violations List any entity, partner, holding company or subsidiary involved in the Proposal, or any corporate officer, that has been involved within the post five years in any litigation or arbitration including but not limited to any action or claim arising out of the procurement or performance of o municipal solid waste contract; arising out of performance of o processing or marketing contract; arising or connected with violation of stote or federal anti-trust lows; arising from or connected with allegations of corrupt practices; or arising from operoting permits and other operating requirements, including local, state and federal rules or regulations. In the case of national companies with multiple affiliated regional companies, the above disclosure should be limited to Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia) operations and personnel. Exploin detoils fully with copies of any pleadings and/or settlement papers. In the event that disclosure is limited by court authorized non -disclosure provisions, then general circumstances shall be described to the extent authorized by the non -disclosure provisions. Entity Waste Management of Washington, Inc. Court/Agency King County Superior Court Citation 1 5-2-28794-0 SEA Date 1 /19/17 Summary Appeal of City of Sammamish decision to reject WM bid. Parties filed satisfactions of judgment, ending the case. WM paid attorney fees. vWJr PAGE 20 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION 3.4 BA Subcontractors List all items of work or elements of the Services to be performed by subcontractors, and the names, qualifications and resumes of the subcontractors. Also, list the equipment and supplies to be purchased from vendors. Provide on estimate of cost, expected dote of purchase, and length of time necessary for delivery for these purchases. WasteRec Services Cedar Grove Composting, Inc. P.O. Box 6909 7343 E. Marginal Way S. Fort Worth, TX 76115 Seattle, WA 98108 (844) 927-8372 www.wasterecservices.com For more information on Cedar Grove and WasteRec, please see Section C, Collection and Management Operations. Below is a list of equipment and supplies Waste Management anticipates purchasing from vendors to service the Federal Way contract. PRODUCT • DELIVERY TIMEFRAME CNG Collection Vehicles $9.1 million July 2019 May/June 2020 Carts and Containers $3.8 million February 2020 June 2020 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 21 WINUM, SECTION B.5 6.5 Experience Describe fully the experience of your team (both individuals and the corporate, partnership or entity team) in providing the Services requested in this RFP. WM is Federal Way's reliable, innovative partner Waste Management of Washington has served the City of Federal Way since 1990 as a reliable partner and industry innovator. Today, we provide your city's 18,331 _ residential customers with garbage and compostables services each week and recycling services every other week. We also service about 1,000 commercial and ,�' ormultifamily customers. WM and the city have worked together toward a greener future, introducing single stream recycling, food waste composting, and other services to divert material from landfills. Our Experienced Team Serving Federal Way WM's team members, from drivers to contract compliance, have dedicated their careers to managing collections and contracts in Federal Way and throughout the Puget Sound. Senior District Manager Marc Davis and his team of route managers, operations specialists, and drivers, will design and run routes, oversee delivery of new carts, and serve as valuable liaisons to the city during implementation. See Section B.2 for more information on Marc's experience. Federal Way Collection Drivers — A total 420 years of WM experience Residential Recycle Drivers Residential Yard Waste Drivers Residential Garbage Drivers Armondo Tapuro, 12 years Jordan Romanoff, 3.5 years Beverly Fecteau, 3 years Jeff Coleman, 2 years Kenneth Sharpe, 2 years Bill Laduke, 19 years Adrian Zatkovich, 15 years Armando Maier, 12 years Mario Caro, 2 years Pat Hoefs, 23 years Allen Clarke, 22 years Brett Lohrman, 21 years Barry Carr, 21 years Norrell Webster, 20 years Andre Edwards, 18 years Matthew Schackel, 16 years Commercial Recycle Drivers Commercial Garbage Drivers Eric Cook, 24 years Cody Fingerson, 13 years Todd Hazel, 3 years Johnny Schneider, 29 years James Larkin, 27 years Mike Tomaszewski, 27 years Marty Lee, 22 years Sean Cleary, 16 years Drop -box Drivers I Douglas Thomas, 31 years Chad Brockelman, 17 v�Jrli. PAGE 22 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.5 10 Leading our Federal Way team is Public Sector Manager Laura Moser, who has decades of experience in solid waste, and knows your city, residents, and services. Laura is committed to ensuring a worry -free implementation of the new contract. .................... . Hannah Scholes, manager of Public Education and Outreach, will partner with city staff to inform Federal Way residents and businesses about new services and offer educational materials. WM's Contract Compliance team, led by Mindy Rostami, will design a detailed implementation plan to roll out the new contract. Many individuals and departments work to fulfill our contracts to the highest standards. For details on our team members, please see B.2. Our 29 years of partnership and accomplishments! WM has developed green technologies and creative recycling and diversion methods that have become international standards. Through our working relationship with Federal Way staff, we have introduced many enhancements to your city, demonstrating the expertise and experience of our Federal Way team. 2002 » New contract transitioned from a residential recycling system with three stacking bins to a dual - stream program using 64-gallon carts for paper, and 18-gallon bins for tin, aluminum, and glass 2004 » Rolled out single stream recycling, eliminating the need for two containers » Added food scraps to residential yard waste across King County from 2004-2007 2008 » Mayor's Day of Concern for the Hungry launched. Over 10 years, WM has collected more than 141,255 pounds of food donated by residents at the curb and delivered it to the MSC Food Bank 2010 » Changed yard waste collection frequency from summer/winter schedules to weekly collection year- round at no additional cost to residents 2012 » Began distributing recycling fliers transcreated in eight languages (Amharic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Somali, and Vietnamese) » WM Recycle Corps, a team of multilingual college interns, started working in Federal Way to encourage recycling, particularly at multifamily residences » Built CNG infrastructure at South Sound district for slow fueling of new CNG collection fleet; replaced all diesel trucks 2013 » Added Onboard Computing Systems in our collection vehicles to provide even more accurate service to customers » Invested millions in the purchase and renovation of JMK Fibers Recycling Center to increase recycle processing capacity for the Puget Sound area » WSRA Individual "Recycler of the Year" Jeanette Brizendine was nominated by WM and won! 2015 » Inaugural year for Federal Way Recycle Palooza, a city-wide recognition program that rewards residents for recycling right Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 23 WJ,UrIi. SECTION B.5 2016 » Launched local City Services team to better serve city staff Broadened our customer communication channels with the use of Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, and more! WSRA Public Agency "Recycler of the Year" City of Federal Way Solid Waste and Recycling Division was nominated by WM and won! 2017 » Implemented Residential Clean Cart Program, a unique approach to behavioral change for better recycling 2018 » Launched EnspireO, a web -based, interactive database tool to enhance our reporting and turn data into information for decision making 2019 >> Deployed new recovery plan for the snowstorm in February More than a service provider, we are actively involved in Federal Way As a local, regional, and national business, WM is deeply connected to Federal Way residents and community organizations. We offer support through public outreach, education, and volunteering. WM's contributions to your community within the past year include: For an eighth year, WM was a major sponsor of Federal Way's 4th of July Red, White and Blues Festival at Celebration Park. „ At Federal Way Kids Day and Federal Way Touch -a -Truck, families explored a WM compressed natural gas truck. WM connected with Spanish-speaking community members at Flavor of Federal Way and celebrated sharing cultures through delicious food! WM participated in Federal Way's first Composting and Gardening Event. At Storming the Sound with Salmon, WM outreach staff taught students the basics of recycling all bottles, cans, and paper through a fun recycling relay race. For the Mayor's Annual Day of Concern for the Hungry, WM collected 12,310 pounds of donated food placed on curbs by residents. Through sponsorships, donations, in -kind services, and participation, WM provides ongoing support to many events and organizations important to the Federal Way community. Federal Way Farmers Market Federal Way Coalition Against Trafficking Break the Chains 5K Walk/Run Federal Way Performing Arts and Events Center We Love Our City cleanup events Mayor Jim Ferrell's State of the City address at the Performing Arts and Events Center Kiwanis Club of Federal Way Salmon Bake Holiday Tree Lighting Federal Way Chamber of Commerce lunches City of Federal Way Parks Department community cleanup projects v�rli. PAGE 24 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.5 Thoughtful, focused, and resilient amid a changing industry WM is the leading provider of comprehensive waste management services in North America, offering collection, transfer, recycling and resource recovery, and disposal services to customers in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. With roughly 17,000 collection and transfer vehicles, the company has the largest trucking fleet in the waste industry. WM is also a top developer, operator and owner of landfill gas -to -energy facilities in the United States. WM is focused on keeping recycling environmentally and economically feasible for customers. We have invested more than $1 billion in processing infrastructure alone. This investment resulted in 15.3 million tons of recycled goods in 2017, a 91 % increase in recycling tons since 2007. To tackle recycling challenges, WM worked to increase operational efficiencies and lower operating costs at our recycling facilities, and is actively educating customers, communities and environmental organizations across North America about contamination. As noted in WM's 2018 Sustainability Report (sustainability.wm.com and Attachment 9), one example of our new recycling education efforts includes the launch of "no plastic bags" in the bin. More information can be found at RecycleOftenRecycleRight.com. Investing in the future now Our continued commitment to our planet and our people is reflected in our investments to reduce our impact on the environment. This differentiates us from other companies. Growing a cleaner fleet: WM has committed to reducing emissions associated with our fleet by 45% by 2 03 8, against a 2010 baseline. From 2010 through 2017, WM has reduced fleet emissions by 28%. Harnessing energy at the landfill: WM operates the largest fleet of heavy-duty natural gas trucks in North America, and nearly one-third run on 100% renewable natural gas generated from landfill gas, providing the ultimate "closed loop" solution. Technology Innovations: Investing in state-of-the-art routing technology to improve fleet efficiencies reduces miles driven — nearly 9 million fewer miles a year since 2017. Optimizing routes reduces our environmental impact and increases the quality of service. "The world is changing more rapidly than ever. To sustain and succeed in the face of this change requires agility, adaptability, and, above all, a resilient spirit. We see these qualities tested and proven countless times each day by our employees who manage the environmental needs of our customers." —Jim Fish, WM president and chief executive officer Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 25 r11Ju. SECTION B.5 Describe similar projects, and include the scope of services (including o summary of which collection and/or processing services were provided under contract), annual revenues, tonnages and number of customers. WM's Puget Sound employees are dedicated to providing top-quality services. Our commitment is reflected in the repeated renewals of our contracts with cities, which allows us to develop deep understandings of our customers' needs. Our recent contracts include: \N City of Seattle renewed, for another 10 years, WM's contract to serve about I(/ 95,678 residential, 6,758 commercial, and 2,798 multifamily customers. CITp City of Newcastle negotiated a new contract with WM to serve about 3,209 residential, nine multifamily, and 44 commercial customers. kr�pS City of Normandy Park chose WM through an RFP process. In 2018, we started FIRM ryNory PARK servicing 2,407 residential, 11 multifamily, 35 commercial customers. Selected Waste Management Local Experience MUNICIPAL CUSTOMER City of Algona RESIDENTIAL I co I MULTIFAMILY I « COMMERCIAL tI 1 s TOTAL CUSTOMERS 900 YEARS OF SERVICE 15+ * ANNUALTONS/ REVENUE 1,905/$580K City of Auburn 1 0 Z tl 0 tl 0 I 15,252 15+ 60,747/$11.2M City of Duvall 1 0 I 1 0 Z 1 0 It 2,519 20+ 4,219/$1.4M City of Kirkland 11 0 I 11 01 I 1 0 I 23,546 40+ 67,284/$13.5M City of Marysville 0 Z 0 Z 0 I 11,012 20+ 10,731/$1.2M City of Mill Creek 1.1 0 I 1 0 i tI 0 Z 5,417 20+ ** 14,386/$2.7M City of Mountlake Terrace v Co. I z co Z 2 zo I 5,532 30+ ** 10,647/$3.1 M City of Mukilteo 1 0 Z 1 0 Z tl 0 I 4,640 40+ ** 13,788/$3.3M City of Newcastle X 0 Z 1 0 11 0 2,093 25+ * 6,119/$1.9M City of Normandy Park 11 0 I 1 0 tl 0 2,407 = 1 + ** 1,940/$1.1 M City of Pacific It 0 Z It 0 Z tl 0 I 1,784 15+ * 4,910/$1.4M City of Tukwila X co I 1 0 Z I i., i 3,946 5+ ** 36,220/$6.OM City of Redmond z Co. I z Co. I I is I 13,836 40+ * 58,833/$10.1 M City of Seattle 1 0 Z 1 0 Z tl 0 I 105,234 25+ ** 189,984/$37.4M City of Snoqualmie 1 « I tl 0 I It 0 I 4,346 7+ ** 11,796/$2.OM I SOLID WASTE s^a RECYCLING I YARD/FOOD WASTE xRENEWAL **RFP WIN vWJr PAGE 26 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION B.5 Describe any major problems encountered in establishing service, collecting solid waste, or collecting, processing, and/or marketing recyclobles or compostables, along with o description of how such major problems were resolved to the satisfaction of customers. WM has successfully implemented and transitioned municipal contracts in the state of Washington for more than 40 years. We have had no problems in establishing service, collecting solid waste, or collecting, processing, and/or marketing recyclables or compostables. Provide references (including contact name, title, organization, moiling address and contact information) for oll such similar projects described. These references should hove direct operational management responsibility over the Proposer' contract and full knowledge of Proposer' detailed performance provided under that contract. These references will generally be locol government staff, rather than elected officials. Our selected municipal references City of Auburn AUBURN W.ASHINGTON Joan Nelson Solid Waste & Recycling Coordinator 25 West Main St. Auburn, WA 98001 (253) 931-5103 jenelson@auburnwa.gov City of Normandy Park CITY of NO ... NDY PARK WASHINGTON Amanda Leon Parks Director 801 SW 174th St. Normandy Park, WA 98166 (206) 248-8257 aleon@normandyparkwa.gov City of Tacoma City of Kirkland of K At John MacGillivray Y. , 7 Solid Waste �--a Programs Supervisor 123 Fifth Avenue Kirkland, WA 98033 (425) 587-3804 JMacGillivray@kirklandwa.gov City of Seattle QP Hans Van Dusen, Solid Waste Contracts Manager P.O. Box 35177 Seattle, WA 98124 (206) 684-4657 hans.vandusen@seattle.gov Lewis Griffith Environmental Services, Division Manager, Solid Waste Tacoma Municipal Building, 4th Floor 747 Market Street Tacoma, WA 98402 (253) 573-2420 Igriffit@cityoftacoma.org City of Newcastle Jeff Brauns Public Works Director 12835 Newcastle Way Suite 200 Newcastle, WA 98056 (425) 649-4143, ext. 124 jeffb@newcastlewa.gov City of Snoqualmie 1000010* Dan Marcinko tr' Public Works Director 38624 S.E. River St. P.O. Box 987 Snoqualmie, WA 98065 (425) 831-4919, ext. 1 135 dmarcinko@ci.snoqualmie.wa.us City of Tukwila Henry Hash Public Works Director 6200 Southcenter Blvd. Tukwila, WA 98118 (206) 433-01 79 Henry. Hash@tukwilawa.gov Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 27 WYJ 2, SECTION 3.5 0 � Seattle I IN Public Utilities March 25, 2019 Mr. Rob Van Orsow City of Federal Way 3 33 25 8" Ave. S. Federal Way, WA 98003 Dear Mr. Van Orsow: I am writing to recommend Waste Management based on their long and successful partnership with the City of Seattle in delivering exceptional solid waste services. Waste Management has been a valued partner in Seattle's internationally recognized solid waste system for over twenty years, fulfilling the following services agreements: • Recycling services for 70,000 households and 2,000 apartments (1989 —1999) • Garbage, recycling, and yard waste services for 70,000 households and 2,000 apartments (2000-2008) • Garbage services for 3,500 businesses (2001-2008) along with independent commercial recycling services and franchise garbage services in prior decades • Garbage, recycling, and food/yard services for 90,000 households, 2,300 apartments, and 5,000 businesses (2009 — 2029) • Long -haul disposal services for all Seattle garbage (1989 — 2028) Throughout these agreements, Waste Management has demonstrated an ongoing commitment to exceptional customer service, performance reliability, environmental improvements and operational safety. Their service reliability has continually surpassed City standards. We receive fewer than 0.5 miss complaints per 1,000 stops, well below our standard of 1 miss per 1,000 stops and below historic performance trends. In 2009, they demonstrated comprehensive preparation and exceptional execution for the service transitions under the current service agreement, as they took on substantial new service areas and customer accounts. Over the last decade, Waste Management teamed with the City in customer training for the expansion of our multifamily food recycling program, rewarding business and resident recycling, and cleaning the City, through Think Green Recycling Challenges, Recycle Corps, and Think Green Street Crews. In 2019, Waste Management continues to partner with Seattle in innovative programs and service delivery. Through a competitive procurement, Waste Management was recently awarded a new 10-year service contract for South and Northwest Seattle beginning April 1, 2019. The new contract includes a new fleet of near -zero emission natural gas trucks burning 100% Renewable Natural Gas 700 Fifth Avenue I P© Box 34018 1 Seattle, WA 98124-4019 1 206-684-3000 1 seattle.gov/util VWPAGE 28 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION 3.5 (RNG), generated from WM landfills, alongside anew fleet of smaller RNG and electric support vehicles. Waste Management's operations today continue to improve adaptive management practices with enhancements to their state-of-the-art on -board computers, route tracking, and performance data. Waste Management data systems provide hourly service uploads to SPU and WM contact centers, with task completions, service exceptions and customer charges. We have always valued the high caliber of staff and managers at Waste Management and their pro -active commitment to providing high quality and localized services to our customers. on behalf of the City of Seattle, I am pleased to provide an excellent recommendation of Waste Management as a service partner. Please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions at hans.vandusen(Oseattle.gov or 206-684-4657. Sincerely, Hans Van Qusen Solid Waste Contracts Manager EMAIL TO THE WM TEAM ON MONDAY, APRIL 1, 2019: "We appreciate the long history of WM-SPU partnership, the successful completion of 2009-2019 services, and most importantly your exceptional, comprehensive and pro -active efforts to prepare for this new service contract. Great work on all fronts for continued exceptional leadership and services for our customers. Thanks!" 700 Fifth Avenue I PO Box 34018 1 Seattle, WA 98124-4018 1 206-684-3000 1 seattle.gov/util Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ISeattle � Public Utilities PAGE 29 rJu. SECTION B.5 Our selected community references Federal Way Chamber of Commerce rGREATER FEDERAL WAY Chamber of Commerce Rebecca Martin, President & CEO Chamber of Commerce Bldg 31919 First Ave. S. Suite 202 Federal Way, WA 98003 (253) 838-2605 rmartin@federalwaychamber.com Multi -Service Center I Robin Corak, CEO MSG P.O. Box 23699 CMDC Federal Way, WA MULTISERVICE CENTER 98093 (253) 838-6810 robinc@mschelps.org Federal Way Farmers Market Rose Ehl P.O. Box 24795 Federal Way, WA 98093 (253) 261-0207 federalwayfarmersmarketevents@yahoo.com Performing Art and Event Center Foundation — Mary Gates, President P.O. Box 24753 PERFo.kw*Am Federal Way, WA 98093 EVENT Cwu (253) 927-6482 maryg16321 @aol.com Diversity and inclusion for a better workforce Fostering mutual trust and respect is a cornerstone of being an inclusive and welcoming workplace, one that is well -positioned to serve our customers and communities. It's also important that our workforce reflect our diverse customers and neighbors in Federal Way. In September, Federal Way Public Schools was recognized as the most diverse school district in Washington state and the fifth most diverse in the nation, according to Niche.com. Federal Way's Diversity Commission strives for a community which is "united amidst diversity, where each individual is respected, equally valued, equally needed, and equally cherished. Equality is not sameness, it is equivalent value." WM shares Federal Way's values. As an equal opportunity employer, WM is committed to maintaining a workplace environment free from discrimination. We encourage careers for veterans, women, minorities, LGBTQ, and populations that are under -represented in our workforce. WM constantly examines existing and emerging employee recruitment strategies, placement and retention results, employee engagement, professional development planning, and compensation/benefits. v�Jrli. PAGE 30 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION 3.5 Valuing our military veterans for their leadership, teamwork, and safety skills When it comes to developing career pathways, ��P�oY�Rs�PPORToF WM is a clear leader in recruiting, hiring, retaining, THE EMPLOYER UARD P ORT or RVE and developing military veterans. We maintain a network of veteran employment outreach partners for recruiting purposes. We frequently advertise with key veteran employment resources, such as G.I. Jobs and Military Times, and we participate in more than 100 militaryjob rTrr'19 fairs a year. xwana Our role as one of the country's top employers of military veterans is recognized throughout the industry. Six times, G.I. Jobs has named WM a F 4 Top Military Friendly Employer. Five times, the Military Times has named WM a Best for Vets employer. U.S. Veterans Magazine has honored us as Best of the Best as a military employer. Adding women to our ranks Today, one in 14 WM employees is a veteran, spouse of a veteran, or a current reservist. This includes veterans at the South Sound district, Route Manager Marklus Henley and Technician Adam Mitten. We are grateful to our military veterans for their service and proud to have them on the WM team. Aaron Alvarado, Former U.S. Marine lance corporal, Area fleet director The waste industry has traditionally been male -dominated, so WM is actively focusing on women as we recruit, hire, and develop talent. Our Pacific Northwest recruiting team uses social media and recruiting partners to specifically focus on opportunities for women and minorities. Job boards we use include Jobs4Women.net, Women for Hire, and Women in Business and Industry. Other strategies underway to interest women in roles at WM include: Hosting WM National Career Days that involve social media campaigns specifically focused on recruiting women Encouraging local WM women operators and drivers to tell their stories to the media, as they did across the Pacific Northwest in 2017 via social media, TV news stories, and columns in community newspapers Leveraging our membership in Women in Trucking to recruit women in driver, fleet, dispatch, maintenance, and operations positions, including in leadership roles Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 31 MUM, SECTION 3.5 Best of the best for professional women When it comes to work -life balance, telecommuting, flexible scheduling, maternity support, wellness programs, professional development, and mentoring, WM is in the winner's circle for the 2019 Women's Choice Award. After evaluating hundreds of Fortune 1000 companies, Professional Womon's Magazine named WM to its 2018 list of the Best Employers for Professional and Millennial Women. Professional Womon's Magazine promotes the advancement of multicultural women in all aspects of business and employment to provide equal opportunity. LGBTQ top employer We are pleased to be recognized as a top employer for LGBTQ Quality and Inclusion on the 2018 Corporate Equality Index. This recognition shows we are on the right path as we work to foster equal opportunity and create a workplace where all employees are valued and respected. WM named a disability -friendly company DIVERSEability Magazine has released the early results of its review of the nation's Best of the Best Top Disability -Friendly Companies, and WM is on the list. The publication, one of the nation's fastest -growing, disability -focused magazines, polled hundreds of Fortune 1000 companies for its 2018 Best of the Best evaluations. Recognition for doing what is right At WM, we have been recognized for our ethics training, ethical business practices, and social responsibility. FORTUNEIB WORLDS MOST BBB ADMIREDGEAii.nxrnc,rxfnfrr Rrisxtr.iinNrrnrr FTSE4Good TOURNAMENT 2016COMPANIESIIn 3BLoa CorAarare Responsibility Mogazine's 1 O CORPORATE CITIZENS BEAST tote M WORLDS MOST TM o ETHICAL w COMPANIES'' 1RE.00V1 WOMEN'S CHOICE AWARD' T 11L Vt11l '.i of 1Yi'w "Waste Management constantly boosts my skills and encourages me. I am blessed to work with a company and coworkers who treat me as an equal. I'm proud that my coworker's little girl saw me driving a garbage truck, and now she wants to grow up to be like me." —Bev Fecteou, WM South Sound recycle driver, 2018 South Sound district Employee of the Year �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 3 2 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 SECTION C: Collection and Management Operations CA Garbage, Recycling, and Compostables Collection and Handling Describe fully the collection equipment and containers to be used under the Bose Contract, keeping in mind the Bose Contract specifications for the collection frequency, types of containers, and the City's intention that garbage, recyclobles, and compostobles be collected separately. WM begins with safety WM's commitment to driver training, fleet maintenance, and sophisticated technology have made Federal Way safer. WM's safety philosophy MA In 2002, we launched our safety philosophy, Mission-2-ZeroTM (M2Z) in pursuit of zero unsafe behaviors by all employees and zero unsafe work conditions. Our goal is to prevent all accidents and injuries through engaging employees with coaching and knowledge building. Risks are inherent to our industry. Collection drivers not only have to be well - trained as vehicle operators, they must be on the lookout for other drivers on the road, often those in a hurry to pass our collection vehicles during stops. Our safety program includes thorough training, standardized rulebooks, and a suite of industry -leading programs, such as installation of DriveCam® video event recorders in all of our Federal Way vehicles. Vehicle Safety With roughly 17,000 WM trucks on the road each weekday, vehicle safety is a strong focus. We invest about $500 million a year maintaining collection vehicles and $100 million a year maintaining and repairing heavy equipment. Our drivers inspect their vehicles twice daily to support proper operation and tie preventive maintenance inspections to vehicle usage rates. Dedication to drivers WM is committed to our drivers. We train them, keep them safe, offer injury prevention programs, and create a work environment they find fulfilling. Our driver retention rate at South Sound district is one of the best almost 95%. Before commencement of the new contract, WM will have wage parity for Teamster drivers on all South Sound district collection routes. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 33 YYiUm, SECTION C.1 Extensive Driver Training Our on-the-job training and routine evaluation programs for drivers exceed U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. » Newly hired drivers have at least 80 hours of » Maximum hours behind the wheel are strictly training, split between learning in a classroom limited in accordance with federal regulations. and a truck cab with an experienced driver. » All WM drivers must pass a general physical » New drivers are evaluated on the job on days and meet DOT physical requirements. 30, 60, and 75. » All drivers participate in safety briefings every morning before routes begin. SAFETY Defensive Driving System WM Safety Services has developed a new, comprehensive, professional driver program specific to waste -industry vehicles that addresses the day-to-day challenges our drivers face and promotes defensive driving. This improves on the industry's standard program, which was created for passenger cars and over -the -road trucks. The WM SAFETY Defensive Driving System is constructed around six operating principles, each meant to help drivers manage specific roadway hazards: SEE 3-6-9 ADVANCE FIND EVALUATE THINK YIELD be aware of field of view. safe space. other vehicles' outside the right of way. conditions in Monitor Respect following behavior. Be cab. Perform Allow others safe front, beside, conditions ahead distance and scan prepared to regular vehicle space to turn, and behind your of your vehicle. area for anything adjust course maintenance and cross, and merge. vehicle. that may impact and speed based never drive while safe vehicle on other vehicle distracted. operation. actions. Power of people and technology WM embraces technology to -------------------------------- make our operations safer. Our A `' `% innovative program, Service i Delivery Optimization (SDO), has ; significantly improved our collection �� TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT ; and maintenance operations by _ ' harmonizing technology and logistics - - - management processes with the skills of our drivers. By improving our systems through technology - like onboard computers, routing software, and cameras - we improve safety and accountability, effectively set expectations, increase employee engagement, and maximize customer satisfaction while collecting Federal Way routes. South Sound district uses SDO to improve morning and end -of -shift routines. The DOT requires all commercial vehicles to be inspected for safety according to its checklist before and after trips. WM reengineered the DOT's list specifically for collection trucks. Our twice -daily inspections are above industry standards and catch repair issues before trucks leave on routes. That means vehicles spend more time on routes servicing our customers in Federal Way. PAGE 34 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 DriveCam® A critical element of SDO is DriveCam®, a small video recorder mounted on the windshield of our collection vehicles. The recorder is triggered by certain vehicle behaviors, such as aggressive braking, swerving, or a collision. Once an event is captured, information is sent to WM route managers for performance coaching. DriveCam® also allows us to appreciate the ways our drivers avoid collisions with defensive driving techniques. We use these events to document and disseminate best practices among our drivers at our huddles every morning. SDO Drives Expectations for Federal Way Performance SDO has increased drivers' satisfaction, which has reduced turnover, given us a highly trained team, yielded better performance, and strengthened our relationship with unions. Because our entire operation is highly organized and predictable, drivers know what to expect. They will typically drive the same route. Their days run smoothly. They complete their workdays on schedule. Drivers work as a team, using peer -to -peer advice to foster individual improvements that make the whole company stronger. If a recycle driver accidentally left spilled paper on a route, then the garbage driver who follows will call the driver to mention the problem. By keeping tabs on each other, drivers provide better service to our Federal Way customers. "This is a difFerentiator for WM. By building drivers' knowledge and skills, then giving them the best safety technologies, WM is setting the industry standard for safety." —Jerry Ginter, WM's Pacific Northwest area safety director 'M is an easy 10 years ahead of the industry in tech and safety." —Marc Davis, South Sound district senior district Through SDO we actively engage with our drivers. Our drivers are our frontline employees, and their feedback from the city's streets is vital to meeting Federal Way's performance expectations. Our morning launch starts with a safety talk Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 35 MUM, SECTION C.1 Injury Prevention Collection drivers are prone to sprains, strains, and overexertion injuries as they jump on and off trucks, and handle heavy loads. WM cares about our drivers, so we contracted with Integrated Rehabilitation Group's Industrial Athlete program to help drivers prevent injuries. Certified trainers visit South Sound ---- -- district twice a week, once in the morning and once in the evening, "To our employees, our to teach our drivers how to improve their safety, flexibility, strength, nutrition, and overall wellness. Industrial Athlete program shows that we care about them, their health, and well-being." —Jerry Ginter, WM's Pacific Northwest Area safety director A driver's morning safety check Trainers provide education during our morning launches, lead dynamic warm-ups, design programs for those who want to work one-on-one with trainers, and do small group sessions focused on specific prevention techniques, such as increasing shoulder flexibility or hip range of motion. In the two years since the program began, injuries have dropped by 24%. Good morning drivers! PAGE 36 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Service= SECTION C.1 WM's Federal Way fleet is safe and green Identify the vehicle chassis and body used to collect residential, commercial, multi -family, and drop -box service sectors. Also identify for each type of truck: the number of compartments, the capacity of each comportment, total weight, and volume capacity of vehicle, loading and unloading characteristics, the number necessary to perform the required Services, the average number of collections each vehicle con make in o day, and the useful expected life of each collection vehicle. Collection vehicles Our state-of-the-art fleet with expert drivers provide the city and our customers safe, quiet, efficient, and environmentally friendly collections. We propose the continued use of automated front -load vehicles with Curotto-Can Automated Carry Can attachments for the fastest load times on the market and up to a 30% productivity advantage over side loaders. The Curotto-Can attachment is easy to switch between collecting containers and carts. With this system, the driver's eyes are always forward, which is safer and allows closer monitoring for contamination in recyclables and compostables. WM's CNG Fleet for the City of Federal Way WM will service the city of U00 Federal Way with a new NOX compressed natural gas (CNG) collection fleet fueled by renewable natural gas (RING). They will be powered by new near zero (NZ) natural gas engines, providing even lower NOx emissions than our current CNG fleet. Materials collected Residential Garbage, Recycling, Compostables Commercial/ Multifamily Garbage, Recycling, Compostables .., ,. Garbage Type of Truck Front Loader with Curotto-Can Front Loader Drop box Chassis Autocar WX Autocar WX Autocar WX/Freightliner Body Heil Heil Amrep Compartments 1 1 n/a Capacity 10 tons 10 tons 10 tons Total Weight 66,000 GVWR 66,000 GVWR 60,800 GVWR Volume Capacity 40 cubic yards 40 cubic yards 10-40 cubic yard boxes Average number collections 800 120 10 Loading Characteristics Front loading with Curotto- Front loading Roll up Unloading Characteristics Full rear ejection Full rear ejection Tilt to dump Number of Vehicles (base proposal) 16 5 2 Useful Life 10 years 10 years 10 years glib Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 37 WJ,UrIi. SECTION C.1 WM Vehicle Safety Features All WM collection vehicles meet or exceed federal motor vehicle safety standards. They are well- equipped to keep our employees and customers safe. Backup Camera and ✓ Reverse Motion Sensor Provides rear view when truck is in reverse, reducing potential for accidents and Alarm enhancing pedestrian safety. Audible Backup Alarms 'VI and Lights All trucks are equipped with eight backup lights and audible backup alarms. Body Configuration ✓ All trucks are equipped with audible and visual alarm systems, alerting driver if is during for if truck Alarm vehicle out of configuration movement, example arms are up or vehicle is in an over -height situation. Monitors driver actions and behavior. Forward -facing camera is invaluable for ✓ DriveCam® evaluating driver reactions to traffic conditions, accident prevention, and accident investigation. ✓LED Strobe Lights and Flashers Enhances rear -of -truck visibility for approaching motorists and pedestrians. ✓ Reflective Signage and Highly reflective rear -of -vehicle signage and striping provides exceptional Striping nighttime visibility to vehicles approaching from behind. ✓ Bus Boy Mirrors Angled convex mirrors give the driver an unrestricted view of the area in front of the truck, which is especially valuable when children and other pedestrians are present. Provides fog- and frost -free views on both sides of the truck. Mirrors are from driver's Electric Heated ✓ Rearview Mirrors electronically adjustable the seat to provide unrestricted views of the sides and rear of the truck. ✓ Trapezoidal Side Lights Floodlights located on the sides of the body switch on automatically when the truck is in reverse for added safety. On natural gas powered trucks, methane detectors provide immediate audible for leaks from fuel lines, highest On -Board Methane ✓ Detection and visual alarms potential tanks or providing the margin of safety for our drivers and customers. Disc Brakes with All trucks have disc brakes with hydraulic accumulator assists, which begin ✓ Hydraulic Accumulator slowing the truck as soon as the gas pedal is released, decreasing stopping Assist distances and increasing safety for our communities and drivers. ✓ Four -Six Braid Part of WM's standard truck body specification, doubles the safety margin Hydraulic Hoses against high-pressure hydraulic leakage. Sears Air Ride Driver's ✓ Provides added comfort and excellent ergonomics for the driver. Eight including for lumbar help driver fatigue Seat adjustments, support, reduce and improve overall performance. ✓ Plastic Shovels and Helps drivers maintain a clean work space and community. Used in scatter clean Brooms up, spill response, and truck cleaning. Driver can control all stored energy by disconnecting batteries. This is used by ✓ Battery Disconnect the driver/technician when cleaning behind the blade, during maintenance, and when the vehicle is left unattended. ✓ Emergency Spill Kits Equipment including oil pads, booms, and other gear helps mitigate the impact of spills. ✓ Fire Extinguishers Fire extinguishers allow our drivers to respond to fire hazards. We equip our trucks with 20-pound fire extinguishers, well above the DOT requirement of 5 pounds. Drivers place wheel blocks for added protection, if they are stepping away from their trucks for time. They triangles, if they to Wheel Blocks and ✓ Safety Triangles significant position need control traffic. Our brake pads limit levels of asbestos, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury, Environmentally and are made of less than 5 % copper. In addition, our drum brake blocks already ✓ Advanced Brake Pads have a reduction of copper to less than 0.5%. Pads and blocks will all have less and Drum Brake Blocks than 0.5 % copper prior to 2025, well ahead of regulatory requirements. These are important measures for waterway protection. v�Jrli. PAGE 38 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 Renewable Natural Gas and Near -Zero Emissions gas engines for our collection vehicles WM will continue to power all our collection vehicles in Federal Way with renewable natural gas (RING), minimizing emissions in your community. RING is produced from biogas captured from our landfills, and yields 60% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than traditional compressed natural gas. Learn more about RING under Attachment 1. WM minimizes neighborhood impacts » Our natural gas engines are much quieter than diesel engines. » Our routes are scheduled to minimize impacts on neighborhoods and traffic. » Dampeners on the mechanical arms of front- » We avoid early morning collections from load vehicles reduce noise and wear -and -tear commercial customers who are near residential on equipment. customers. Collection carts, colors, and labeling Cascade As part of our base proposal, WM is pleased to offer, in exchange for the old ones, all new garbage, recycle, and compost carts manufactured by Cascade Engineering for a fresh clean look! All carts will be clearly labeled with collection type, graphics that inspire proper sorting, and the City of Federal Way's website and dedicated customer service phone number, (253) 833-3333. WM maintains, repairs, and replaces all carts as necessary. Residential WM Cart Sizes for City of Federal Way Garbage Cart Sizes Recycle Cart Sizes Compostables Cart (Grey) (Blue) Sizes (Green) ..... ..... .... . 0 Engineering/ Cascade Cart Solutions is the only cart manufacturer in North America certified as a Women Business Enterprise (WBE). We are proud to partner with them to bring you the best cart deployment experience. certified WBENC WnMCN C17L1iIN;ss 1. N-f. PP.Si Multifamily and commercial collection containers, steel and plastic In the new contract, WM will provide new, grey detachable steel garbage containers to multifamily and commercial customers. Commercial detachable and drop -box containers are purchased by WM from WasteQuip, the leading North American manufacturer of waste -handling equipment and one of our frequent suppliers. All containers are maintained by WM. » Containers are color coded per city specifications. » Graphic labels will feature WM's dedicated customer service phone number for Federal Way, (253) 833-3333, website address, and list of accepted materials. » WM also adds "Close Your Dumpster Lid" decals, designed with city staff, in support of stormwater protection. » Plastic detachable containers are available to contain heavier, wet -type solid waste and aid in noise reduction while emptying. We have already installed slotted lids on recycling containers at more than one-third of multifamily properties in Federal Way and have more to come! Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 39 W1111111IRK. SECTION C.1 Detachable containers have fireproof lids, lock bars, locks, wheels on 1-yard to 4-yard containers, and are watertight to prevent leaks into surface and groundwater. Drop -box containers are available with attached screen -tops or solid metal lids. Slotted lids on recycling containers are part of our contamination reduction program for multifamily complexes. Our drivers monitor for graffiti to keep our containers looking good. WM will continue to provide cans of spray paint to City Code Enforcement team members to cover up graffiti on our containers. Removing graffiti quickly is the key! WM Commercial Container Sizes Detachable Steel and Plastic Containers 1 cubic yard 1.5 cubic yard 2 cubic yard 3 cubic yard 4 cubic yard 6 cubic yard 8 cubic yard Drop -Box 10 cubic yard 20 cubic yard 25 cubic yard 30 cubic yard 40 cubic yard Example of our 4-yard steel container Example of our drop -box container Example of our slotted recycling lids at Homestead Apartments in Federal Way I<M Enhancement for Federal Way Smart waste and smart cell in Federal Way's city center! Imagine Federal Way's city center with smart, solar -powered waste and recycling compactors that call for servicing when they are full while also improving Wi-Fi and cellular connections for passersby. Through an exclusive partnership, as part of our base proposal, WM is excited to offer Federal Way Bigbellys with the new Telebelly system. Under the new contract, and with the city's approval, WM will work with staff to develop a plan to install four sets of Bigbellys. They provide the following benefits: Cleaner Federal Way public spaces: Eliminates overflows, visible waste, windblown litter, and pest access A Telebelly double unit �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 40 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 » Increased connectivity: Delivers robust wireless and cellular service to Federal Way residents, businesses, and visitors » Increased productivity: Reduces collections by up to 80%, resulting in decreased truck time, street wear, and fuel consumption Describe how each vehicle will be marked or signed so that witnesses to spills, leakage, and/or damage may quickly report such occurrence. Each truck is labeled with a dedicated truck number and spill -alert phone number. We will work closely with city staff members to ensure any truck signage meets their approval. Identify any subcontractor used for container inventory and delivery or retrofitting via pointing or application of new decals. During implementation, WM will partner with WasteRec to assist with cart removal and delivery. WasteRec has helped with many cart transitions in the Puget Sound region. Delivery and removal of steel containers is handled by WM employees, who also paint containers and apply decals. Describe and provide examples of your route management system. Describe how routes ore initially developed and modified over time, how your on -board computer systems manage route progress, route changes, exceptions (no set -out, blocked containers, contaminated materials, extra set -outs, etc.) and diversions from normal routes due to rood maintenance, inclement weather or other unforeseen needs to deviate from the planned route. Also describe how the on -board system (if used) communicates with your call center's account system to provide close -to -real-time updates for each customer during the collection day. WM's route management enhances efficiency, minimizes environmental impacts WM combines excellent technologies, management, and seasoned drivers to serve the City of Federal Way safely and efficiently while minimizing environmental impacts and maximizing customer satisfaction. We use eRoute Logistics 4.OTM, which features mapping capabilities supported by Microsoft's Bing Maps, to plan collection routes that require the least miles, which lowers fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and wear on trucks, tires and streets. Since our vehicles are on your streets for fewer miles and hours, we also increase safety. Your residents and businesses experience less noise and disruptions. We adjust routes as needed to reflect growth and service changes. » Our routing system is linked to our Onboard Computer System (OCS), uploaded to tablets carried by each driver, which tracks trucks in real-time. » WM's Onboard Computer System Dispatch (OCSD) enables two-way communication between dispatchers and drivers, so they can work together to prevent service interruptions. Dispatch team member, Misty Adcox Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 41 WINUM. SECTION C.1 » These systems are seamlessly integrated with our customer database, Mid -America Systems (MAS), which pushes out tickets to dispatchers, so they can immediately address service changes and requests. The MAS integration also allows customer service representatives to see the customer issue at a glance. Key technologies that will continue to be used during Federal Way collections include: Technology eRoute Logistics® Mapping and routing » Considers traffic patterns, vehicle capacity, location of disposal software system sites, and travel times to create efficient routes with the best value used to develop and to the customer modify routes » Fully integrated with our billing and customer database, Mid -America Systems (MAS), to capture new customers and service changes Plan Versus Actual Software that plots » Identifies routes that may be running behind customers' typical (PvA) Technology planned route versus schedules, for example, due to road maintenance or extreme actual route status weather, enabling WM to redistribute routes to prevent missed or late pickups Onboard Onboard (truck/ » Obtains real-time information on truck locations, customers Computer System driver) tablets with serviced, truck capacity, service status, and service exceptions (OCS) GPS technology that >, Digital camera captures images of field events, including service capture route data in exemptions such as "no container out to be serviced" or "container real time blocked by delivery truck," which are transmitted to WM's database to be addressed by our dispatchers » Gives customers the convenience of obtaining a collection estimated time of arrival through our website and mobile app Onboard In -office software » Route modifications are made in real time and instantly appear on Computer System connecting drivers' tablets, preventing service disruptions Dispatch (OCSD) dispatch and route » Enables dispatchers and managers to electronically assign service management to tickets and communicate with drivers for immediate customer driver OCS issue resolution (e.g., blocked container, late set out, etc.) DriveCam® Palm -sized digital » Designed to capture video and audio inside and outside the vehicle video event recorder when triggered by abrupt actions such as hard braking, sudden mounted on the acceleration, swerving, speeding, or collisions windshield of » Helps managers provide constructive feedback to drivers so we collection vehicles continuously improve and reinforce our core value - safety » Helps identify and address risky behaviors » Reduces collisions, claims, fuel consumption, and maintenance costs, allowing us to provide competitive service charges WiFi-enabled » Helps reduce contamination ® comprehensive truck „ Equipped with GPS mapping and dedicated cameras to record Smart Truck camera system every bin or cart serviced Technology » Documents overloaded containers and contamination as well as validating service levels » Will provide data to develop programs to increase diversion and improve recycling participation �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 42 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 Snowmageddon 2019: WM balances safety and service 0 February 2019 was Puget Mayor Jim Ferrell Sound's snowiest month in 50 v years, closing streets, schools, WfWe d_ _ Thank you, Waste and businesses. Gov. Jay Inslee L Management, for scrambling declared a state of emergency. to get caught up! For two weeks, WM followed our established extreme weather WM Puget Sound protocols, monitoring conditions to determine when we could @WMPugetSound safely make collections, and extensively communicating with city 11111MM11iiii Garbage to the staff and customers. curb in Fed. Way! No matter When the snow stopped falling, and we anticipated safe streets, _ what day you WM and city staff worked together to develop a recovery plan regularly receive to quickly and safely collect customers' accumulated garbage, service, put garbage at curb today & leave recycling, and compostables. out until collected. Collection is happening Thurs-Sat. We'll WM collected all residential garbage carts one week and all collect garbage missed on snow days. wmnorthwest.com/ recycling the following week. Our drivers showed their commitment weatherboard. html to their customers by working through a Saturday to ensure all yard waste was collected to finish our recovery! Proactive winter weather communication Every fall, WM meets with city staff to coordinate on an inclement weather plan. WM places inserts in customer bills notifying them how garbage, recycling, and compost service may be impacted WM will customize during inclement weather and what steps they should take for inclement weather safe collections. This is one of many ways we are proactive in messages for our Federal our planning and communications and another way we engage Way customers. That customers to select notification preferences. means Federal Way Please see Attachment #2 Inclement Weather FAQs customers using their local customer service • number will hear a message that speaks Waste Management is committed to providing reliable ;.. collection for all customers. If severe weather conditions directly about their '�a J prevent the safe collection of garbage, recycling or food scraps/yard debris, please remove containers from the street Please Review at the end of the day. service delivery. Our Severe Garbage, Recyclingg and Food Scraps/Yard Debris 1 4 Weather Policy will be callected the follmu-ui week on your next scheduled collectlor day_ In the event of two successive weather delays, an additional take the busincs day that Wmlloction will place on next possible week �•-•-a•w� More information: www.wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard or 1-800-59 2- 9995 Example of one of our severe weather billing inserts Severe weather plan and management Communication is essential during any weather delay or other service disruption. We mobilize our internal inclement weather team which includes operations, dispatch, customer service, contract management and communications. During severe weather, the following plan is followed: WM operations surveys road conditions and updates city staff on service plans early in the morning. Our inclement weather team activates internal and external communications plans. For customers that includes outdials, texts, emails, media releases, and social media. Our online service alert Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 43 �In�. SECTION C.1 website, www.wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard, had 270,000 clicks during the February snowstorm. At the end of each day, we continue working with our inclement weather team to assess the weather and service plans. We reactivate our internal and external communications plans accordingly. City staff is given an end -of -day report, including an estimate of customers who were not serviced. If service is interrupted for two or more collection cycles, WM will work with city staff to provide temporary residential garbage and recycling collection sites using driver -staffed, drop -box containers or other suitable equipment. Site locations will be determined with the city's approval. Please see more about our Customer communications in Sections C.2, C.3 and D. Provide your preferred Contamination Reduction Pion including thresholds for togging and collecting versus togging and leaving containers. At what point is the customer contacted directly via phone or e-mail to follow-up on continuing problems? How do you plan to monitor containers, on -route or separate sampling? When is service suspended and containers removed from the Customer's control? How do they get service bock? Are customers provided incentives for clean materials? Does the Contamination Reduction Pion approach vary between sectors, and if so, how? WM reduces contamination with monitoring, technology, and education In the new contract, we will WfYou asked. build on the successful programs We delivered. we previously designed and implemented in partnership with city staff. Those efforts are the basis of our contamination reduction plan: WM Recycle Right Road Map. The Clean Cart Program (see page 47 for more details) Slotted Lids on recycling containers that help multifamily and commercial customer recycle right WM Recycle Corps is our signature summer college intern program. Annually, our interns provide dynamic and innovative education to your community. Past programs have included multilingual outreach campaigns to raise awareness about contamination with property managers, business owners and residents. Event participation, materials, traditional and social media engagement educate our customers about the ways to recycle right You can read more about our education efforts with residential, multifamily and commercial customers in Section D. Slotted Lids — A Success Story WM has installed slotted lids on recycling dumpsters at 58 multifamily properties in Federal Way. Lids prevent residents from putting filled plastic bags and other contaminants into dumpsters. The results are dramatic: Out of 271 Haul -or - Calls at the properties, only 14 occurred after the slotted lids were installed. Drivers notice a difference too! �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 44 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services R S Drivers will visually inspect recycling and compostables. If the container has more than 5% contamination, the driver will not service the container. Instead, the driver will use an onboard tablet to take a photograph and notify the WM dispatch team. Using our Haul -or -Call (HOC) system, a dispatcher will attempt to call the customer, to provide the following options: » Remove the contamination and have their container serviced on their next regular collection. » Remove the contamination and call WM to request a return trip for a charge. » Ask WM to service their container as garbage for a charge. » Also, during this call, dispatch will provide the customer with additional information about our no -charge public education and outreach assistance and tools to help reduce contamination, including slotted lids, on -site assistance, and clear signage. If a dispatch staff member is not able to reach the customer by phone, the container will not be serviced. » Under our proposed program, an email will be sent to the customer with a photo and an explanation of proper recycling or composting practices. In addition, we will provide one-on-one education and outreach services. » WM outreach staff will call contaminated multifamily customers weekly and commercial customers monthly to offer advice on reducing contamination. » Outreach staff will schedule site visits, right - size service levels, and install slotted lids at each multifamily and commercial property, if necessary. WM Recycle Right Road Map Driver photographs contamination, calls dispatch and leaves "Cops" tag R Dispatch calls multifamily/commercial customer and sends educational email 0 A Customer elects to have container hauled as garbage We will distribute multilingual materials, reusable recycling tote bags, and other items to assist each multifamily property with contamination education. We will track each customer identified as having contamination and report to the city on our outreach actions and customers' status monthly. Since recycling service is required for all businesses and multifamily properties in the City of Federal Way, service will not be suspended. WM outreach staff will keep providing tools and techniques to reduce contamination, including the tactics listed above and as detailed in Section D. oa� Driver photographs contamination, leaves "Cops" tag and customer receives an educational email Cart is tagged and not serviced M ier elects to Customer elects to have cart :ontamination emptied as garbage I Customer Serviced on Dispatch requests next scheduled routes MSW expedited service collection day truck CONTRACT CONTRACT RATE APPLIED FOR RETURN TRIP NO rHARCF RATE APPLIED FOR EXTRA GARRACF RECYCLING ALL ST*RS Customers who have contamination but who become RECYCLING ALL STARS will be eligible for our annual recycle right contamination incentive program! Annually, residential customers who show a significant improvement in their recycling will be entered to win a free month of WM service! Annually, multifamily and commercial customers who clean up their contamination will be eligible to win a summer celebration at their property where management, staff and/or residents will be recognized for their hard work in improving recycling! Drivers will visually inspect recyclables and compostables carts while tipping them. » Driver spots contamination and takes a photo and leaves an "Cops" tag. » We will email customers their photos and explanations of proper recycling practices. » Driver will then manually check this cart on subsequent service days. Driver will not service carts that are more than 5% contaminated. Instead, they will continue to use their onboard tablets to take photos, which will be uploaded to customers' accounts. Through various communications channels, customers whose carts are repeatedly tagged for contamination and not serviced may: » Remove the contamination and have their cart serviced on their next regular collection. » Remove the contamination and call WM to request a return trip for a charge. » Ask WM to service their container as garbage for a charge. Service suspension and re -initiation. » Each quarter, WM outreach staff will call all customers who have three or more instances of contamination to offer additional education and notify them that continued contamination could lead to suspension of service. » If customers are noted as contaminated six or more times over a six month period, WM, in collaboration with city staff, will recommend that service be suspended. » Customers can reinstate their service by completing an online assessment and pledge. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 45 I V jjW SECTION C.1 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK VWPAGE 46 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 Residential customers WM Clean Cart program one-on-one coaching that yields results In recent years, WM's Clean Cart program has successfully reduced contaminated recycling among residential customers through a combination of technology, monitoring and education. In the six months after graduating from the program, an impressive 97% had clean recycling! Community -based social marketing studies show people share what they have learned with family and friends, vastly extending the reach beyond the program participants. This program informed our WM Recycle Right Road Map Contamination Plan! Here's how it works: Recycle drivers identify one customer per route day with egregious contamination. Each week, WM outreach staff call, email, and send photos to educate the customer about how to recycle properly. A translator is used, if appropriate. We track customer progress over six collections to ensure clean recycling. We work with residents to transform the way they recycle. Here's an example of one customer's improvement after the Clean Cart program. WEEK 1 WEEK 6 ✓ One-on-one customer education ✓ Social equity and inclusion ✓ Reduces contamination and increases participation ✓ Measurable results Since its inception in Federal Way, the program has educated more than 140 (and counting) customers, converting them from habitual contaminators to recycling champions. Residential "Tip Floor" Recycle Audits WM will audit Federal Way WM will gather this data residential recycling routes throughout the year and at the Auburn district share results with city staff We will utilize the data in all our targeted outreach materials and programs Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 47 �IrJV1�. SECTION C.1 Disposal and processing sites Identify the destinotion for oll collected materials. If more than one recycler or composter will be used, identify the proportion of loads destined for vorious destinotions and the criteria for routing trucks to o porticulor facility. WM uses the King County disposal system, specifically the Algona Transfer Station, for disposal of all municipal solid waste. WM collection trucks unload recyclables at Recycle Northwest, our transload facility co -located with the South Sound district in Auburn, where materials are reloaded into larger trucks for more efficient transport to JMK Fibers Recycling Center in Tacoma for processing and marketing. Compostable material will be sent to Cedar Grove Composting and WM's Columbia Ridge facility in Oregon. If you prefer to use different containerization or processing than the current single -stream recycling system anticipated by the Draft Contract, please address the continuation of the single -stream recycling collection and processing opprooch in your main proposal body and then address your preferred alternative separately under Section E, Bose Contract Modifications. WM plans to use the single stream recycling system as described in the draft contract and has no alternatives related to this operation. Identify your preferred market adjustment index or indexes and your preferred adjustment period. WM suggests using state -mandated filings to measure the change in year -over -year commodity revenue. Specifically, as a certificated hauler, we file annually with the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC) the blended value of our commodities sold for the 12-month period 10/1 through 9/30, every year by 11 /15. Since the first rate adjustment under the new contract will be effective 1 /1 /2022, we propose measuring the change in value by the difference in the per -ton rates filed for the 12-month periods ending 9/30/2020 versus 9/30/2021. The percentage change would be applied to the commodity rate submitted on Form 2. Subsequent adjustments would follow the same process, applying the year -over -year change to the prior year ending rate. Using this approach ties adjustments to the actual results of our Puget Sound MRFs. If your proposed recycling processing facility is planned, but does not currently exist, please identify o fully permitted and operational facility that could serve os your primary facility if your proposed facility is unavailable of the start of the contract. WM will continue to process recyclables at our JMK Fibers Recycling Center. VWPAGE 48 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 WM is committed to sustainable recycling Describe fully your proposed recycling processing facility, including location, hours of operation, processing capability per hour and per day by material type, tons of material currently processed per day by material type, additional processing capacity committed to in the future by material type, and the amount of that capacity needed to process the recyclobles collected under the Bose Contract. WM has plenty of recycling capacity All Federal Way recyclables will continue to be processed at JMK Fibers Recycling Center, which WM owns and operates. Recyclables are processed according to the highest industry standards. This facility has ample queuing, parking, processing, and storage capacity. The JMK facility is more than 90,000 square feet and is on 10 acres in Tacoma. JMK Fibers exceeds all capacity requirements of the Federal Way RFP. It can process approximately 180,000 tons of material per year. In addition to the JMK Fibers site, we have the Cascade Recycling Center (CRC) in Woodinville as a nearby backup facility. Facility Capabilities and Processing Facts Proposed Processing Facility JMK Fibers Recycling Center Location 1440 Port of Tacoma Road, Tacoma, WA 98421 Hours of Operation Monday -Friday, 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Current Processing 780 tons per day Processing Capability 780 tons per day / up to 60 tons per hour Federal Way Capacity Requirements 170 tons per week Residual Rate 6% +/- WM backup local facilities and processing capabilities Area Recycling Facilities Owned and Operated by WM FACILITY LOCATION FACILITY COMMUNITIES PROCESSING TYPE SERVED CAPABILITIES Cascade Woodinville Materials North Puget 550 tons per Recycling Recovery Sound day Center Facility SMaRT Spokane Materials Eastern/Central 250 tons per Center Recovery Washington & day Facility Idaho $6.5 million JMK Recycling Center enhancement underway! Through ongoing equipment investments, upgrades, and maintenance, we seek to continuously improve MRF design, operational efficiency, recovery, and system optimization. JMK Fibers' current advanced sorting equipment includes paper magnets, optical sorters, eddy current separator for aluminum, seven mechanical screens, four balers, plastic film capture system, and an air separator for glass.To respond to changes "Our multimillion - dollar investment at JMK will raise t the quality of paper and plastic commodity streams by improving separation of paper and containers. This will increase our market options and allow us to supply more material to domestic paper mills." —Mott Stern, WM area director of recycling ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 49 r1111Ju. SECTION C.1 in global recycling markets and material characteristics, JMK Fibers is undergoing $6.5 million in upgrades. WM is adding two paper screens and four optical scanners, plus conveyors, chutes, controls, and wiring. Our new equipment will: mechanically sort prohibited material from paper enable the plant to make high -quality paper feedstock for domestic and export markets minimize the need and downtime to remove "tanglers" by installing non -wrapping fiber screens Specifically address how commingled materials ore currently processed and the average rejection or contamination rote experienced by your firm or contracted processor. Describe how your processing facility chooses recycling markets and ensures that collected materials ore remonufoctured into new products rather than high -graded and partially recycled or used os fuel. WM tackles contamination at MRFs with strict processing and quality measures WM has repeatedly demonstrated our ability to recover clean material for high -value markets. Despite a dramatic drop in recyclables markets in 2018, WM's Pacific Northwest Area never had to landfill any recyclables. After recyclables are delivered to our JMK facility, we have many safeguards in place to monitor and control the quality of the materials we process and prepare for sale. When material is tipped on our floor it is visually inspected and, if it is highly contaminated, we reject or downgrade it. We provide pictures to support the reason. Immediately after being fed into the system, the material passes through a conveyor where sorters remove contaminants that will interfere with processing or damage our equipment. The sorters cannot, however, remove all contaminants. From this point, various sorting technologies separate materials by type. Quality control staff remove any identifiable contaminants before each material enters the final bunker for storage and baling. After materials are baled, quality control staff examine the physical presentation of each bale and remove missed contaminants. Material at the end of the processing system, which includes unrecoverable materials and contaminants, also called residual, is disposed of as garbage. To ensure the bales we deliver to end -users meet or exceed industry quality standards, JMK monitors sorted recyclables far more frequently and stringently than the norm. Samples of materials are taken or bales are broken and sorted to assess composition. Materials in the sample are weighed to determine the percentage of contaminants in the bale. Our quality control measures consistently allow us to market our material according to current strict market requirements. WM maintains clear communication with our end -markets to ensure virtually 100% reject -free marketability for all our recycling commodities. "WM staff want to support good'+ recycling habits among our customers. We know it may take many different approaches to achieve beneficial outcomes. We have the staff and resources to be successful." —Hannah Scholes, WM manager of public education and outreach �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 50 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 WM JMK Recycle Processing Diagram 3.CORRUGATED SCREENS 0� 0 0` —` —` —" Material crosses a triple- 0 deck Old Corrugated Cardboard (OCC) screen, 1. MATERIAL IN -FEED 2. PRE-SORT STATIONS which skims off the OCC Trucks are weighed and directed to the Sorters remove rejected items and film, which is from the rest the material stream. The ,OCC tip floor. Material is unloaded, inspected vacuumed away. Bulky materials, inert materials floats over the screen, and stored, until it is ready to be fed to a and large pieces of plastic are also removed and where it is inspected conveyor. in some cases sent for additional recycling. before being conveyed to storage bunkers. NEW! Three new optical sorters with advanced technology to improve paper sorting quality. it IM IM Ell NEW! Two newspaper screens with advanced technology for better sorting of materials. S. PAPER MAGNET 4. NEWSPAPER SCREENS Material left in the main flow is now mostly containers. At this stage, the materials pass through ® o These materials flow over a paper magnet, designed a series of disc screens, which separate to extract paper from the stream. It uses powerful containers, cans and bottles from old vacuum technology to hold two-dimensional paper newspapers and remove any remaining o O flat to the conveyor, while round three-dimensional fiber material. Ocontainers continue on the flow. 0 0 0 = 6. STEEL MAGNET 7. GLASS SORTER 8. OPTICAL SORTING — Next, a steel magnet Whole glass bottles are broken Bottles and cans that make it through the glass sorting : NEW! A removes and stores and fed via conveyor belt area run through a series of optical scanners. These = fourth Optical ferrous materials to the glass crusher, which scanners separate out the last of the paper from the = Sorter for from the material crushes the glass and moves it commingled stream, as well as PET soda/water bottles, Plastics will stream. to a storage area. HDPE milk/detergent bottles, and aseptic milk/juice sort the cartons. Each are stored separately. highest value plastics to ensure greater accuracy in processing. 10. BALING Interior storage , bunkers accumulate large quantities 9. EDDY CURRENT of each separated The remaining material is delivered to an eddy current that material stream, automatically separates aluminum by use of a rare earth electro which are current, which repels the aluminum over a baffle where it drops to a subsequently chute and is blown into a bunker for storage processed in ultra- high -efficiency equipment for compaction into - balesfor shipment to end- . . 0 0 end -use markets FINISHED PRODUCT Forklifts move the bales to a finished product storage area where they are checked for quality SHIPPING Bales are shipped to end users around the world via truck, rail or ship, where they are used as feedstock for new products Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 51 SECTION C.1 $6.5 million JMK Recycling enhancements underway The architectural rendering below is labeled with numbers that correspond to the numbers on the process diagram on the previous page. 0 Two new screens for . One new additional newspaper and three new . optical sorter for optical sorters for paper plastic China's impact on quality standards — zero tolerance for contamination China was the single largest consumer of recyclable materials generated in North America, giving it unparalleled influence over material standards and requirements. Since 2013, China has implemented policies to reduce contamination in material entering its country. Now more than ever, the quality of materials we collect and process for recycling in the United States is of great importance. China's policy has had a significant financial impact on our recyling business. We added more sorters and slowed the MRF throughput. These are expensive measures but necessary to ensure recyclables remain marketable. In partnership with Federal Way, we can work together to ensure that recycling streams are clean. For details on our collaborative public education programs, see Section D. WM cultivates many markets for recyclables WM is the nation's largest exporter of recyclables. We have long cultivated diverse markets for our commodities, so we had many options already in place when China restricted imports of recyclables. In addition, WM has an established reputation for using sophisticated equipment and rigorous quality control to reduce contamination, yielding high -quality processed recyclables. WM adjusted swiftly to market changes. No recyclables went to landfills. From the Pacific Northwest, WM sends processed recyclables to nine countries in addition to China —Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Malaysia, the Philippines, India, Thailand, Indonesia, and the United Arab Emirates. WM also supports local domestic paper mills as they adjust to different market conditions. Plants are shifting, for example, from producing newsprint or directory stock to liner board for "That has been our edge in this difficult time. Quality has kept us in the forefront of markets. When marketing recycled commodities, WM always seeks the highest value, highest use market." —Heidi Zimmerman, WM commodity brokerage manager, who also happens to live in Federal Way �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 52 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 the online shopping industry. WM has been successful at marketing recycled cardboard to local firms, including Port Townsend Paper Co., and WestRock and Greif Industries (previously Caraustar) in Tacoma. WM has been a longtime supplier to McKinley Paper Co., which will open a mill in Port Angeles this fall. See Attachment 3 to read Brent Bell's presentation at the WM Sustainability Forum. Brent is WM's Vice President of Recycling Operations. Describe fully your proposed compostobles processing facility, including location, hours of operation, processing capability per hour and per doy, tons of material currently processed per doy, additional processing capacity committed to in the future, and the amount of that capacity needed to process the compostobles collected under the Bose Contract. If your proposed composting facility is planned, but does not currently exist, please identify o fully permitted and operational facility that could serve os your primory facility if your proposed facility is unavailable of the stort of the contract. WM currently uses Cedar Grove Composting to process residential and commercial compostables, including yard debris, food waste and food -soiled paper that WM collects in Federal Way. Cedar Grove Composting offers state-of-the-art composting technology to produce compost for residents' gardens, which closes the recycling loop. It is the largest composter in Puget Sound and has been in operation since 1989. WM plans to continue delivering Federal Way's compostables to Cedar Grove through 2021, at which point WM's contract with Cedar Grove expires. Beginning in 2022, WM will have several options for processing Federal Way's compostables. Unless WM makes other arrangements with Cedar Grove or another local composter, WM will move its compost processing operations to our permitted composting facility at WM's Columbia Ridge facility outside Arlington, OR, which can handle the same materials as Cedar Grove. Federal Way's compostables will be reloaded into containers at our Auburn facility, then shipped by rail to eastern Oregon. Compost produced there will be used by farmers and vineyards in southeastern Washington and northern Oregon. This will take compost from a saturated market in King County to an area with significant needs for organic material. Cedar Grove Processing Facility Facts Processing Facility Cedar Grove Composting's facility occupies 26 acres and has been in operation since 1989. Location 17825 Cedar Grove Rd., Maple Valley, WA 98038 Public Hours March -October November -February Monday -Friday, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., closed Sundays Closed Saturdays and Sundays Contractor Hours WM has access 24 hours per day, if needed. Permitted Processing 153 tons per hour 1,375 tons per day Capacity Current Processing Tons 1,100 tons per day Alternative Processing Should Cedar Grove's Maple Valley facility become unavailable, WM will use Cedar Grove's Site: Option A facility at 3620 36th PI., Everett, WA 98205. Alternative Processing Should both the Maple Valley and Everett facilities become unavailable for any Site: Option B significant time, WM will consolidate Federal Way's compostables, reload the material into intermodal containers, and transport material to Arlington, OR, where WM has a permitted composting site at Columbia Ridge. Accepted Materials Yard debris, clean wood, pre- and post -consumer food waste, including produce, meats, bones, cheese, bread, cereals, coffee grounds, egg shells, food -soiled paper, cardboard, as well as Cedar Grove -approved biodegradable bags, compostable serviceware, and other packaging products. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 53 WJ,UrIi. SECTION C.1 Identify the operator (if subcontracted), location, structures, and zoning of your proposed mointenance and support facilities. Provide the number of repair boys available of the facility and maintenance staffing levels (e.g., mechanics and assistants) dedicated to Services under the Contract. Provide the totol number of trucks mointoined of the site for oil Proposer operations, os well os the number of trucks and spores dedicated to the Contract. WM's maintenance and support facilities The maintenance and support facility for City of Federal Way services is WM's South Sound district, 701 Second St. N.W., Auburn, WA 98001. The facility underwent a $7.2 million renovation in 2010 to support our natural gas fleet. The property spans more than eight acres, is zoned heavy industrial and includes: 12,000-square-foot maintenance shop, including eight bays, staffed by 11 CNG-certified service technicians and one welder, maintains 54 collection vehicles 4,000-square-foot headquarters for the district manager, public sector manager, route managers, public education coordinator, operations specialists, and collection drivers Compressed natural gas slow -fueling station for collection vehicles Recycle Northwest (RNW) Transfer Station for reloading recyclables, which are hauled to JMK Fibers in Tacoma to be processed. RNW is permitted for collection of Construction, Demolition, Land - clearing (CDL) waste. This facility supports six Class A drivers and three equipment operators. 4,000-square-foot building for WM's engine rebuild, truck salvage, and battery reconditioning programs 8,000-square-foot building for storage and cart building A public fueling station, built in partnership with Don Small and Sons, is located at the Fuel Farm, 325 C St. N.W., Auburn WM reserves spare vehicles for Federal Way WM will keep three spare trucks in reserve for Federal Way. With more than 54 natural gas trucks in the South Sound district, 500 trucks in the Puget Sound area, and 850 trucks in the Pacific Northwest, our backup fleet is robust. Our South Sound district maintenance team �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 54 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 The City actively works to protect its water resources, including surface and groundwater. It is important to the City that oll containers do not leak and hove tight fitting lids that close, and that they ore always closed after servicing. What steps do you propose to ensure these requirements? Similarly, leaking compactors con pollute surface water and it is important to the City that compactors do not leak during operation, or during or after servicing. What specific steps do you propose to prevent pollution from compactors? Working together to protect the environment WM is deeply committed to protecting the environment in the City of Federal Way and every community we serve. Our operations staff receives rigorous training on preventing environmental hazards. In Federal Way, we will continue to use many measures to safeguard surface and groundwater. Container condition monitoring During collection, WM drivers are required to check the condition of carts, containers, and compactors. Defects in structural integrity are immediately noted by drivers on their onboard tablets. A ticket for a container repair or replacement is automatically generated, and fulfilled by our container delivery team. Most compactors we service are not owned by WM. When a problem is noticed, a ticket is sent to a route manager who alerts the customer to the problem. If the compactor poses safety or environmental concerns, we discontinue collection of the container until repairs are completed by the customer. Our South Sound district has been very successful in confirming compactors are safe by partnering with municipal stormwater and drainage staff and visiting customers together. We also closely monitor compactor weight and volume because overfilled compactors have a higher potential to leak. We work closely with compactor customers to schedule collections at an appropriate frequency. Keeping container lids shut All carts and containers purchased by WM have tightly fitting lids. WM posts labels, designed in consultation with Federal Way staff, on containers to remind everyone that keeping lids closed is critical to protecting our environment. Drivers are instructed to shut lids when returning containers to their collection locations. Route managers confirm this is done during routine spot checks. We also take responsibility for educating customers, who may like to keep lids open for easy access, about the importance of closing them to avoid contaminating stormwater. I KEEP PUGET SOUND CLEAN Preventing vehicle spills and leaks WM keeps the City of Federal Way's streets and water clean by adhering to a strict spill prevention and response protocol. This includes maintenance procedures designed to catch potential spills, leaks, and hose breakages before they happen. Our teams are trained to respond to spills in a timely manner. Every 50 hours, each automated truck is inspected and lubricated to prevent service interruptions while on route. IsClose your dumpster lid. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 55 �IWVu. SECTION C.1 Every 150-operating hours, each of our collection vehicles undergoes a spill and leak prevention assessment. Mechanics inspect hoses and replace ones showing signs of wear prior to manufacturer scheduled replacement. Drivers closely check their vehicles for leaks twice per day, during pre -trip and post -trip inspections. When a driver notes a leak, the truck is not returned to service until it has been repaired. A spare truck is used to prevent delays in collection. All fluids, including antifreeze, are collected and recycled when drained. Used oil filters are drained and scrapped per regulations. WM's spill response protocol If a leak or spill occurs during collections, the driver immediately contains the spill, using the onboard spill kit. The driver notifies WM dispatch staff of the spill, noting its location, fluid type, proximity to drains, and approximate quantity. The city -designated contact is notified. A route manager goes to the scene to assist in containment, and ensure the spill is properly managed per Department of Ecology standards. The route manger documents the spill with before and after cleanup photos, and reports to local and state authorities. If a driver is unable to contain a spill or it has reached stormwater drains, dispatch sends our contracted professional groundwater service provider to cleanup. WM's Waste Watch® helps keep Federal Way safe We delivered. In the new contract, the City of Federal Way has requested the Waste Watch@ program WM has long provided! Our Waste Watch@ community safety program began in Forest Grove, OR, in 2004, and is now in more than 100 communities across North America. WM has trained about 4,000 drivers to look and listen for suspicious activities and emergency situations, then report to public safety and law enforcement agencies. WM's program has received national and local accolades, including the National Sheriffs' Association's Award of Excellence in Neighborhood Watch. We partner with other safety W__4STE - related organizations and programs, including AMBER Alert, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Community Crime Stoppers, and the Department of Homeland Security. 'WATCH., Onboard technology such as DriveCam@, a small video recorder mounted on the windshield of our trucks, has helped make Waste WatchO successful in Federal Way. While primarily a driving safety tool, drivers can manually start the camera if they witness a potential crime. Urgent messages, such as AMBER Alerts, can be communicated to drivers via our Onboard Computing System (OCS) for instant, geo-targeted communication. v�Jrli. PAGE 56 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.1 Local Waste Watch® successes In Federal Way, Driver Andre Edwards noticed an elderly customer fell in her driveway. He provided first aid for her head wound, then comforted her until the ambulance arrived. Driver Micah Speir found a bag of checks worth $12,000 near a trash bin on his route � , • 4 , and returned it to the Seattle elementary school where it belonged. Driver James Thomas saw one of his customers on the ground, called 911, and waited until the ambulance arrived. Through his knowledge of the customer, he was able to relay information to help with the paramedic's assessment. "We live on a private road that requires the drivers to back in and handle cans by hand, which I consider to be above and beyond. We have received phone messages with reminders about service changes (e.g. holiday deliveries) which are helpful. The drivers always seem friendly and accommodating. Specific requests by phone have always been handled promptly and professionally." —Christina K. "The service is reliable, the containers are returned in the same condition and location. The drivers do not leave a mess, share the road and are safe." —Tracy & Laima R. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 57 �IrJV1�. SECTION C.2 C.2 Billing Support and Customer Service Support Describe in detail the manufacturer and model of equipment and software used to maintain route lists, customer service histories, and the ability to provide city -requested reports of customer - specific information and data. WM's fully integrated billing and customer support system From our drivers on Federal Way streets to managers in our office, everyone at Waste Management works together to create an outstanding experience for our customers. That is why we use the equipment and software we do. Our fully integrated system ,/ Federal Way staffing guarantees we give our customers excellent services at the ,/ Exclusive service line curb, create easily understandable bills, and provide the city with for Federal Way calls accurate reports. ✓ Extended Saturday WM's billing system hours for Federal Way WM uses Mid -America Systems (MAS) as our customer billing system. MAS software operates on an IBM iSeries AS400 Platform, running i5/OS version 7.1. WM can create customized reports for city staff from our fully integrated system, including data by type of service. We can query all customer types and produce reports based on Federal Way's requests. MAS System Features Fully integrated billing: MAS integrates all billing, routing, and customer service information into one operating system. Our invoices allow us to create city -approved billing inserts and messages. We post electronic versions of the inserts for customers who have opted for paperless billing. Reliability and redundancy: We perform data quality audits monthly to ensure all information in MAS is accurate and current. Our data is automatically backed up to prevent loss. Efficient route sequencing: Electronic route logs are generated from billing data every day and downloaded to drivers' tablets nightly to guarantee accurate service. New customers and service changes are posted at the top of drivers' route screens. Each customer is assigned a unique account number that tracks detailed information, including contacts, size and quantity of containers, and service history. Route information is viewable in MAS. Accurate service: MAS connects directly to our receivables processing system. Customers remit their payments to WM's regional payment center or online. 24/7 online bill pay option: WM offers a safe, secure, convenient online system, allowing customers to pay their bills 24/7. In Federal Way, 1,702 customers have enrolled in autopay and 2,556 in paperless billing. Please see Attachment 7, An Easy -to -Understand invoice. Five in -person pay stations in Federal Way Fred Meyer 33702 21 st Ave. S.W Monday -Sunday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Valley Harvest 28855 Military Rd. S. Monday -Sunday 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Purified Water to Go 2012 S. 314th St. Monday -Saturday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Walmart 1900 S. 314th St Monday -Sunday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Walmart 34520 16th Ave. S. Monday -Sunday 8 a.m.-9 p.m. PAGE 58 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.2 WM's Enspire° reporting system Our sophisticated system allows WM to produce reports for Federal Way, including commercial, drop box, residential, and multifamily data. Providing monthly and annual reports starts on the street with our drivers who enter customer information into their tablets, which transmits data to our Onboard Computing System (OCS). This information is stored in our OPUS database. Each month, we pull information from OPUS, as well as MAS, to generate reports. Data is collected on our local server where SQL queries perform calculations for tonnage and diversion reports. Customer Service Reports Additional queries analyze account data to provide customer and container counts, customer inquiry information, and other information. Using Spotfire, we directly pull each month's data into the reporting template specifically designed for Federal Way, based on feedback from city staff. Once updated, the information is published to Enspire®, allowing the city to securely view its reports on any web -enabled device, 24/7. WM's Contract Compliance team will continue to provide Federal Way staff with monthly reports, including our Customer Service Center ASA (average speed of answer) and ABA (average abandon) performance, and a customer complaint log. In addition, under the new contract, this data will reflect Federal Way -specific information. As part of our ongoing commitment to world -class service, these reports will be discussed during regular meetings with Federal Way staff to help the city get the most out of the information we provide. When requested by city staff, we provide extra reports, for example, data on service levels, specific commodities, or tonnage broken down by residential, multifamily, commercial, and drop -box customers. Describe your experiences in other cities implementing comprehensive collection operations and customer services similar to those specified in the Contract, with particular emphasis on how the transition between the previous contractor and your Entity was handled, and how your Entity developed accurate customer service level and billing data in the event the predecessor's records were unavailable. WM offers Federal Way the smoothest transition WM will use our extensive knowledge of Federal Way's staff, residents, commercial customers, and area to seamlessly transition to the new contract. While each implementation is unique, the foundation for our continued success in Federal Way will be built on consistent communication and coordination with city staff throughout the transition as well as: Local, dedicated operations and contract staff focused on Federal Way's needs A newly appointed Federal Way customer service team with expertise on the contract that will train all Pacific Northwest (PNW) representatives on contract changes New public education and outreach to apprise customers of service additions and changes Extensive use of traditional and social media to share contract changes with different customers in different ways Our seasoned WM transition team includes contract management, operations, contract compliance, billing, customer service, communications, and public education and outreach. This team will develop a Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 59 WJ,M, SECTION C.2 detailed service transition plan for Federal Way. They will follow an implementation tracker developed and monitored by our contract compliance team. Recent transitions and implementations WM has implemented many contracts for new partners and added newly contracted services for longtime partners, like Federal Way. Recent examples include: New contract services for existing municipal partner, 2019 Transitioned to new, WM-provided carts Embedded residential yard waste service with garbage rates Swapped cart colors Provided unlimited commercial and multifamily recycling to customers with garbage service Offered free kitchen compost buckets to all residents Installed solar -powered Bigbelly public litter and recycling containers New partner, 2018 Obtained customer database from former hauler and verified list Transitioned to new carts Painted commercial and multifamily recycling dumpsters blue to promote diversion Offered extra yard waste collections after city - designated storm events New contract services for existing municipal partner, 2016 Transitioned to year-round, weekly yard waste collections Added 20-gallon food scrap carts for residential customers with limited yard space Painted commercial and multifamily recycling dumpsters blue to promote diversion Increased commercial and multifamily embedded recycling to 200% Added a call -in service for electronics recycling at curbside See Attachment 4 for more information on the City of Newcastle's cart color swap experience. WM's approach to consistent, reliable customer service Outline your overall approach to customer service and how the various elements of customer service (call center, web -based, outdiol messaging, and mobile opp) work together to provide excellent customer service and enhance two-way communications between Contractor and customer. WM will enhance Federal Way's service in the next contract by appointing a team of four seasoned professionals for Federal Way customers. They will be supported by our highly trained PNW customer service representatives at our state -of -the art center in Phoenix. Your city staff will continue to enjoy VIP service from our City Services team in Kirkland. WM will designate four senior staff members at our PNW Customer Service Center as experts on Federal Way's next contract. This is the first time we have taken this innovative approach to customer service. Two customer service supervisors and two team floor leads will oversee Federal Way calls. Customer Service Manager Denie Covert will continue to serve as a liaison to our Federal Way staff. This new, winning combination will ensure Federal Way receives personalized, attentive, and prompt service. VW PAGE 60 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.2 NEW! Federal Way Ambassadors Robin Krueger and Joshua Pilkington, veteran WM customer service supervisors, will lead our Federal Way customer service representatives. Robin will be the lead and Joshua will be her backup to ensure consistent leadership and follow through. They will have intimate knowledge of the contract, visit Federal Way to meet with city staff, and ride with our drivers to get to know your city. They will 0- _ provide ongoing management, coaching, and support for our Federal Way 0- customer service team. Federal Way Champions Bryan Larson and Robert Neugebauer, seasoned WM customer service team floor leads, both from the PNW, will be Federal Way contract experts. They will train all customer service representatives assigned to staff the Federal Way service line. They will handle elevated calls and provide real-time coaching to our representatives taking Federal Way calls. Bryan Larson joined WM in 2017. As a customer service lead, Bryan currently handles escalated customer service issues, communicates market changes to representatives assisting residential and commercial customers, and directs communications from other departments to appropriate parties. Bryan is a Pacific Northwest native, who grew up primarily in the Seattle area. Robert Neugebauer is a customer service team lead who helps ensures quality service at PNW's center. He coaches new and experienced call center representatives to ensure performance standards are exceeded. He handles customer escalations, _ oversees real-time performance, line management, monitors calls, and creates reports to management. Robert is a liaison between representatives, supervisory staff, and other departments. He has been with WM for three years. Federal Way Exclusive Call Handling System Federal Way customers will use (253) 833-3333, as their exclusive service line. These calls will be placed in their own Federal Way call queue, allowing segmented staffing and tailored metric reporting! Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 61 MUM, SECTION C.2 State -of -the -Art PNW Customer Service Center World -class customer service begins with good listeners, and we have many at our PNW Customer Service Center. Customers may call us before breakfast or after work and anytime in between. F_ ®Extended Saturday hours for Federal Way WM will increase our Saturday hours to 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Highly skilled Federal Way customer service representatives will be available weekdays 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Our online self-service options are available anytime, anywhere. We have 108 PNW representatives in our Customer Service Center and within this group there will be a team primarily taking Federal Way customer calls. Another nearly 400 representatives on the Phoenix campus can help with Federal Way calls, in case of an emergency. Extensive training prepares and empowers our customer service representatives to resolve customer issues on the first call and gives them the resources they need to research more complex inquiries. Advanced technology helps our representatives work efficiently and accurately. We use surveys and feedback to continuously improve our operations. See comments from our customers throughout our proposal! Calls are recorded and supervisors review representatives' performance during weekly coaching sessions. Our interactive system gives callers the option of proceeding in English or Spanish, and then to be directed to a representative for residential, commercial, or dropbox services. Alternatively, customers may press "0" to connect immediately. WM's City Services team supports Federal Way staff WM's City Services, established in 2016, is dedicated to quick resolutions, in four hours or less, of city staff members' requests. In 2018, the team replied to 550 emails from Federal Way. Phone calls are typically answered within seconds! This highly skilled, professional team, based in our Kirkland office, is available exclusively to city staff via phone or email. Team members can swiftly answer inquiries about billing, customer concerns, set up permanent and temporary city containers, find service information for specific addresses, and provide historical data. In January, the city requested eight new WM carts to support a food drive at high schools. Within 15 minutes of receiving the email, our City Services team scheduled the deliveries and advised the city. When the food drive finished, WM picked up the carts the next day. vWJr PAGE 62 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.2 The City Services team at a glance Tammy Marcella Leila David Monica Samantha Lane Manibusan Salsbery Bednar Danko Griffiths billing liaison billing senior set-up senior set-up senior billing manager supervisor coordinator coordinator billing clerk clerk More information about Tammy and Marcella is in Section 13.2. WM's many options for service requests Describe how service requests mode via call center, web -based, and mobile opp elements ore responded to, without creating duplicative response effort. All customer contacts, whether by Customer Service Center, websites, or mobile app, are tracked. Each customer's request creates a ticket, which must be closed by resolution of the problem or fulfillment. Requests across platforms are consolidated in the customer's account, preventing duplicative responses. Describe the functionality of your website including the basic structure, how it allows customers to interface with customer service representatives, and the degree to which customers con manage their accounts (e.g. change their subscribed service levels, order service, request o missed pick- up collection) through both website and mobile opp elements, and how you ensure that web and mobile opp requests ore accurately tracked, resolved, and reported. WM offers an extensive suite of interactive options for customers to use on their smartphones, tablets, or computers. Our online tools constantly evolve in response to customer needs. ® Before we launch the new contract, we will create no - charge, "dummy accounts" for City of Federal Way staff to test our customer service systems for reliability and satisfaction. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services "The IT team appreciates the feedback we've received from Federal Way, which helps us make improvements." —Joke Morris, WM digital director PAGE 63 ��. SECTION C.2 WM offers many online and self-service options oOnline Our customers are often on the go and online. At WM, we are right there with them, ° — customer offering 24/7 access to their accounts and information with just a click. b service 24/7 and Customers may sign up to receive text or email messages from WM regarding holiday UTexting emailing service, inclement weather delays, local campaigns, and more. » wmnorthwest.com/federalway: Our customer -friendly, Federal Way -specific website lets customers easily view their service options online. The site contains information on collection days, holiday schedules, and weather delays. » www.wm.com/us: Customers may pay bills online, schedule a service, and learn "what goes where." » recyclenw@wm.com: An email to this address provides residents and businesses with quick answers to their tougher recycling questions. Live digital Customers who prefer online chats may reach a digital care customer service chat professional weekdays 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. WM With WM's mobile app, which works on Apple and Android phones, customers can sign up mobile app for ezPay, set up account notification preferences, see their service days, find out when their driver will service their containers and request additional pickups. The app provides quick links on acceptable recyclable and compostable materials. Amazon Echo Customers only need their voices to connect with WM through Amazon Echo. Alexa can answer recycling questions, provide an updated account balance, and give information on WM career opportunities. After-hours Our customer service number allows customers to obtain basic account and collection calls schedule information through an automated system, even during non -business hours. WM Our WM Interactive Voice Response (IVR) automated telephony system distinguishes Interactive our services from the rest of the industry. Our customers have easy, voice -controlled Voice options available 24/7. IVR enhancements include: Response » One-time payments: Customers may provide credit card or banking information to make a payment. » Special event alerts: When our customers call, they hear messages regarding special events in their areas, including holiday services and weather alerts. » Status updates and ETA: Customers may find out if their service has been completed or receive an ETA on when it will be. » Commercial pickup scheduling: Our commercial customers may schedule extra pickups with just a few clicks of their phone keypad. » Drop -box pickups: Our drop -box customers are able to schedule service. » Federal Way specific information: And as a service enhancement in the new contract, Federal Way customers will hear only Federal Way specific information. P ww� e w«wo.w Alexa can answer recycling - questions, provide an updated account balance, and give information on WM career opportunities.:.<._: �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 64 With WM's mobile app, customers can sign up for ezPay, set up account notification preferences, see their service days, find out when their driver will service their containers and request additional pickups. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.2 Describe your recent innovations in providing customer service; for exomple, via new technology on trucks or new methods/technologies to better communicate with customers, and how you adapt and respond to advances in technology. WM's innovations enhance customer service Green Pages Green Pages, our knowledge management tool, provides information about Federal Way's contract, such as services, rates, collection schedules, maps, special events and activities. Green Pages are audited by contract managers on a quarterly basis and can be updated promptly with urgent messages to the customer service staff. Customer service representatives use Green Pages to quickly answer questions. WM technology working to meet our Federal Way customer's needs CUSTOMER WM options for customer RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL DROPBOX Automatic payments are quick, easy and recurring to help Autopay customers ensure on -time payment and avoid potential late vl fees or service disruptions. Paperless Customers can opt into receiving invoices and billing inserts their invoice is / J / Billing online and are notified with an email when V V available.... Online Bill Online bill payment was designed for the customer on the go. It's 24/7 frees from hassle ✓ / Pay available and the customer the of V calling or mailing in payments. w Creating a wm.com profile enables customers to access billing, like / / Proofilefile account, and self-service applications scheduling V V a bulky or extra pickup. Edit Contact Customers can easily update their personal contact V f Information information online 24/7. Customers can schedule an empty and return or switch out Empty and containers online. This service can be modified or cancelled N/A N/A Return as necessary, plus we provide a history of service requests to help with planning and budgeting. Pickup Customers can view pickup schedule, next pickup date, and / Schedule/ estimated time to arrive online to ensure that containers are V ETA ready, avoiding any customer inconvenience. Holiday Holiday schedules provide up-to-date information online and for delays that Schedule prepare customers any potential service occur during holiday seasons. ............. Bulky or Extra Scheduling a bulk item or an extra pickup is quick and easy ✓ ✓ N/A Pickup for customers with this simple online form. Customers get timely email responses when they submit Contact Us their questions or report service -related issues online using our convenient Contact Us form. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 65 WJ,Z, SECTION C.2 Onboard Computer System WM rapidly embraces new technologies to give our customers world -class service, convenience, and safety. One of our most important innovations driving customer satisfaction is our Onboard Computer System (OCS). Drivers carry tablets that link them to dispatchers and their managers. OCS enhances customer service by: Obtaining real-time information on truck locations and capacity Allowing one -touch verification of carts that have been serviced and indicating a reason for any cart not being collected (cart not out, cart blocked, locked access, contamination) Enabling customer service and dispatch to communicate with the operations team for immediate resolution of customer issues, including on -call requests, rerouting, and service needs Empowering drivers to note missing or damaged carts, so tickets may be generated for repairs or replacements Facilitating reports of graffiti and illegal dumping Additional information about OCS may be found in Section C.I. Enspire° Enspire® is an innovative reporting tool WM built with our city partners in mind. This intuitive reporting platform offers city staff 24/7 access to their data on any web -enabled device. WM uses the interactive dashboard to produce routine and requested reports for our partners, including comparisons of trends. See more about WM's reporting systems on page 59. Customer -at -a -Glance Customer -at -a -Glance (CAAG) remarkably improved our ability to quickly understand customer accounts and service histories. CAAG is used throughout the organization, from customer service representatives to contract managers to operations staff. CAAG combines the following into one location for easy review: wm.com/ezPay WM's integrated billing system, Mid -America System (MAS) Onboard Computing System (OCS), which captures service history and statuses Photos taken by drivers to document, for example, service overages and contamination Customer -at -a -Glance gives representatives access to customers' full profiles and eliminates the need to open and search for data in multiple applications. We have access to everything we need to know about our customers in less than a minute, which typically allows us to achieve resolutions on first calls, in less time. PAGE 66I SECTION C.2 Provide the location and staffing levels of your call center facility. Discuss how staffing levels ore established and modified to ensure timely customer service, and how new and existing staff ore trained. Describe how customer service performance is measured, including the specific targets or performance metrics used to evaluate your performance. When call center staff handle calls from more than one city or Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission -certificated service area, describe the procedures and aids used by those staff to address calls from different service areas without delaying responses to customers. WM's Pacific Northwest Customer Service Center is fast, effective WM will continue to use (253) 833-3333 as Federal Way's dedicated phone number. In the next contract, we will revise our system to create an exclusive call handling system for Federal Way. Your customers will be served by representatives with expertise on Customer Service Federal Way. In the next contract, four Federal Way subject hours are extended to experts will focus on ensuring our representatives know and 8am-5pm on Saturday understand the intricacies of your new contract. And, we will designate selected employees to be "Federal Way primary" representatives. Calls from Federal Way on (253) 833-3333 will specifically route to these designated representatives first. In the event of overflow, calls will be handled by other PNW representatives. Our command center constantly monitors incoming call volume and directs calls to different teams, if wait times lengthen. Customers are given the alternative of an automated callback ("no need to hold, we will call you back") during high call volume periods. Genesys, a global leader in customer care technology, helps us track and report our wait time performance. Supervisors use the data to manage the team in real time. The platform creates daily reports, which are used for benchmarking, staffing adjustments, training opportunities, and improvement. ®Our Phoenix -based staff will be led by four team members with specific responsibility for the Federal Way contract. Our PNW customer service team includes: 60 27 m 10 4 6 1 residential commercial digital care lead supervisors customer representatives representatives representatives representatives service manager (email and live chat) liaison Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 67 WJ,UrIi. SECTION C.2 Top-notch Training WM trains new customer service representatives for 12 weeks, recently increased from five weeks, to make certain they are fully prepared to answer all customers' questions. Topics covered include: New hire orientation History of Waste Management Overview of products and services Commitment to municipalities and customers Introduction to business Explanations of MRFs, transfer stations, composting facilities Understanding contracts Review of service territory Overview of municipalities and contracts Training never stops Developing customer relationships Clear communication Active listening De-escalation techniques Customer engagement tools Detailed service and products Stay positive and calm Maintaining professionalism Customer Service Center equipment and systems training MAS, integrated billing system Green Pages, knowledge management tool Genesys reporting WM is committed to steadily improving and training our entire customer service team. As our business evolves and our customers' needs change, we introduce new technologies and give our representatives more education. We offer extended training in classrooms, through our Talent Central courses, in huddles, with side -by -side call listening, peer mentoring, and coaching. The following tools measure and improve customer service. Customer surveys Every month, our customers complete about 20,000 surveys, which are compatible with smartphones and tablets as well as PCs. We use the data to improve our customer service delivery. We are already performing very well! In 2018, customers rated our PNW representatives 9 out of 10! Recent experience surveys We ask customers about their recent call, digital live chat, or email, and receive about 10,000 replies a month. The survey has 12 questions and takes two minutes to complete. See customer responses shared throughout the proposal! Each representative receives five to 10 examples of direct customer feedback every month. WM offers coaching to encourage effective communication. Satisfaction surveys Under our customer loyalty program, we also survey randomly selected customers to assess their satisfaction with our services. We use the 10,000 replies a month to keep tabs on our performance from the streets to our Customer Service Center. Independent quality monitoring WM employs an external company to review four conversations per month between an representative and customer, and six digital exchanges, both emails and chats. The results are used to create better customer service. PAGE 68 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.2 Discuss how long it takes you to physically respond to service calls by line -of -business, how you monitor and adapt your field staffing to minimize your response time, how the resolution of each service call is performed in o timely manner, and how this is tracked and routinely reported os port of internal performance evaluation os well os required periodic reports. WM tracks requests through ticket system Nearly all customer complaints are resolved within one business day for all lines -of -business, including missed pickups. WM monitors and tracks all customer contacts through a ticket system, including requests for service, change of service, status of service, complaints, and compliments. Each ticket is created in an open status and requires closure on completion and/or resolution of the requested action. If an issue requires immediate attention and/or escalation, an email is also sent to the local operations management team. A case is opened South Sound Operations Specialist Denie Covert, our for customer Sunny Lawrence runs daily reports customer service inquiries that of open tickets and distributes them manager, sends a weekly require more extensive follow to Senior District Manager Marc Davis and Route Managers Jason open -case report, 000.which the South Sound up, for example Shea, Marklus Henley and Dian operations team uses visiting a site Young. This keeps all open tickets to cross-check with its to right -size a in front of the entire team for reports to be sure no container. accountability and quick resolution. issue is overlooked. If a repeat issue occurs within two months, a code red case alerts the district, dispatch, and operations managers. Resolution is expected within two hours. The driver is given direct, immediate, one-on-one education and support. This coaching approach by our operations team, typically corrects the problem immediately. WM's quality control program includes performance standards for ticket creation, closure, tracking, and service recovery. Local management is responsible and accountable for these performance standards. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 69 WJ,M, SECTION C.2 Describe your procedures for handling "missed" collections. Do you hove o separate route for handling misses of the end of each day; is each route driver responsible for collecting their misses on the day or day after regular collection; or does your Entity use some other system? How has this approach worked to minimize repeat misses? How do you improve services for those customers who repeatedly report justified misses? How do you handle customers who repeatedly report unwarranted misses? WM's South Sound missed collection rate is less than one per 1,250 collections. That is far below the industry standard. We strive to retrieve missed collections the same day. Collections are handled by the route driver or another driver who is nearby. We do not need a separate route for misses. Our drivers' onboard tablets significantly reduce missed service by noting route sequence and special service requirements. After each stop, drivers use their tablets to record the address was serviced, if any issue prevented service, or if the container was not out. The information posts to the customer's account notes, which customer service representatives can see if the customer calls. Every driver is coached on several service metrics, including any missed pickups. A report is generated each day for the route managers to review with the drivers. Resolving repeated missed collections On rare occasion, a customer reports repeated missed collections. An escalated complaint ticket is sent to a route manager for investigation. The route manager and driver review our detailed service logs, GIPS data, and route completion reports to research the customer's complaint. They work together to identify the root cause of the problem and, more importantly, arrive at a solution to prevent future misses. A route manager and driver may meet with the customer to seek a mutual understanding of expectations and resolve the problem. In the future, the driver may take photos to document the collection was performed as scheduled or no cart was set out at the time of collection. WM maintains an electronic record of all contacts, by phone and internet, related to missed collections and our responses. This information is included in our monthly reports to the city. "You are ALWAYS so dependable and come no matter the weather conditions... Thank You!" —Lynn J. "The Recycle lady is an amazing person. Her friendliness and willingness to help us "get it right" is impressive." —Raymond S. "I really appreciate it when the Waste Management guy puts my garbage can next to the garage on an especially windy day. In fact, I called to give kudos to him! I'm a widow, so now I am responsible for everything. The extra effort to prevent a wild goose chase on my part for a missing lid, was/is much appreciated." —Jenny F. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 70 Federal 'Vvay Solid 'Aaste Collection Ser, ices SECTION C.2 delivered.f You asked. You asked. We We will deliver. WM ALREADY DELIVERS WM WILL DELIVER! Operations Operations Plastic detachable containers and slotted >> Included in our base proposal, new carts for lids for multifamily complexes and garbage, recycle, and compost, labeled as commercial businesses requested by the city. Existing carts will be Waste WatchO, a longtime WM program, is collected and repurposed by WM. We'll even active in Federal Way remove customer -owned cans on request! CNG trucks for a clean, green and >> All new grey garbage containers for quiet city multifamily and commercial customers Enhanced contingency plan to provide Customer Service an uninterrupted fueling supply for our >> A city -centric customer service model collection vehicles City staff will be able to try our online Customer Service service options with 10 no -charge VIP local City Services team whom you dummy accounts before the launch of the know and work with already! new contract Public Education and Outreach Public Education and Outreach WM Recycle Corps interns and o WM Public Education and Outreach grassroots outreach, including the Coordinator Denaya Shorter, at our South distribution of reusable tote bags to Sound district, will dedicate 40% of her time to multifamily residents programs in Federal Way Dedicated staff with a robust, results- >> Increased efforts to reduce contamination oriented education and outreach plan in Federal Way's businesses and multifamily complexes Community Partnerships o Social media campaign to increase WM will remain actively involved in paperless customer communications community partnerships, including the backed by a promise from WM to donate Mayor's Day of Concern for the Hungry, $1, up to $5,000, to the Multi -Service Farmers Market, and We Love Our City Center for each person who enrolls! cleanup events >> Partner with city to measure effectiveness of public education programs aAND MORE... >> South Sound Teamster drivers will be paid the same for garbage, recycling and yard waste collection New Bigbelly recycling and garbage units for downtown �® Federal Way! • • WM Think Green Recycling and Reuse Collection O O Events! See Section D for more information. WM Green4Good Grants Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 71 �IYJtJ1�. SECTION C.3 C.3 Transition and Implementation Plan Describe your proposed transition and implementation plans to ensure on efficient and successful implementation of service provisions os outlined in the Bose Contract. Identify the major issues and challenges along with your proposed approach. The City of Federal Way has relied on Waste Management as its local service provider for almost three decades. Throughout our partnership, we have shown our dedication to innovation and investments in technology and people to enhance our collection and customer services. Building on our established partnership and continuing to communicate effectively will contribute to a smooth implementation for the new contract. Yes, we're your current service provider, and this new contract will receive our full attention. We will work closely with city staff to identify changes from the existing to the new contract, then inform customers appropriately. Key to all successful new contract implementations is having proven collection equipment and resources in place. We will make certain residents have the right containers, with the right instructions, and we will collect safely, on time, and efficiently. Contract services The City of Federal Way's new contract requires many of the services WM developed and implemented, often in consultation with city staff, during the current contract. No company is better prepared than WM to continue delivering the services you appreciate. South Sound driver and customer �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 72 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.3 Discuss customer information, promotion and notification, customer service, customer response, procurement and delivery of vehicles and other equipment, contingency plans and other considerations which will ensure successful transition and implementation of the comprehensive Services under the Bose Contract. At WM, we apply a team -based approach to our contract implementations to guarantee success. The implementation will be led by: Laura Moser Marc Davis Public Sector Solutions Manager Senior District Manager (206) 391 -9112 (mobile) (253) 880-6479 (mobile) All our key WM departments and staff, whom you work with daily, will play important roles. Contract Team WM's Contract Compliance team will establish and monitor our contract checklist and implementation plan. Contract Compliance will summarize contract services and rates. The team is responsible for making sure all key customer and contract information is entered in Green Pages, our knowledge management tool, discussed in Section C.2. See Sections B.2 for more information about our contract compliance team. City Services and Billing Accurate customer contacts, service levels, and billing information are essential to a smooth implementation. Our City Services team and billing department will work with Federal Way to confirm WM has the most current customer information. Our database is continuously updated and maintained. Our staff works diligently to verify account information, and customers frequently update their information on their wm.com accounts. With a new contract, Federal Way residents will continue to benefit from access to our convenient billing and payment options. This is especially valuable to the growing portion of our customers who prefer the convenience of managing their accounts online, setting up automatic bill pay, and receiving electronic paperless invoices, all at wm.com. See Section C.2 for more information about our City Services and billing teams. Customer Service Federal Way ambassadors at PNW's Customer Service Center in Phoenix! Dedicated Federal Way customer service champions! Customer Service reporting exclusively for Federal Way! Please refer to Section B.2 for more information on our dedicated Federal Way customer service team and Section C.2 for more information about our PNW Customer Service Center. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 73 WJ,K, SECTION C.3 Public Education and Outreach team Our education materials and programs are like none other in the industry, which is important when implementing new services and contract changes. In collaboration with city staff, our Public Education and Outreach team will ensure the educational materials developed are pertinent to customers' collection needs. They will work with city staff to schedule a community event to offer residents, business owners, and property managers a forum to ask questions about new service offerings. See Section D for more information about our Public Education and Outreach team and programs. WM educational tools and methods During implementation of our new contract, each category of customers will receive tailored information .I .F- ILTIFAaaLf L41111111EKLIAL Welcome WM will host a community event at a convenient, accessible location to introduce residents, Community business owners, and property managers to new service offerings. Our overview will be followed Meeting by a Q&A session. New WM will mail each Federal Way resident, business, and property manager a postcard describing Services the new collection services that begin Sept. 1, 2020. The mailing will alert them to key dates, Postcard rate changes, new service offerings, and community meetings and/or site visits and events. We will promote our campaign for customers to register for paperless communication preferences! Information WM will mail comprehensive Multifamily property managers Commercial Packages information packages to will receive packages with information packages residents, including: everything listed in the will include materials » highlights of new and/or residential packages, but similar to those enhanced collection services customized to their needs. described for » a recycling educational guide, WM will send samples of multifamily properties. including a list of recycling educational materials, such programs beyond the cart as recycling and compost » waste reduction tips guidelines, posters, decals, and » resources for hazardous waste order forms. disposal » a list of cart sizes and rates » instructions for choosing communication preferences Site Visits Our education and outreach Our education and staff will conduct site visits with outreach staff will multifamily customers to: conduct site visits » review new service offerings with commercial » identify container capacity, customers, as described under access, and placement multifamily. obstacles » distribute educational materials » address site -specific recycling challenges » promote communication preferences for property managers �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 74 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.3 OUTREACH RESIDENTIAL MULTIFAMILY COMMERCIAL Media WM will use traditional and social media throughout the contract implementation to keep Outreach residents and businesses informed. We will use our "Think Green Federal Way" Facebook page, and Social Twitter, and links to city media. Media Outdials Outdial calls also may be used to introduce customers to new services, new service days, and instructions to specify communication preferences. Website Our Federal Way website is available 24/7 to customers with the most up-to-date information on services, events, and implementation updates. Addendum #3 Due to recent weather impacts to collections and the potential for more frequent similar disruptions, the City requests proponents further develop two aspects in their proposals: • Communications to customers (by sector) • How refunds will be issued from you to customers (by circumstance) Customer Service Communications: In o comprehensive manner, describe how you os Contractor will establish customer -facing communications with oil customers (by sector and/or line -of -business) serviced under this contract. How will Contractor obtain and maintain the necessary customer contoct information to ensure oppropriote information, instructions, and messages ore provided to oil customers — based on the context of the issue thot impacts the customer. Describe how Contractor will actively seek communications preferences os port of: • Updating existing customer account information, • Initial customer set-up, os well os • Ongoing active updoting of oil existing customer communications preference Describe how customers will be incentivized to request these communicotions in context with the service issue (and by material stream or waste type if appropriate), selecting among: Paper moil, Emoil, Phone colVvoicemoil, Mobile text, Mobile opp, or ony other appropriate communication opportunities Describe how incentives would be administered, for example how o credit or other benefit would accrue to o customer that elects to use one form of communication over another (such os paying bills on-line versus via paper moil). WM maintains an extensive customer database for Federal Way for all lines of business, which is routinely updated. Many of our customers have already specified their communications choices. Before launching the new contract, we will orchestrate a multi -pronged campaign in partnership with the city to encourage customers who have not already done so to opt for a greener, more efficient experience by: sharing their communication preferences enrolling in paperless billing setting up autopay To inspire your community to register communication preferences and/or go green, WM will donate to the Federal Way Multi -Service Center $1 for each of the first 5,000 customers who newly select their communication preferences, sign up for paperless billing, or enroll in autopay. A social media campaign will track Federal Way's progress to the $5,000 goal. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 75 �IYJtJ1�. SECTION C.3 We will encourage residents to register their communication preferences in many ways, including through: ongoing coordination with city staff WM hosted community event welcome postcards and information packets traditional and social media campaigns announcements in paper and online bills prior to the launch of the new contract email and text outreach with existing wm.com customers outdial calls at the start of the new contact, then annually ®To support the City of Federal Way's push for customers to opt for environmentally friendly paperless accounts, WM will offer a $5.00 annual credit for customers who opt to go completely paperless. The credit will appear on invoices annually. Customers may set up and manage accounts on wm.com, our mobile app, or by calling our Customer Service Center. They may choose communication preferences, request paperless billing, and set up autopay. For detailed information about our many communications options and our database management, please see Section C.2. Describe how the Contractor will actively engage with customers to select the manner in which the customer will be contacted for various service interruption and billing issues, including: weather -related service delays, labor contract related work stoppages, occasional/random missed collections and/or missed pick-ups, external factors that prevent access to customer containers os set out, initial container and welcome pocket delivery, with verification of proper set-up, on -call or bulky waste collection services billing issues, etc. Weather or labor delays: Customers who have specified a preference will be notified by phone, text, or email. Those who have not made a choice will be notified by outdial calls. This approach reached approximately 70% of our customers during the recent snow event. They also may visit www wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard for service alerts, which had over 270,000 clicks during the February 2019 snowstorm. For occasional missed collections and external factors preventing collections, multifamily and commercial customers will be notified through our Haul or Call (HOC) protocol by immediate phone calls from dispatchers who will also send emails to customers who do not respond. Residential customers will be notified by email or a tag on the cart. WM will verify proper setup and initial container delivery through customer responses to our mailings, calls, emails, and texts. During phone calls, customers are asked to verify their contact information and communication preferences, and are informed of online options to manage their accounts. Before the new contract, WM will send customers new service update postcards, which will be mailed and tracked in our database. Customers will call or use online tools to request and confirm on -call or bulky waste collection services. Billing issues are handled in accordance with WUTC rules. Customers are sent one letter and called u�Jrli. PAGE 76 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.3 twice in the month before service will be stopped. If no payment is received within 10 days, then service is canceled. How will you os Contractor administer refunds in cases of missed collections, weather -related service delays (of one week in duration, two weeks in duration, and beyond two weeks in duration), potential labor contract related work stoppages, and simple changes in service (such os cancellation of services mid -billing cycle or resizing container configurations). Refunds Missed Collections are recovered within one business day with no refund provided. In the event of service interruptions due to weather, safety conditions, or a labor dispute, WM will collect material missed at no additional charge. The amount of materials set out can be comparable to numbers of missed services. WM does not anticipate labor disruptions because all South Sound drivers are part of Teamster Local #174 and are under a newly ratified collective bargaining agreement. Drivers, regardless of what they are collecting (garbage, recycling, yard waste), will have rate parity by the start of the new contract. However, should a labor disruption occur, we would implement recovery efforts similar to inclement weather. Our integrated billing system, Mid -America Systems, automatically prorates accounts for any new starts or cancellations. For changes of service, the prorates are calculated manually following the same logic. Every prorate is per -day. Clearly state your intention on whether you wish to assume ownership of the existing carts, and if so, how you intend to collect, wash, re -label and re -deliver those carts without customer service interruption. WM is pleased to offer all new garbage, recycle, and compostable carts as part of our base proposal. We will take ownership of the city's current older carts which we will collect and repurpose elsewhere or recycle as appropriate. Each new cart will meet city specifications for color and labeling, giving Federal Way a fresh new look! Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 77 WINUM. SECTION C.3 What is the proposed time frame and process for Controct-compliant carts to be provided to oll customers? How would this affect comprehensive promotion and education of the new collection program? What other issues would arise with reusing the existing carts and how would you mitigate or minimize impacts to customers? With WM, Federal Way customers' transition to the new contract will be smooth. We will contact customers through various methods to ask their preferences for cart sizes and services as part of our promotion and education plan. We will remove their old carts and deliver new ones by the start of the contract, September 1, 2020. See section C.1 for full details on cart specifications. Include o timeline which identifies major tasks and key dotes in the transition and implementation plan. Implementation key tasks and timeline 0) O N J O N p N O N N O N O N O N p ry O N O N Implementation Tasks N 'a N H N o ry °z N o N - N LL N a N N ? N Ncc 'a N LU N MILESTONESKEY Finalize contract terms with city X Contract execution X In collaboration with city staff create and X X X deliver implementation/ transition plan Procure NEW carts and grey containers X Order NEW CNG Federal Way fleet X Concurrent internal WM and city staff X X X X X X X X X X X X X X implementation meetings New contract starts X COMMUNICATIONS Develop and implement outreach communications plan for new contract, including WM Think Green Facebook page, WM Twitter, etc. X X X X X X X X X Customer campaign to increase sign ups for notification preferences and paperless billing EDUCATIONPUBLIC Collaborate with city on design and distribution of "New Services Coming" X X X X X X mailing for residential customers Collaborate with city on design and distribution of "New Services/Site Visit" X X X X X X promotion for multifamily and business customers Conduct commercial and X X X X X X X X multifamily site visits VWPAGE 78 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION C.3 rn 0 N J M p) O N p N O N O ry O N O N p ry O N O N N 'a N N N N N N M N OC N Cr} N N N N 'a N LU Implementation Tasks H o zz o LL a ? ® Coordinate with city and plan X X X X community event Develop website with new contract information and provide appropriate review X X X X X X time for city Collaborate with city on design and distribution of residential, commercial, and X X X X X X X X multifamily information packages OPERATIONS Establish routes for new residential and commercial X X X X X X X services (weekly residential recycling and embedded compostables, etc.) Delivery of CNG Federal Way X X collection trucks Decals with city -specific (253) 833-3333 placed on new X X carts and delivered ®Decals placed on NEW grey garbage containers and existing X X recycle/compost containers and delivered Create final route maps to deliver to city X X X BILLING AND DATA TASKS amReview new services and create codes. Update rates within MAS X X X system. Adjust billing frequency from quarterly to monthly Update customer service levels to X X X reflect new services. ®Conduct tests with city using no -charge accounts to check for X reliability and customer satisfaction with online services CUSTOMER SERVICE Federal Way Ambassadors meet city staff and do driver ride- X X X X alongs to learn about city streets, landmarks, and our customers. enFederal Way Ambassadors train Federal Way Champions and X X X X X X X X X X X X X X customer service representatives Federal Way dedicated call X handling system implementation Update internal knowledge tool, Green Pages to reflect new services and X rates Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 79 WW2. SECTION C.3 WM's contingency planning Extra support for city staff Our seasoned team, from our contract manager to our City Services team, we'll be ready to help WM and city staff troubleshoot swiftly and proficiently during our new contract implementation. Extra customer service representatives WM plans for a spike in calls during the first few weeks of new contracts. Our new Federal Way customer service approach will be in place; please see details in C.2. Additional customer service representatives will be assigned to handle inquiries from Federal Way customers. The representatives will be thoroughly briefed on the new contract. Customers often call to request duplicate copies of materials we already sent or to confirm service level changes. Extra route managers WM will add route managers during the transition and implementation to the new contract. This extra support has proved invaluable many times in the past when we have upgraded our services with our municipal partners. WM's post -implementation plan Our implementation monitoring continues after the new contract has begun. Our multi -disciplinary team follows a post -implementation audit tracker crafted by the Contract Compliance team to ensure all aspects of the new contract are in place. Natural Gas Fuel Availability WM is enhancing our contingency planning by converting to an uninterrupted fueling supply for our collection vehicles. In addition, we have access to mobile fueling units that could be used to bring natural gas from our Bremerton site, which is fueled by a different natural gas grid. With multiple contingency fueling measures, we can keep Federal Way trucks on the road. PAGE 80 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D SECTION D: Implementation and Public Information If Proposer would be o new service provider for the City, describe in detail how you would work with the existing contractor to ensure o smooth transfer of information and cart/container exchanges in o timely manner prior to the contract services start dote. As Federal Way's incumbent service provider, Waste Management guarantees minimal disruption during implementation. We will work closely with City of Federal Way staff to identify changes from the current to the new contract and provide information to our customers regarding those changes. Our Contract Compliance team will play an integral role in implementing new services in Federal Way. They are the keepers of the contract and will reference it to establish our contract compliance checklist and implementation plan. Our Public Education and Outreach team will collaborate with city staff on the development of materials used to educate and inform the public, including direct mailers, postcards, and social media posts. We will ensure messaging is tailored to the customer type —residential, multifamily, or commercial. Please refer to Section C.3 for more information. During implementation, WM will host a community meeting at a convenient location to introduce changes to services and rates, promote new recycling education resources, and encourage customers to identify communication preferences. The community meeting will include an open Q&A format to encourage participation and ensure all questions, from the most basic to the most challenging, are answered. For several weeks prior to the contract start date, and through the first month of collection services, WM will increase the number of customer service representatives and route managers to help support the transition. We have relied on this method in previous contract implementations and found it is an invaluable way to smoothly introduce our new services and programs. WM will deliver all new garbage, recycle, and compost carts to Federal Way customers as part of our base proposal. All containers will conform to the new color standards. Details are in C.I. As your incumbent provider. We already know and trust each other, allowing the sole focus to be on delivering new services for customers. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 81 �In�. SECTION D Identify the individuals involved in this effort, their qualifications and previous experience in tronsitioning existing collection programs. Implementation Function and Expertise Laura Moser ' Laura will serve as the city's primary liaison throughout the implementation and a ` r Implementation contract term. She is also the implementation manager. Laura has worked for Ongoing Contractt WM for more than 20 years, managing several implementations, including for Management Federal Way, Auburn, and Pacific. Laura is detail -oriented and brings a wealth of experience and passion to her role. Marc handles our South Sound district operations. Under Marc's leadership and Marc Davis guidance, our South Sound team manages 64 collection drivers, covering 57 Operations routes, serving 34,000 residential and 4,800 commercial and multifamily customers. Marc has worked with Federal Way throughout his nine years with WM. Mindy Rostami Mindy has been with WM for seven years and has helped implement more than Contract 10 municipal contracts. Her keen eye for detail and contract knowledge will Compliance ensure full compliance with all facets of our new offerings. Hannah Scholes Hannah will provide leadership and oversight for the development of Federal Way -specific education programs and material. A knowledgeable industry Public Education & professional, Hannah has a proven record for working with municipalities Outreach and businesses. She has extensive experience with community -based social marketing (CBSM) and Federal Way programs. Jackie Lang Jackie will manage all media outreach associated with the implementation. She Communications & will oversee social media campaigns, including our Think Green Federal Way Media Facebook page and advertising. Tammy Lane Tammy and her team will ensure rate and service codes are accurate for contract Billing implementation. (i-0 Denie, Robin, and Joshua, along with floor leads Bryan Larson and Robert Neugebauer, will ensure our customer service representatives are well-informed Denie Covert of new service offerings in Federal Way. Your Federal Way team will update our Robin Krueger knowledge -based tool, Green Pages, in preparation for the new contract. Joshua Pilkington Customer Service �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 82 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D Describe and provide examples of materials developed by Proposer's staff and used to introduce and support single-family recycling and compostobles programs. Address how materials will be distributed and how residents seeking additional information will be accommodated during program introduction. Detoil how your approach will increase and maintain participation and how methods may change os participation levels increase or decrease. WM's residential approach to promote recycling and composting WM's Public Education and Outreach team is committed to creating programs that inspire recycling and composting the right way. We create materials that are appealing, targeted, and produce results. WM staff members use Community -Based Social Marketing (CBSM) principles in all our education and outreach programs because: Social science researchers found awareness and education alone do not lead to behavior change. People do not change their behaviors because it is "the right thing to do"; and People change their behaviors when the benefit to them outweighs the barriers to changing behavior. The science behind CBSM has successfully fostered sustainable behavior change around the world, for example in water and energy conservation. With the goal of removing barriers to make recycling and composting simple for Federal Way residents, WM proposes these education and outreach strategies: Distributing clear, concise public education materials Engaging residents through results -oriented, creative behavior -change programs Enhancing the visibility of recycling and composting through social media and community outreach Using CBSM tools, WM will build on public education programs previously developed over many years in collaboration with Federal Way staff. We will create programs that measurably increase recycling, composting, and diversion in Federal Way, and complement the city's existing outreach efforts. Measuring our impact In the new contract, WM will be even more data -driven in our public education efforts. WM and city staff will use measurable results to evaluate the effectiveness of our outreach programs in Federal Way. This will influence our future programs, and allow methods to change as participation levels change. WM, in discussions with city staff, will set criteria for weighing the benefits of outreach programs. Together, we will carefully establish: Who is our audience and how will we reach them? What methods will we use to convey messages? How will we measure success? How will we report results? Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 83 WJ,K, SECTION D WM Public Education materials and programs for Federal Way customers Below are some of our education materials and programs (recycling and composting) that may be offered to residential, multifamily, and commercial customers. Additional information is available through our Customer Service Center and websites. During the implementation of the new contract, each category of customers will receive tailored information. For details, please see Section C.3. Welcome Packets for new Customers (residential, multifamily, and commercial customers) Our informative, attractive Welcome Packets are available in print or electronically and include WM's collection procedure summary, recycling/composting guidelines, and waste prevention tips. In 2018, we mailed 822 to residential customers and 30 to commercial and multifamily customers, and 1,565 customers went paperless and received their materials online. To further engage customers, we direct them to our website and Customer Service Center for more detailed information. They are encouraged to select their communications preferences, sign up for paperless billing, and enroll in autopay. p"; - t Sustainability e-Newsletter (residential and multifamily 1� customers) » Through a partnership with King County, WM's Foodcycler e-newsletter has converted more than 5,000 residents into active composters! We are excited to offer Federal Way residents this quarterly sustainability y e-newsletter. FlntH p: SELECT h FOOD SUM ETCHER r' =� » Topics include tips for improving composting skills, banishing pesky fruit flies, and packing sustainable picnics! - ,. hanks for foodcyding! Collection Guideline Updates (all customers) Once a year, and at the start of the new contract, we will mail new collection schedules as well as recycling/ composting guidelines, and tips on increasing recycling and preventing waste. Customers will have the option to go green and receive these guidelines electronically, rather than in print. In 2018, we mailed this comprehensive package to all 18,333 residential and 1,000 commercial and multifamily customers. In the new contract, we will send this annual mailing to residential non -subscribers and individual multifamily residents, too. We will work closely with city staff to ensure each update addresses the most relevant customer questions and concerns. VWPAGE 84 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D Bill Inserts (residential, multifamily and commercial customers) » In collaboration with the city, we will continue to create quarterly, educational bill inserts. » WM inserts provide timely information on topics such as winter collection schedule changes, weather delay procedures, and rate changes. Inserts also reinforce sustainability messaging, such as waste reduction, recycling, and composting. » In the new contract, we will encourage customers to choose communication preferences, paperless billing, and autopay. Paperless bills and inserts also have educational messages. Free Recycling Event Here's what to do with your materials in case Up t, Mreh gl fgbg y,lg,dyd Saturday, September 22 of severe weather u b ue d dd i n g y ne g l ly sheduledc II Monday please n e,ydng II d y ` 9 am — 3 pm os[e Managements mmted mpmed:ng refable two weeks In the e,entof—s—ess— weather delays, makeupc,Ilecton wll \ Wild— Parking collecton for all ust,mers be made on the next p—ble day. 3fiH92 Milton Rd S, Federal Way If d p tthe safe Credts wll nob Issuedf delayed II due to ndement weather Seereverse fw a listof a¢ Wdi fy aterae on For 24 J Updates h hw.zt com/weatherboard d yremo �n f y"heweetat the - Federal Way end of the day. W ....: ,. Federal Way "Oops" Tags (all customers) » Drivers post friendly tags to advise customers their carts were not collected because they set out contaminated material. The tags explain how to correct the problem and obtain more information from our many education resources. » In 2018, drivers posted 2,000 tags to help customers improve recycling. 0 0 ® » Our drivers recognize they are our first line of customer service and must interact professionally with the public. ''u » Customers typically want to do the right thing, but sometimes they just need more information. "Oops" tags connect us with customers in a specific, measurable way. » We use r'Oops" tags as part of our Recycle Right Road Map (our contamination plan), please see Section C.1 for details. Media (all customers) » WM uses traditional and social media to educate customers about services, recycling and composting programs, and events. » Our social media is popular! In 2018, our Think Green Federal Way page had more than 00 3,200 likes. An average of 437 visitors engaged with the page per month in 2018. Customers also follow @WMPugetSound, our regional Twitter account. ' » Social media is an effective tool for engaging customers in campaigns developed in Tube collaboration with city staff. C1yu1FederAWay - — ---° Website (all customers) » Our local Federal Way website, wmnorthwest.com/federalway, is available 24/7 and has the most up-to-date information on services, events .,00:wa and programs. - M » wm.com is an engaging tool for customers to set up accounts, select City t,fF.d-f°VV�vI.communication preferences, paperless billing, and autopay. Once on �w " "'� wm.com, customers can learn more about WM and recycling, too! w » Our websites are updated frequently, and rich with resources for the It r °„, beginning recycler or a sustainability expert. Details are in Section C.2 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 85 �In�. SECTION D L CttAN S"TV&ECYCLA T�wMDG RKYCL ING i9 CIinRU1uG Recycling Facility Tours Recycle Often. Recycle Right.® (all customers) WM's research -based education and outreach program offers an array of materials tailored to customers. Federal Way customers may visit the site, RecycleOftenRecycleRight.com, to access the campaign and make a digital promise to rethink recycling by "getting back to the basics of good recycling" and encouraging others to do the same. Additional educational resources for residents, businesses, and property managers are available at WM's Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° website. Education staff will take Federal Way residents on tours of our Cascade Recycling Center in Woodinville to observe the sorting process, get tips for recycling better, and learn about markets for recycled materials. Our tours are designed to engage participants from diverse backgrounds from kindergarten classes to corporate sustainability teams. We also offer tours in Spanish. Classroom Workshops WM developed, in collaboration with Snohomish County and honored by SWANA, a waste -reduction and recycling program for elementary and middle schools. In addition to these free presentations, we offer schools lunchroom waste audits and advice to increase recycling. Both services are available to Federal Way. Community Events At community celebrations, our outreach staff plays the "wheel of waste" to help Federal Way residents learn whether items are garbage, recyclable, or compostable. WM outreach staff distributes reusable shopping bags and encourages event attendees to use them while grocery shopping to reduce consumption of single -use shopping bags. WM Think Green Recycling and Reuse Collection Events (residential and multifamily) Residents may safely and sustainably dispose of hard -to -recycle items such as foam, textiles, and electronics, at annual events in partnership with the South King County Tool Library. We will collaborate with city staff to ensure residents benefit from this unique collection event that highlights the Tool Library's work in waste reduction. The objective of these events are to: Provide recycling collection for hard -to -recycle items not picked up at curbs, with a primary focus on multifamily residents Encourage reuse by partnering with local charities to host donation stations Provide recycling and compost educational materials to attendees Increase Food Scrap Collection Ajoint study WM conducted with King County showed cart tags are an important communication tactic and can change customers' behavior. The study found that cart tags inspired 20% of households that previously were putting food scraps into garbage carts to start putting them into compost carts. The study proved, once again, that CBSM is successful. We're excited to explore these innovative outreach approaches in Federal Way. PU 4I INLi tL 06 }(;FtkY] I:Np FGC1pS011,pp PAPER M Yf]IJR YARD WASTE SIN w v�Jrli. PAGE 86 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D Media Visibility and Community Engagement for the City of Federal Way Partnering with WM ensures reliable and innovative service for the City of Federal Way. As a bonus, Federal Way benefits from media visibility and community engagement resulting from WM's proactive work with local media and social platforms. Community volunteers gather with South King Fire and Rescue volurt= sect cautions for the arrual Mayor's Day cf Concern for the Hungry last week. P�cte tW �r' s, _ e e) "auls MAYOR'S DAY OF CONCERN FOR THE HUNGRY Federal Way helps fill Multi - Service Center food shelves More than 2,500 households rely on the Multiservice Center for food each month Community volunteers gathered with city leaders at local grocery stores to collect donations for the Multi -Service Center food bank last week during the annual Mayor's Day of Concern for the Hungry. During the week, Waste Management also teamed with the city to collect food and non-food items for the center. jjWWj WM Puget Sound ,76= CvviviNugetsouila Reminder for Waste Management customers across Western Washington: With weather & safety issues, your #1 source for the most up-to-date collection information is wmnorthwest. com/weatherboard. Please continue to check this site as conditions change. w Think Green O Federal Way This Thanksgiving week, we're thankful for 12,300 pounds of food collected by Waste Management drivers curbside as part of Mayor Jim Ferrell's food drive this year — a new record! Thanks to our generous customers and the tireless staff and volunteers at the Multi -Service Center for making this year's collection a resounding success. w Think Green O Federal Way Bravo, Federal Way Performing Arts & Event Center! Waste Management is proud to partner with you to make art more accessible to children in our Federal Way, Washington community both at the opening gala and for years down the road! Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 87 SECTION D w Think Green O - Federal Way Old latex paint taking up space in your home? The City of Federal Way is hosting a latex paint recycling event this Saturday, Nov. 17 from 9am-3pm in the City Hall North Parking Lot (700 333rd St.) See below for more information on recycling fees. Federal Way, WA Greater Federal Way Chamber RECYCLE LATEX PAINT Saturday, November 17, 2018 SAM-3PM City Hall North Parking Lot • 700 S 333rd St, Federal VV y Recycling Fees: Quart: $1.25 Gallon. $225 5-Gallon: $12.25 Gsrt aM'. P r cnmw.»v. Federal Way !t;Z : k-'4J w Think Green O Federal Way Multifamily housing - unique recycling challenges, from tenant turnover to cultural barriers. Bring in the WM Recycle Corps Interns, knocking on doors In Federal Way with in -language recycling education & helping property managers make recycling more convenient & easy to understand for all. #Recycling101 in action! Federal Way, WA Greater Federal Way Chamber Federal Way Mirror 7 Waste Management thanks customers with V- Day trucks Local Waste Management employees worked their routes the Wednesday before Valentine's Day in festive fashion, decorating their trucks with heart adornments and handing out chocolates to anyone who crossed their 6 a.m. paths. w ..... Think Green Federal Way �f I Thanks to Federal Way, Washington's Solid Waste & Recycling Project Manager Jeanette Brizendine for meeting with our Waste Management Recycle Corps interns! The multilingual intern team is out and about in Federal Way today helping to "crack the recycling code" and increase recycling rates in apartments and condos it's just one more way the City of Federal Way and WM partner to keep our community clean and green. Look for us this Saturday at the Federal Way Farmers Market! W WM Puget Sound .e.sr... @WMPugetSound Partnering to reduce food waste in Federal Way! At the Federal Way Compost and Garden event this weekend, Mayor Jim Ferrell & WM presented a special prize to one of Federal Way's A+ composters — and shared tips to reduce food waste! WUM WM Puget Sound @WMPugetSound M Who's behind the masks? Super recyclers at Federal Way Kids Day! They came to learn how to clean up recycling, and now they're out spreading the word: Recycle empty bottles. cans, paper and cardboard and keep them loose in your cart —no plastic bagsl Federal Way. WA Greater Federal Way Chamber Federal Way Mirror King County. Washington - Government King County Solid Waste Division PAGE 88 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D Describe fully how you will promote multifamily recycling and increase multifamily recycling levels. Detoil the communications, outreach and assistance methods os well os technological or operational innovations you propose to increase those recycling levels. Detoil how your approach will increase and maintain participation and how methods may change os participation levels increase or decrease. Provide examples of where your approaches hove been effective, how effectiveness is measured and also provide information materials developed and used by your staff. Our multifamily approach, targeted and tested WM helps Federal Way's multifamily properties recycle right! In 2018, we: ✓ Visited 21 complexes with highly contaminated recycling, right -sized their service levels, and provided recycling information and tools to more than 1,481 residents ✓ Called 106 property managers and offered free recycling guidelines, on -site assistance, and answered questions to help reduce contamination ✓ Taught residents at Uptown Square Apartments about proper waste sorting through games and multilingual educational fliers ✓ Installed slotted lids on recycle containers at 58 properties, significantly reducing contamination ✓ Supported the Recicla Mas pilot program at Parkway Apartments with King County and the city. Spanish-speaking liaisons provided recycling education, including door-to-door outreach. Containers were labeled with bilingual English/Spanish information. Drivers reported an increase in recycling and cleaner recyclables. Apartment and Condominium Recycling Program Toolkit RECYCLING ALL ST*RS Due to infrastructure challenges, space limitations, and high resident turnover, multifamily recycling programs present challenges. We like to think of them as opportunities. In our years of work with the City of Federal Way, we have learned that many strategies are needed for a population of diverse cultures, languages, ages, and incomes. WM has devoted extensive resources to developing and testing best practices for encouraging recycling at multifamily properties, such as our "3Cs" approach. Through that experience we have learned the importance of optimizing recycling infrastructure, and engaging residents and property management to drive recycling success. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 89 WJ,M, SECTION D WM's "3Cs" Approach for Multifamily Recycling Success CONVENIENCE Garbage, recycling & com ost containers must CLARITY \ It must be clear to residents which containers are for garbage, recycling & compost. Appropriately colored containers, large multilingual decals and signage help increase clarity. p be equally convenient for ' residents to access. Co -location of O \ontainers is best. - - - - - - - ............. . (-�%_,PA(-ITV There must be sufficient room in the recycling container for residents to encourage proper recycling and minimize contamination. The standard capacity needed for recycling is .12 cubic yards per unit per week. CLARITY CAPACITYCONVENIENCE Recycling and garbage containers It must be clear to There must be sufficient room in recycling must be equally convenient for residents which containers for residents to place their recyclables. residents to access. This generally container is for garbage For most properties, recycling service should requires co -location of containers and which container is be approximately 50 percent of total service wherever possible. for recycling. volume, with per -unit capacity in the range of We advise property managers >> We provide 20 to 30 gallons (0.10 to 0.15 cubic yards). on optimal container location container labels >> We help property managers determine the and ensure pairing of recycling, with images and in best service level for their residents' needs. compost and garbage multiple languages We add recycling containers or pickup days containers. to differentiate to increase recycling collection capacity. We provide tote bags for recycling, compost >> In some cases, we advise reducing the residents to conveniently and garbage. size or number of garbage containers to transport their recyclables from >> We install slotted eliminate excess garbage capacity and make home to container. lids on recycling space for recycling and compost containers. containers to reduce contamination. For Federal Way, in the next contract, our multi -pronged programs will continue to be grounded in behavior change, led by our experienced, dedicated Public Education and Outreach team, and offered in collaboration with the city. We will apply the following approaches to achieve our collective multifamily recycling goals: Increase recycling and diversion Decrease contamination Engage meaningfully with residents and property managers v�rli. PAGE 90 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D WM Multifamily Tools On -site technical assistance and training Our public education and outreach staff will conduct site visits (utilizing the "3Cs" approach) to educate property managers and residents (with lobby events and presentations), on incorporating recycling best practices into their home or apartment building. WM Recycle Corps Each summer we recruit dynamic, multilingual college students to offer door-to-door education to multifamily residents. We will continue to coordinate with city staff to discuss priorities around recycling, then deploy our award -winning team to accomplish shared goals. 10 From translation to transcreation yo ®5 V" IS WM is a leader in providing culturally appropriate recycling education. We transcreate educational materials by delving into a culture, finding relevant products and symbols, then creating a unique brochure. We have guidelines transcreated in Amharic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Russian, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese. In our = a e new contract, we will offer multilingual dumpster decals as well! Property Manager Composting TocWt Compost assistance for super recycling multifamily properties As residents master recycling, WM will help properties add compost service and promote residents' participation. After initial program design coordination with a b from Federal Way staff, WM will contact property managers to discuss how to best Why,,,, 7 implement a successful program using our compost implementation toolkit. WM Recycle Right Road Map (our contamination reduction plan) Our contamination reduction plan (please see C.1) is an important part of how we engage multifamily property managers. WM drivers identify properties struggling to recycle right, then we offer a wide array of tools to help. Property managers are more likely to become engaged and invested in program improvements when there are savings tied to contamination reduction. "Know Before you Throw" (our specialized multifamily contamination campaigns) Each multifamily recycling program has unique challenges and opportunities. Through this new and innovative approach, WM outreach staff will audit recycling at multifamily properties to identify the number one barriers to clean recycling. Our goal is to help residents recycle better with simple, direct and targeted information. For example, if Public Education Outreach Coordinator Denaya Shorter sees many pizza boxes in recycling containers, she will create a single -message campaign around that issue. She will develop creative and informative emails or postcards, depending on city and property manager preferences. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 91 WINUM, SECTION D Evaluating program effectiveness In working with Federal Way over the years, we've applied many effective tools. In the next contract, we are eager to design a more specific measurement tool for our multifamily programs. WM will continue to collaborate with city staff to create meaningful, public education programs that are data -driven and measurable. The graphic below is an example of how we will evaluate our program effectiveness. We will work with staff to determine desired impacts and identify measurable output indicators for each program. We will use diversion metrics and quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate success. Diversion Rates 10 J J U z a cc W 4. W Ln g i W O U 40% FTE outreach coordinator Multilingual WM Recycle Corps interns & materials "Oops" tags Drivers viewing contamination 40 Discontinue Outreach Method People Residential Customers Direct mail 18,333 Contamination education via phone or email 100 Contamination education via "Oops" tag 2,000 Events 1,400 Multifamily Customers Direct Mail 142 On -site property manager assistance 24 Email/phone assistance 136 Door-to-door resident education 1,500 Commercial Customers Direct Mail 873 On -site assistance 25 Email/phone assistance 925 On -site assistance Multifamily door-to-door outreach/ contamination campaigns Contamination Reduction Plan Clean cart program Educational booths at community events Think Green Recycling and Reuse events/lobby events Direct mail or e-mail Facility Tours/ presentations: school property managers, business owners, residents or maintenance staff Increased knowledge of accepted materials in recycling and compost programs More usage of proper bins, carts, and containers More multilingual internal and external container signage Increased understanding of benefits to waste reduction and diversion Increased diversion Reduced contamination Increased consumption of recycled goods Reduced overall consumption Increased environmental stewardship We will work with Federal Way to ensure our Continue education programs meet our shared diversion and sustainability goals. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 92 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services SECTION D Explain your procedures for submitting public information material to the City for approval and any approval timeliness you will expect the City to meet. Prior to distributing any public education materials, WM will consult with city staff to discuss and develop reasonable milestones for outreach work, such as the creation and distribution of annual service updates, and a timeline for designing, reviewing, printing, and distributing the materials. Our goal is to provide meaningful, thoughtfully designed materials to advance Federal Way's goals. Identify and describe fully the qualifications of your Education and Outreach Manager including previous experience in working with recycling collection programs and government organizations. Hannah Scholes, WM's manager of education and outreach for the Pacific Northwest, started her career in recycling programs in your city. Hannah worked with Federal Way for three years to create comprehensive recycling, composting, and waste -reduction education programs. Among her accomplishments in Federal Way are: Developing and implementing the Clean Cart program, which successfully reduced contamination in residential recycling. Launching a successful pilot program to increase food scraps collections from residents. In partnership with city staff, facilitating seven community focus groups to seek feedback on outreach materials and methods. Working with more than 50 multifamily property managers and complexes in Federal Way to increase recycling and reduce contamination. She used multilingual materials and interns to reach more residents, and designed unique outreach tactics for each property depending on needs. In Federal Way, Hannah used her fluent Spanish to: Collaborate with city and county staff on the Recicla Mas pilot program at Parkway Apartments. Create recycling decals and posters in Spanish and English. In her new managerial role, Hannah leads a team of education and outreach coordinators who work with businesses, municipalities, and communities to improve materials management practices. Her years of experience in program management and community -based social marketing have led to many nuanced and effective behavior - change campaigns. Hannah was a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay serving as an Environmental Outreach Technician. In addition to Hannah's commitment to the success of public education and outreach in Federal Way, she manages Denaya Shorter, whose biography is in Section B.2. Denaya will spend 40% of her time working on these programs for the City of Federal Way. "WM outreach staff use many different approaches to solve specific challenges at each property and implement sustainable recycling programs." —Hannah Scholes, Manager, WM Public Education and Outreach Your Federal Way team, Denaya Shorter and Hannah Scholes. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 93 MUM, SECTION D Recycle Often. Recycle Right.0 "Oops" tags facility tours collection guides traditional media sustainability e-newsletter Education & Outreach Facebook YouTube wminorthwest.com Instagram classroom workshops & presentations 1*,. - raen R e cy _i g a i­i d 1, ire=,rig._ on -site technical assistance SECTION E SECTION E: Base Contract Modifications Submissions contingent on on alternative Contract cannot be reasonably compared with competing Proposals and shall be considered non -responsive. The City has conducted on industry review process prior to releasing this RFP and has incorporated into the Bose Contract suggested changes (shown os tracked changes) deemed reasonable and in the best interest of the City and its ratepayers. All Proposals shall be based on the Bose Contract (Appendix A) included with the RFP, without alteration; however, Proposers may identify specific Bose Contract provisions that they believe unreasonably affect costs for the City to consider the proposed change. The City is interested in Proposer ideas on potential revisions to the range, containerization and degree of commingling of Recyclobles that minimize contamination and maximize the marketability of collected materials. If o Proposer wishes to propose alternatives to the fully -commingled single cart system contained in the base contract, please do so under this Section E of your proposal. For each Proposer -proposed Bose Contract modification the following format shall be followed to maintain consistency between Proposals: Clearly indicate the reason for the requested change; Whether the proposed change is on integral port of your Proposal or is simply o preference; Propose alternative text; and Provide the rote impact to your Proposal (or "no rote impact" if none) resulting from the proposed change. The listed rote impact shall reflect the annual rote reduction or increase of the proposed modification and shall be identified in dollars with o "+" representing on increase in annual aggregate rates and o "- "representing o decrease in annual aggregate rates. If there is no rote savings or increase associated with the proposed modification, the Proposer shall indicate "no cost impact." The City encourages that any and oll questions specifically regarding Bose Contract language interpretation or the acceptability of alternative approaches be asked during the industry review period to the extent possible period rather than waiting for the RFP question/answer process described in Section 2.3. WM has no exceptions at this time. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 95 WJ,UrIi. SECTION E THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vWJr PAGE 96 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ALTERNATIVES Alternatives Waste Management encourages the city to evaluate its options for the next agreement. Each of the options listed below will accomplish different goals for the city. Alternative #1: Every -Other -Weekly, Residential Recycling Collection The Base Contract includes weekly residential recycling collection. Under this alternative, recycling collection would be retained at the current level of every -other -weekly. Please provide the monthly rate decrease (-) per residential customer associated with this alternative. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #2: Non -embedded Compostables Collection The Base Contract includes embedded compostables collection for all residential customers. Under this alternative, compostables collection would continue to be subscription based with interested customers signing up for and paying for the additional cost of the service. Please provide (1) the amount to be removed from residential garbage rates; (2) the subscription rate for 32-, 64-, and 96-gallon carts of residential compostables service. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #3: Mandatory Collection The Base Contract anticipates a continuation of non -mandatory collection for all customer sectors. This alternative would shift all customer sectors to mandatory service. Please provide the monthly rate increase (+) or decrease (-) per residential customer associated with this alternative. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #4: Relaxed Collection Vehicle Standard The Base Contract includes requirements for new collection vehicles at the start of the contract term. This alternative provides for a relaxed contract standard that vehicles shall be no greater than 10 years old throughout the life of the contract. Please provide the annual revenue requirement increase (+) or decrease (-) associated with this alternative. WM prefers to deploy o new fleet of low emission collection vehicles. Alternative #5: Expanded Commercial Recycling The Base Contract includes a continuation of the cart -based embedded commercial recycling program. This alternative would include unlimited embedded commercial recycling as described equivalent to the contract services provided for multifamily recycling. Please provide the additional cost of providing unlimited embedded commercial recycling expressed as $X.XX per cubic yard of garbage collected each month (For example, the added cost to a one -cubic -yard container collected once a week would be the proposed amount multiplied by 4.33 [1 yard x 1 /week x 4.33 weeks/month]. This amount would be added to the commercial and drop -box rates if this alternative were implemented. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 97 WJ,02, ALTERNATIVES Alternative #6: City Billing Agent Alternative The Base Contract includes a continuation of contractor billing where the contractor bills customers and receives funds on their own account. Under this alternative, the contractor would provide all customer service and billing functions, but would bill under the name of the City, collect all funds and deposit them in a City utility fund account, and provide appropriate reconciliation. The contractor would be paid "wholesale" rates out of the City's dedicated utility fund. The City would be responsible for setting the "retail" rates charged by the contractor, allowing for bad debt, possibly carving out and paying disposal fees directly to the county, possibly stabilizing ratepayer impacts due to recycling market shifts, and otherwise managing the utility fund and reserves. Please provide the annual change (+/-) in your initial year annual gross revenue requirement, if this billing arrangement were implemented. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #7: Alternative Service Fee Escalation Component - WST The Base Contract includes an aggregate Consumer Price Index escalator. Under this alternative, the BLS CPI sub -category component for Water, Sewer, and Trash would be substituted as the index used to calculate annual service fee escalations. The floor and ceiling limits contained in the draft contract would be retained with this alternative escalator. Please provide the annual change (+/-) in your initial year annual gross revenue requirement if this contract change were implemented. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #8: Alternative Service Fee Escalation Component - 3.5% The Base Contract includes a Consumer Price Index escalator. Under this alternative, instead of a CPI index, a flat 3.5% increase would be used to calculate annual service fee escalations. Please provide the annual change (+/-) in your initial year annual gross revenue requirement if this contract change were implemented. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. Alternative #9: Quarterly Residential Customer Billing The Base Contract provides for monthly residential customer billing. Under this alternative, instead of monthly billing, the current practice of quarterly billing would be continued. Please provide the monthly change in residential customer rates if billing frequency is reduced to quarterly. Please refer to Form 2 for rote details. v�rli. PAGE 98 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services Form 1: Cover Sheet and General Information Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 99 WJ,M, THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 100 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 1 - PAGE 1 OF 2 Form 1 COVER SHEET AND GENERAL INFORMATION Entity Name: Waste Management of Washington, Inc. Home Office Address: 720 41" Avenue, Suite 400, Kirkland, WA 98033 Washington Business Address: 720 41" Avenue, Suite 400, Kirkland, WA 98033 Website Address: www.wmnorthwest.com Name, Title, Address, Telephone Number, Fax Number and E-Mail Address of the person to be contacted concerning the Proposal: Laura Moser, Public Sector Manager 701 2nd Street NW Auburn, WA 98001 Telephone: (253) 804-5730 Fax: (253) 804-6654 Email: Imoser(cbwm.com If Applicable, Name of the Parent Company: Waste Management Holding Home Office Address, Telephone Number and Website Address of the Parent Company: Waste Management, Inc. 1001 Fannin, Suite 4000 Houston, TX 77002 Telephone: (713) 512-6200 Website: www.wm.com Describe the parent company's relationship with the Proposer: Waste Management of Washington, Inc., a Delaware Corporation, is a wholly -owned subsidiary of Waste Management Holdings, Inc., a Delaware Corporation, which in turn is wholly -owned by Waste Management, Inc., a Delaware Corporation. If applicable, does the person signing the documents have the authority to sign on behalf of the Proposer? X Yes No Form 1— Cover Sheet and General Information 1 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 1 • PAGE 2 OF 2 Names of Companies that will share significant and substantive responsibilities with the Proposer in performing services under the Contract: Cedar Grove Composting 7343 E. Marginal Way S. Seattle, WA 98108 Telephone: (206) 832-3000 Fax: (206) 832-3030 Attach to this form, and number appropriately, documentation showing that the Bidder is duly organized and validly existing as a corporation or partnership in good standing. Please see attached documentation. Form 1— Cover Sheet and General Information 2 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 1 Delaware PaRei The First State I, JEFFREY W. BULLOCK, SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE, DO HEREBY CERTIFY "WASTE MMAGEMEN'7T OF WASHINGTON, INC." IS DULY INCORPORATED UNDER TiiE LAWS OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE AND IS IN GOOD STANDING AND HAS A LEGAL CORPORATE EXISTENCE SO FAR AS THE RECORDS OF THIS OFFICE SHOT, AS OF THE TENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, A.D. F11ttm AND I DO HEREBY FURTHER CERTIFY THAT THE ANNUAL REPORTS HAVE BEEN FILED TO DATE. AND I DO HH7EBY FURTHER CERTIFY THAT THE LRANGHISE TAXES HAVE BEEN PAID TO DATE. u++ra M, 6M 2309994 8300 G 5R4 20186568745 ,rou may verify this certificate online at carp detaware gav%authver shtml aw.r w wr.i.lRnvr d n,» Authentication: 203389295 Date: 09-10-18 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 1 STATES OF A,,qebtatp .. •• e 4 l of f tee+ Secretary of State 1, KIM WYMAN, Secretary of state of the State of Washington and custodian of its seal, hereby issue this CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. 1 CERTIFY that the records on file in this office show that the above named entity was registered under the laws of the State of Washington and that its public organic record was filed in Washington and became effective on 05119/1999. I FURTHER CERTIFY that the entity's duration is Perpetual, and that as of the date of this eeruficate, the rcconis of the Secretary of State do not reflect that this entity has been dissolved. I FURTHER CERTIFY that all fees, interest, and penalties owed and collected through the Secretary of State have been paid. I FURTHER CERTIFY that the most recent annual report has been delivered to the Secretary of State for filing end that proceedings for administrative dissolution are not pending. Issued pate: 03/30/2018 UBI Number 601415286 Home Jurisdiction: DE STAT , Q Given under my hand and ft Seal of the State of Washington at Olympia, the State Capital i13{j Kim Wyman, Secretary of State 18�g �q Date Issued: 03/3D12018 •G1I Form 2: Price Proposal Please See Attached Envelope Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 105 �In�. •G1I THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK J�1 . PAGE 106 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services •G1I Form 3: Contractor's Proposal Deposit Surety Bond Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 107 WiMUM. OME THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 108 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 3 - PAGE 1 OF 4 Form 3 CONTRACTOR'S PROPOSAL DEPOSIT SURETY BOND to the City of Federal Way, Washington We, Waste Management of Washington, Inc.as Principal, existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Washington and authorized to do business In the State of Washington, and Lexon Insurance Com an as Surety, organized and existing under the laws of the State of Tem are held and firmly bound unto the City of Federal Way, a Washington municipality, as Obligee, in the penal sum of $25,000.00, forthe payment of which we jointly and severally bind ourselves, and our legal representatives and successors. WHEREAS, the Principal has submitted a proposal for solid waste collection to the City of Federal Way, NOW THEREFORE, the condition of the obligation is such that if the Obligee shall accept the proposal of Principal and make timely award to the Principal according to the terms of the RFP documents; and the Principal shall, within ten days after notice of the award, exclusive of the day of notice, enter into the Contract with the Obligee and furnish the contractor's bonds (performance and payment bonds) with Surety satisfactory to the Obligee as specified in the City's RFP and draft contract, then this obligation shall be null and void; otherwise if the Principal fails to enter into the Contract and fails to furnish the contractor's bonds within ten days of notice of award, exclusive of the day of notice, the amount of the proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the Obligee, payable by the Surety; but in no event will the Surety's liability exceed the face amount of this proposal security bond. This bond may be executed in two original counterparts, and shall be signed by the parties' duly authorized officers. This bond will only be accepted if it is accompanied by a fully executed and original power of attorney for the officer executing on behalf of the Surety. PRINCIPAL (CONTRACTOR) Wa Management of ashington, Inc. no,p,' 1S, Principal SigIlle Date Printed Name Courtney A. TipPY llnm rtT;-- " Liont-SACISs rs etary SURETY Lexon Insurance Company �o19 (` `t �4—k�� 04 15 2019 Surety Signature Date Theresa Pickerrell Printed Name Attorney -in -Fact Title Name, address, and telephone of local office/agent of Surety Company is: Acrisure LLC dba Smith Manus — 2307 River Road Suite 200 Louisville KY 40206 Appendices January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 3 - PAGE 2 OF 4 POWER OF ATTORNEY "-11078 Lexon Insurance Company KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, a Texas Corporation, with its statutory home office in Austin. Texas, does hereby constitute and appoint: Brook T. Smith, Raymond M. Hundley, Jason D. Cromwell, James H. Martin, Barbara Duncan, Sandra L. Fusinetti, Mark A. Guidry, Jill Kemp, Lynnette Long, Amy Meredith, Deborah Neichter, Theresa Pickerrell, Sheryon Quinn, Beth Frymire, Leigh McCarthy, Michael Dix, Susan Ritter its true and lawful Atfomey(s)-In-Fact to make, execute, seal and deliver for, and on its behalf as surety, any and all bonds, undertakings or other writings obligatory in nature of a bond. This authority is made under and by the authority of a resolution which was passed by the Board of Directors of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY on the 1 st day of July, 2003 as follows: Resolved, that the President of the Company is hereby authorized to appoint and empower any representative of the Company or other person or persons as Attomey-In-Fact to execute on behalf of the Company any bonds, undertakings, policies, contracts of indemnity or other writings obligatory in nature of a bond not to exceed $10,000,000 00 Ten Million Dollars, which the Company might execute through its duly elected officers, and affix the seal of the Company thereto. Any said execution of such documents by an Attomey-In-Fact shall be as binding upon the Company as if they had been duly executed and acknowledged by the regularly elected officers of the Company. Any Attomey-ln- Fact, so appointed, may be removed for good cause and the authority so granted may be revoked as specified in the Power of Attorney. Resolved, that the signature of the President and the seal of the Company may be mixed by facsimile on any power of attorney granted, and the signature of the Assistant Secretary, and the seal of the Company may be affixed by facsimile to any certificate of any such power and any such power or certificate bearing such facsimile signature and seal shall be valid and binding on the Company. Any such power so executed and sealed and certificate so executed and sealed shall, with respect to any bond of undertaking to which it is attached, continue to be valid and binding on the Company.. IN WITNESS THEREOF, LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY has caused this instrument to be signed by its President, and its Corporate Seal to be affixed this 22nd day of June, 2018. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY BY Brian Beggs President On this 22nd day of June, 2018, before me, personally came Brian Beggs to me known, who be duly swam, did depose and say that he is the President of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, the corporation described in and which executed the above instrument; that he executed said instrument on behalf of the corearation by authority of his office under the By-laws of said corporation. t"y 7A'Ie, yy�'y •.*iq*'+.� AMYTAYLOR Notary Pudic Slate of Tennessee oaridsoa coumy My Commission Expires 07-ea19 .�W" CERTIFICATE BY JOAAq4(k� Amy ylor Notal Public 1, the undersigned, Assistant Secretary of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, A Texas Insurance Company, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that the original Power of Attorney of which the forgoing is a true and correct copy, is in full force and effect and has not been revoked and the resolutions as set forth are now in force, t Signed and Seal at Mount Juliet, Tennessee this Day of ri i 20 ee�,� 14.1 BY Andrew Smith Assistant Secretary "WARNING: Any person who knowingly and with intent to defraud any Insurance company or other person, flies and applicatlon for Insurance of claim containing any materially false information, or conceals for the purpose of rrtfsleading, information concerning any fact material lhereta, commits a fraudulent Insurance act, which is a crime and subjects such person to criminal and civil penalties." WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 3 • PAGE 3 OF 4 Lexon Insurance Company 10002 Shelbyville Road, Suite 100 Louisville, KY 40223 Date: April 15, 2019 To: City of Federal Way 33325 8" Ave. S. Federal Way, WA 99003 Principal: Waste Management of Washington, Inc. Bid Date: April 15, 2019 Description: Garbage, Recyclables, and Compostables Collection Dear Sir/Madam: We, Lexon Insurance Company hereby agree that in the event an award is made to Waste Manaaement_of Washington. Inc. on the project as captioned, we will execute the necessary Performance and/or Payment Bonds that may be rewired. Sincerely, Lexon Insurance Company Theresa Pickerrell Attorney -in -Fact WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 3 • PAGE 4 OF 4 FLOWER OF ATTORNEY i-x-11078 L.exon Insurance Company KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, a Texas Corporation, with its statutory home office in Austin, Texas, does hereby constitute and appoint: Brook T. Smith, Raymond M. Hundley, Jason D. Cromwell, James H. Martin, Barbara Duncan, Sandra L. Fusinettii, Mark A. Guidry, Jill Kemp, Lynnette Long, Amy Meredith, Deborah Neichter, Theresa Pickerrell, Sheryon Quinn, Beth Frymire, Leigh McCarthy, Michael Dix, Susan Ritter its true and lawful Attomey(s)-In-Fact to make, execute, seal and deliver for, and on its behalf as surety, any and all bonds, undertakings or other writings obligatory in nature of a bond. This authority is made under and by the authority of a resolution which was passed by the Board of Directors of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY on the ist day of July, 2003 as follows: Resolved, that the President of the Company is hereby authorized to appoint and empower any representative of the Company or other person or persons as Attomey-In-Fact to execute on behalf of the Company any bonds, undertakings, policies, contracts of indemnity or other writings obligatory in nature of a bond not to exceed $10,000,000.00 Ten Million Dollars, which the Company might execute through its duly elected officers, and affix the seat of the Company thereto Any said execution of such documents by an Attomey-In-Fact shall be as binding upon the Company as if they had been duly executed and acknowledged by the regularly elected officers of the Company. Any Attorney -In - Fact, so appointed, may be removed for good cause and the authority so granted may be revoked as specified in the Power of Attorney. Resolved, that the signature of the President and the seal of the Company may be affixed by facsimile on any power of attorney granted, and the signature of the Assistant Secretary, and the seal of the Company may be affixed by facsimile to any certificate of any such power and any such power or certificate bearing such facsimile signature and seal shall be valid and binding on the Company Any such power so executed and sealed and certificate so executed and sealed shall, with respect to any bond of undertaking to which it is attached, continue to be valid and binding on the Company. IN WITNESS THEREOF, LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY has caused this instrument to be signed by its President, and its Corporate Seal to be affixed this 22nd day of June, 2018. LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY �SEAL� BY •r F.,4� Brian Beggs President ACKNOWLEDGEMENT On this 22nd day of June, 2018, before me, personally came Brian Beggs to me known, who be duly swam, did depose and say that he is the President of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, the corporation described in and which executed the above instrument; that he executed said instrument an behalf of the corporation by authority of his office under the By-laws of said corporation. U AMY TAYLOR Notary Public, Siate of Tennessee Davidson County - My Commission Expires 07-09•19 CERTIFICATE BY j4l� C4� Amy kylor Notal Public 1, the undersigned, Assistant Secretary of LEXON INSURANCE COMPANY, A Texas Insurance Company, DO HEREBY CERTIFY that the original Power of Attorney of which the forgoing is a true and correct copy, is in full force and effect and has not been revoked and the resolutions as set forth are now in force. Signed and Seal at Mount Juliet, Tennessee this c 7 h Day of t 20 19 BY Andrew Smith Assistant Secretary "WARNING: Any person who knowingly and with intent to defraud any insurance company or other person, flies and application for Insurance of claim containing any materially false Information, or conceals for the purpose of misleading, Information concerning any fact material thereto, commits a fraudulent Insurance act, which Is a crime and subjects such person to criminal and civil penalties." Form 4: Identification of Performance Security Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 113 wYJM, 17191e AMI THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 114 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 4 PAGE 1 OF 1 Form 4 IDENTIFICATION OF PERFORMANCE SECURITY If the Proposer is awarded a Contract on this Proposal, the surety or other financial institution that provides the letter of credit or other performance guarantee shall be: Lexon Insurance Company whose address is 10002 Shelbyville Road, Suite 100, Louisville F_ Kentucky 40223 , whose Street City State and Zip Code telephone number is 615 553-9500 and website address is httos://www.sompo-intl.com/ Form 4 — Identification of Performance Security 1 January, 2019 17191e AMI THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 116 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services 19011.111101 Form 5: Certification of Proposal — Declaration and Understanding Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 117 �IYJtJ1�. IDIOM= THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 118 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 • PAGE 1 OF 3 Form 5 CERTIFICATION OF PROPOSAL - DECLARATION AND UNDERSTANDING Proposer's Declaration and Understanding The undersigned Proposer declares that the only persons or parties beneficially or financially interested in this Proposal are those named herein; that this Proposal is, in all respects, fair and without fraud; that it is made without collusion; and that the Proposal is made without any connection or collusion with any person submitting another Proposal in connection with this RFP. The Proposer declares that this Proposal is genuine and not made in the interest of or on behalf of any undisclosed person, firm or corporation; this Proposal is not submitted in conformity with any agreement or rules of any group, association, organization or corporation; the Proposer has not directly or indirectly entered into any agreement, induced or solicited any other Proposer to submit a false or sham Proposal; the Proposer has not solicited or induced any person, firm or corporation to refrain from Proposing; the Proposer has not sought by collusion, fraud, deceit or any unlawful act to obtain for itself any advantage over any other Proposer or over the City; and Proposer has not otherwise taken any action in the restraint of free competitive proposals in connection with the Services for which this Proposal is submitted. The Proposer declares that it has familiarized itself with the nature and extent of the Base Contract, the existing solid waste collection services, all local conditions and all other relevant facilities, properties, laws and regulations that in any manner may affect cost, implementation, progress, performance or furnishing of the Services. The Proposer has satisfied itself as to the services and equipment to be provided, including the fact that the description of the services and equipment is brief and is intended only to indicate the general nature of the Services, and that this Proposal is made according to the provisions and under the terms and conditions of the Base Contract, which fully and completely incorporated into this Proposal by this reference. The Proposer further acknowledges that it has satisfied itself as to the nature and location of the solid waste handling services, the general and local conditions, particularly those bearing on the availability of equipment, access, recycling and compostable material markets, disposal fees, availability of labor, roads, and the uncertainties of weather or similar physical conditions in the City, the character of equipment and facilities needed to execute the Services, and all other matters that may in any way affect the Services or the cost thereof under the Base Contract. The Proposer further acknowledges that it has satisfied itself as to the character, quality and quantity of information provided by the City regarding the existing solid waste collection services and solid waste system, and the Proposer has adequately investigated the City's customer base and any additional information that may be provided by the City. Failure by the Proposer to acquaint itself with the physical conditions of the City's customer base and all available information shall not relieve it from responsibility for properly estimating the difficulty or cost of successfully performing the Services and providing the equipment required under the Contract. Form 5 — Cert. of Proposal — Dec. of Understanding 1 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 • PAGE 2 OF 3 The Proposer warrants that, as a result of its examination and investigation of all the data referenced above, it can execute the Services in a good, timely and workmanlike manner and to the satisfaction of the City. The City assumes no responsibility for any representation made by any of its officers, employees, representatives, or agents during or prior to the execution of the Contract, unless (1) such representations are expressly stated in the Contract; and/or (2) the Contract expressly provides that the City assumes the responsibility. The Proposer has given the City written notice in a timely manner of all conflicts, errors, omissions or discrepancies that it has discovered in the Proposal Documents and the written resolution thereof by the City is acceptable to the Proposer. Contract Execution, Performance Guarantees and Insurance If this Proposal is accepted, the Proposer proposes and agrees to enter into a Contract with the City, in the form provided in the Proposal Documents and as revised via subsequent addenda, to provide services and equipment ("Services") as specified or indicated in the Base Contract for the prices and during the time period indicated in this Proposal and in accordance with the other terms and conditions of the Base Contract. The Proposer accepts all of the terms and conditions of the Proposal Documents, including, without limitation, those dealing with the disposition of Proposal security. This Proposal will remain subject to acceptance until 180 days following Proposal submittal. The Selected Proposer shall sign and submit the Contract with the appropriate performance security and proof of insurance acceptable to Federal Way within five (5) days of City Council approval of the Contract with the successful Proposer. Self -Reliance The Proposer acknowledges that the information contained in this Proposal represents its understanding of the City's existing solid waste collection services, terrain, streets, alleys, container locations, recycling and compostables markets, and other conditions that could affect the costs or operational efficiencies of fulfilling the Contract. In preparing this Proposal, the Proposer acknowledges that it is solely responsible for its Proposal and that it has relied on its own investigation and research. Start Of Services And Contract Term If awarded a Contract, the Proposer agrees to commence all Services under the terms and conditions of the Contract on September 1, 2020 and to continue providing services throughout the term of the Contract as specified therein. Form 5 — Cert. of Proposal — Dec. of Understanding 2 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 • PAGE 3 OF 3 Unit Price Proposer proposes to invoice and collect payments of the Contract charges (rates), as set forth under the provisions of the Base Contract. Proposer charges (rates) may be adjusted upward or downward solely as provided in the Base Contract. Generally, the Proposer shall be responsible for all real (non -inflationary) cost increases, and may benefit from any real cost decreases, except as specifically agreed to in the Contract. Proposer agrees that the per -unit served price and the price adjustments represent a reasonable measure of the labor and materials required to provide the Services, including allowances for overhead and profit, and applicable taxes, fees and surcharges for such services. Prices shall be given in U.S. dollars and cents. Compliance with Process Integrity Requirements Proposer hereby certifies it and its employees, officers, and officials have complied with the Process Integrity Requirements as described in Section 2.16 of the RFP and further agrees to comply with those Guidelines during the Proposal evaluation process. Addenda The Proposer below lists and acknowledges receipt of all Proposal Documents and of the following addenda: Addendum Number Date Addendum # 1 February 6, 2019 Addendum #2 February 26. 2019 Addendum #3 March 14, 2019 Proposer agrees that all Addenda issued are part of the Contract, and Proposer further agrees that its Proposal includes all Addenda. Form 5 — Cert. of Proposal — Dec. of Understanding 3 January, 2019 IDIOM= THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 122 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services WASTE MANAGEMENT OF VVASHINGTON, 1NC FORM 5 • PAGE 1 OF 2 Identification and Authorization The name of the Proposer submitting this Proposal is: Waste Management of Washington, Inc. Doing business at: 720 4th Avenue Suite 400 Street Kirkland WA 98033 City State Zip Code which is the address to which all communications concerning this Proposal and the Contract will be sent. The names of the principal officers of the corporation submitting this Proposal, or of the partnership, or of all persons interested in this Proposal as principals are as follows: Jason Rose Waste Management 425-814-7831 jrose@wm.com Adam Winston Waste Management 503-493-7858 wnston@wm.com Mary Evans Waste Management 425-814-7844 mevans4(fwm.com If the Proposer is a partnership, attach to this form and number appropriately a copy of its partnership agreement. If the Proposer is a corporation, attach to these form copies of its Articles of Incorporation, bylaws and Certificate of Good Standing, as certified by the Secretary of the Board of Directors. If Sole Proprietor or Partnership IN WITNESS hereto the undersigned has set its hand this day of , 2019. Signature of Proposer Title Identification and authorization 1 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 • PAGE 2 OF 2 If Corporation IN WITNESS whereof the undersigned corporation has caused this instrument to be executed by its duly authorized officers this 15"0 day of &1 1'1 , 2019. Waste Management of Washington, Inc. Nan -Lie Pf Corporation � rrllx4tv� By Area Director, Public Sector Solutions Title e + ^y r Attest (Authorized Officer) Identification and Authorization 2 January, 2019 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 WASTE NIANACEIMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS The undersigned, being all the Directors of Waste Management of Washington, Inc., a Delaware corporation ("the Company"), hereby consent to the adoption of the following resolution without the necessity of holding a meeting; of the Board of Directors of such corporation, such resolution to have full force and effect as if adopted at a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Company duly called and held: RESOLVED, that Mary Evans (Area Director of Public Services), or any officer of the Company be, and hereby is authorized, following; compliance with appropriate corporate policies and procedures, to execute by and on behalf of the Company any and all agreements, instruments, documents or papers, as they may deem appropriate or necessary, pertaining to, or relating to City of Federal Way Garbage & Recyclables & Compostables Collections, and that any such action taken to date is hereby ratified and approved. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned have executed this consent effective this 22nd day of February, 2019. oausgned bV- CKRR-e-y'X ppy, Director o«usyn.d by. Jason ose, Director WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY 1, Andrew M. Kenefick, hereby certify that I am Assistant Secretary of Waste Management of Washington, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the "Corporation"). Attached hereto are correct and authentic copies of: I. Articles of Incorporation (and amendments thereto) of the Corporation; 2. By -Laws of the Corporation; 3. Certificate of Good Standing issued by the Washington Secretary of State; and 4. Certificate of Good Standing issued by the Delaware Secretary of State. Dated: February2--) , nig Andrew M. Kenefick Assistant Secretary WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 SECRCTARV Of STATE DIMTON OF CORPWGlTIO1t5 FILED 09t00 AM 09/15/1992 922605014 • 2309994 Certifleata of bcorpm*ticm Of WASxwGTON WA= XAUIZW & RECYCLING, DIC: FIIW. Tire name of the corporation is WwWagion Waste X"nr & Recycling, Inc. SECOND. The address of its office in the State of Delaware is The Corporation Trust Center, 1Zt}9 OrwvrStreet n the City of Wilmington, County of New Castle. The name of Its resistered agsat at such address is The Corporation Trust CQMPAM. TH1RD. The rows of the business or purposes to be conducted or promoted Is to in any lawful act or activity fof which cogxwstions may be orgy *md under the C#esteral Corporation Law of Delawam FOURTU The total n mber of shares of all dasses of stock which the corporation shall howe authority to issue is one thousand (1,000) shares, all of which shall be common stock having a par valve of SLOG pat spate. F137M The name and nulling addreu of the incorporator of the corporation is: Howard L Kruse 30033 Butterfield Road Oak Brook 1L 60321 SUt;'M 7b* original by► swi of the corporation si.s11 be adopted by the inecrpamlor. Tboreafter, is furtherance and not in limitation of the powers conletred by statute, the board of directors is expressly authorized, from time to dme, to make, aitq, or repeal the bylaws of the corporation. SEVENTH. Meetings of etodd3olders may be hold within or without the State of Delaware, as the by-laws may provide. The boob of the corporation may be kept (subject to any Provision contaisted In the statutes) outside the State of Delaware at such place or pleces as may be de6gnated fraar time to time by the board of directors or in the by-laws of the corporation. Elections of directors need not be by wrinea ballot unless ibis by-laws of the corporation shall so provide. EdG>EiM A dkwor of the corporation shall not be parsooaily liable to the corporation or ifs stockholders for monetary damages for breach of fiducloxy duty as a director, wampt to the oxteat provided by applicable law (i) for any breach of the director`s duty of loyalty to the 'corpratioa or its stockholders, (ii) rot vets or omissiom not in good faith or which irtvotve intentional misconduct or a knowinS violation of law, (ill) pursuant to Section 174 of the Delaware Gonna Corporation. L.w, or (iv) for any transaction from which the director derived an improper pere:onal benefit. Each person who is or was a director or officer of the eorporadm and each parson who serves or WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 served at the requert of the corpomdon as a &rWor or oMcer (or equivaleat) of vwtber oraarpdm shall be lademalfW by the Corporation to the fullest wAW autbodzed by the amoral Corporation I.aw of Delaware as it my be in affect froze time to time, except u to any action, Pill or broa#bt by oc on beUd of ruck director or ofam whitow prior approval of the Board of Di"dors. NINTH. Wbenavtr a compromise or arras nett is proposed between this corporation and is creditam or essay dam of tbem aced/or betwaan ibis corporation and its v*eMolders or nay clans of theaN any court of sgWtable *kdictlon Within the State of Delaware ma,r, an the application in ■ m=mw�y way of this corpumtlon or of any creditor or stockholder thereof or on the applications of wW receiver or receivers appointed -for this carporatica under' the provisions of section 291 of Title 8 of th• Del& came Cade or on the application of trvsttsasr in ditrolution or of any receiver or receivers appoinbd for thb corporation under the provirionts of section 279 of 71de 8 of the Delawsm Coda, order a maatirtg of the crodhors or doss of eraditon, nnd/or of the stocitholdetn or darn of >rtoclrholdsn of this corporation, ss the cue may be, to be suzstaasomd in such manna as the said court diract& If a majority in number reprerentissg tlaea-fourths in value of the creditors or claw of creditors, and/ar of the slockholdwxs or days of stochholderst of d s corpor Son, as the case easy be, agree to any comprvmiw or armnemeui aced to any remillizatka of this corporation ones Consequence of such compromises or ar"Meut>em the said =Womise or anwiernent and the said retorg><siudon shall, if ranctioned by the court to which the said application bas been made, be binding on all the creditors or clan of creditors, and/or on all the stockholders or clans of stockholdears, of this corpoarttdor4 as the case m y be, and Aho on this corpormium TENTH. 'sine corporation reserves the right to amend, alter, change, or repeal arty pnnidan contained in this certitiakte of incarperatiam in the man= now or haroafter pr+escn`b ed by statute, and all rights conferred upon stockholde:n herein true granted sub*1 to this reservation. TEX UNDERSIGNED, being the incorporator hemlabefore named, for the purpose of formirsg a corporation no nant to the General Corporations L.aw of the State of Delaware, dcu malts this, c iicato, hereby de dab* and certifying that this is his act and diced and the faeb herein stated are true and accordingly has hwmnto set hi: bud this ltith day of September 2992. lfov■ard L Kruse, Incorporator WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 —DEC-20-99 MIA 07c55 Pff NOR P" 734-1460 FAX M HM1478 airs or mu" _ cmcr1Rr or craw arrrsm or Cavaurswo rrrso osrao sw I&.1 0t DDrsSOGTD/ - !iffm C111MMTKOFAMEYDMIM OF t'SRMCATIC OF INCORPOPATMN or WASBENGM WAM BAULM & RECYCLING, M WuWVcm Woo Kmft & Rwr ft Ina., m =pntiov mad sand ex#stia8 aWw oad by vimm of dw Oea W C mp mdw Law of ttte 3(ate of Dels+rmte (dw " `), do= hwob7 cut* as fbRlayra 1. 7'ho amaedmmt to On Cmpaadoo'a Catif w of b=p xadm set Earth 6Am waa duty adopted is aecotd a Wth tha ptariafom of Sw otra 24 aad 228 of the GWOW Cmpmadm Law of Ibe Stroa of Ddxw= arrd hob= carotaotad to sad rAborind by the ale dasidw)cW dodt#+ed to Mo by aria= coact!! Oft to uxvhm will+ tbO ptm►fdoaa of Seetim 229 of dw G=crw Catpaattae Law of tfte Stain ofVakwam 2. AnkJa I of the Cwporadorti Ca d icab of Inoarporwim is M=dod w teed to Mow rm trams of the ompandw to wme Mtmamx d at wuhfnswv+, Ina. ON MTw Pomtkw 1 ' IN 1V17' a3S NifMOF, mdd oarporado ba e:acd Us Card Buto to be spad IWO dsr of Dca*tbew, 1999. Aft -a Rabat d. SLWoa, Vim PraddcrA WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 A MMED AND RBSTATED BY-LAWS OF Waste iKa erA of WasTslv&w, jnc (hesdaaRer a" the "CorpWatWa") ARTICLE l OFFICES SectsSecttoa 1. Registered Of kx. The MgWen d of cc of the Corpcmtioa shad be c/o CT Calporadon Sysxm, 1209 Orange Street, WWnb*tao, Delaware 19' ). Section 2. Other Mces. The Corpuratiuu may also have offices at such other ponces both within and without the State of Dekware as the Board of Directors may from dyne to d= determine. ARTICLE 11 MfiE 1NUS OF STOCKHOLDERS Sectim 1. Place of MeatLzE. Meetings of the ssackhol&rs for the election of directors or for any ethic purpose " be held at such time rind place, either within or without the State of Debwtre, as shall be design fmm time to dare by the Bard of Directors find stated in the notice of rite meeting: or in a duly executed waiver of modoe thereof. Section 2. Annual Meetings. The at nual mectbrgs of stockbo3den shall be hdd on mat date and m such time as " be deAMVed ftm time to dme by rite Board of Directors aml crated in the notice of the to cdq, at whfcb meetings the stoeMoMars shall elect directors anti tramact suc11 other busioesa to May properly be brought before the meeting. Written notice of Each annual meeting suristg the place, crate aril boar of rite meeting shall be given to wick swckbokW entitled to vote at such meeting ox less than tan (10) nor more than bay (GM drys be(= the date of the section 3. SnecW Meedagi. Special macdogs of atoaldroiders may be called by the PtesWm or the Baud of Directcm. Notice of a special meeting stating the place, date and bout of mile rmeebg and the purpose or purposes for which the nmeting is called shall be given not less than ten (10) trot mote than sixty (60) days before the date of the meeting to each stccktn kr entitled to vote at such meeting. Si. . oar 4,. tactic M, Adjam>ooent. Except n otherwise prtrrided by law or by the Cenifltatte of hcoapuradoo, the bolde a of a mttjarity of the capital stock lsst,ed and outstanding rind wearied to vote thereat, preacut in person or represented by proxy. shall cmtino a quonan at all meeting of the stockhoidars for the transaction of Wsimeas. It. however, =b gtsor= shall not be ptesm or represented at any inert% of the aackhoMm, the stocito iers eWded to vote thereat, preseza in person to reprosgrad by Proxy. sball love power to adjourn the meeting 0= time to Lippe, without notim of any sucit adjourned meedog other than armamcememt of the time and piece tbeteo! at the meeting u which the adjotomam- i is taken, until a quorum sine!! be Presets: of represmoted. Additionally, rite chairman of tho muting shell have power to adjourn, postpone, or recess the meeting ftm tints to time, without notice outer than ennowKennent at the meering of the time and place of the adjourned, postponed, or mussed sneering. At any such adjourwd meed* at which a Timm shaU be present or repre=%Id, any business may be rra>xtactid which might have been transacted at dto meeting as originally noticed. If the adjourmment is for most: than thirty (30) days. or if after the adjonrmnew a new record date is Fixed for the adjoanrd trtceung, a notice of the adjourned m shall be given to each stackholdrr entided to vote at the meeting. Seetkm 3. Votbi . Unless otherwise regjired by law, the Certifto of Incorporation or oldie By-laws, (i) any questftm bmugbt before arty meeting of stockbokiars at wbkcb a quorun is present shall be decided by the vote of the hoiden of a majority of the outstanding shuns of stock rgmsemed iced cotitled to you thereon and (it) each stockbokier represemd at it meeting of stockholders shall be entitled to cast tme vote for each share of rite capital 3mck entitled to vote thereat held by such stocicholder. Such votes any be cast in. pennon or by proxy but no proxy Page 1 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 shall be voted on or PAw fta (3) years from its date, unless sueb pixy p uyWas for a looger period. The Board of Directors, to Its discretion, or the ofl'kar of the Corporation presiding at a meeting of stotdeholdera, in his dlscrc*% may squire that any votes M9 at such maefhmg,shall be cast by written ballot, Scctloa 6. Ust of Stockbolden Entitled to Vote. The oflker of the Corpmd= who bas rberge of the stock ledger of the Corporation sbail prepare and males, at least ten (10) days betm every meeting of stocitbckkn, a complete list of the swicholdets entitled to vote at time meeting, arranged In alphsbethzi order, and sbowirr8 the address of each stockholders mod the mmdw of share's regWAM in the name of each stocit kler. Ach list shall be open to to cxrmrhmdon of arty stockboider, for may purpose germane to the needs, &uW ordinary bushrettt bmnn, for s period of at least ten (10) days prior w the meeting at the principal place of business. of the Corporation, 7b@ list shall also be produced and 1aep1 at then tierce and place of the meeting tiubg tits wbaitr lima tbemc , and my be hLgpcn:d by any stoeiWoWer of the Corporation wbo is prostmt, Section 7. 5toekk LdM, The stock ledw of the Corporation shall be the oaxly ovidenc+e as to wbo are the stocWm*n emided to ettamim the stock ledpr, the liar required by Senior 6 of thb Article iI or the book of the Corporation, ar to vote is persaa or by proxy at any matting of sw1cholden. ARTICLE III DIIiF.Li'0R8 Section 1. Numher_rnnd Election of Dirmton. The birsfaoeaa sad #Mk3 of the Corporation "I be meaeged by or under the directions of a Board of Directory consisting of one or mote diraetant, the exact mrmber of directors w be determined hoe time to time by resokutlom adapted by the of irwative vote of a majority of the directors then in office. At each aaemrual meeting of stocltboklen beginning with the nrn4 des daabl be elected. Each director shall hold office until. the ensufag meeting or undi such directors snccnsor is elected and 9AUUied or umaaif such director's eaudier death, mms4MwAot4 or rrstroval. Directory of the Corporation may be removed, with or wbthont cause, by the holders of it rmijoriry of the deems then entklcd to vote at an clecdon of diceceon. Section 2. Vstadcies. Any vacancy an the Board of Directors that results f m an incrmtse in the number of directors may bo 61M by a majority of the Board of Directors loco is office. provided that a titp = is preseet, sod any other vacancy occurring in time Board of Directors may be filled by a rmkjorky of the directors then In of ka, ova if mesa than a quoruaa, or by a sobs mmining director. Section 3. Dudes and Powers. TLe busWoss of the C Totadoo shell be mugged by or under the dim ikm of the Board of Dimon, wbkh nary exercise all such powers of the Corporation and do W such lawful acts sad things as are not by suttee or by the Cotporradon's Certificate of incorporation or by fosse By-laws directed oft roared to be exanhad or dome by the siwelcbolden. Sec§0 4. Mec§gg. The Board of Directors of the Corporadw may bold meetings, hods regular and special, eltber within or without the State of Delaware. Regalaa meetings of We Board of Directory my be held without notice at such time and at such place as my from time w time be determined by the Board of Dimont. Special weatings of the Bond of Directors may be adW by the President or any two direcrgm. Notice thereof stating the place, date and bout of die meeft shall be given to each director either by mail not leas them forty-eigbt (48) bouas before the time of the meeting, by telepbone, eta wnic facsimile or teitgmm sot less than twelve (lA hours below the dme of the meethatg. section 5. uauua. Etaept as may be otherwise VwifS &Uy provided by taw, the Corporation's Certificaw of incorporation or tbeae Ely -laws, at aU weedogs of the Board of Dimon, a Majority of the enma Board of Directors shall constitute a quorum for tt>t traonction of bushtess, add the act of a majority of the directors present at any, meeting at wt» eb theca is a gxrum shall be the act of the Board of Dirmton, It a quorum shall tort be pram at any tneeft of the Board of Dimon, the directors present tttaraat may adjoam the mating frarn time to time, without notice other than am mrncemoat at the meatitrg, until a shier shall be Plow". Page 2 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 Section d. Actiaua of Board. Unless otherwise psavided by the Corporatfan's Cerdficate of Ott pomdon or these By-laws, any action regttired or permitted to be tale nt at any meatier of the Board of Directors or of any commidee thereof may be tercet without a maecthmg. If all the members of the Board of Directors or =tminm as the case may be, heat dzroto in writing or by electronic transmission, and the writing or electrunk otacumissiou is filed with ft wixtes of proceedinals of the Board of Dl=tors or cummkoe. Section. 7. Mcctinsts by Meam of Conference TekpltM. Unku otherwise provided by ft Cogx tlou's Cardfi ate of lacorporation or these By4awa, remembers of the Board of Directors of the CorpumWoa, or any woe "go" by the Board of Directors. may participasa ism a meeting of the Baud of Directors or such committee by means of ■ confereat.e telephone or similar cxmmuniatioos equipoaent by mum of which ail perx= in the mooing can hear each other, and patticipadaa in a meeting plug= to this Seeft 7 of thin Article Bt shalt constitute ptese in persaa at such mecdq. Section 8. Committees. The Board of Directors may. by resoiutiau passed by a moxity of the cadre Band of Diratars, deaigaate one or metro committees, each commines to comist of one or mare of the dltecun of the Corporation. The Hoard of Dlr an may desigaete one or am dirocum as alternate mmtbers of any comtaime, wbo may replace any absW or dfsquaiifiad member at any meeting of any such ooaunince. In the abeencn or d1upilification of a member of a co m rdttee, and in the absence of a dcaignatlou by the Board of Direcum of to alteram member to replica the absent at disqualified a omber, the member or members thereof present ai any mating and trot disqualified front voting, wbether or not tech members constiaue a quon= tray ww1mmly aMbd another member of the Board of Directors to act at the ttmftdng in the place of any absent or disgnUHW member. Any committee, to the extent allowed by law sort provided la the tesohnim cgablishiag rucb comnmkft, shall have and ,may exercise all the powers W authority of the Hoard of Directors in the management oaf the businen and affairs of the Cotporadom Each a>zrtrn vlwe shall keep regular nslnurm and report to the Bout of Directors when required. Suction 9. Con:o adon. The d6xctars nay be paid their aapemu, if airy. of attendance at each meeting of the Board of Directors and may be paid it fixed sum far s=Wance at each meeting of the Board of Directors or a stated glary as director. No such payment their preclude any director fmin serving the: Cogxndmt in airy other capacity and tcceiving compeasamm tbemkr. Members of spacial or standing committees any be allowed like compensation fbr aaeuding committee meetings. Seedon 10. bam=ted Directors, No con act or transaction between the Cogxm doe and era or tore of Its ditacuasa or oftiters. or bt:cwtxrt the Corporation and arty other corporation. parmesahlg, association, or orhar ogAWzuim is whkb one or mum of its dirsciars or officers art; dimuna or officers, or have a floanclal hw=4 shall be void or voidable solely for this reason, or solely becattse do d3ncw or ofl3oer Is present at or participates in the meeting of the Board of Directors or committee there" which authorizes the contract or transaction, or solely because his or their votes are ootmsad for such purpose if (0 the material facia as to his or their relationship or Interest seed as to the ctmtract or trsasaaxion are disclosed or are koowu to the Board of Directors or the cmmittee, and the Board of Dimum or committee in good faith outhorines the contract or transaction by the affirmative votes of a mz jority of the disiatcarested dirmoas. ton though the disiaseressed directors be less than a qum=; or (ii) the material fact+ as to his or their ralatioaship or iaticaest and u to the courract or ttanssctio m ue disclosed or are Ittxnm to the stockholders etadded to vote tharvou. and die coutraci or traarmdou is specifically approved In good faith by vote of the stockholders; or (ill) the contract OF tittnsacttqu 12 lair as to the Corporation ass of the time It Is wAborizpd, approved or ratified, by the Board of Directors, a c=mniaw den -of or the st kbokiers. Comma or inteteudd directors may be cz mead In determining the presence of a quorum at a meeting of the Board of Directors or of a committee which maborbtes rho coottact or uansacdou. Papa 3 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 ARTICLE IV OFFIClRS Section 1. General, the officaa of the Corporation shall be chosen by the Board of Directors and Stun be a President and a Secretary. The Board of Dtrwm. to Its db=da% may also choose on Treasurer and one or eaten Vice Presidents, Asslstam Secresaries, Assistaoi Tuners and other officers. Any number of offices may be bold by the same peraoo. uuiless otherwise PmMked by law, the C,arporation's Cerdflcsls of fuwrporatbn or these By-laws. 7be 01171 rs of the Corporation need not be slockholders of the Co paratiw nor need smh officers be directors of the Corporatism. Section 2. f .The BmJ of Diane a at its first meedq held ater each amtf meeting of stoddboldsra ftH elect the officers of the Corporatim vwbo Shall bold their offices for such !arms ad " exercise such powers and perform web duties as shelf be determined htnm tame to time by the Baud of Dirmm; and all oftfars of the Corporation shod) bold office umtB their successors am chosen and tpulif ed, or uatif their earge r resignation or re:movai. Any officer may be removed sr my rims wth or without caw by the afl mats ve vote of a Y of the Board of Directors. Any vacancy occurring In any oflkoe of the Corporation small be Med by the Board of Dismors. IU salaries and other cmapeosadon of all officers of due corporation shut! be !feed by the Board of Directors. Section 3. Vc§g Securida Owned by the Sot adon. Powers of attorney, proxies, w lvers of notice of mmft. ter mum s and other taauuments relating to securities owned by the Corporadon may be executed in the name of and on bela f of the Corporation by the President or any Vke President and zW such trflfeer my, in the nerve of and on behalf of the Corporation, aft a l sucb action as any veb officer may deem advisable to vote in PC or by proxy at any meeting of security holders of any corporation to which the co poradon rosy own securities and at any such meeting $hall Possess sad may exercltta say and all rights and powers taddent to The ownership of such n urid a and which. as the owmr thereat, the Corporation might have exercised and possessed if present. 7be Board of Directors may, by resolution, hum tiara to doe confer Mm powers upon arty other person or persam. Section 4. The Ptesidosrt. The President shall be the chief executive officer and the ci icf ooperatiag officer of the Corporation, Shall have general direction of the bwdavu and aflhirs of the Corporation and general pqavW= over its several officers, subject, however, to fhe aontral of the Board of Director's and shall we that all wdeers so resatntioaa of the Board of Directors on +`serried into effw. The President may Sign ceni>icato rcptesa dq shares o! stock of the Corpondoo. The President umy execott; and deliver, in the name am on behalf of the Corporation, (i) conwacts or other imaumems authorized by the Board of Directors and (le) contirwis or unfroze cm is the usual and regular course of business except in cases what the czecution and delivery thereof shall be expressly dekgmd of penWOW by the Board of Ditntora or by these By-laws to same otbar officer or agent of the Corporation. The President shall preside at caeedup of too stoclibokliam in Wdldo% the Pre wm shall perform all other duties incident to the office of President and have such other powers and perform =b other darks as fhan time to time may be assigned to him by the Board of Directors or as ass puss m1W by these By-laws. Section S. Vice Presidenns. Vice Presidem, if there be any, shall perform all duties incident to the office of Vice President and Rave such other powers and pederm surrh other duties as ft= time to time may be assisted to him by these By-laws. by the Board of Directors or by the President. The Vice President rM alga cet>ifiwtes of stock of the Corporation. In the absem or disabRity of the Prcaidem, a Vice Pn*idem may preside u ratings of the stocithotders. Section 6. a" 'reta�r r,. 7ho Seerewy erred atlaad all meetings of the Brand of Directors and aU megfinp of scot idngitiers and record all the pmvedings thereat is a book or booia to be kept for that purpose; the Secretary shall dW perform like duties for the standing committees when refired. The Secretary shall give, or aura to be givers, notice of all medngs of rho stockholders and specid meetings of the Baird of Directors. if the Secretary shalt be arable or shall mA= to caw w be given notice of all =& ogs of the srockbolders and special ntaotings of the Board of Directors, and if there be no Assistaat Secretary, then either the Board of Directors or dip Pry idebrt may choose another officer iv cause such notice to be given. Tbc Sacretary shaft have ctatody of the seal of the Corporation Arad the Secretary or any Aasistmit Semetaary. if there be one, shall have authority to aiiitt the same to my tmaumew Page 4of10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 Rig it and wbem so ate, It may be attested by the A artim of the Secretmry or by the slpmture of troy arch Auistarat Secretary. The Board of Dbutora may give general authority to any other olfleer to M the mal of the Corporation and to attest the aft'btime by such ofik=*m sigoatm. The Secretary shell see that ail books. reports, simmer tt, cemi5tatm nd other doetr mere teed records by law w be kept fir Ned axe property kept or Hied, as the case may be, tm additiaD, It Seenetatry sb&U perform all other dutiea incident to the otflee of the Secretary and have such other powers and perform snob other &do as may be pretaertbed by the Bard of D4tctm or the Presklem. Scctkm 7. Treasurer, The Tmasi=, if there be one, shalt have the custody of the cogorne ihorb artd smcwides and shill keep taU and accurate oac i s of recegn and disburmmema in books belonging to We Corp<aradm mod shall deposit all mmym and oahar valuable effects In the tmme and to the credit of the Cotpomdoo to such depositories as may be designitted by the Board of Dkeaots. The Treasurer sball disbum tots Nettie of the Corporation as may be ordered by the Board of Mrectors, taking prow vouchers for such disbittsemew, sod shall render to the Preaidem mA the Board of Direcwrs, at its regular meetings, or wbou the Board of Dfeeders so re*d m, an amount of id bb u mwd ma as Treamm and of the firoxid cor4tion of the Corpa Wks. In RiWk sic, the Treasurer shill perform all other dudem WeWemt m the ofllix of the Trea=r trod have such other pimrm rod perform such other throes as my be prescribed by the board of Directors or rho President. §Tgqm S. Assis= Secrexaties. F-x=pt as may be otherwise provided to these Hy -laws, Assistant Secretaries, if there be nay, shaft partorm such &3da and have suds powen as bm time to time racy be assigned to them by the Board of Directors, the Pteestdern, any Vice FtesWmx, if then be one. or else Secretary, and in the abmem of the Secretary or its the event of the Seemiary's disability err mtdW to act. shall perform the duties of the Secmtaxy, soil wt= so ailing, shall lave a[l the powers of cod be sublm w aA the mlUktiora upon tha Secretary. Secdon 9. Ami'sna Tnamrm. Assistant Tmasutorm, if them be any, atimn perforill such dudes and bare .usch powers as fran time w time may be an4ried w them by the Beard of DEmmrs, the President, any Vice President, if there be one, or the Tmm rt:r. and in the abmice of the Trr as nr or In the evmu of the Trtisturer's disability or refsal to eta, shalt perform the dtttim of the Tresmm, emd when so suing, sheik trove ail the powms of asd be subject to an the resakdom upon the Treastmr. section 10. Other offloera. Such other officers as the Beard of Directors any tiro n shall perform such deed= ante bsve such powers a$ from time to time may to assigned to than by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors may dckgiste to tray other officer of the Coiparadm the power to ckvase such Wm officers and w prescribe Weir regxcdve duties sad powers. ARTICLE V STOCK Form of Certificates. The steam of the Cmpmcdon shah be repaesent d by urtilkaft provided thsu the Board of Dirrcum; may provide by resohnion or rextludom thsu some or sit of arsy or all ceases err series of stock snail be emcertiflcmd shares. Any such re mksdom " Dot apply Qo shares ntprimmed by a certiftcare until such ul ficsiw is surmoUre d io the Corporation Every twkleir of stock in the Corptneudon mpreaerdW by cdrtiHwA shall be =&kd to have a certificate s*oed, in the on of the Corporation (t) by the Clm6mm or Vice-Chdr=n of rite Board, if any, or the Presidtsal or a Vice Ptesidem and Q by the Secre;tuy or an Atsistam SeemUrY ix by the Treasurer or an Asmimaot Treasiu r of dx Corptxadm cudfying the wm3ber of shoes owoed by such holder of stock in the Corpotatfan. Seeder Z. Sim. Any or aU of the son ones on the earthen a teeny be a ihcsWile. In raze any oftcr, infer agent or registrar who has sued or whose facsimile signamm has been placed upon a certificate shalt bavts ceased to ba much officer, tramfer spat or registrar before such certificate is lsstsets. k may be ismued by the Corporation with die sat>m effoa as it much perlm weft aucb oef m, Qamgar agzm or re:gi>ttar at the dare of issue. Pngc 5 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 Swoon 33. LDu CertMates. The Board of Directors may dimes a new xrdfx m to be Issued In place of aqy aerti&= therr:mkre lamed by the Corpora on aeged to have been load. Won or destroyed, upon the mddm of as a1!ldavit of toot tact by the parsers claim* the cardiksm of a Rik to be lost, stoke or destroyed. Whoa wthinizing Poch issue of a new eertificete or tmaertifirated :harms, the Board of Directors may, la lu discmdom and as a condolers precedes to the Issuance dwroof, nxpdm the owner of Rich fast, sttdan or destroyed cordflcate, or nrb owner's legal represratative, to advertise the same in such roamer as the Boom of Duectots shall require and/or to it" the Corpomthm a bond to such sum as it tray direct as iademaky t any coal= that, may be made against the Corporation with ropeet to the cenilicam alleged to have been lost, atden or destroyed. Section 4. Tnuak . Star of ft Cogxwntiat shall be traasimnble in oboe masm prescribed by law and In than By -lava. TrawAn of static shall be made an the books of the Corpmatian only by the person roamed in the cetd&s<te or by his amarney hawfWJy consdazed In writing and upon the surreader of this certitfcate therefor, whicb shall be caar,skd before a new corollate shah be Issued. Section S. iiexcrd Date. In order that oho Corporation may dewmin a the swddwlders a adM to notice of or to vote at any meeting of etocidtoiders or nay adjow mteat thereof, at eazvkd to re:celve payment of any dividend or other distribution at allotment of any rig}=, or enrtided to exercise my righm In respect Of tray change, conversion a exchange of stack, or for the purpose *(any other lawful acdoa, the Baud of Dbacton may fix. In advance, a record data, which shall not be rsoora than slnry (60) days er lase than tan (10) days before the date of such matting, nor roora than sbtry (60j days prior to any other action. A deumninsdon of srvckholders of record entiried to nodca of or to vote at a meeting of stockholders shall apply to any adjutrmaos of the meeting; provided, boriever, that the Board of Directors my fix a new retard date for the adjourned , Section 6. Beaefi W Owners. The Corporative: sW be enured to rune fire exachrPiva rip of a person registered on its boob as the owner of shares to receive dividends, and to vote its such owner, and to bald lisbk for calls and a mmmew a person regi wW oa Its books as the owner of shares. and shall not be bound to recophs any equitable or other claim to or interest in such share or stares on tits pan of any other penes, Wbothtx or not k ftll have express or other notice thereof, except as otherwise pmvkted by law. ARTICLE Vl NOTICES Section I. Notices. Whenever notice Is required by law, the Corporation's Carti#icata of Incorporation or obese By-iawo, to be given to any director, member of a committee or stockholder, such notice may be given by mail. a" -- -ed to such director, wanber of a committee or stocldvlder. W his address as k sppean on ex records of oboe Corporation, with poamp thereon prepaid, and such notice shush be domed to be given at the lima when the same shall be deposited in the United states mail. Notice may also be given peraonahly, by telephone or by demo de traramission, Section 2. Waivers of Nodca. Wlteaever any notice is retphcd by law, the Corporation's Certificate of Incorporation or these By-laws, to be given to any director, member of a committee or swcidtohder, a waiver thereat in writing, signed. by the person or persons eWtkd to said edict, whether before or ai%r the time Plated therein, sisal be deemed equivalent thereto. Airaadancae of a person at a meexfng shalt constitute a waiver of notice of such meeting, except w hea the persaet ascends a o=tivg ror the express purpow of objeoctiag. u the begimting of the meeting, io the msactios of say bumcas, beocausa the mceft In not lawfully calkd or wavened. Page 6 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 ARTICLE Vtr GENERAL PROVISIONS section 1. Dividends. Dividends t P02 the capital stock of the Corporation, sue )= to applicable Isw and the pmvisioas of the Corporation's Certifkata of incnrporatfon, If any, may be dsclartd by the Board of Dist sctarx to any regular or special m cdM- and MY be Peld In cgsh. In property, or in nhsrrsrr of rise Capital erode. Before payment of any dlvldend, dram try be net aside out of any Au ds of the Carporad w avttiiabde for divideeda each arm a sm as the Boated of Dltnctara $om bane to tbam, is in absolute discretion, deems proper as a M$"" or ataerves to meet contingencies, or for equalizing d6vfde06. at for rep2bing or umintining any property of the Ct>rWratieta, or for any Proper Purpose, end the Bout of Directors may modify or abolish any such reserve. Section 7. Dtsb+usemeam All cberla or dettands for raoaey and antes or the Corporation shall be sighed by such officer or officers or such other perraou or pusaat as the Board of Directors may tram tune to time de3*A e. Se cdon 3. Fiscal Year. The fiscal year of the Corporation shall be rued by resohrtivn of the Board of Directors. Section 4. Caayorate Seal. jbe corporate seal, if thin shall be one, shall be in such team as the Board of Dir=lm may ptescrabe. Section 5. Coutrao rs. 11=0 ss aWerwiw provided in these Bylaws or by law or as otherwise directed by the Board of Directors, the Pmosidettt. any Vim Pete mi, the Tre4 aotrea, the Assistant Treat: m, the Secretary, or the Assistant Secremry slab be authorized to execute aid deliver. in the name and on bebalt of the Corpo *$m all , bonds. cuwxw s, deeds, mortgagca, and other irntra=wn, either for the CarporatiOU'S DM otccorrar or in a hduciuy or other capacity, and do seal of the Corporation, if appropriate, shall be attired thereto by any swb officer or the Secretary or an Aulstaw Secretary. The Board of Directors at the Preikkat or. if designated by rho Board of Dif=tors or the President, thorn any Vice Pre skk= or the 5ocretary, may authorizer arty other officer, employee, or agent to exemm and deliver, M the mane and on be Wf of the Corporation, agreements, bonds. councts, dexdt, mortagp* and other Inswunmwts,eldwr for the Corpo utW% own account or is a fidaeciny or other capacity, and, If appropriate, to a.fffa the seal of the Corporation thereto. The grant of such awhotity by the Board of Directors or any such officer may be general or confined to spatter aourdiuons. Sub)= to the f=go 4 provisions, the Board of Dirrctou MAY attthoriza any off ter, officers, agent or agents, to enter into any cor+tsaa or ex o m am deliver Any Etr smear En the name of sad an behalf of the Co rporatioa, and such n0ority may be general or contiued to specific instaurea. ,lectlon 6. Checks, W. All shecka, demands. drafts or other owlets for the paymestt of money, noun or odwr evfdences of k debtehoen issued in the rsetme of the Corporation mmy be signed by the Pteslde w. the Treasurer, the Assistant Treasurer and/or such abet officers or persons as the Board of DLtect n [tare rime to time may desigtaata and. if so reW red by the Board of Directon. shall be catmtersigned by the President, ft Truunr, the Assam Treasurer and/or arch otter of ors or persona as to Board of Directors frnrn time to time may denigrate, and In such taatmer, as shall be determined by the Board of Directors. Section 7. [)e netts. All trends of the Corpor dou teat otherwise employed shall be deposUcd from time to time to the credit of the Catpos don in such bards, trust compudcs or ocher deposiories as the Board of Direcw may select. Checks, dregs, bills of ettchaags, accepances, notes, obdipttions, and orders %r payment of money made pay" to the Corpurad000 tray be eadoned for deposit tg the credit of the Carporatba with a duly awhmized depositary by the Presidem the Treswrer, the Aubtua Trtssorsr and/or ssrch other otfica or persons as the Board of Directors Moran tiatee to time may designate. secLkm8. Loam. No leans and no renewals of any loam shall be contracted an behalf of d3a Corporation except as authorized by tie Board of Directors. When aud4orized m to do, any of er or agent of the Cwporudou may of a betas and aehvawa for ehte Corporation from any banit. trust eosapany, or other knti ti m or tiom my Individual, corporadon, our Ram. rand for such loans and advanca may mslte, execute, and deliver promWwry note, fronds, or other evidencos of iadebtedoess of the Corporation. Men auttl rbzd so to do, arty otter or agent of the Corporation may pledge, hypothecate, or transfer n security for ,he payment of any and all loans, advanoxs, Page 7 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 indebtcdoess, and liabiiisies of the Corporadon. any and all atockt, securities, and other real of penonai property 91 any time bell by tba Corporation and to that end may eodorme, assign, and deliver same, Such autbaft may be general or confined to specific instances. AR71M VM 1NP%tNMCA7WK §10ba 1. Fbwtr to lndama& lu Acdom. Suitor or BMMe W_ Other than Thane by of 4t tM Rkm ofrlas Ca r Svb}ect to Sectloo 3 of this Ankk VUL the Corporation, OM indctt WY aqy person vho was or is a party or is fttatened to be trade a parry w any tbrratmrod, Mu t3 or completed action, suit or pro=ft, w+6 ub" civil, crhnhaal, admisdaradvo or tuvesa pdw (other than an action by or is the tight of the Cosparad* by reason of the fact that such person Is or was a dim= or officer of the Corpotaticss, of is or was servisD, m the tcquest of the Cmporadoo as a dhatotr, officer. employee at agent of anodser corporation, puMa'd*. jtdnt vtn un, trust. employee bwefk p(m or what courprbe, orgasms eMemd (lpcludiag atW=Ys' fees), judPtsO", ft m and AM== paW in wWo mW acnatiy and reasonably tamrtred by such person is comecdon whh such action. suit err PRUeft if such person acted in good faith and in a matmcr snob person tamormbty believed to be in or not opposed to the best !mare" of the Capotstlon, and, with respect to any crimigad action or proceedlM bad no reasonable cattle to believe torch pet mn's conduct was udawfiul. The tembutdoo of any active, auit or proceeding by JudgrorM order. seakunml, cwtvkft, or upon a plea of noio or its equivalmu, aball not, of Itself, create a premmpdon Hatt such person did not act in good faltb and in a manaet wbkh mch parma reasonably believed to be ba or pat opposed to the bees here= of the CorpmWm and, with mpact to UW crimimi action or p meedhm. had reasonable came to believe that bis conduct was tnlfaw'U, Section 2. Power to f SEM In Action, Suits or Atocee&E by or In the giant of the Corporadau. MJoet to Section 3 of this Article VM. the Caposatlm shall Iadecnalfy any person who was or is a patty or Is to be made a party to say tbremened, peening or com*ted suction or tads by of is the riglu of cite Carpara lon to procuta a judgmem in In favor by neon of Ike rsct that WCb person le or way a director or Ofr$M. of the Corporation. err is or waa teeming at do regum of do Catporatioa as a director, oftider, eatpluyee err ages of anothter corporadoa, pacrmer*O. ,joint venruse, truer. employee benefit plan of other enmpdw against eta (molt t►8 SuOm Yi1` *"-0 acr aiiy and ra aabty incurred by such perm in c=wtion wkb the defense or mW meat of such action of suit If such persm acted in good faith and in a aIer such person nano u"Y belkved ro be in nr not opposed to the best. iateram of the Corporation: meant that no indemaifStAdm shall tx tmuW in respect of any clalut. issue or matter as to wbkb such person shall have been adjudged to be !Fable to the CmTomdm uahesm and 0* to the extent that don Caws of Chancery or the court in which such action or suit was bmughtt shall determine upon appHmtion that, despite We adjudication of liability but In view of all the cistmshncea of the caw, such person is fatrhy sad reasonably entitled to indemnity for such etcpeusas whieb the Coup of Chancery or such other court shelf deem proper. Section 3. Aushoriradoa of lndemnlfiatclan. Any lfl&�Ioo under this Article VM (unless ordered by a court) stall be media by the Corgnrtt ice only as mthorind in the qmd to case anon a detartakack a that indemrdfirWm of qm diracttor or off$= is ptoW In the chmostmes because such ;1 0 has neat the Mdkable standard of conduct set rortb in Sectkm i or Section 2 of thtb Article VA), as the case may be. Such determination shall be trade (1) by the hoard of Directors by a aWority [rote of the dimmm who are pot parties to such action, mk or proceeding, even tbowtgb hears Ilan a quo m, or (9) if there are no such directors or if such directors so direct, by Independent legal toumd in a written opipkrn, or (ill) by the stockholders, To doe extent. however, that a director or officer of the Cotpommtiaa has been succm1W an the merle or odlerwin in defame of atry action, suit or proceeding described above, or in defame of any claim, issue or nutter thercto, such person shall be lodexont6ed against e (including suorneys' fees) acmilfy and reasonably W=md by him in connection tberewith, without the necessity or mWmriratkm in rho specift case. Section 4. in�a oo by -a Court. Notwithstanding spy M=107 dt=dm i m in the specific case under Sacdm 3 of this Article YID, and notwfilLuanding the absence of any determination thereunder, any director or officer may apply to any court of compMm jurisdiction in the State of Deloware for iadetnaiilralbn to the ertseat otherwise permissible under Sectiom I and 2 of this Amick VIA. The basis of such Indemeiticadon by a court shalt be a Page 8 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 detertaimtkm by such coact that Index of tree director at officer is groper In the etn�trastaa m because such person bee mat rise appikable st abudt of conduct so march in Section I or Section 2 of this Article VIII, as the case may be. Nettltar a weary de(mminadon in the specific cane under Section 3 of this Ar*k Vii) rror the sbst ace of any detertainedon thertuoder shall be a defense to such appiicadoo or cmW a premom that the dire= or off= seefting welmmiricadom has not met any Swicable srartdud or conduct. Notice of any applicadon for Indannificadon pursusot to this Samoa 4 of this Ardde VIII sbaU be given to the Corporation promptly upon the filing of Stroh application. If suceessfal. its whole or to part, the dhmor or of xw seelaag indeamifisation shall also be entitled to be paid the expeusa of p vsecudq mob applicadou. Section 5. Mmet Ptrsbk is Advance. ExM= incurred by a dhcW of afficef in defandW of hnestigaft a Ihr+eatened or pending action, suit or proceeding may be requited by rho Baud of Directors to be paid (upost arch tettmr sad cvndit M, If any, u the Bawd dmem appropriate) by tie Corporadoxt In advance of the final disposition or tssch acdM soft of procure$ upm receipt of as w*rmkbn by or on btdntif of such director or officer to reitay such otnotnte if it shaft ultimately be determined that such person is not entitled to be indemnified by the Corporsduo as maborired in this Article VM. 5eactioa $. Nonexcusivity of todemnifiau#oo and Advan-ementof Expanses. Tito iademallkatim and advaacamem of expenses provided by, or granted pursuant set, this Mick VAI sW eat be deettred exchnive of any amber rigfns to whicb those seeking Inft=ffk2don or advattcetsteat or expenses may be enWled Under any By-LAw, agreemetst, c oaams, vote of sw-kbaldm or dishmmewd directors or pUrtit} W to the dirCC.t = (bowsoever aabodied) of any curet of cosopetem )misdretioa or other►c►fse, bath as to action in a Per>icta's official capaa:fty ud as to action m another mpocity+ while holding tauh office, it being the policy+ or the Corporation that iodmammdan or the pmum spoeifmd in Sections 1 and 2 of this Article VIU shell be made to the fattier exteor permitted by law. ibe provisions of this Article VW shall tsar be demmd to preclude rib indemalftlion or any person wbo la not epoc[MW In Section I of Section 2 of aria Article VIII but whom the Corporation has the ptrwer of obilpdm to Indemnity under the provisions or the General Corporatim Law of the State or Debwarer, or otherwise. Section 7. Insttranae. The Corporation may pumbm and maintain € s once tea behalf or any person who Is ur wee a director or officer of ft Corptr dots, or b or wu serving at rbe request or tba Corpotstiaa as a director, onket, employee or agent or another corporation, parmatship, johd vem sm. tract, employm benefit plea or other amterprL" against any liabilky asserted ageimt such persxtn end incurred by !tiro in atsy such capacftY, of arising oast of satrh persons stem as such, whedw or not the Corporation wouldd hive the power or the obltpdoo to indemnify such person against such Ifabilfry tinder the provisions of this Article Vat. Sec Cemain DeWdotn. For purposes of this Article Val, references to 'the Corporation" shall Include, in sdditkm to the resulting txxporarleat, Arty voastitaatr carP tior (iomadfrtg any c 0aghW nt of a tuent) absorbed in is coawbdWw or merger which, if its separate existema bad caadaued, would bans had power anti mahorhy fo imkomify its directors and officers, so that any person who h or was it directory or officer or sorb consdmaat corporation. or Is or was a director or officer of axb cumthueni corporation serving at the request of such oaastiment corpomdon as a director, offfcs`r, employee or agm of arsotim ceMorsdon, IpMnruship, joint vermno, trust, empfoyee benefit plan or other enterprise, dull stand is the same poaldon under the provWom of this Ard* Vlif with reRxz to the rt stuldq or surviving cotporatioo act such indmnit'icadaa relates to such persamt's sets while serving in any of the foregoing capacities, of such cmu*uent txtporadoo, as mcb person would bane with respect to such coax imam cotptnial sa if its separate exWence had cotufntW. For purposes of tf�s Article VUL referenda to fines' shad include any excise tarts assessed on a person with mrspect to an errtpioyee benefit pine, and rNieteaccs to 'serving at the rtgwst of the Corporation• shalt Include any service as a dkwwr or officer of the Corporadoa Which imposes duties on, or involves services by, such director or officer with respect to an eurptoym bestetit plan, im participams or beneficiaries, and a parson wbo Acted In good faith and in a ==ej Basch person reasonably believed to be in the but" of the panicipam and benet'ickries of an eatpkyee baaefii plan shelf be deemed to have acted in a manner 'tint opposed to the best inmrv= of the Corpomdcn` as resferred to is this Ardcle VIII. Page 9 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 5ecdon 99. Sruvival of 1n&moiftLd2q and Advancement of Experrsea. The kdannifiarlon and advanoemem of expenses provided by, or Scooted pumusat to, this Article VIA fall, unless od arwlse provided wb= autlorixed or iradfiad, continoe as to a perm wbo, has teased to be a dbww or atllker and shall Inure to the benefit of tho heirs, executor and adminimrators of such a person. Section 10. Limiudon on Notwitbsaadlag anything coausiaed in this Ardck VW to the taogarary, weeps far praceeding3 W enforce dgbts W fodcmdficadon (which shop be governed by Section 4 of this Article VIil). the Corporation shaD am be oWlgated bo indemnify any director or vgAm In rs>m dw with ■ pr+xtsdfutg (or put dwml) Inidatad by such ptrsotr treks: such p woodieg (or pan tfttteo4 was mWrksed or consented to by the Board of Directors of tha Corporation. 5ectiout 11. Indeaaadication of&MphUM and Axem. The Corponufm may, to the extaoot suWodred ftm tiute to tune by the Board of Directors, provide rights to b1m mificallan ad to the a ft"Mmant of expenses to empk7m and agents of the Corporation similar to those conferred in this Article VM tti d hukn and ofters of the Corporadom ARTICLE ix MENDM S Sec Except as otherwise PmWed in Ute Corporation's Ceniflcate of tworpmvion, ftse By-laws guy be akered, mended or repasled, in whole or In pars, or new By-laws may be adopted by the noelboidcrs or by the Board of Obwors. Except as otherwise provided In the Corporation's Certf>kate of Imorporado% all such atuteadgrems mm be approved by either the bokfers of is =)oo ft of the otstatanding capital stack entitled io vote therein or by a majority of the enrjne Board of Directors Wets in offm Page 10 of 10 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON. INC. FORM 5 1V'V-'" ASS Leik NO I fiT-' i STATES OF k�mf 0 .► ( I Secretary of State 1. KIM W+YMAN, Secretary of State of the State of Washingtoo and custodian of its seal, hereby issue this CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. I CERTIFY that the records an file in this office show that the above named ctttity was registered under the laws of the State of Washington and that its public organic record was riled in Washington and became effective on 05/I911999. 1 FURTHER CERTIFY that the entity's duration is Perpetual, and that as of the dale of this certificate, the records of the Secretary of State do not reflect that this entity has been dissolved. I FURTHER CERTIFY that all fees, interest, and penalties owed and coilwed through the Secretary of State have been paid. I FURTHER CERTIFY that the most recent annual report has been delivered to the Secretary of State for filing and that proceedings for administrative dissolution are not pending. Issued Date: 03/30I20tg UHI Number. 601415 286 Home Jurisdiction: DE Given under my hand and the Seal of the State of Washington at Olympia, the Slate Capital 11A';;� *AO?, — Kim Wyman, Secretary of State Date issued: 03/30/2018 WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC. FORM 5 Delaware game I The First State I, JEFFPXY W. BULLOCK, SECRETARY OF STATE OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE, DO HEREBY CZATIFY "WASTE MANAGEMENT OF WASHINGTON, INC-" IS DULY INCORPORATED UNDER THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF DELAWARE AND IS IN GOOD STANDING AND HAS A LEGAL CORPORATE EXISTENCE SO FAR AS THE RECORDS OF THIS OFFICE SjfOV, AS OF THE TENTH DAY OF SEPIM61BER, A.D. 2018. AND I DO HEREBY FURTHER CERTIFY THAT THE ANNUAL REPORTS HAVE BEEN FILED TO DATE. AND I DO HEREBY FURTHER CERTIFY THAT THE FRANCHISE TAXES HAVE BEEN PAID TO DATE. 2309994 8300 SR# 20186568745 You may verify this certificate criltne at corp delaware govlauthw shtml Tr"'N HIiFt4 Mc�M�eYd ilM Authentication: 203389295 Date:09-10-18 IDIOM= THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 142 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 1 Attachment 1: Renewable Natural Gas Primer Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 143 �IYJtJ1�. ATTACHMENT 1 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 144 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 1 Renewable Natural Gas as a Low Emissions Gas What is Renewable Natural Gas? Renewable natural gas (RNG), or biomethane, is a pipeline -quality gas that is fully interchangeable with conventional, fossil natural gas and can be used in natural gas vehicles. RNG is essentially biogas (the gaseous product of the decomposition of organic matter) that has been processed to purity standards. Like conventional natural gas, RNG can be used as a transportation fuel in the form of compressed natural gas. Biogas is produced from various biomass sources through a biochemical process, such as anaerobic digestion, or through thermochemical means, such as gasification. With minor cleanup, biogas can be used to generate electricity and heat. To fuel vehicles, biogas must be processed to a higher purity standard. This process is called conditioning or upgrading, and involves the removal of water, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and other trace elements. The resulting RNG, or biomethane, has a higher content of methane than raw biogas, which makes it comparable to conventional natural gas and thus a suitable energy source in applications that require pipeline -quality gas.' Using RNG to offset fossil fuel: How does it work? Offsetting natural gas is analogous to the process of wielding renewable electricity from our landfills. In the case of renewable electricity, energy is added to the electrical grid at one of our landfills, and that same amount of energy is "credited" as renewable electricity by a user at another site within the same electric grid. Key to this process is that the amount into the grid equals the amount out of the grid — and both transactions must take place within the same electric grid. WM has been offsetting electricity with renewable energy for decades using this process. Renewable fuel works in exactly the same way. Biogas is processed and cleaned before the clean biomethane is put into the pipeline at our (or another company's) landfill — and an equal amount is used as fuel within the same pipeline system. Like electricity, the gas input and outflow must be on the same gas pipeline system and must be carefully recorded to ensure that they are the same. The process is carefully tracked and verified as renewable fuel by the U.S. EPA when the cycle is complete and only qualifies as Renewable Natural Gas after the gas has been used in natural gas vehicles. This certification system is in place at each of our qualified landfills and fueling facilities. Importantly, each gas project is reviewed and qualified by the U.S. EPA using engineers to verify the connection between the renewable gas entering a gas pipeline and that the gas was actually used for fuel. Federal Legislation recognizes RNG. Renewable natural gas is part of the same Federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) as Ethanol and Biodiesel Fuel. In fact, it is considered more valuable as a renewable fuel (fewer emissions) than these commonly accepted fuels, and is worth more in the RFS2 incentive system. Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) made from landfill gas qualifies as Cellulosic Biofuel under the EPA's Renewable Fuel Standard. The monetization of Renewable Fuel Credits (RINs) under the RFS requires (1) a landfill gas source (2) an RNG facility, (3) CNG fueling stations, and (4) a transportation fleet using CNG as fuel. Through this commonly accepted process of displacing fossil fuel with Renewable Fuel within the same pipeline system, WM is able to place clean biomethane into the natural gas pipeline at our landfills to displace the need for an equivalent amount of fossil fuel when we use natural gas out from that same pipeline in our trucks, earning the description of RNG fuel. 1 U.S. Department of Energy, Alternative Fuels Data Center, http://www.afdc.energy.gov/fuels/natural—gas—renewable.html Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 145 1 YYJLU. ATTACHMENT 1 Waste Management's Landfill Gas to RNG Waste Management has the largest fleet of natural gas vehicles in our industry with 7,621 natural gas collection trucks operating in North America. We support this fleet with natural gas fueling capabilities at 123 of our sites, of which 25 have public fueling stations. WM is unique in that we are both a source of and an end user of Renewable Fuel. We currently fuel over a third of our natural gas fleet with Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) produced from landfill biogas at four of our own facilities. Our long-term and ongoing investments in RNG production facilities, coupled with a natural gas fleet that can operate on RNG, are moving us closer to a near -zero emissions collection fleet. WM RNG use. In 2017, WM's CNG fleet consumed 6,670,000 MMBtus of natural gas (at 6,000 NGVs). Of that total usage, we are managing approximately 2,010,000 MMBtu/yr of biogas that offset our total fleet needs (or 30%). This includes internal and external biogas sources. The percentage is lower in 2017 because our fleet size grew while our RNG supply stayed roughly the same. California, Oregon, and Washington's CNG fleet usage is offset with Renewable Natural Gas. RNG reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 70% from diesel A decade ago, WM invested in technology to create renewable natural gas fuel from landfill gas. We now produce RNG at: Altamont Landfill, California Milam Landfill, Illinois American Landfill, Ohio Outer Loop, Kentucky Our California, Oregon, and Washington natural gas trucks are powered by renewable natural gas. v�rli. PAGE 146 Federal Wav Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 2 Attachment 2: Inclement Weather FAQs Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 147 �IYJtJ1�. ATTACHMENT 2 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 148 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 2 Inclement Weather FAQs Why is my garbage and recycling not being collected? This winter storm created extensive unsafe road conditions impacting our collection services. Our highest priority is safety — of our drivers and of the communities we serve. Garbage collection is one of the top 5 most dangerous occupations. When we send our drivers out for collection, we must consider the size of the collection vehicles (averaging over 50,000 lbs.) the conditions of the residential streets our drivers spend most of their time on, the stop and start nature of servicing residential streets, the strenuous physical labor and proximity to oncoming traffic. These factors create high risk that is exacerbated in snow and ice. Rest assured our operations team are out inspecting every route so that as soon as it is safe to do so, we will be out to collect. What's your plan for resuming collection? We are operating under inclement weather and our operations team is closely monitoring weather conditions. We are preparing for various storm scenarios and working closely with city staff on contingency plans. We will be posting updated collection information and service schedules daily on our website (wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard) and social media platforms. We strive to update our website twice daily (between 8am-10am and again at 6pm-8pm) but always check back periodically. Our customer service team and city staff will also be aware of any updates in real time. We understand this is an inconvenience and greatly value and recognize your reliance on our service — we will do our best to collect you as safely and efficiently as possible. What is the best way to receive service updates? The wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard contains the most up-to-date service announcements. We also use WM and city -specific social media platforms, press releases and media advisories, if applicable. If you are a WM-billed customer, please make sure you are signed up to receive customer notifications either via phone, text or email. Our goal is to notify residents the night before if we are clear that there will be no service. If our operations team is going to scout routes in the morning, the notification cannot be performed the evening before but will be sent as soon as possible the next day, What am I supposed to do with extra garbage material? Here are some tips to storing extra garbage: Fill current bin to capacity Place extra bags next to current garbage container Store in personal extra container labeled "garbage" Store waste in storage containers, unwanted cardboard boxes, etc. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 149 ATTACHMENT 2 What am I supposed to do with extra recycle material? Please place extra recycling in a kraft paper bag, cardboard box, or personal container labeled. Make sure to label these extras as "Recycling." Why am I seeing WM trucks on the road if you are not providing service? During weather events like this, we need to prioritize servicing critical locations, such as hospitals and other medical facilities. If you see trucks on the road despite being told we are not operating, we are most likely attempting to collect from these customers. These types of facilities never close and from a public health and safety perspective, it is important to try and maintain consistent collections, even during weather events. Why don't we receive customer credit? Waste Management's service interruption policy, in the event of a missed collection due to weather or safety conditions, is to collect all material missed at no additional charge. This is an industry standard protocol. No credit is provided for postponed service because we still collect and manage the material, and incur costs related to collection and management of the material. PAGE 150 Federal ` v'av Sohd',Iv ste Collection Servi;es ATTACHMENT 3 Attachment 3: Recycling News Bulletin Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 151 WiMUK. ATTACHMENT 3 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 152 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 3 This month's Recycling News Bulletin follows the Waste Management Sustainability Forum, where corporate leaders, municipalities, government officials, experts, innovators and influencers came together to share insights and exchange ideas. As part of the discussion, Brent Bell, Vice President of Recycling Operations for Waste Management gave a recycling update on recent trends and next steps for improving the sustainability of recycling. His speech (condensed and edited for brevity) is below: 2018 was a challenging year for recycling programs across the globe. I know I am happy to have 2018 behind us! I thought it would be great to take you all through the journey of contamination, hard to recycle items and finally, how we are managing through difficult market conditions with education and technology. I'll use a couple of short videos to highlight some of our challenges and more importantly, our solutions. Let me first tell you a quick story of when I realized that we really do have a problem with recycling. It wasn't when we started in January 2018 with a complete ban of mixed paper into China, which was 30% of the fiber we collect —no that wasn'tit. And it wasn't when I walked down the hall to tell our senior leadership team that the recycling estimate for 2018 would be a $100M negative impact on earnings —that was badthough. No, the moment I realized recycling was in trouble came at the dinner table with my mom. Now my mother knows that I check her recycling cart —every time I go to my parents' house because their cart is in the garage right as you walk in the house —(how many of us flip the lid for a quick peek at a relative's house?). No, the moment came when my mom asked, "Can I put our old Christmas lights in the recycling cart?" That was the moment when I realized that my mom, my very own mother, is a "wish - cycler." Wish -Cycling Wish -cycling is a term used to describe recyclers who want to do the right thing and hope that everything they toss in the bin is recyclable —they have the best intentions but need some education to recycle the right items. Wish -cycling is one of the leading causes of contamination in our country today. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 153 ATTACHMENT 3 Currently, contamination levels average around 25% - that means for every ton of recyclables we collect, we must remove 500 pounds to meet our customers' quality standards. Contaminants can impact good recycling programs by increasing costs, reducing the efficiencies of processing, and lowering the value of commodities. And the most serious problem with contamination are items that cause injuries to recycling professionals responsible for sorting those materials. Employees who work in the recycling facilities could be injured with the wrong materials —batteries that cause fires or propane cylinders that explode. These do not belong in curbside programs, and neither do plastic bags or bowlingballs. We get some really unusual items in recycling carts. We recently surveyed our facility managers and asked about the types of items they see coming across the sorting line. This list included everything from hoses (lots of these) to engine blocks, grenade launchers (of course, they're metal, right?), a deer, a black bear and even a python snake. However, the number of bowling balls that we receive is one that is really fascinating to me. It amazes me how many bowling balls we receive. Through a Google search, I learned there are only 3,000 bowling alleys in the US. But our recycling facilities receive over 100 bowling balls each week. That works out to about 5,000 bowling balls every year —or 82,000 pounds of bowling balls annually! I've never seen any recycling program that accepts bowling balls, however, once a week, 100 wish-cyclers decide —I'm going to take my lucky 16 lb. ball and drop it in the good old 96 gallon wishing well, better known to us as the recycling cart. The good news is I know my mom doesn't bowl —so I can't blame her for this one. How can we do a better job with education programs? We thought that it would be great to hear from our front-line workers who are physically fighting the battle against contamination every day. I'd like to show a video that we recently created that will give you a glimpse into what contamination looks like when it shows up at the curb and in our recycling facilities. Contamination Video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMLgPANSkW4) The single biggest improvement that will help any recycling program is to remove contamination —not only will this help on the operating side —but the cleaner materials will always improve the economics of any recycling program. Education and Technology My final segment is really geared around next steps. What are we as an industry going to do about contamination and what is Waste Management doing to lead the efforts. If I had to pinpoint two potential solutions, those solutions would be focused around education and technology. Most wish- cyclers are not out to contaminate their recycling - they just don't know any better. We need to invest in education programs to help reduce contamination levels. Waste Management's Recycle Often. Recycle Right° education and outreach program offers tested education materials to help our customers know how to recycle correctly. The second solution has to do with investments in technology. In 2018 we had a full year of data/ productivity from our first robot, and by the end of this quarter, we will have three different robots active in our recycling facilities. We are learning a lot about robotics and how great they work alongside our additional investments in the latest screens and optical sorting technology to better improve our material quality. YYjum� I PAGE 154 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 3 Here are some video highlights showing how we're tackling education programs and technology investments. E Education /Technology video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxmNRTOjEN4he) Closing We know we must invest in recycling education programs —we know we must work together as an industry to resolve contamination issues and other issues that are impacting recycling programs. We know that Waste Management can't solve these issues alone - we have to educate the wish-cyclers and work alongside manufacturers, municipalities, customers, and end users. The technology advancements that we are seeing today on the recycling side are impressive. We have a vision for our future recycling facilities to use data combined with technology to process material more accurately and efficiently than ever before. Not just today's stream, but technology that can handle material in future streams. Technology that can change and adjust as materials in the stream evolve over time. Technology that sorts each targeted material into separate categories. We call this "positive sorting" and it will ensure that our end markets receive material that is free of any contamination levels. That vision and concept of our new Material Recycling Facility or MRF, was presented to Waste Management senior leaders last year, who approved it whole-heartedly. The concept is now an active project with a building purchased and equipment arriving daily. We are excited to put all these pieces together and expect to have a running system by the end of this year —no longer the MRF of the future, but the MRF of today. As the nation's largest residential recycler, we continue to look for technology to advance processing of recycled materials and invest in great education programs. Technology and education programs that will tell my mother (and all wish-cyclers) that Christmas lights and bowling balls never belong in the recycling cart! Resources for Recycling Industry News Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° (RecycleOftenRecycle Rig ht.com) WasteDive (wastedive.com) Waste360 (waste360.com) Resource Recycling (resource-recycling.com) WasteToday (wastetodaymagazine.com) Learn more: Sustainability Forum presentation by Brent Bell, Vice President Recycling Operations WM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKgJOI ul FHI&feature=youtu.be (this video is 24:50 in length) Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 155 ATTACHMENT 3 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 156 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 4 Attachment 4: WM and the City of Newcastle Aligning Cart Color Standards Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 157 �IYJtJ1�. ATTACHMENT 4 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 158 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 4 WM and the City of Newcastle Aligning Cart Color Standards February 2O19 Project Overview In March of 2019, the City of Newcastle and Waste Management entered into a new long-term collection contract for solid waste and recycling services. One element of the contract included switching garbage and yard waste cart colors to align with surrounding cities and King County. The goal of this change was to ease the transition for any new resident moving to Newcastle and reduce confusion in the services currently provided. The delivery and removal were managed by WM's public sector and operations staff and the work was carried out by WasteRec, a third party. Implementation Plan Minimizing customer and driver confusion was the most important aspect of this implementation. To achieve this goal, our team developed a strategic plan that included multiple methods to communicate the upcoming change. The successful methods included: Internal Stakeholder Meetings Our implementation team consisted of operations, contract compliance, communications, public education and outreach as well as customer service. Weekly meetings, during a two -month time period, were held leading up to the implementation. During these meetings we ensured processes, deadlines, and expectations were clearly communicated to mitigate any impacts to both the city and the customer. An internal Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document was developed to educate PNW call center staff on the implementation process and to provide talking points to effectively answer implementation questions, especially surrounding the cart swap. External Stakeholder Meetings Waste Management regularly met and coordinated with Newcastle city staff throughout the implementation phase. Meetings were designed to update the city on WM's progress, address any concerns or questions, and collaborate on effective messaging to community residents. One effective tool WM provided to city staff was an external FAQ document that was utilized as an educational tool empowering staff to field questions from community members and keeping elected officials aware of our progress. Residential Mailing With the new changes to the contract, both WM and the City decided to send the annual residential mailing right before the launch of the new contract. This allowed the opportunity to introduce and explain the service enhancements, which included the cart color swap. During the design phase we made sure all cart icons were labeled properly and showed the new cart colors. We also utilized many forms of call -out or notification boxes to draw attention to the message. W YOUR NEWCASTLE Now Recycling uor.IC. far Guide Inside side 0 YMPj%QPP ft[YQIWL WA Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 159 ATTACHMENT 4 �- Gty of Nexcaetle Ail'. ::.......,..::..� Waste Management has asked us to share These answers to FAQs they've received about the new bins and services starting in 12-71, this March Forany other questions pleasecontact Waste Management at or I ,:1*1) 09 Oil 01 These are your new carts[ New services from WM will be available to all Newcastle residents starting March 4. This includes new garbage and yard waste carts, cart color changes, year-round yard waste service, solar compacting public litter stations and more! Learn more here = bit.ly/2Sjflyg Social Media & Website Updates Updates on the WM website, WM and City social media platforms were very important in delivering information to the community. WM developed multiple posts and tweets enabling City staff to quickly post on to their website and social media channels. This provided an easy to use resource for the City to utilize in gettting information out to residents in a timely manner. These platforms also allowed WM and the City to answer questions and calm concerns regarding the changes. Cart Decals & Hangers Once the new carts were received we used decals and tags to further the color swap messaging. In addition to the standard "what goes in the cart" decal we added a second decal on the cart lid. This decal read "GARBAGE" or "FOOD & YARD WASTE" in big block letters. The intention was to draw both the resident and driver's attention to the contents that belonged in the new colored cart. The final element of our 00 0 communications effort was placing a hanger on the handle of each new cart delivered. While temporary, the hanger messaging provided a reminder about the cart color change and informed residents they could begin using their new carts right away. This was placed directly on the cart handle where we believed it would be most visible to residents. FOOD &YARD WASTE 0]voil Your c ,'L o: ,,ws are changing! Please becpn us" your new gray cart far gartQV and your new green cart Nx yard waste, if p!ni have any q« „5Lon5, rg" Waste a ;r nl at- 1-sal}-s92-es9s .�a.,.. Driver Training Along with residents, WM drivers needed to be properly trained to manage the new cart color change. Route managers worked in both group settings and one-on-one with drivers to ensure they understood the changes, timeline and methods in providing further feedback to customers. The most effective training took place in driver launches. These launches are quick, 5-minute meetings, used to convey safety messages, operational changes and allow WM route managers to address driver's questions in real time. Results Successful cart delivery and removal quantities were provided to WM daily by WasteRec throughout the implementation. This provided a level of confidence and accountability that WM was able to share with city staff. By the end of the three-week implementation approximately 6,500 garbage and yard waste carts were delivered and 4,250 were removed. The difference is due to no removal of personal cans and adding yard waste carts. During the first week of new services, our operations team was able to determine that the color swap for garbage and yard waste carts was a success. We interviewed each driver that serviced the City of Newcastle during the week and all reported very high complying usage of the new carts. Yard waste drivers noticed very little, if any, garbage in their trucks which validated our communication strategy was effective. Any customer that appeared to not have made the change was left a friendly reminder via the same cart hanger used during delivery. We are happy with the result of the service enhancement and believe this strategy will work well in other communities WM partners with. v�Jrli. I PAGE 160 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 5 Attachment 5: WM: Innovators and Leaders in Waste Prevention and Recycling Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 161 wYJM, ATTACHMENT 5 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 162 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 5 WM: Innovators and Leaders in Waste Prevention and Recycling Cities across the Pacific Northwest partner with Waste Management to achieve sustainability goals, such as increasing recycling while reducing contamination. Our Public Education and Outreach team has extensive experience developing innovative, award -winning recycling education and outreach programs to help cities achieve their respective goals. As innovators and leaders in our field, we bring this knowledge and research to all the cities we serve. We drive towards results and are committed to helping our city partners reach sustainability goals in whatever way we can with the talented and dedicated professionals we employ. Award -Winning Public Education Team Our strength is truly in our people. WM's Public Education and Outreach team members are not just industry experts —they share a passion for environmental sustainability and community engagement to help residents and businesses overcome barriers to recycling and composting. Our partners at King County, City of Seattle and other local jurisdictions say it best: WM team members are professional, accountable and industry experts. Our team members understand recycling, compostables and garbage collection are critical municipal services that contribute to a community's overall well-being. They know that education alone doesn't increase recycling. As part of their outreach to businesses and multifamily properties, they provide technical advice and assistance in right -sizing containers. They share tools for employees and residents to increase recycling, waste reduction and waste prevention. Our process is simple yet effective. We focus on engaging customers, ensuring efficient collection and continuing to invest in technologies that improve our industry. Our Public Education and Outreach team members are multidisciplinary, and have experience working with new and existing customers. Acting on our foundation of service excellence, safety and professionalism, they coordinate efforts to align with cities' goals and aspirations. Our team structure allows for collaboration and encourages forward -looking solutions. What's more, our staff members truly "walk the talk" in their daily lives, and are excited to share their knowledge, passion and expertise with the communities we serve. PAGE 163 MUM, ATTACHMENT 5 Experts in Community Based Social Marketing A key tool in building our successful programs is Community Based Social Marketing (CBSM). CBSM uses the latest research in behavior change, which examines motivators and ctics that are proven to be effective. Social science researchers have learned that awareness and education alone do not lead to behavior change. People do not change their behaviors because it is "the right thing to do." People change their behaviors when the benefit to them outweighs the barriers. We overcome barriers by using incentives, direct outreach and simple messages. Our Public Education team members are trained in CBSM, and we infuse it into all our outreach programs. Whether incorporating messages that encourage recycling behaviors into our marketing and education materials, or providing tools for multifamily residents to recycle, our work is based on the principles of CBSM. Most notably, our experience includes the development of a 2013 customer recycling behavior study in King County and Snohomish County. The study yielded several key findings that WM now uses in developing behavior change tools for other partner communities. The results are impressive; our programs have yielded significant recycling diversion. The WM Public Education and Outreach team Recycling Behavior Study — The Foundation of WM's Outreach Programs The WM Behavior Study provided foundational information that our team now uses to help partner cities change recycling behaviors in their communities. In partnership with King County and Snohomish County staff, WM designed and conducted this research project to determine the barriers and benefits to recycling specific materials, and to better understand garbage and recycling behaviors with the goal of increasing recycling. The 2013 study yielded key findings that WM now uses in the development of CBSM initiatives. The study focused mostly on resources and outlets customers use if they have a question about recycling, and the biggest recycling challenges, especially plastics. While the study gave WM a deep understanding of how social and behavioral trends impact recycling, we constantly review and adapt to demographic changes in the communities we serve. To learn more about this study and our other Revenue Sharing Agreement work with King and Snohomish Counties, please visit wmnorthwest.com. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 164 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 5 WM Recycle Corps Internship Program The WM Recycle Corps internship program, now in its seventh year, is a big part of WM's community outreach throughout the Puget Sound. Trained by WM recycling educators, the WM Recycle Corps interns work with businesses, multifamily properties and residents in 26 cities across two counties to improve recycling habits and reduce waste. WM Recycle Corps is not only valuable for communities, it is a recognized program within the industry, and has earned awards from the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) for both education and innovation. The program has become an incubator for the green industry. WM Recycle Corps Puget Sound Commercial and Multifamily Outreach Each year, WM Recycle Corps reaches over 6,000 businesses and multifamily properties throughout the Puget Sound. 1° It 4DSince 2014, nearly 50% of WM Recycle Corps alumni have begun working as professionals in the industry for private companies, the public sector, and consulting firms. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 165 ATTACHMENT 5 Multifamily Expertise Our Public Education and Outreach team is knowledgeable about the challenges and complexities of multifamily engagement. With an approach grounded in behavior change, social inclusion and service equity, WM recommends tackling multifamily recycling through a multipronged approach that includes social media campaigns, on -site technical assistance, and resident education and engagement Successful multifamily recycling programs rely on a supportive infrastructure that makes it easy for residents to participate. Research and pilot programs supported by WM have identified The Three Cs of a successful multifamily recycling program: Convenience, Clarity and Capacity. Our experienced team provides resources and information for property managers as well as outreach and technical assistance to improve recycling infrastructure and enhance tenant education. Examples of technical assistance recommendations may include: Adding recycling containers or pickup days to increase recycling collection capacity Rearranging or adding containers to ensure proximity of recycling, compost and garbage containers Multicultural Outreach Adding container labels and posters recycling, compost and garbage Reducing the size or number of garbage containers to eliminate excess garbage capacity and make space for recycling and compost containers WM is a leader in providing culturally relevant recycling education, and is experienced in the research and development of tools proven to increase recycling and reduce contamination. For Puget Sound's diverse communities, we go beyond translating materials. Instead, we delve into cultures to find relevant products and popular symbols,then we transcreate a system unique to each community. Our list of transcreated guidelines is ever-expanding, and currently includes Amharic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Russian, Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese. Examples of our fliers can be found in the Sample Materials section of our proposal. Our work in multicultural outreach and education includes the WM Recycle Corps internship program. Each year, we recruit interns from diverse communities to reach residents of various languages and cultures. WM Recycle Corps 2017 was our most diverse class to date with language abilities in Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese and Vietnamnese. WM Recycle Corps 2018 was also diverse with many interns speaking Spanish. v�Jrli. PAGE 166 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 5 WM continues our research to better understand recycling behaviors and the effectiveness of different outreach methods, based on language Papel ques 'Yeas proficiency and ethnicity. We conducted a to blanca pureza. first -of -its -kind study to learn how to best Er-p..m Eres dibujo de nietas. educate the Spanish-speaking Latino community Avicn y barquito. in Snohomish County. The study used CBSM to MBecara de princeaaa. PapeL me dueie reciclarte. identify the best outreach methods to encourage iEres ii fancia de mis nenasl recycling at home. By examining barriers, and Pero s2 que lgual han de gozarte the benefits based on their survey responses, otras manitas ajenas. - Maria de Lourdes Vlctorta WM determined that in language direct mail, digital and TV advertising were the most effective tactics to produce behavior change. Using this reasearch, we created the Oda al reciclaje or Ode to Recyclables campaign which features local poetry, art and music to highlight the value of recycling and which items can be recycled. Our team brings this wealth of research, experience and knowledgeto all our partner cities. 4 A[F_ .., Thought Leadership: Shifting Perspective, Changing Goals As a society, our waste stream is changing. For example, we're seeing more —and _ more complex —plastics and less paper. In the past decade, there's been a great deal of focus on often costly, sometimes abstract and frequently difficult -to -achieve weight -based goals. Recycling is important, but reducing environmental V l impacts is even more important. As thought leaders, the WM team believes that recycling is a worthwhile goal, but waste reduction is even better. WM embraces Sustainable Materials Management (SMM), which advocates decisions based on the entire life cycle of materials, as well as collaborative and integrative approaches to problem solving. Life cycle thinking encourages the least costly and most beneficial system improvement. Our data driven approach includes analyzing materials, management strategies and prioritizing our efforts based on the highest environmental benefits. Through our research and analysis, and with the application of life cycle thinking concepts, WM is better positioned to help customers develop waste programs and solutions that focus on their ultimate goal of achieving maximum reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the most cost-effective manner. National Programs with Local Impact Recycle Often. Recycle Rights' To keep recycling viable, we are addressing contamination on both the local and national scale. The Recycle Often. Recycle Right. sM education and outreach program is a first for the industry, and is designed to be flexible, adaptable and customizable. The campaign takes a back -to -basics approach by focusing the message on three key behaviors: Recycling empty bottles, cans and paper 24S Keeping food and liquids out of recycling Keeping loose plastic bags out of recycling Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 167 �IYJtJ1�. ATTACHMENT 5 This research -based program promotes the basics of recycling by simplifying guidelines and empowering everyone to become a recycling ambassador. Our site www.RecycleOftenRecycleRight.com_includes recycling curriculum that can be downloaded by educators, city staff and members of the community. When residents simply follow the three key rules, there is a dramatic decrease in contamination and increase in recycling volumes in our communities. These simple messages have been incorporated into all educational materials to ensure a consistent message is communicated effectively to customers. One in every five people who make the promise to Recycle Often. Recycle Right.s" interacts with the popular Recycling Myths feature, which allows site visitors to discover whether an item may be recycled in their curbside containers. They also get expert tips for disposal. Awards and Recognition F'Vr 2015 SWANA Gold Excellence Award for Education and Innovation: SWUA SWAKA.dr WM Recycle Corps The WM Recycle Corps collegiate summer internship program is not only valued by communities, but also by the industry. This unique approach to recycling education earned recognition from the Solid Waste Association of North American (SWANA) in both the education and innovation categories in 2015. 2017 SWANA Silver Excellence Award for Educational Program: SWANa 'SWANA.urg Youth Education Program Our innovative waste reduction and recycling outreach programs for elementary and middle schools in Snohomish County include a schoolwide theatrical assembly show, individual classroom workshops, customized technical assistance, action project assistance and family outreach booths. By providing a full range of educational and technical assistance, WM helps teachers deliver the important message to reduce and recycle. VjM r 2018 WSRA Recycler of the Year Award: , m� .- ,�a„,d" Multicultural Engagement WM is committed to engaging the diverse communities that we serve. To reach multicultural residents, WM employs a multi -pronged approach that includes innovative studies and programs, community events and direct outreach to businesses, multifamily properties and residents. �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 168 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 6 Attachment 6: WM RSA: Collaborate. Innovate. Repeat. Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 169 WJ,M, ATTACHMENT 6 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 170 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 6 WM RSA: Collaborate. Innovate. Repeat, Waste Management participates in an annual Recycling and Commodity Revenue Sharing Agreement (RSA) with Snohomish County and King County, a program unique to service areas that are regulated by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC). A portion of revenues from the sale of curbside and multifamily collected recyclables are used every year to develop and deploy projects, programs and campaigns aimed at increasing curbside recycling and composting, and decreasing contamination through public education. However, this is not your average public education program. The RSA has become WM's breeding ground for innovative, award -winning research and outreach strategies that change recycling behaviors for good. It's the place where we brush aside business -as -usual thinking and dig deep to uncover how to reach customers in ways they haven't been reached before. Whether it's knocking on doors at apartment buildings, pumping up a room full of elementary school students or engaging with Latino households, we are leading the way by pushing boundaries every year and applying our learnings along the way. No other company is making this magnitude of an investment in developing, testing, and implementing waste reduction outreach strategies that stand out and reach audiences who have historically been deemed "hard to reach." As a result, RSA projects help inform and inspire public education efforts across the many communities that WM and its partners serve. "Collaborators and innovators... the Waste Management team is a true partner and has helped make King County a leader at the regional and national level." -Gerty Coville, Program Manager King County Solid Waste Division What seeds this breeding ground for effective outreach? Our set of guiding principles: Collaborate. Waste Management believes the best ideas come when we listen, share ideas, and leverage the experience and expertise of our municipal partners. We work together each year to set goals and priorities, and devise strategies together that map to those goals. Research is our Compass. At the onset of a new challenge, we always ask 'do we know what it will take to move our customers to action?' and 'what is holding them back?' If we don't know, we don't guess. We research instead — customer surveys, focus groups and pilots. Strategy Grounded in Behavior Change Theory. Our education strategy is rooted in the theory of behavior change. WM uses social marketing principles to build every campaign, making sure we prioritize the most impactful behavior, understand the barriers our customers face in changing that behavior, and know what is most likely to motivate them to change. We are rigorous and follow every step of a successful social marketing process. Even when there are ten of them. Culturally Competent Program Design. The demographics of the communities we serve are rapidly changing and becoming ever more diverse. We know there's no such thing as a "one size fits all" when it comes to public education. WM is committed to building outreach programs for diverse audiences that take into account each Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 171 �IYJtJ1�. ATTACHMENT 6 community's unique barriers to recycling more, and taps into the messages and tactics that will best resonate and motivate them to take action. nnovate, Innovate, Innovate. Through the RSA, the WM team works with our partners to think outside the box of bill stuffers or dense recycling guides, and consider new and unexpected ways of engaging with customers. We devise campaigns with multiple touchpoints so that our audience engages with us where they live, work and play. These guiding principles are at the heart of every RSA project, spanning a variety of areas, including organics diversion, multifamily recycling, youth education and outreach to multicultural populations. Organics Diversion The RSA has been the testing ground for a variety of strategies to increase food scrap diversion curbside and raise awareness of the composting loop that takes scraps from kitchen to garden. Over the last five years, WM has built a strong community of "Foodcyclers" who have pledged to compost food at home, and have been given tools to help them be successful. Events with local chefs in supermarkets demonstrated how easy composting can be, and innovative ideas like Produce Sticker Trading Cards promoted keeping contaminants out of the compost feedstock. Food scrap collection incentive pilot >> "Scrap Happy Kitchen" chef demo events Food scrap collection PR/marketing campaign o Keep Compost O'Natural produce sticker Door-to-door outreach and educational trading card promotion campaign to increase yard waste subscription >> Compost to farm trials and deliveries rates >> Door-to-door kitchen food scrap container Compost Days partnership promoting retail and delivery pilot bulk sales of compost >> Cart tagging pilot regional partnership "All You Can Shovel" customer appreciation >> Organics contamination work group pilot events at Cedar Grove facilities "I'm a Foodcycler!" campaign and pledge program Multicultural Outreach It's not enough to simply translate education materials. WM is committed to designing and transcreating outreach programs for diverse communities that not only address language barriers but also employ community -specific messages and outreach tactics that are proven to resonate. Since 2012, WM has transcreated more than 50 recycling information pieces for eight language communities. We even created a viral recycling jingle. In 2016, the RSA supported a Latino household recycling pilot that tested the effectiveness of strategies including text message recycling tips, media advertising, door-to-door and direct mail. WM also engages with Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean and Spanish-speaking residents at cultural events and ethnic grocery stores around the region. Examples of multicultural outreach include: Pilot Measuring Behavior Change and Testing the Effectiveness of Outreach Strategies among Latino Audience Multicultural event outreach in four languages Transcreated recycling guides and education materials Door-to-door outreach to multicultural multifamily residents Spanish language outreach campaign Spanish language door-to-door outreach pilot for Latino multifamily residents �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 172 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 6 Community Outreach WM's award -winning Recycle Corps program takes community outreach to the next level. Each year a fresh crop of interns are provided extensive training in order to provide one-to-one recycling and composting education in the community. Since 2012, the WM Recycle Corps interns have educated residents in multiple languages at more than 300 community events throughout the Puget Sound. Schools Outreach Through the RSA collaboration, WM has developed a SWANA-award-winning waste reduction and recycling outreach program for elementary and middle schools, now in its fifth year. In 2016 alone, we reached nearly 40,000 students at 63 schools, providing 49 assemblies, 220 classroom workshops, and in-depth technical assistance to 25 schools. Multifamily Several RSA research and pilot programs have helped crack the code for better multifamily recycling, including identifying "The Three Cs" as key features of a strong program: Convenience, Clarity, and Capacity. These features help optimize recycling infrastructure and increase tenant engagement. In implementing The Three Cs, the WM team has been on the ground at countless multifamily complexes, working with property managers and engaging with residents in 8 different languages one door knock at a time. "WM Recycling All Stars" program with property manager toolkit and recognition program Washington State Recycling Association multifamily recycling study group Research Multifamily recycling assistance pilot projects Door-to-door pilots for tenant education and property manager technical assistance Review of Waste Management multifamily programs in North America RSA projects have run the gamut from usability and message testing for materials, to pilots to determine the most effective outreach strategies before a larger campaign implementation. The largest research effort to date was in 2013 when Waste Management and its partners conducted a comprehensive recycling behavior study to determine the barriers and benefits to recycling specific materials. The study, a first -of -its kind in the U.S., paired curbside cart audits with door-to-door resident interviews, aimed at identifying disconnects between beliefs/knowledge and actual behaviors. Follow-up focus groups with residents allowed for an even deeper dive into the barriers and motivations for recycling and composting more. Recycling Behavior Study Studies to identify solutions for expanding recycling opportunities in public spaces Service level study International study of multifamily programs and strategies Recycling incentive program pilot Recycling harmonization research and analysis Latino Recycling Behavior Study Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 173 ATTACHMENT 6 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 174 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 7 Attachment 7: An Easy -to -Understand Invoice Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services PAGE 175 wYJM, ATTACHMENT 7 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK �IrJ�Ju. PAGE 176 Federal Way Solid Waste Collection Services ATTACHMENT 7 An easy -to -understand invoice Im Okaw t of 2 CustomerID: 2-82290-00885 wwiTt MAS4A1[MfCM• custx-cr Nana HU 'ONfFl UNcc Fvaa1 1LNf rf.occ natc t! 1 macrNu""r 97635 1S6 4 '�'���'IyIyIIII �IIIVIIIMVOWOVRiiIW��� - _- ® i f mN Visitwm.com August 19, $124.73 tc :a u: y. �•rr^ rcri: .: x 2017 if payment ed .ftn f38119l2128.60 d TicJunna= Jun a in ammil '"yyW�°°"° r a}urt 7v u °'°''" ^�' SIMPLE GUIDE TO YOUR INVOICE , .. -J>g imix ubJ ;plc W -gfiQ a �365)OOO-44 i8 ='J'- (FRONT) Fre�'OLS Balance PJ7 TIFS 4dl3stfnerlt: _JrrerC' ct rges Tut-1 E-Le� + + f9712 - - 12473 124.73 O Customer ID Unique identifier for your account+ [.I. nck.1 ; t, And nt f c^z- Billing Period �, no oa aca Shows the billing cycle dates for this invoice. VVM raw �rrr�+ ItLISTS YNMaIOIt �• t+x cr.�u 9'H:LIp K P,1:! �e.•. s.w i,5.we.s W M CUSTOMER 3I T 3ACKSON STREET STOCKTON CA OS20S vlrr owre+.ro n.H ►r kr Nss.,.n 4 ... �.�, can .4rwJ ......... - . Elf: 1,07 O 'cfy �u¢by CQl13,i 1T r ccr+ac Yta OQ! 13,E 1 T 436358911564 BOt-007645&2 S':4 ]3 S 176.60 Ct18t73i440199 S8�7i'i 39394�59lVTd849�TS7 tb o��o 11,3:�t. � gSS74/i S THINK GREEN. WASTE MANAGIE EMr OO BOK 43S30 RIOOM.AZ BS 127 Contact Information We're always here to help, either online or by phone. What Do I Owe and When Quickly see the total and when it is due Account Overview © A quick summary ofyour monthly charges. A full breakdown is in the details section below. Detailed Account Activity OInformation by service location, including all services, credits, and additional charges Payment Coupon O If paying by mail, this is the portion of your n.. paper invoice you return with payment. .wrr• .. 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Set Up Automatic Payments Sign up for our automatic payment service for a convenient way to establish recurring payments on your account. _..' AXOTUC Irayrnat swan: i 7Jitixtr'' Wr2a.V atagaran t0 pay my tvn- r tty aac,mc2ly :xxtrrq ^may fral my bwk a=otlft- I of cax;S sfnnnr:tcn by rccryng'A=a ..Vza3Crrari at n••rt mn or ty c7ane ttn ar�arfar tarv� rutn9a tstm a rry �rvom vows ar7l-sar[ ¢Jo .7k¢ ! arg cy-m rxAAMUc%VMVt. to mraract c rt,-w tc=".. p7ytran it t zgn are Cr ymf v oca reflect, tta' yar Wy"tat wil to daMiaut _VSa I aaYAcmunt y+Ddar Syt"C I I .. ... anrl�'.rYtc.rb aar bo al:vr bW fa yar zca/2!>frsrn rYCJQ aeratlw Vas :rrn 3�Evsa>w Na n u.�,a ac rt..par.:>bi>!c:n.:fiatum,fz sA �.. .>.,e.rvr.rc>aatan � a frata..-rrl e,a a�a _>.>atl,.t, ::arr ansevaar uyr!>n.�wn �a.ai e.frmaa:ya, ur.Aa->nra��.as>.ers.�aa�r...gp.n�ka,.r+.d.a.. r.�>l. 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Monthly Rates Unless Otherwise Specified Service Level Count Pounds Per Unit Disposal Fee Collection Fee Total Service Fee Service Level Monthly One 32 gallon Garbage Cart (met 591 current microcan cost) 612 20.23 S 1.42 $ 17.68 $ 19.10 Weekly Residential Curbside Service Total Garbage Customers: 18376 One 19/20-gallon Garbage Cart 3477 9.25 $ 2.82 $ 21.22 $ 24.04 1 32/35- allon Garbage Cart 7931 16.18 $ 4.94 $ 31.07 S 36.01 1 60/64-gallon Garbage Cart 5039 32.36 $ 9.87 $ 35.86 $ 45.73 1 90/96- allon Garbage Cart 1317 48.54 $ 14.81 $ 43.32 S 58.13 Extras (32 gallon equivalent) 1919 16.18 $ 1.14 $ 4.86 $ 6.00 Miscellaneous Fees: Recycling Only (no garbage service) $ 11.69 Compostables Only (no garbage service) $ 12.88 Extra Compostables (32 gallon bag/bundle/can) $ 3.00 Second 96-Gallon Compostables Cart (rental only) $ 1.50 Additional 96-Gallon Compostables Cart (for ongoing excess above base 96-gallon service) 285 $ 6.00 Return Trip, per line ofbusiness 33 $ 15.00 Roll -out Charge, per 25 ft, per cart 61 $ 3.00 Drive-in Charge, per month, per line of business 11 $ 6.00 Dormant Account (charged past four weeks suspension) per month $ 7.50 Overweight/Oversize container (per /u) $ 3.00 Redelivery of one or more containers 11 AT $ 15.00 Cart Cleaning (per cart per cleaning) 1 $ 10.00 On -Call Bulky Waste Collection Non-CFC Containing Large Appliance ("white goods") per item 1 $ 20.00 Refrigerators/Freezers/Air Conditioners per item 1 $ 5.28 $ 14.72 30.00 $ 20.00 Sofas, Chairs, per item 2 75.00 Mattresses, Boxsprings, per item 2 100.00 S 7.04 $ 12.96 $ 20.00 Weekly Commercial [ME Can and Cart NOTE: Column C is total ME and comm containers. Number in column B in (red) is the portion that are ME One 20-gallon Garbage Cart (23) 27 9.25 $ 2.82 $ 17.21 $ 20.03 1 32/35-gallon Garbage Cart (294) 399 16.18 $ 4.94 $ 17.70 S 22.64 1 60/64-gallon Garbage Cart (6) 60 32.36 $ 9.87 $ 23.91 $ 33.78 1 90/96-gallon Garbage Cart (4) 34 48.54 $ 14.81 $ 30.09 S 44.90 Extras (32-gallon equivalent) (3) 16.18 $ 1.14 $ 4.86 $ 6.00 Emptying Litter & Recyclables receptacles in public areas, per unit, per collection (including lining) tbd 16.18 S 1.14 $ 2.86 S 4.00 Compostables Service: Weekly 35-gal Cart Yard Debris/Foodwaste service 8 $ 11.57 Weekly 64- al Cart Yard Debris/Foodwaste service $ 12.19 Weekly 96-gal Cart Yard Debris/Foodwaste service (29) 58 S 12.88 Ancillary Fees: Return Trip, per line of business $ 15.00 Roll -out Charge, per 25 ft. unit, per cart, per pickup,per week $ 1.50 Redelivery of containers S 10.00 Com ostable lining (per Cart, perpick-up) $ 4.00 Cart Cleaning/Swap (per Cart) $ 10.00 Weekly Commercial/ ME Detachable Container (compacted) 1 Cubic Yard Container 343.59 $ 104.82 $ 305.90 $ 410.72 1.5 Cubic Yard Container 515.39 $ 157.24 $ 400.40 $ 557.64 2 Cubic Yard Container 687.18 $ 209.65 $ 494.90 $ 704.55 3 Cubic Yard Container 1 1,030.77 $ 314.47 $ 683.90 S 998.37 4 Cubic Yard Container 1 1,374.36 $ 419.30 $ 872.90 $ 1,292.20 6 Cubic Yard Container 3 2,061.54 $ 628.95 $ 1,260.88 $ 1,889.83 Commercial Detachable Container (loose) 1 Cubic Yard, 1 pickup/week (1) 91 114.53 $ 34.94 $ 78.47 $ 113.41 1 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week 1 114.53 $ 69.88 $ 156.94 S 226.82 1 Cubic Yard,3 pickups/week 2 114.53 $ 104.82 $ 235.41 S 340.23 1 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 114.53 $ 139.76 $ 313.88 S 453.64 1 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 114.53 $ 174.70 $ 392.35 $ 567.05 1.5 Cubic Yard, 1 pickup/week (2) 24 171.80 $ 52.41 $ 99.53 S 151.94 1.5 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week (1) 1 171.80 $ 104.82 $ 199.06 S 303.88 1.5 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week 171.80 $ 157.23 $ 298.59 S 455.82 1.5 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 171.80 $ 209.64 $ 398.12 S 607.76 1.5 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 171.80 $ 262.05 $ 497.65 S 759.70 2 Cubic Yard, 1 pickups/week (6) 101 229.06 $ 69.88 $ 120.71 $ 190.59 2 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week (13) 21 229.06 $ 139.76 $ 241.42 S 381.18 2 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week (3) 3 229.06 $ 209.64 $ 362.13 $ 571.77 2 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 229.06 $ 279.52 $ 482.84 S 762.36 2 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 2 229.06 $ 349.40 $ 603.55 S 952.95 3 Cubic Yard, 1 pickup/week (20) 85 343.59 $ 104.82 $ 163.59 S 268.41 3 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week (40) 58 343.59 $ 209.64 $ 327.18 S 536.82 3 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week (2) 11 343.59 $ 314.46 $ 490.77 S 805.23 3 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 343.59 $ 419.28 $ 654.36 $ 1,073.64 Page 1 of 3 Federal Way RFP 2019 Form 2 Rate Proposal Proponent: WM of Washington, Inc. Monthly Rates Unless Otherwise Specified Service Level Count Pounds Per Unit Disposal Fee Collection Fee Total Service Fee Service Level 3 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 1 343.59 $ 524.10 S 817.95 $ 1,342.05 4 Cubic Yard, 1 pickup/week (39) 125 458.12 $ 139.77 S 198.69 $ 338.46 4 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week (47) 89 458.12 $ 279.54 $ 397.38 $ 676.92 4 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week (6) 43 458.12 $ 419.31 $ 596.07 $ 1,015.38 4 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week (6) 6 458.12 $ 559.08 $ 794.76 $ 1,353.84 4 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week (1) 6 458.12 $ 698.85 $ 993.45 S 1,692.30 6 Cubic Yard,I pickup/week (19) 69 687.18 $ 209.65 $ 273.88 $ 483.53 6 Cubic Yard, 2 pickups/week (22) 61 687.18 $ 419.30 $ 547.76 $ 967.06 6 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week (5) 21 687.18 $ 628.95 $ 821.64 $ 1,450.59 6 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 2 687.18 $ 838.60 $ 1,095.52 $ 1,934.12 6 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 1 687.18 $ 1,048.25 $ 1,369.40 S 2,417.65 8 Cubic Yard, 1 pickup/week (16) 60 916.24 $ 279.53 $ 331.81 $ 611.34 8 Cubic Yard,2 pickups/week (12) 49 916.24 $ 559.06 $ 663.62 S 1,222.68 8 Cubic Yard, 3 pickups/week (4) 22 916.24 $ 838.59 $ 995.43 S 1,834.02 8 Cubic Yard, 4 pickups/week 2 916.24 $ 1,118.12 $ 1,327.24 S 2,445.36 8 Cubic Yard, 5 pickups/week 3 916.24 $ 1,397.65 $ 1,659.05 $ 3,056.70 Extra loose cubic yard in container, per pickup (83) 125 114.53 $ 8.06 $ 6.94 S 15.00 Extra loose cubic yard on ground, per pickup 114.53 $ 8.06 $ 11.94 $ 20.00 Detachable Container Ancillary Fees (per occurrence): Stand-by Time (per minute) $ $ 1.60 10.00 Container Cleaning (per yard of container size, including transort) Redelivery of Containers S 30.00 Return Trip per line ofbusiness (1) 3 `771 $ 15.00 Service Level (based on pick ups) Daily Rent Monthly Rent Delivery Charge Haul Charge Commercial /MF Drop -box Collection Non -compacted 12 cubic yard Drop -box (0 boxes) $ 1.88 $ 56.40 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Non -compacted 15 cubic yard Drop -box (0 boxes) $ 2.24 $ 67.20 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Non -compacted 20 cubic yard Drop -box (9 boxes) (1) 35 $ 2.67 $ 80.10 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Non -compacted 25 cubic yard Drop -box (1 box) (1) 3 $ 3.08 S 92.40 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Non -compacted 30 cubic yard Drop -box (1 boxes) (1) 10 $ 3.47 $ 104.10 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Non -compacted 40 cubic yard Drop -box (4 boxes) (1) 8 $ 3.84 $ 115.20 $ 91.37 $ 198.41 Compacted 10 cubic yard Drop -box (1 boxes) 0.3 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 15 cubic yard Drop -box (7 boxes) 10 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 20 cubic yard Drop -box (3 boxes) 3 %� $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 25 cubic yard Drop -box (4 boxes) 15 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 30 cubic yard Drop -box (16 boxes) 23 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 35 cubic yard Drop -box (3 boxes) 10 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Compacted 40 cubic yard Drop -box (10 boxes) 9 $ 91.37 $ 240.82 Drop -box Ancillary Fees Per Event Return Trip $ 30.00 Stand-by Time (per minute) $ 1.60 Container cleaning (per yard of container size) Solid Lid Surcharge (per month of rental) $ $ 10.00 20.00 Drop -box directed to other facility (per mile, one-way) $ 3.75 Service Level Pounds Per Unit Disposal Fee Collection Fee Haul Charge Temporary Collection Hauling 2 Yard detachable Container 2 229.06 $ 69.88 $ 150.89 $ 220.77 4 Yard detachable Container 2 458.12 $ 139.77 $ 248.36 $ 388.13 6 Yard detachable Container 2 687.18 $ 209.65 $ 342.35 $ 552.00 8 Yard detachable Container 2 916.24 $ 279.53 $ 414.76 $ 694.29 Non -compacted 10 cubic yard Drop -box-. S 234.55 Non -compacted 20 cubic yard Drop -box (4 boxes) 11 S 234.55 Non -compacted 25 cubic yard Drop -box S 234.55 Non -compacted 30 cubic yard Drop -box (16 boxes) (I I MF) 15 $ 234.55 Non -compacted 40 cubic yard Drop -box (5 boxes) (3 MF) 11 $ 234.55 Service Level Delivery Fee Daily Rental Monthly Rental 2 Yard detachable container $ 91.37 $ 1.30 $ 39.00 Temporary Collection 4 Yard detachable container $ 91.37 $ 1.45 $ 43.50 6 Yard detachable container $ 91.37 $ 1.80 $ 54.00 Container Rental and Delivery 8 Yard detachable container $ 91.37 $ 2.00 $ 60.00 Non -compacted 10 cubic yard Drop -box $ 91.37 $ 2.35 $ 70.50 Non -compacted 20 cubic yard Drop -box j S 91.37 $ 3.34 $ 100.20 Non -compacted 30 cubic yard Drop -box ! $ 91.37 $ 4.34 $ 130.20 Non -compacted 40 cubic yard Drop -box $ 91.37 $ 4.80 $ 144.00 Page 2 of 3 Federal Way RFP 2019 Form 2 Rate Proposal Proponent: WM of Washington, Inc. Monthly Rates Unless Otherwise Specified Service Level Count Pounds Per Unit Disposal Fee Collection Fee Total Service Fee Service Level Event Services Per Da Delivery, provision, collection of a set of 3 carts (G, R &C) $ 25.00 Hourly Rates Service Per Hour Rear/Side-load packer+driver $ 145.28 Front -load packer +driver $ 145.28 Drop -box Truck + driver $ 145.28 Additional Labor (per person) S 78.95 Commodity Value Initial Year Recyclable Commodity Value, per ton 10,000 S 54.07 Proposal Alternatives (1) Every -other -week Single -Family Recyclables Collection $ (3.05) Per month decrease in garbage rate per SF customer (2) Non -embedded Compostables Collection: Amount removed from Single -Family Garbage Rates $ (9.48) Per month decrease in garbage rate per SF customer Subscription rate for one 32-gallon Compostables Cart $ 10.53 Per month Subscription rate for one 64-gallon Compostables Cart $ 11.04 Per month Subscription rate for one 96-gallon Compostables Cart $ 11.59 Per month (3) Mandatory Collection S 0.47 Per mo increase or decrease in garbage rate per SF customer (4) Relaxed Collection Vehicle Standard S - Annual increase or decrease to revenue requirement (5) Expanded Commercial Recycling S 2.61 Per month increase per cubic yard of garbage collected (6) City Billing Agent Alternative S (63,573) Annual increase or decrease to revenue requirement (7) Alternative Service Fee Escalation Component - WST $ (006,119) Annual increase or decrease to revenue requirement (8) Alternative Service Fee Escalation Component - 3.5% $ (340,132) Annual increase or decrease to revenue requirement (9) Quarterly Single -Family Billing I S (1.08) jPer mo increase or decrease in garbage rate per SF customer Page 3 of 3 Excerpt of WUTC Filings Dated 11/15/17 and 11/15/18 Per WM MRF Per Recycling Market Index King Countv Average Average Revenue Revenue Tonnage Revenue per Ton Revenue per Ton 2017 Filing Oct; 2016 4,860.15 $ 386,327 $ 79.49 $ 362,753 $ 74.64 Nov 5,396.37 $ 471,389 $ 8735 $ 409,492 $ 75.88 Dec 5,092.39 $ 479,154 $ 94.09 $ 402,886 $ 79.12 Jan. 2017 4,651.23 $ 502,397 $ 108.01 $ 392,316 $ 84.35 Feb 3,673.69 $ 398,563 $ 108.49 $ 311,446 $ 84.78 Mar 4,437.30 $ 538,251 $ 121.30 $ 381,905 $ 86.07 Apr 3,801.72 $ 299,669 $ 78.82 $ 288,965 $ 76.01 May 4,498.71 $ 368,443 $ 81.90 $ 348,063 $ 77.37 Jun 4,281.10 $ 434,278 $ 101.44 $ 369,870 $ 8640 Jul 4,045.63 $ 448,074 $ 110.76 $ 367,757 $ 90.90 Aug 4,126.32 $ 420,011 $ 101.79 $ 362,491 $ 87.85 Sep 4,02654 $ 301.074 $ 74.77 $ 274,666 $ 6821 62,891.15 $ 5.047,631 $ 95.43 $ 4,272,609 $ 80.78 2018 Filing Oct, 2017 4,069.73 $ 216,160 $ 53.11 $ 146,949 $ 36.11 Nov 4,314.06 $ 293,293 $ 67.99 $ 200,330 $ 46.44 Dec 4,319.19 $ 342,805 $ 79.37 $ 217,371 S 50.33 Jan., 2018 4,786.07 $ 281,426 $ 58.80 $ 238,079 S 49.74 Feb 3,286 95 $ 182,386 $ 55.49 $ 154,461 S 46,99 Mar 3,845.38 $ 155,644 $ 4048 $ 180,324 S 46.89 Apr 3,820.85 $ 191,280 $ 50.06 $ 129,890 S 34.00 May 3,554.52 $ 205,546 $ 57.83 $ 146,320 $ 41.16 Jun 3,856.72 $ 92,327 $ 23.94 $ 121,284 S 31.45 Jul 3,878 63 $ 114,254 $ 29.46 $ 134,563 S 34.69 Aug 4,136.64 $ 147,972 $ 35.77 $ 165,198 $ 3994 Sep 3,643.40 $ 153,182 $ 42,04 $ 135,943 $ 37.31 47,512.14 $ 2,376,277 $ 50.01 $ 1,970,712 5 41.48 Change (5,379.01) $ (2,671,354) $ (45.421 $ (39.30 % Change -10.20 -47.§S :48 Initial Commodity Rebate ($54.071ton as converted to an amount per customer) $ 1.00 5 1.00 Revised Commodity Rebate (example) 5 0.52 $ 0.51 When the first adjustment to the contract occurs in January 1, 2022 it will measure the change in the commodity values from the 12 month periods ending 9/30/2020 versus 9/30/21. The percentage change would be applied to the initial commodity rate submitted in Form 2 Subsequent adjustments will follow the same process CHANGE IS INEVITABLE. MANAGED WELL, IT RESULTS IN PROGRESS. w BY CHOOSING TO DRIVE THIS PROCESS, WE HELP ENSURE CHANGE FOR THE BETTY BETV COMPANY CEOMessage...............................................2 Waste Management At -A -Glance ..............5 Mix of Service................................................6 Goals & Progress.........................................7 Economic Impact.......................................13 Awards & Recognition...............................15 Reporting & Materiality .............................17 BETTrr SOLUTIONS Overview......................................................22 Waste Reduction.........................................25 Recycling.....................................................28 Organics......................................................37 Waste -Based Energy.................................43 Investments & Innovation .........................47 Hard -to -Handle Materials .........................50 Consultative and Customized Approach.. 53 Waste Management Phoenix Open .......... 63 Recycling Partnerships .............................68 BETS OPERATIONS Safe Landfills..............................................70 Energy Conservation..................................77 Carbon Footprint & Strategy.....................79 Fleet............................................................. 84 Water Conservation...................................90 __ � . �, s WORKFORCE Our Workforce............................................93 Diversity & Inclusion..................................94 Engagement & Retention ..........................98 Talent Management.................................102 Safety.........................................................103 Security.....................................................109 Training......................................................111 1a]II(W 1LILIJUZIIIIV Local Communities..................................116 Environmental Preservation ...................118 Public Education......................................122 Community Vitality...................................125 Charitable Donations...............................129 Disaster Relief..........................................131 Stakeholder Engagement on National Issues...................................133 APPENDIX Company...................................................137 Operations .................................................157 Workforce..................................................186 Communities............................................196 w ' II j 9 THOUGHTFUL, FOCUSED AND F AMID A CHANGING INDUSTRY. IN THIS SECTION CEO Message...................................2 Waste Management At -A -Glance ... 5 Mix of Service..................................6 Goals & Progress ............................7 Economic Impact ...........................13 Awards & Recognition ...................15 Reporting & Materiality ................17 Jim Fish President and Chief Executive Officer The world is changing more rapidly than ever. To sustain and succeed in the face of this change requires agility, adaptability and, above all, a resilient spirit. We see these qualities tested and proven countless times daily by our employees who manage the environmental needs of our customers. And in 2017, we found these qualities tested as our organization managed — and prevailed over — challenges, including a series of natural disasters and a seismic change in the recycling industry. Waste Management's resilience has enabled us to adapt and propel our business forward. Uniting in the Face of Natural Disaster In the summer of 2017, we were humbled by nature's wrath in Texas and Florida where we have thousands of employees, millions of customers, and extensive operations. Then, fires and floods in the Western U.S. and Canada further tested the relationship between our communities and Mother Nature. As these disasters disrupted lives and businesses, resiliency, community and mutual support were headliners as our company and our neighbors came together. Waste Management's resilience has Fortunately, no Waste Management employees were injured in enabled us to adapt and propel our hurricanes Harvey and Irma, but many were affected by damage. Our strategy was simple: take care of employees first and then business forward. help customers. In Texas, and in particular Houston where our corporate offices are located, the storm impacted every employee in some way and displaced 135 of them with their families. Yet, within a week, we were back on the streets of Houston providing vital environmental services. The story was similar in Florida, where hurricane Irma destroyed several of our facilities in Key West, but we were back on the streets in most parts of the state within 48 hours of the storm. Again, we were grateful that all employees were safe, though 260 of them needed assistance from our Employees Care Fund. I could not have been prouder of our employees' response to each other and to the needs of their communities and customers. Our agility and adaptability in these difficult situations reflected not only the commitment of our employees, but also years of careful planning. That planning includes resiliency plans for each of our facilities that are customized for each region. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Driving Change in an Evolving Recycling Industry Also in the summer of 2017, our recycling world began to turn upside down. For many years, China borrowed from the environment to fuel their economic growth. Once again, we were reminded of the connection between environment and economics, and how important it is to not take advantage of one at the expense of the other. China simply could not ignore its environment any longer and began to implement a series of policies that ultimately impacted the global recycling industry. As the largest residential recycler in the U.S., and the seventh largest exporter of any commodity, Waste Management was impacted significantly by these import limitations. For perspective, in 2017, we exported 27 percent of our recycling tons to China and by the end of 2018, we were not sending any residential recyclables to China. Once again, planning and foresight helped us adapt quickly. Waste Management has in recent years begun to develop new markets for mixed paper and plastics, both domestically and around the globe. This advance planning helped insulate the company from the most severe impacts of China's import restrictions. We are mindful, however, that we are not alone — we need a vibrant and sustainable global market. We are doing our part to drive needed change in recycling by encouraging all stakeholders to rethink recycling. This starts by remembering that recycling is not simply about landfill diversion. It is about product transformation and reuse, and it's about real environmental and resource conservation benefits. Today, recycling must be part of a sustainable materials management model — one that carries a cost of service and serves as feedstock to the manufacturing sector. With this perspective, Waste Management, and the entire industry, can shift our focus from recycling everything just for the sake of "recycling," to recycling the right things well to ensure optimal environmental and economic outcomes. It's a big change in mindset, but a necessary one to ensure continued resilience and success in a dynamic and evolving marketplace. Investing in the Future Now Disruption also can be a powerful positive force. Today, we're seeing how the disruptive power of technology can test our adaptability while enhancing customer centricity, operational efficiency and carbon reduction. Waste Management has long been an industry leader in technology investments, and the past year was no exception. Our investments included: • Placing our first robot in a recycling facility located in Houston. Robotics at recycling facilities can help with quality control, and also enhances worker safety. • Purchasing a new generation of natural gas collections trucks with engines that reduce emissions to "near zero." These new engines improve air quality in the communities in which we operate. • Producing and using more of our own low -carbon fuels in our natural gas trucks. An early leader in the production of renewable natural gas from landfill biogas, we now have four facilities producing renewable transportation fuel at our landfills. This means 6,500 route trucks are running on natural gas, 32 percent of which run on renewable natural gas, which reduces the emissions from these trucks by over 90 percent. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT • Testing the use of on -board cameras and computer technology to provide customers with immediate recycling quality feedback through photos, emails and even phone calls — all with the hope of improving the quality of recyclables collected and reducing contamination. • Deploying CORe° technology to reduce the environmental impacts of urban food waste. Waste Management's CORe° technology increases the renewable energy output of wastewater treatment facilities by 50 to more than 100 percent. We provide a service that is as old as the planet, but we rely more and more on technology. These and other technology investments are critical to ensuring that our strategy is always future focused, making us better at what we do and equipping us to adapt in a changing world. Aiming Higher with New Goals In 2017, our GHG-reducing F As we have publicly advocated in recent years, it's time for the recycling industry to focus on GHG emissions reduction as the life cycle goal of services saved over waste and materials management programs. Matching words to action, we have set ambitious new goals for our business. Over the next 20 years, we intend for our waste solutions and services to result in an overall reduction of GHG emissions four times greater than generated by our own operations. In 2017, that ratio was three. Our journey to four will be the total GHG emissions Waste supported by two additional goals: reducing fleet emissions by 40 percent Management's operations through renewable fuel use in our growing fleet of natural gas vehicles; generated all year. and collecting two million more tons of recycled materials to offset emissions associated with raw material use by 20 percent. Just as we have revisited our sustainability goals in 2018, we expect that many of our customers will do the same — and we are prepared to support them however they need, whether by devising processes to generate less waste or implementing more community recycling services. Although our business is shaped by global economics, we never forget that the services that we provide are local. Our communities have their own definitions of sustainability, and our goal is to provide them the information they need to make smart choices. From recycling education programs and organics handling services, to preserving what can be reused, we will provide services that reflect customer needs — and empower them to steer their choices toward environmental and community stewardship. Not only managing change, but driving it remains our focus for ourselves and those we serve. Respectfully, Jim Fish President and Chief Executive Officer W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Waste Management AT -A -GLANCE (as of and for the year ended December 31, 2017) Waste Management, Inc. (NYSE: WM), based in Houston, Texas, is the leading provider of comprehensive waste management environmental services in North America. $17.2M 6,536 107 42.3K 305 total donated in ; alternative fuel charitable giving vehicles natural gas employees transfer $1.9m : fueling stations facilities in -kind 127 20M services : landfill : entities - gas -to -electricity served facilities GIVING ENERGY OPERATIONS* ....................................................................................................... 90 wildlife habitat pollinator 20Khabitats acres of certified programs programs Ai6swiftnAmiffm CONSERVATION construction and demolition recycling facilities 14 other 28 commercial/ paper only recycling facilities 1N:W8141►Ic 4 dual stream CORe° recycling facilities facilities 44 single-strea m recycling facilities Pv40 composting/chipping/ grinding facilities FINANCIALS $1.5B $3.2 B $1.5 B returned to cash from capital shareholders operations expenditures $14.5B Total Revenue :.......................................... : LANDFILLS 244 5 active solid active hazardous waste landfills waste landfills *Waste Management, Inc. is a holding company, and all operations are conducted by its subsidiaries. References to "Waste Management," 5 "the Company" or 'WM" refer to Waste Management, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries, unless context provides otherwise. nays 9 Disclosure and reporting can lead to consensus across our industry about how to better inform the public of the kinds of services provided by waste and recycling companies. Over the past several years, Waste Management has engaged with the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) on consensus means to inform the public of the kinds of service provided by the waste and recycling segment of the Infrastructure Sector. Waste Management supports this effort to improve the transparency and utility of sustainability reporting. In this vein, we have replaced our previous "Mix of Business" reporting distinguishing forms of "green" service and instead provide the breakdown of services provided and materials handled per customer type that SASB recommends. Waste Management serves 20 million customers each year. For obvious reasons, our curbside recycling and disposal services have the largest number of individual customers, 18.3 million. We also serve 1.2 million commercial and industrial customers ranging from small businesses to global enterprises. We serviced 2,645 municipal contracts in 2017. Mix of Service by Customer Category (number of customers) ■ Residential: 18,300,000 ■ Commercial: 1,005,671 ■ Industrial:199,988 e Other:174,050 Municipal: 2,645 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 6 I YA 161,14 U LUCHLI i�i Since 2007, we have been working toward a set of goals to achieve by 2020, all designed to position Waste Management as the leader in environmental services, reduce our overall impact on the environment and differentiate us from competitors. Since then, we're proud to say significant progress has been made. On ourjourney toward those 2020 goals, the recycling market has changed around us, as has our business strategy. We've taken a hard look at recalibrating our goals based on environmental burden -reduction attributes such as energy or emissions reductions, in particular greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions. We want to clearly communicate the environmental benefits our services provide. Waste Management Sustainability Goals 2010-2038 1. ENVIRONMENTAL GOAL Waste Management will offset four times the GHG emissions we generate through our operations by 2038. In 2017, the services that Waste Management provided offset the emissions of our own operations by three times. Waste Management's new goal, a jump from three times to four, will require us to decrease the emissions from our operations while increasing the emissions -reduction services we provide for ourselves and our customers. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 7 Emissions Reduced > Fleet and fuel: Waste Management will emit fewer emissions through our operations by transitioning from diesel to alternative fuel vehicles in 90 percent of our entire fleet. We will use renewable fuel in over 90 percent of our vehicles. Our goal of emitting fewer emissions requires an investment in a Near Zero fleet. Over 90 percent of our fleet purchases are "NZVs" (Near Zero Vehicles), which will allow us to reduce emissions associated with our fleet 45 percent by 2038, against a 2010 baseline. > Facilities: Waste Management will continue to improve energy efficiency at our facilities, reducing our own emissions throughout our systems. Emissions Avoided > Production of renewable energy: Waste Management will avoid emissions by capturing methane at our landfills for use by third parties as renewable electricity and renewable fuel. > Recycling: Waste Management will increase avoided emissions by recycling materials for the greatest environmental benefits. 2. COMMUNITY GOAL Waste Management will help make communities in which we live and work safe, resilient and sustainable. Though our operations span 20 million customers in the U.S. and Canada, we are very much a local business that is an integral part of the communities we serve. We want to help make our communities, cities, towns and counties better places to work and live — today and for the future. To do so, we support events, programs and organizations that are as varied as the thousands of communities and individuals we serve. We concentrate on initiatives that enhance our environment, promote education and improve the livability of our communities. Focus areas include: > Projects that reduce environmental impacts, including beautification and litter control efforts > Providing environmental education and outreach > Support of wildlife preservation efforts > Support of safe neighborhood programs > Support of a variety of charitable giving projects W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 8 Waste Management Sustainability Goals — 2010-2038 (cont.) Recyclables Managed (MTCO2e avoided) 18 17.3 16 15.1 14 7 15.3 14 14.0 12 10 8 8.0 6................................................. 2007 2014 2015 2016 2017 2038 GOAL Waste -Based Energy Production (MTCO2e) 3.0 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.4 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.55 0.0 ............................ 2014 2015 2016 2017 2038 GOAL Number of Acres Protected 26,000 26,000 25,000 25,568 24,000 22,000 20,000 20,000 20.000 18,000..........................................0...... 2014 2015 2016 2017 2038 GOAL Our WHO partner has changed its emphasis from acreage to site quatity and impact of project, and we are shifting our goat accord ingty. On -Road Fleet Emissions Reductions (percent reduction in MTCO2e emissions) 50 45% 40 30 24% 27% 22/o 0 20 1 10 J I I I 0 ....... ....... ....... ...... 2014 2015 2016 2017 2038 GOAL Number of Wildlife Habitat Programs 120 119 110 110 100 95 90 90 90 80..........................................0...... 2014 2015 2016 2017 2038 GOAL Numbers reftect both' Lands for Learning" projects and specific habitat sites. Note that in 2017, the WHO program was revised to emphasize site quality and impact rather than quantity. Our program hastaken that approach aswetl. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 9 2017 Sustainability Key Performance Indicators GHG EMISSIONS ASSOCIATED WITH OPERATIONS [MMTCO2e)1 Process2 14.5 14.08 1.14.33 `11 1 13.5 11 0 � 13.44 13.60 13.0 12.5 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 AVOIDED GHG EMISSIONS [MMTCO2e)4 Renewable Energy Generation 6 5.636 5 4.588 4 1 3 2.531 2.252 2.421 2 a......I1 ................................ 20136 2014 2015 . ............ 2016 2017 Reflects the impact of our 2014 divestiture of the Wheelabrator waste -to -energy business. Transportation' 1.800 1.746' 1.725 1.738 1.733 1.650 1.69 1.597 1.575 1.500................................................................ 2013' 2014 2015 2016 2017 Recycling of Materials' 35 34.61 34 33 32.48 32.57 32.59 32 31.61 31 30..................................................... 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 WASTE -BASED ENERGY BENEFITS (EQUIVALENTS )' Tons of Coal Equivalent 8 6.145 5.973 b 4 2.513 2.540 2.480 2 0................................................................ 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Waste -Based Energy Production (million households) 1.200 1.100 1.089 0.900 0.600 0.471 0.470 0.460 0.300 1.......1......1 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Energy Use 0.8 0.656 0.6 40 0.355��:: 0.586 0.4 36 0.439 0.2 0................................................................ 20134 2014 2015 2016 2017 Carbon Permanently Sequestered' 20 19.48 19 18.54 18 17.68 17 16.84 16 15 1 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 10 Sustainability Key Performance Indicators RESOURCE SAVINGS ACHIEVED THROUGH RECYCLING Household Energy Cars Off Road Equivalent (in millions) (in millions) 2.5 2.3 8.0 1.9 7.6 2.0 1.8 1.7 1.6 7.5 •m 7.3 1.5 • 7.0 6 g 6.9 6.9 1.0 6.5 0.5................................................................ 6.0................................................................ 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 SAFETY PERFORMANCE Total Recordable Vehicle Accident Injury Rate Recordable Rate (incidents per 100 employees) (driver hours without a vehicle accident, in thousands) 3.5 20 19.4 18.5 3.3 3.2 18 1 3.1 3.3.0 3.0 16 14.4 2.9 � 2.8 14 13.8 2.7 ...... 10.............2 ....... I ...... 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2016 and 2017 adjusted to exclude "Other Vehicle Initiated Impact" incidents. PHILANTHROPY Charitable Giving (in millions) $20 $18 $17.16 $16 $14 $13.98 $13.50 $13.67 $ 1 2 1 $12.00 $10 .................... i........................... 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Key Performance Indicator Footnotes 1 Since 2013, we have used the modified 100-year global warming potentials (GWPs) promulgated by the U.S. EPA. Pertinent to our carbon footprint, our Scope 1 and 3 emissions calculations use the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCCI Fourth Assessment Report (FAR) GWP, and our Scope 2 emissions from purchased electricity use the IPCC Second Assessment Report (SARI GWP. 2 Process emissions come from our landfills. The amount of landfill gas that is collected can be measured, the amount of landfill gas generated, and the amount emitted to the atmosphere as fugitive emissions must be estimated using prescribed calculation methodologies. The applicable methodologies are the Solid Waste Industry for Climate Solutions (SWICS) Protocol and the U.S. EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP) rules. Our landfill footprint includes estimated emissions from both active and closed facilities. 3 Our methodology for calculating fleet efficiency conform to U.S. EPA's SmartWay Truck Taal. SmartWay calculations use records compiled fortax credit and fee purposes. The tax documentation reflects fuel purchased in a year, including some insignificant amounts of fuel stored rather than used in a given year. Note that our transportation emissions reported here include those from both our collection fleet and our noncollection "yellow iron" (i.e., off -road equipment such as forklifts and excavators) used on site. A small amount of fuel in this category is used for nontransportation purposes (e.g., running emergency generators or barbeque grills on site), but we do not subtract these from our transportation totals. 4 We are reporting these data to inform our customers and the public about the potential GHG reduction benefits associated with carbon storage in landfills, our renewable energy production and the value of the recyclable materials we collect and process. We are not presuming to characterize how emerging regulatory programs will allocate credit forthese avoided emissions, so we do not claim these GHG reduction benefits as our own nor attempt to deduct these reductions from our carbon footprint. 5 In our calculations, we assume that, by recycling and composting, we divert materials from our modern WM landfills with landfill gas -to -energy capacity. If instead our recycling and composting were to divert materials from the "national average landfill" from the EPA WARM model, the emissions reductions achieved by recycling and composting would 36,091,771 MTCO2e in 2017. Note also that the increase in emissions reductions realized by recycling does not correspond arithmetically to the increase in total tons recycled. That is because, for example, paper recycling (80% of all recyclables) achieves very high emissions reductions, while the emissions reduction potential associated with glass recycling (20% of recyclables) is nominal on a per ton basis. For a discussion of the protocols that govern this calculation of carbon storage or sequestration, see page 160 of the Appendix. 6 For a discussion of the protocols that govern this calculation of carbon storage or sequestration, see page 160 of the appendix. 7 Tons of coal equivalent is calculated based on the equivalent number of households that could be powered by waste -based energy production. Note that standard industry assumptions about household energy use differfor the waste -to -energy and landfill gas -to -energy sectors: Standard waste - to -energy reporting is 1,000 households per installed megawatt, while the household conversion for landfill gas -to -energy is based upon U.S. Energy Information Administration data that is updated yearly. Our calculation does not include wind or solar energy because we don't own the energy. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 12 U1 2017 was in many ways the best year ever for Waste Management, returning $1.5 billion to shareholders. This performance is a strong platform from which to spend resources to make long-term advancement on recycling technology and equipment, fleet efficiency and emissions reduction, and investment in our employees. "Looking at the full year, 2017 was exceptional for Waste Management as our continued focus on improving core price, adding profitable volume in a disciplined manner and controlling costs led to arguably the best year in the company's history." Jim Fish, President and CEO Revenue (in billions) $15 $13.6 $14.5 $12 $ 9 $ 6 $ 3 $ 0 .............. 2016 2017 Revenues grew 6.4 percent, our largest increase in revenue dollars since 1998 Adjusted Income from Operations' (in billions) $2.8 $2.63 2.6 $2.41 2.4 2.2 2.0 .............. 2016 2017 Adjusted income from operations grew more than 9 percent w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 13 Adjusted Operating Adjusted EPS' Free Cash Flow Margin (in billions) 18.5% 18.2% $3.5 $2.91 $3.22 $1.78 $1.77 18.0% 17.7% $2.8 $1.76 17.5% $2.1 $1.74 17.0% $1.4 16.5% $0.7 $1.72 $1.7II1IIII 16.0% ....... $ 0 ....... $1.70 ..... J....... 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 Adjusted operating margin increased 50 basis points 2 Adjusted Operating EBITDA''' (in billions)' $4.0 $4.0 $3.8 $3.7 $3.6 $3.4 $3.2 $3.0 1 ....... 2016 2017 Operating EBITDA exceeded $4 billion. Share Repurchases (in millions) Diluted earnings per share increased more than 10 percent. Adjusted Operating EBITDA Margin''' Free cash flow increased $60 million year -over -year. Cash Dividends (in millions) $750 28.0% $750 27.8% 27.7% $740 27.6% $730 $726 27.4% $720 27.2% 27.2% $710 1 27.0% IN....... $700 ....... 2016 2017 2016 2017 Adjusted operating EBITDA margin increased 50 basis points? Income Taxes Paid (in millions) Cash dividends paid to shareholders were up 3.3 percent. Real Estate Taxes Paid (in millions) $750 $750 800 60 $58.3 $58.0 $740 600 $524.3 48 $730 $725 $408.4 36 $720 400 24 $710 200 $33.2 $38.1 12 $5.8 $5.6 $700 ....... 0 .............. ......Illllll 0............................................. 2016 2017 2016 2016 2017 2017 2016 2016 2017 2017 U.S. Canada U.S. Canada U.S. Canada U.S. Canada In 2017, we returned approximately $1.5 billion 'Non-GAAP measures. Please see pg. 137 in the Appendix to this report for additional information and a link to shareholders through dividends and share to reconciliations of these measures. repurchases. zA basis point is one -hundredth of 1 percent. 'Operating EBITDA is defined as income from operations before depreciation and amortization. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 14 kWARDS R, RFCnGNITIC CORPORATE AWARDS World's Most Ethical Companies: The Ethisphere Institute 11 of the past 12 years CDP (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project): Reporting since 2004 I-PIN,w A1116 DJSI North American and/or World Indices: 13 of the past 16 years Climate Disclosure Leadership CDP A -List: 2016 and 2017 Dow Jones Sustainability Index Index: 11 consecutive years S&P 500 Commercial Services & Supplies Sector Leader: 2018 ..................................................................................... 100 Best Corporate Citizens: > Euronext Vigeo World 120 Index: Corporate Social Responsibility Magazine 2012-2015 2015-2018 > Ecovadis: CORPORATE > Change the World: Silver (2017), Bronze (2016, 2018) SUSTAINABILITY Fortune Magazine 2015 > FTSE4 Good Index Series: 2011-2018 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 15 > Green Fleet Leadership Award: Chicago Area Clean Cities Coalition, 2017 > Education Excellence Award: ENVIRONMENTAL Youth Education Program, Washington Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA), 2017 WORKPLACE > Governor's Environmental and Economic Leadership Award: Davis Street Transfer Station, California EPA, 2017 > "Best for Vets" Employer: Military Times 2010-2018 > "Best Place to Work," Corporate Equality Index Score 90+: Human Rights Campaign 2011-2017; Corporate Equality Index Score 80, Human Rights Campaign, 2018 > Best Companies to Work for MiLLennials (Top 100): Women's Choice 2018 > America's Best Places for Latinos to Work: Hispanic/Latinos Professional Association (HLPA) 2017 > Corporate Conservation Leadership Award: Wildlife Habitat Council, 2017 > Carolyn Crayton Award: Keep America COMMUNITY Beautiful, 2017 — Awarded to employee Buford Clark > Community Partner of the Year: Wildlife Habitat Council 2015 > Environmental Gold Leader: Awarded to the Denver Arapahoe Disposal Site, Denver; Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Environmental Leadership Program, 2017 > Frank Condon Award: Environmental Federation of Oklahoma, 2017 > Top Military Friendly° Employer: GI Jobs 2010-2018 > Military Friendly Diversity Program: GI Jobs, 2018 > Top Military Friendly: Canada Company's Military Employment Transition (MET) 2017 > Top Military Spouse Employer: Canada Company's Military Employment Transition (MET) 2017 > 50 Best Companies to Sell For: Selling Power Magazine > Corporate Lands for Learning of the Year: Wildlife Habitat Council 2015 > Community Partner Award: Grass Valley Chamber of Commerce 2017 > Simi Valley Education Foundation Legacy Award: Simi Valley Education Foundation 2017 > Supplier of the Year Services Award: > Business of the Year: Chamber of BASF 2015 Commerce, Okeechobee County, 2017 > Excellence in Job Creation and Major > Award of Appreciation: Nevada City BUSINESS Investments: Le Conseil des entreprises Chamber of Commerce, 2017 en technologies environnementales du RECOGNITION Quebec (CETEQ) 2017 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 16 As North America's leading provider of comprehensive waste management services, our mission is to maximize resource value while minimizing impact to further both economic and environmental sustainability for all our stakeholders. Transparency is an important part of this mission. Accordingly, we are committed to consistent public disclosure and discussion of our own progress through the publication of a sustainability report every two years. In off years, we update key data and content to the most recent full year. Our last comprehensive report was published in 2016 with available data and key discussion items updated in 2017. Generally, this report covers subject matter for 2017 and early 2018 for Waste Management's wholly owned operations, all of which are located in North America. All data is for the year ended December 31, 2017, except where noted. Notes on the scope of the data, including changes to methodology from the prior reporting period, are included either with charts or in footnotes. This report has been prepared in accordance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standards: Core Option. In addition, this year we are piloting the use of the 2017 draft Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) metrics for the waste and recycling component of the Infrastructure sector. We provide an index cross-referencing those indicators. We also provide an index cross-referencing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) in support of these global reporting systems attempting to increase focus on sustainable practices. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 17 Assurance We currently do not seek external assurance for all elements of this report. Our 2017 GHG emissions inventory has been assured by Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance Ltd. The inventory includes direct (Scope 1 and 2) emissions and indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions from the following sources: > Purchased goods and services > Capital goods > Fuel- and energy -related activities (not included in Scope 1 or Scope 2) > Business travel > Employee commuting > Downstream leased assets The complete assurance statement is available as part of our CDP filing. Materiality The content of this report has been compiled and organized based upon insights from a materiality assessment conducted by an internal team. This team is charged with ongoing stakeholder engagement, including participation in key business and multistakeholder organizations listed in the Appendix of this report, media relations, disclosure of sustainability information for sales and marketing purposes, and completion of sustainability survey requests. The materiality process involved four steps: > Identification of potential material topics by reviewing GRI aspects, benchmarking against key corporate peers and analyzing past Waste Management reports, which themselves have been amended overtime to reflect feedback from customers, community representatives, employees and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). > Inventory of aspects and topics most important to external stakeholders, primarily NGOs and customers and their supply chain vendors, based upon requests, surveys and ongoing engagement since the last reporting period. > Survey of internal stakeholders, which included more than 40 cross -functional directors and subject matter experts, to determine which topics impact our business most. Participants were queried about topics most likely to trigger impacts over the next five years and over which Waste Management is able to exercise control. > Normalization and ranking of results from internal and external stakeholders determined by breaking scores into quintiles for scoring purposes by an independent statistician. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 18 In 2017, we supplemented our earlier materiality review and annual review of topics covered by customers and investors by surveying the sustainability goals and metrics of our top 60 customers to determine any data needs that were unaddressed. In addition, we engaged significantly with the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) as it developed consensus reporting standards for the infrastructure sector. We believe this effort to enhance the transparency and utility of our sector's reporting was productive and have appended to this report an index cross-referencing our pilot effort incorporating the SASB metrics. This alignment with SASB has resulted in some modification to our reporting (e.g., changing our characterization of mix of services to customers) and some supplementation of reporting (e.g., adding a characterization of our operations by location in dense populations). We find that data requests from customers and the investment community are increasing in type and scope. In an effort to balance the providing of the detail requested with the public interest in clear reporting on our business strategy and its key impacts, we are making more extensive use of our GRI Content Index for specialized audiences. In addition, we are aligning with many of our customers by including an index cross-referencing the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDGs) to increase the utility of our reporting for researchers. Forward -Looking Information This report contains forward -looking statements, including statements concerning the company's outlook, performance or results in the future, as well as statements of beliefs about the future, plans and strategies or anticipated events. You should view these statements with caution. They are based on the facts and circumstances known to the company as of the date the statements are made and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to be materially different. Such risks include, but increased competition; pricing actions; failure to implement our optimization, growth, and cost savings initiatives and overall business strategy; failure to identify acquisition targets and negotiate attractive terms; failure to consummate or integrate such acquisitions; failure to obtain the results anticipated from acquisitions; environmental and other regulations; commodity price fluctuations; international trade restrictions; disposal alternatives and waste diversion; declining waste volumes; failure to develop and protect new technology; significant environmental or other incidents resulting in liabilities and brand damage; weakness in economic conditions; failure to obtain and maintain necessary permits; labor disruptions; impairment charges; and negative outcomes of litigation or governmental proceedings. Please also see Part I, Item 1A of the company's most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC for additional information regarding these and other risks and uncertainties applicable to our business. The company assumes no obligation to update any forward -looking statement, including financial estimates and forecasts, whether as a result of future events, circumstances or developments or otherwise. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 19 The matrix below summarizes the results of the assessment: Materiality Assessment r C Q E L a 0 s rn c L X W Very Important (15-12) Important (11-10) Somewhat Important (9-8) Internal Stakeholders - Business Impact/Control Very Important (15-12) Data Reporting and Verification (151 Compliance (141 External Recycling Rate (141 Local Engagement Plans & Programs (141 Local Environmental Impact (141 Public Policy Engagement (141 Safety Record (141 Anti -Corruption (131 Green Service Sales (131 Renewable Energy Generation (131 Innovation (121 Impact on Local Environment (121 Local Impact Assessment & Improvement (121 Important (11-10) Business Ethics/Code (111 Business Mix (11) Energy Consumption (11) Labor Practices & Human Rights (11) Supplier Screening —Environment (11) Climate Change — Financial Impact (101 Diversity (101 GHG Emissions — Scope 1-3 (101 Risk Management (101 Transportation Impacts (101 Somewhat Important (9-8) Corporate Governance (9) Customer Satisfaction (91 Customer Privacy (9) Economic & Local Economic Impact (9) Internal Recycling Rate (9) Life Cycle Analysis (9) Recycling Service Sales (9) Disaster Relief (8) Employee Demographics (8) Water Consumption (8) Less Important (7-4) Alignment with International Frameworks (7) Contributions (7) Emissions of Ozone, NOx, SOx (71 Biodiversity Impact (61 Freedom of Association (6) Layoffs & Turnover (6) Social Media (6) Supplier Screening — Labor Practices (6) Supplier Screening — Social (6) Local Procurement (5) Political Contributions & Involvement (5) Benefits (4) Conflict Minerals (4) Executive Compensation (4) Government Financial Assistance (4) W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 20 u = = CAPITALIZING ON CHANGE THROUGH N TECHNOLOGIES AND NEW THINKING. IN THIS SECTION Overview ................................................ 22 Waste Reduction .................................... 25 Recycling............................................... 28 IllfOrganics.................................................37 Waste -Based Energy 43 Investments & Innovation ..................... 47 Hard -to -Handle Materials 50' Consultative and Customized Approach .......................... 831 Waste Management Phoenix Open ..... Recycling Partnerships ......................... As the leading environmental service and solutions company in North America, Waste Management works with our customers to meet their unique service needs. From residential customers, to small businesses, large corporations, manufacturing and even large public venues — we are tasked with providing comprehensive waste solutions to our varied customer base. We Leverage this expertise in a variety of ways: Public Sector Solutions: A team of 215 professionals is dedicated to our work with municipalities across the country. With over 5,000 municipal contracts, Waste Management provides a comprehensive suite of environmental solutions. Our services range from waste collection and disposal, recycling and organics collection, processing market and providing necessary infrastructure to manage waste collection and disposal; recycling and organics collection, processing and marketing; and providing necessary infrastructure to manage waste systems effectively and efficiently. We take our responsibility seriously, engaging as partners with our municipal customers to innovate, protect the environment, and leverage data and technology to drive lasting change. We pride ourselves on being involved in the fabric of the community, ensuring that we understand the unique values of local government. > Direct Support of Our Commercial Customers: Our commercial customers have unique service support needs depending on state and local requirements, cost or a desire for programs designed around specific type of customer base. Waste Management understands that our customers' sustainability needs are varied, and we work with them to meet service needs — whether it involves managing a range of materials for recycling, or providing specially designed containers or staff education. W 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 22 SustainabilitySolutions: Waste Management's Sustainability Services (WMSS) experts provide creative and comprehensive waste solutions across a wide range of industries, events and customer types. We leverage this expertise by dedicating nearly 400 trained consultants and service professionals who evaluate service options and manage customers' programs on site. WMSS ensures efficient operations, minimizes environmental impact and instills a culture of safety, while accelerating performance. In the process, customers gain access to Waste Management's resources, technologies and innovations, which comprise the leading portfolio of environmental solutions in North America. The complexity of our services is seen in the breadth of the waste solutions that we provide. This includes our policy work to identify the areas of greatest environmental impact associated with our industry. An example is our focus on using life cycle assessment to prioritize areas of focus for the greatest environmental impacts. Life Cycle Assessment Approach to Recycling The idea of what successful recycling means has evolved significantly in recent years as the waste stream has shifted. Where goals were once focused on weight and volume, Waste Management — along with many other companies, cities, states and even academic institutions — has turned to goals based on environmental attributes, most notably reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a life cycle approach to assessing recycling. In recent years, Waste Management has aligned with the concept of sustainable materials management (SMM), a framework that encourages everyone in the recycling value chain to explore the impact of materials across their life cycle. This helps us understand that impacts can occur at all stages — from design and manufacturing, to inputs and outputs of the product, to how people will use and dispose of the product. The life cycle approach considers the entire life of products from mineral extraction through end of life, and the impacts at each point along the way. Life cycle thinking quantifies materials, energy consumption and emissions associated with those processes. Evaluating GHG emissions with a goal of reducing them can provide insight into trouble spots or changes that may need to occur to ensure resources are optimized across a product's life cycle. For our part, we have been closely studying the waste stream to improve our environmental impact, while using more data and marrying the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's SMM model with Waste Management's cost model to determine cost per ton of GHG emissions reduction in our industry. In doing so, we can prioritize waste management strategies to optimize the environmental benefits from materials across the waste stream. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 23 oSo End of Life Virgin Material Amaw Extraction Manufacturing Life Circle of Material M O 00 ^ o0 Transportation While we constantly seek to make a positive impact on the environment In 2017, we avoided 32,586,647 through a variety of measures, our greatest contribution undoubtedly MTCO2e of life cycle emissions comes from waste reduction services and recycling. Fully 60 percent of our through recycling, renewable emissions reduction contribution is tied to our recycling activities alone. And by recycling the right things well, we have the opportunity to reduce energy generation and organic GHG emissions by over 80 percent. Significantly reducing GHG emissions material composting. is both achievable and essential to ensure our operations have a positive and lasting impact on the environment and the communities we serve. Establishing New Goals With this in mind, we've taken a close look at our goals over the past two years. In recent years, the GHG reduction services we offer our customers — recycling, landfill gas -to -energy projects, renewable natural gas projects and carbon sequestration in landfill — helped them avoid over three times the GHG emissions generated by Waste Management's own operations. Recently, we announced our goal to increase those avoided emissions to four times the GHG emissions generated by our operations. Additionally, we've set a science -based goal to increase avoided emissions from recycling by 38 percent by 2028 against a 2010 baseline. This goal aligns with our campaign to improve the quality and quantity of recycling, while reducing its volatility. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 24 I ]HETION ..�� Through our work on life cycle thinking we have gained renewed appreciation for the first "R" in the waste hierarchy: "Reduction." While recycling plays an important role in how we manage material, reducing waste offers the greatest environmental benefit of all. Federal Way Mayor Jim Ferrell [left) with Waste Management driver. Waste Management has partnered with the City of Federal Way in Washingnton state for years, to help feed those in need. In 2017, Waste Management drivers collected 12,300 pounds of food — a new record and a shining testament to the giving spirit that makes Federal Way so great. We work with customers to look beyond diverting waste from landfill to actually eliminating waste to begin with. We analyze choices in procurement, deliveries and packaging and make supply chain recommendations to improve their overall environmental impact and reduce on -site waste. And we implement the recommendations as well. For example, in 2017 our Sustainability Services (WMSS) team worked within customers' supply chains to implement and expand a returnable parts program that eliminates or vastly reduces single -use parts, along with a launderable wipes program that meets hazardous waste exclusions and reduces waste. Food Waste Reduction U.S. EPA, states, local governments and the environmental service sector have increasingly focused on how to avoid food waste and properly manage the food that is ultimately wasted, particularly in terms of capturing its energy resource and avoiding generation of GHGs when disposed. With increased attention to the large quantities and various ways of managing food waste, customers have asked for additional ways to handle source -separated food at its end of life, through composting or anaerobic digestion. The company has responded through its compost and mulching facility network of 40 facilities, 13 of which can accept food waste, and our growing CORe° network — four facilities, with more under development. Preventing food waste upstream, before it becomes waste, benefits both the environment in terms of emissions reduction and communities in need. We are working with U.S. EPA and stakeholders on new ways to avoid emissions from discarded food by reducing the amount discarded. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 25 BETTER SOLUTIONS > WASTE REDUCTION SUCCESS STORY #1 As part of a recent California state grant award, Waste Management of Alameda County, Inc. (WMAC) received funding to purchase equipment for organics processing and to support Alameda County Community Food Bank's (ACCFB) food rescue efforts. Designed to capture organic wastes not already diverted from landfills through existing Source Separated Organics (SSO) collection programs — and conceived through a meticulous multiyear due diligence process — the facility will dramatically improve organics diversion. The new processing facility complements the existing three -bin SSO program and is designed to capture organics that remain in the MSW stream. The project is expected to improve Oakland's total waste diversion from 8 percent to 52 percent by diverting 41,540 additional tons per year (TPY) of organics and 26,208 TPY of recycling. The organics diversion alone will avoid 14,459 MT CO2e per year. And, by 2027, the project will have diverted 305,434 tons of organic waste from the landfill and reduced GHG emissions by 106,495 MT CO2e. As part of its overall commitment to the City of Oakland, Waste Management has partnered with Alameda County, the City of Oakland, ACCFB and Stop Waste for food recovery in the county. Founded in 1985, ACCFB has become the hub of a vast collection and distribution network that provides food for 240 nonprofit agencies in Alameda County — distributing more than 25 million meals last year. The funding will support the Food Bank in bringing five additional stores into its network and will match these stores with local ACCFB network agencies. Collection of food from the five additional stores will result in approximately 175,000 meals per year for local populations in need, while diverting 50 TPY in 2018 and 100 TPY from 2019 onward. SUCCESS STORY #2 WMSS identified alternative processes so that one customer could eliminate a specific type of plastic bag from their manufacturing process. The result of removing this one item from their waste stream was savings in labor, $214,001 per year for both materials and disposal, and avoiding the life cycle GHGs associated with the product. SUCCESS STORY #3 A few years ago, we assumed waste/recycling operations for a new customer in the U.S. They had relocated their engine manufacturing operations from the Midwest to the South. During our review of facility operations and waste and recycling practices, we discovered that significant quantities of plastic contaminated with oil were being discarded. The WMSS team discovered that the engine blocks were shipped from the foundry wrapped in plastic and, once received, were submersed in rust preventative and preservative oils. We learned this practice was in effect from when the manufacturing plant was located in the Midwest and the engine blocks were shipped long distances to a high -moisture climate with exposure to both rain and snow. In effect, it was a case of "we've always done it this way." After the relocation, the engine blocks were shipped only a few miles and within a dry climate. We engaged multiple stakeholders, including the facility engineering team and convinced them that there was no need to use rust preventatives or preservative oils. This resulted in substantial savings to the facility by eliminating the use of the expensive oils and their subsequent disposal. Since the plastic wrap was no longer contaminated with oil, it could now be recycled instead of disposed. BETTER SOLUTIONS > WASTE REDUCTION Waste Management has partnered with the Oregon Food Bank to fight hunger, advance Oregon Food Bank CEO Susannah Morgan (third from left) with members of zero waste and strengthen emergency preparedness since 2014. That's why the food the WMSS Public Sector Solutions team. bank honored Waste Management with its prestigious "Hunger Hero of the Year" award. Oregon Food Bank is the hub for a statewide network of 21 regional food banks and more than 950 hunger -relief agencies. The food bank is based in Portland, Oregon, which is also a world -class sustainability leader and among Waste Management's most progressive city partners when it comes to innovative approaches to waste reduction. "At both the City of Portland and the Oregon Food Bank, bold leadership is resulting in important initiatives that synch up with community values," said Mary Evans, director of Public Sector Solutions for WM-PNW/BC. "For Waste Management, our partnership with the city has helped us see the value of investing in the Oregon Food Bank — to help those in need, bolster emergency preparedness and advance zero waste across the food bank's statewide network." Waste Management first launched its relationship with the Oregon Food Bank in 2014 with a $200,000 donation, funding an emergency generator for the central warehouse and a back-up fueling system. Together, the emergency generator and the back-up fuel system provide critical emergency support when storms hit and the power fails. The generator keeps food cold and fresh; the fuel system ensures trucks can deliver critical food supplies even when the power fails. Portland became the largest U.S. city to initiate every -other -week garbage collection as it added weekly pickup for compost and yard debris in 2011. The city's goal was to incentivize curbside composting while keeping overall rates the same. And the city achieved this goal, with Waste Management as a partner. Read more here. .�r t far v 1 � ",.,,,RECYCLING.1 f YY' 1 4 1. �x As North America's leading post -consumer recycler, Waste Management has been leading change in the ever-growing and dynamic recycling industry for more than three decades. During this period, we've also invested more than $1 billion in processing infrastructure alone, including almost $22 million in 2017, up more than $13 million year - over -year. This leadership resulted in 15.3 million tons of recycled goods in 2017, a 91.25 percent increase in recycling tons since 2007. Our industry and the materials recycled have evolved significantly over the years — from small collection bins full of newspapers and glass bottles in the 1980s to today's large wheeled carts full of plastic water bottles and cardboard boxes used for home delivery of online orders. What amazing changes in just a few decades! 2016 Recycling Imports Into China 3% 55% 24% 55% 51% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% ....... ...... ....... ...... Iron and Copper Aluminum Fiber Plastic Steel ■ China ■ RoW = Rest of World Courtesy: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) We were presented with a new set of challenges in 2017. In July, China notified the World Trade Organization of its intent to ban the import of 24 materials, including mixed waste paper and mixed plastics. While the news was met with skepticism at the time, China has indeed followed through with the ban, resulting in 13.2 million tons of material looking for alternative markets across the globe. Then, in March 2018, the Chinese government implemented a 0.5 percent contamination limit, which has elevated quality expectations for all buyers across the globe. The new contamination limit also increased recycling processing costs in material recovery facilities (MRFs) as recyclers work to remove unacceptable items. With the Chinese government's subsequent announcement of a ban on all imports of recyclables by 2020, the global recycling community began to scramble to adjust to this new market reality. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 28 Changing Market Dynamics In an already dynamic recycling market, China's policy created perhaps the greatest change the recycling industry has experienced to date. The Chinese government's decision serves as a stark reminder of the global nature of our business. According to the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. International Trade Commission, China imported over 13.2 million tons of paper and approximately 776,000 tons of plastic from the U.S. in 2017. Prior to late 2017, a third of the world's recyclables had been imported by China, including more than 50 percent of the paper and plastics recycled across the globe. China's policies have had a far-reaching effect, creating an excess global supply of recyclables. Costs are up for customers due to increased processing and sorting of materials required to meet China's new stringent quality requirements, while commodity values are down. Developing Alternative Commodities Markets With China taking bold steps to rebalance its economic needs with quality of life — clean air, water and a safe climate, the U.S. recycling industry has been forced to recalibrate its thinking and focus on what it can control. Developing diverse domestic and global end markets is the best way to ensure long-term successful, sustainable and economically viable recycling programs. Beginning in 2013, with China's first import restrictions on plastics, Waste Management began to diversify our markets, sending more plastics to domestic markets and more paper to India, Mexico, South America and other countries. In the five years since, we have grown our markets and strengthened our international commodities team. With more than 50 contractors in four offices around the world, including Mexico City, Mexico, Shanghai, China, and Bhopal, India, we have been able to develop a robust international trade business. DOMESTIC MILLS 2018: 68.0% 2017: "r MEXICO 2018: 3.2% 2017: 3.3% NETHERLANDS 2018: 0.2% CHINA 2017: 0.5% 2018: 5.0% 20 17: 27.2% ITALY 2018: 1.4% 2017:0.3% INDIA 2018: 15.6% 2017: 4.9% Following the Path of Our Commodities 2017 vs. 2018 THAILAND 2018: 2.6% 2017: 0.0% TAIWAN 2018: 1.3% 2017: 0.1% V It I NAM 2018: 2.7% 2017: 0.9% W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 29 2017 Recycling Performance Waste Management managed over 15 million tons of material for beneficial use in 2017, broken down as follows: WHAT WE RECYCLED (in tons) L7 PAPER MIXED ORGANICS FLY ASH GLASS METAL 15m33 MILLION TONS PLASTIC C&D / WOOD E-WASTE / LAMPS OTHER Total Recycled 433,040 'i 1 0,UJ6 31,295 121,608 Materials ..................................................................................... WHY WE RECYCLED WHERE WE RECYCLED > To save 117.8 million mature trees ■ > To fulfill the annual power needs of 1.59 million homes ■ > To avoid 32.5 million metric tons of GHG emissions > To supply enough fresh water for 28.1 million people ; for a month • • > To meet the annual municipal waste needs of ■ 27.9 million people • > To save 63.2 billion gallons of water ■•' > To conserve 17.4 billion kWh of electricity Material Recovery Facilities ■ 44 Single Stream > To preserve enough timber resources to produce ; ■ 28 Paper Only or Other Commercial Materials 2 trillion sheets of printing and copy paper • 14 Other > To save 24.5 million cubic yards of landfill space : 11 Construction and Demolition Debris 2 Dual Stream 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 30 Using Life Cycle Thinking to Prioritize Recycling Efforts With constrained resources and weakened market demand, evaluating recycling through the lens of life cycle thinking helps our customers grapple with a changing commodities market for recycling, helping to prioritize their efforts. It's imperative that we remain focused on the materials that provide the most environmental benefit from recycling. As an example, the reduction in GHG emissions from recycling an aluminum can is exponentially more than recycling a glass bottle. What Reduces the Most GHGs When You Recycle? 10 9.1 4 3.5 3.1 2.7 2.4 2 1.8 1.1 1.0 0.9 0 i.............=.......M......a......M......W.......M....... ...... Aluminum Mixed Paper Corrugated Steel Newspaper PET Mixed HOPE Glass Carpet Cans (general) Containers Cans Plastics THE GREATER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Waste Tons vs. GHG Emissions Reduction Glass: 20.9% lil�l��lil�lill �a nlin!i,i li:, i'i'rl'i'lrl'`i'�,: Residue: 24.0% Aluminum: 0.3 Steel 0.3% Waste Tons PET 1.9° Steel OCC: 0.3% — 29.5 Mixed Plastics: 0.2% Mixed Paper: Mixed Paper: 20.3% 39.8% HDPE: 2.6% GHG Emissions Reduction Aluminum: Residue: 1.6% -0.3% Glass: 3.7% PET: HDPE: 1.3% 1.4% Mixed Plastics: 0.0% OCC: 52.2% Focusing only on commodity tonnage misses the bigger picture — how much emissions reduction benefit has been achieved regardless of the tons processed. For example, GHG emissions achieved by recycling Old Corrugated Cardboard is far greater than its weight would suggest. Our data makes it abundantly clear that we should be focusing our efforts on recycling cardboard and paper first, then, metal, PET and HDPE bottles to maximize the environmental benefits of the materials that we manage. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 31 Consumer Awareness Among the most pressing priorities in recycling today is the need to reduce the amount of contamination — or the unacceptable items mixed with recyclables — in the stream that we collect for processing at our recycling facilities. Reducing contamination means reducing unacceptable materials in the inbound stream, which directly impacts the quality of what can ultimately be sold and recycled. It's a difficult challenge, and we all play a significant role when it comes to recycling well — starting with consumers. That's why we're so committed to consumer education and awareness in the communities we serve. Recycling Needs Your Help Over the years, the changing mix of materials in the waste stream combined with a shift to cart -based, single -stream recycling has contributed to an increase in the average contamination rate for materials Waste Management collects in curbside programs to 25 percent. That means 500 pounds of every 2,000 pounds collected is ultimately discarded as nonrecyclable. This increases the cost of recycling because we must sort more material as well as transport and dispose of more material as trash. The lost value of good recyclables that are ruined due to contamination also must be considered. Tprhnnlnnv to ['_nntaminatinn W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 32 Recycling the Right Way We work with recycling community stakeholders to reach as many audiences as possible, using all available communication channels, as this article by Susan Robinson, Director of Public Affairs for Waste Management, demonstrates. As the impacts of China's new import policies to reduce trash in recyclables begin to affect our collection programs, you may be seeing a lot more articles about the health of recycling, both locally and across the globe. In many cases, these articles are communicating the same basic information: > Recycling contamination — or the percentage of trash or unacceptable items mixed with recyclables — has increased, and it's jeopardizing the global recycling industry > Going forward, China will not purchase recyclables if there is even a fraction of trash mixed with the items > As a result, we all must focus our efforts on recycling the right items the right way Susan Robinson Director of Public Affairs Waste Management Simply put, we must reduce the amount of contamination in COLLECTION IS NOT THE SAME the recycling stream, and this can only happen if the materials AS RECYCLING we collect are the right materials. Note the use of the word "collect" above. It's important to highlight "collection," since the quality of the material we collect directly impacts the quality of what can ultimately be sold and recycled. To that end, the following quote is from a recent article by Nina Butler of More Recycling, who describes the need to focus on collection: "Many recycling entities ... are facing severe financial challenges right now despite the environmental benefits that come when recovered materials are used to make new products. In short, the market for recycled materials is broken. We have equated collection with recycling when, in reality, that is just the first of many steps to ensure complete reabsorption of resources." — Nina Butler, More Recycling, Plastics Recycling Update, February 2018 Ms. Butler drives to the heart of one of the key challenges we are up against as we struggle to reduce contamination in recycling programs. Messaging has historically emphasized the importance of placing recyclables in recycling carts. As a result, consumers now equate the w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 33 placement of materials in their recycling cart with recycling. From there, it is out -of -sight - out -of -mind, and it is up to recyclers to ensure that discarded materials are recycled into new products. This poses a difficult education challenge, since it's hard to teach consumers that their materials are only recycled when they replace virgin materials — not when they're collected. It's only when this substitution happens that we realize the environmental and economic benefits of recycling. And, in fact, placing unacceptable materials into the cart leads to additional economic and environmental costs, with no benefits and (ironically) less recycling. We call this wishful recycling "wishcycling," and it is lethal to our nation's recycling programs. WHY IT'S IMPORTANT TO RECYCLE so, why is "wishcycling" such a problem? There are multiple ONLY THE RIGHT ITEMS reasons, but what it all boils down to is that unacceptable materials in the recycling carts ultimately get sorted out at the recycling facility and disposed of as trash. In other words, "wishcycling" does no one any favors, except adding costs and reducing the amount of material that can ultimately be recycled. For example, the average contamination rate for materials that we collect in curbside recycling programs has grown to about 25 percent. That means that 500 pounds of every 2,000 pounds that we collect at the curb is ultimately discarded. This increases the cost of recycling by increasing the cost of sorting materials, transporting and disposing of trash, and also includes the lost value of good recyclables that are ruined due to contamination. At a global level, years of "wishcycling" across the world have contributed to end markets like China becoming stricter on what they'll ultimately purchase and recycle into new materials. Toward the end of 2017, China began instituting a new contamination limit that requires processors like Waste Management to shrink that 500 pounds of contamination to 10 pounds (0.5 percent). That's like shrinking something the size of a grizzly bear down to a puppy. And with these new guidelines come even higher processing costs, while at the same time commodity prices are at long-time lows. Mix all this together and the economics of recycling are certainly under pressure. Focusing on recycling the right things correctly has never IT'S TIME TO RIGHT THE SHIP been more important. At Waste Management, we are focusing on quality, increasing demand, and reducing the economic and environmental impact of the materials we manage for our customers. However, for recycling to be successful and sustainable for years to come, we must all commit to recycling only the right things the right way. Collecting materials is not the same as recycling them. It's only when a material is recycled into something else that we realize the economic and environmental benefits. Anything short of this, and we're simply creating a problem that results in a negative environmental impact. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 34 Educating Our Communities Consumers want to recycle. But recycling can be confusing. It's hard to keep up with what should and should not go in the bin while leading a fast -paced daily life. Plastic bags might seem like obvious items for the curbside collection bin, but they are a huge problem for recycling facilities. That's why we continue to invest in public education programs to help consumers better understand smart recycling practices. It's hard to imagine that one wrong item in a recycling bin can spoil an entire batch of otherwise good materials, but it's true, which is why we've created our Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° (RORR) program. Waste Management's dedicated website details myths, resources, and the do's and don'ts of recycling, as well as providing tools tailored for various entities that might be seeking recycling know-how — including residents, businesses, educators, property managers and government institutions. Our most visited page on the RORR website busts myths and provides accurate information about the most frequently asked recycling questions. For the past three years, we have updated this site with relevant questions on how to recycle the right Keep Plastic Bags Out of Your Recycling things correctly. We're also putting information where consumers are most likely to find it — 45 percent of individuals look to municipalities for recycling information, and they primarily seek it out on the municipalities' websites. As part of our RORR program, we developed a widget for municipal customers to put on theirwebsites that provides targeted recycling education. The widget is user-friendly, hosted by the municipality and comes at no cost. While we do our absolute best to educate consumers through the RORR program, we find that "tagging efforts" is the most effective way to teach customers how to recycle right. Tags placed on bins along our routes that use both positive and negative reinforcement have proven effective because of the immediate feedback to consumers on how to recycle correctly. Finally, as a last resort, we find that charging for contamination serves as a strong deterrent. Using this "tough love" tactic, we're taking a two -pronged approach to contract enforcement: we are reviewing contracts and seeking cost recovery or price adjustments as allowed for contamination; and, moving forward, fully enforcing contracts when it comes to charging for contamination. WASTE MANAGEMENT DRIVERS ON THE FRONT LINE OF CONSUMER EDUCATION Just as consumer awareness on the dos and don'ts of recycling is critical, so too is ensuring that our drivers are consistently trained across the company to help solve the problem of contamination in the waste stream. Drivers can enhance consumer awareness through Waste Management's tagging campaigns and help educate consumers on the best ways to decrease contamination. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 35 We've found that Driver Recycling Surveys are a useful way to engage our drivers, and administering the survey is vital before kicking off any education or tagging and enforcement campaign. The surveys help us assess the current recycling knowledge of drivers, uncover common contaminants on their routes, identify Waste Management's tagging practices and help drivers better understand any barriers that prevent tagging. Waste Management also issues a Facilitator Guide with directions for site leaders to administer the survey, with talking points to introduce the contamination issue, and explanation of the driver's role in prevention. Evaluating results of the driver surveys helps target our campaign materials around a problem contaminant or address barriers that are preventing drivers from identifying and tagging contamination. For new driver training, and for use when rolling out a tagging and enforcement campaign, training videos available on our company intranet university, "Talent Central," show drivers how to identify and report contamination through the use of enforcement tags and onboard computing. These videos, in both English and Spanish, are provided to each driver internally or can be found on Waste Management's YouTube channel. We also offer a Guide to Contamination & Recycling Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for employees. The Guide to Contamination introduces drivers to the basic RORR rules. The Recycling FAQ is a quick reference guide to help drivers identify problem materials and to help accurately answer any customer questions on their route. To incentivize drivers to stay engaged and actively serve as RORR ambassadors, we publicly recognize drivers who are most actively involved in tagging and enforce- ment. We all play a role in helping reduce contamination. And when our drivers are properly informed, their efforts to enforce proper recycling during their routes, as well as educating customers along the way, serve as a dual positive. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 36 RGAN I One-third of food goes uneaten across the globe. Wasted food can add billions of tons of GHG emissions to the atmosphere. In the U.S. alone, more than 60 million tons of food is wasted each year, and displaced food carries a price tag of well over $160 million. The EPA estimates more food reaches landfills and incinerators than any other single material in our everyday trash, making up 22 percent of the disposed stream. Organic materials — primarily discarded food and yard trimmings — comprise approximately 30 percent of the waste stream — and Waste Management continues to utilize new technologies to extract economic and environmental value from these materials. In 2017 Waste Management processed 3.38 million tons of source -separated organic materials, including yard trimmings, food waste and biosolids — sludge sourced from wastewater treatment facilities. Most of the organic waste collected goes to facilities that create marketable compost and soil amendment products. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 37 Organic Waste At -A -Glance 3.38 Million Tons of Organic Material 15A MILLION GALLONS of EBS produced Food converted to biogas produced enough renewable energy to power over 1,350 homes *Total gallons of the EBS° [organic slurry) produced as of 8/2018 761 50-100%+ BIOGAS PRODUCTION Increase in renewable biogas production with as little as 10 percent EBS° volume addition 44 ORGANICS RECYCLING FACILITIES The largest organics recycling infrastructure > 40 Waste Management managed composting and mulching facilities, 13 of which can accept food waste > 4 CORO facilities 19 BULKBINTM PROGRAMS Utilizing 2,500+ Bins Serving customers across various industries, including manufacturing, distribution and retail FAST FACTS Co -Digestion >99% CONTAMINATION REMOVAL CORe° produces a clean EBS° product by removing packaging and other non- degradable material ~o% BIOSOLIDS GENERATION Little to no additional generation of biosolids with EBS° according to independent, peer -reviewed research 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 38 COW: Turning Food Into Energy CORe° is Waste Management's organic recycling process that converts food waste into EBS°, an organic slurry product used to generate green energy. With CORe°, we collect commercial food waste from restaurants, schools, food processing plants and grocery stores, screen it to remove contaminants such as plastic, packaging and bones, and blend the waste into an engineered slurry that has a consistency like cooked oatmeal. The slurry dramatically increases the production of biogas in anaerobic digesters, which is used to create renewable energy. Waste Management's CORe° Process W.va.m... I[CORe Waste -to -Energy Residue or Landfill •' :: Renewable Energy (electricity or fuel) Source Separated CORe° EBS° Transport Wastewater Organics Treatment Plant Biosolids Waste Management's CORe° process EBS° is a high -quality, consistent The EBS° product is used to create is a local, urban solution that product produced with more than renewable, sustainable energy converts food material into our 99% of the physical contaminants in partnership with long-term EBS° product through our found in urban waste. local partnerships, helping them proprietary process. approach zero waste. Adding additional organic material in the form of engineered slurry to a water treatment plant's anaerobic digesters typically increases energy output from 50 percent to 100 percent or more. We use simple figures to communicate to the public the environmental benefits realized from their cities' use of CORe° organics recycling. CORe° Facilities Waste Management's CORe° facilities in Southern California, New York, Boston and New Jersey deliver EBS° to municipal wastewater facilities, which increases their energy output. Waste Management has made over 40 million gallons of EBS° from our facilities to date. Each ton of processed food waste LOS ANGELES can power between eight and 10 homes. 2011 W__ 11CORe L CORe NEWJERSEY 2018 BOSTON 2017 NEW YORK 2016 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 39 BETTER SOLUTIONS > ORGANICS E ■EN■ > Progressive Waste Water Treatment Plant in New England > Recognized by MassDEP and EPA for innovation > Investing over $24 million in the "Organics Energy Project" > Over $7 million provided by Massachusetts agencies > Renewable energy produced will be used for facility heat and electricity > Energy savings of $2.5 million per year, with potential to export to grid > Longstanding, successful program creating fertilizer from biosolids > 100 percent of the fertilizer product sold to local agriculture and landscape businesses r FOOD WASTE Greater Lawrence Sanitary District What began as a demonstration project is now an award -winning, proven technology that is creating renewable energy. Waste Management and the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (LACSD) received the Municipal Project of the Year Award for their Food Scrap -Wastewater Biogas System at the American Biogas Industry Awards. The partnership demonstrates the full-scale co -digestion of urban residential and commercial source separated organics (SSO) at an existing community wastewater treatment facility in a way that can be replicated at other water utilities. The process involves food waste being pre-processed at the Waste Management facility in Orange, California, through Waste Management's CORo' process — removing physical contaminants and de -casing plastic and metal containers — to ultimately provide EBS° for energy generation at the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant in Carson, California. Waste Management Organics Processing Sites Composting and mulching are proven, low-cost solutions for managing large volumes of organic materials. Waste Management's portfolio includes 40 facilities that produce compost and mulch products. We also work with customers to innovate new composting solutions. n JA CORe° Boston CORe° NNJ CORe° Orange Transfer and MRF Recycling Varick I Transfer n Compost/Mulch Altamont Landfill Autumn Hills Landfill Coastal Plains Landfill Countryside Landfill CT Valley Landfill DADS Landfill Deer Track Park RDF Dekalb County RDF Eco-Vista LLC Fitchburg (RCIJ Landfill Glanbrook LF Green Shadows LF GROWS Landfill Guadalupe Rubbish Disposal Co 1q] High Acres Landfill Johnson County Landfill Kirby Canyon Landfill Lake View Landfill Lancaster Landfill Laraway RDF Metro RDF Middle Pennisula Landfill Midway Landfill Milam RDF North Valley MRF Okeechobee Landfill Orchard Ridge RDF Outer Loop RDF Palmdale Landfill 0 Pheasant Run RDF Prairie View Landfill Redwood Landfill South Hills Landfill Timberline Trail RDF Valley Landfill Q CORe° Venice Park Landfill Vista Landfill Willow Ranch Compost Facility An Insightful Look at the CORe° Process 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 41 Waste Management BulkbinsTM Used for Organics Waste We continue to innovate to make it easier to capture the value of organics in an efficient, and environmentally protective manner. Over the past several years, Waste Management worked with container manufacturers to create a new bin, BulkbinTM, uniquely designed for commercial generators of organic material. In Denver, Colorado, our BulkbinTM concept was put to good use with a Waste Management client who was struggling to move its facility to zero -waste status. We utilized our BulkbinTM containers to divert the heaviest material in their waste stream — animal feed products that did not meet their product sales specifications — from landfill. Today, 100 percent of this material is diverted to a compost facility, with the program filling over 200 BulkbinTM containers — 20 to 30 tons — daily. In addition, we worked with a large retailer to provide organics recycling services utilizing the BulkbinTm as part of a reverse logistics approach to economically transport unusable food wastes. That program has been rolled out to over 170 stores utilizing over 1,300 BulkbinsTM. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 42 I RHEIVAIIII r Americans produce about 4.4 pounds of waste per capita every day, according to the EPA, and not all of that waste can be successfully processed. After recycling, composting and other beneficial use efforts, about 65 percent of that waste — a total of about 164 million tons each year — is disposed in landfills. Yet even as waste reaches the landfill, there remains a meaningful opportunity to recapture value. There, as organic material decomposes in an anaerobic environment, it naturally produces landfill gas, a mixture of carbon dioxide and methane, a major component in natural gas fuel and a potent GHG. Waste Management is finding opportunities to create economic and environmental value by turning landfill gas into energy — in effect, making sure that trash doesn't go to waste. From Trash to Power As trash decomposes it produces gas, which is roughly half carbon dioxide and half methane. At our landfill gas - to -energy (LFGTE) facilities, we capture this methane and use it beneficially as New Redwood LFGTE Plant an alternative to fossil fuel to power homes and provide fuel for industrial uses and commercial vehicles, including our own. The U.S. EPA endorses landfill gas as a renewable energy resource, putting it in the same category as wind, solar and geothermal resources. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 43 Today, Waste Management is the largest LFGTE developer and operator in North America, with projects generating the equivalent of nearly 4.5 million megawatt -hours per year, enough energy to power 460,000 homes, or the equivalent of replacing nearly 2.5 million tons of coal annually. In 2017, approximately 55 percent of landfill gas collected at Waste Management -owned and -operated facilities was used for beneficial use projects, and we did not directly incinerate waste for energy recovery. Waste Management has continued to invest in technologies to maximize the capture of energy from our landfills. In 2017, we commissioned new LFTGE facilities at the Redwood Landfill and Recycling Center in Novato, California, to produce renewable electricity, while we are producing renewable natural gas at our Outer Loop Recycling and Disposal Facility in Louisville, Kentucky. Waste Management Landfill Gas Beneficial Use Projects Power 97 528 Off -Site Power 5 56 Medium BTU Fuel 9 25 Liquid Waste Disposal 4 3 Renewable Natural Gas 4 36 Total Projects 119 648 Total LFG Utilized (mmbtul 56,960,000 Equivalent Megawatt-Hours/Year 4,480,000 Equivalent No. of Households 460,000 Equivalent Tons of Coal/Year 2,480,000 Indirect CO2e Offset (tons/year) 2,400,000 Renewable Natural Gas Power Our most frequent application for collected landfill gas is to use the processed methane to generate electricity that is sold to public utilities, municipal utilities and power cooperatives. Beyond electricity generation, we are also a leader in converting landfill gas into natural gas fuels that are distributed for use in residences, businesses and transportation. Renewable natural gas (RNG) produced from processed landfill gas now fuels over 33 percent of our natural gas trucks. With RNG infrastructure at Waste Management's Altamont, California, Milam, Illinois, American Landfill in Ohio and now our Outer Loop landfill in Kentucky, over 33 percent of our natural gas fleet was fueled by RNG by the end of 2017. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 44 Waste -Based Energy Facilities . ■ OEM . 0 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■l ■ L■ ■ ■ IN L■ ■ T ■ ■ 0 r:. ■ ■ i No ■ ■ ■ ML ■ ■ ■7 ■ Direct Gas ■ Power 0 Power and Direct Gas Renewable Natural Gas W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 45 Innovation That Closes the Circle THE LOUISVILLE STORY OCompressed Natural Gas (CNG) collection trucks pick up waste at homes and businesses. The waste is transported to landfills imfor permanent disposal. © Methane is recovered by a series of wells drilled into the landfill. The wells are interconnected to form a collection system © Much of landfill waste is organic, including food and cardboard. Bacteria digest this material, producing methane and carbon dioxide as natural byproducts. ME as AW" OThe gas is routed to the RNG v4J 'I facility for advanced processing. The large geographic footprint Carbon dioxide, nitrogen and N oxygen are removed from the c02 1. 0 gas to produce high -purity methane that meets natural gas�O 0 = Methane pipeline specifications. OO of landfills and their proximity to existing infrastructure can make them ideal locations for large-scale solar installations. Read more about how we contribute to solar energy generation here. © The facility can process up to 5,000 standard O The Outer Loop RNG facility in Louisville, Kentucky, cubic feet per minute (SCFM) of incoming produces enough RNG to fuel up to 800 Waste landfill gas, producing high -purity methane Management CNG collection trucks each day, that is injected into a natural gas pipeline. reducing GHG emissions by more than 80 percent compared to those powered by diesel fuel. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 46 ilillVIA 111 It's often said that waste is simply a resource out of place. That's the idea behind investments we have made in the last decade in companies focused on transforming certain materials in the waste stream into materials of higher value. As these relationships have matured, we have already begun to see opportunities to increase our environmental impact through expanding into broader markets. Enerkem Enerkem converts nonrecyclable municipal solid waste (MSW) into biofuels for transportation and renewable chemicals used in everyday products. Enerkem Alberta Biofuels is the world's first commercial biorefinery to use MSW to produce methanol and ethanol. This facility in Edmonton, Canada, began producing methanol from waste in 2015 and has now initiated ethanol production. The potential annual output of the facility is 10 million gallons. In 2017, Enerkem received EPA registration for the Edmonton facility to sell ethanol under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, becoming the first MSW-to-ethanol facility to do so. Additionally, the facility received the lowest carbon intensity value issued to date by the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines under the Renewable and Low Carbon Fuel Requirements Regulation. Enerkem also recently signed an agreement with Air Liquide, AkzoNobel Specialty Chemicals and the Port of Rotterdam to create an advanced waste -to -chemistry facility in Rotterdam. The facility will be the first of its kind in Europe to provide a sustainable alternative solution for nonrecyclable wastes, converting waste plastics and other mixed wastes into methanol for transportation and chemical uses. The company is developing additional projects in Canada, the United States, Europe and China. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 47 Fulcrum Bioenergy Fulcrum processes MSW into an engineered feedstock, which is gasified and converted into renewable crude. This renewable crude can then be further refined into low -carbon, drop -in jet and diesel fuels. A part of our portfolio since 2011, Fulcrum is constructing its first commercial plant near Reno, Nevada, which will be operational in 2020. When completed, the facility will convert 175,000 tons of MSW to 10.5 million gallons of transportation fuel per year. Fulcrum is planning additional projects across North America, each of which will be able to produce 30 million gallons of fuel per year. Fulcrum Corporate Video Dolphin Services Another source of innovation today is Waste Management Dolphin Services, a leader in dewatering solutions across numerous industries. The Waste Management division has introduced modern, skid -mounted, high-g decanter centrifuge technology for processing industrial sludges and recovering oils from refineries, chemical complexes and food processing operations. This process significantly reduces solids going to landfills, returns water for reuse and recovers oil for recycling. In addition, Waste Management Dolphin Services is piloting autonomous centrifuge dewatering and oil recovery technology for waste streams such as biological sludge and oily tank bottoms to reduce on -site safety risks and exposure. Industries 4 i MAP Ilk FOOD PROTEIN UPSTREAM EXPLORATION MIDSTREAM TERMINALS DOWNSTREAM PROCESSORS & PRODUCTION & PIPELINES REFINING 1 L ft 4 PETROCHEMICAL CHEMICAL REMEOIATION INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER COMPLEXES COMPLEXES & DREDGING TREATMENT PROCESSES W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT M Bigbelly Since 2009, Waste Management has been an investor in Bigbelly — the world's leading smart waste and recycling system. Deployed in communities, campuses and organizations in over 50 countries and all 50 U.S. states, Bigbelly transforms waste operations and drives efficiencies with a smart, connected system. Solar panels on high -capacity cans harvest energy for compaction and communication. Each can holds 150 gallons, five times that of the average receptacle, because waste contents are compressed as the container fills. Bigbelly enables visibly sustainable operations, measurable recycling and contained waste for cleaner public spaces. Bigbelly helps cities enhance their public spaces by extending their smart bins into multipurpose platforms capable of hosting telecom equipment. Communities and solution providers share the challenge of how and where to deploy wireless equipment in the public right-of-way without additional clutter or negative aesthetic impact. Bigbelly enables communities to transform multiple core city services with a single infrastructure — waste management and wireless connectivity — during the pivotal 5G network roll out. The platform hides small cell equipment in plain sight, in an aesthetically accepted form, and exactly where the people are. Fund Investments An important element of innovation is research — who's developing what, what's working and what isn't, and where's the next innovation with potential for commercial success. Waste Management is a Limited Partner (LP) investor in three funds: EnerTech Capital Partners ("EnerTech Capital Partners IV"), Emerald Technology Ventures ("Emerald Industrial Innovation Fund") and Zouk Capital ("Zouk Renewable Energy and Environmental Infrastructure Fund II"). W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 49 IN1311SUAL111 Homes and businesses are filled with ordinary items and materials that require extraordinary disposal handling and recycling methods, due largely to their chemical composition. Think paint, automotive products, swimming pool chemicals, household cleaners, flammable and combustible items, garden chemicals, batteries, consumer electronics and items containing mercury, such as fluorescent lamps, to name a few — all items that should not be placed into regular solid waste bins. We've developed several programs to help our residential and business customers dispose of these materials properly. At Your Door Special Collection'''' Service At Your Door Special Collections"' service provides easy and convenient collection of home -generated special materials for single and multiunit homes in several states where logistics and customer preference support the service. As part of our home collection service, each participating household with qualifying materials receives a collection kit with a containment bag and instruction sheet. In 2017, Waste Management collected 3,590,733 pounds of materials through the At Your Door Collection service. Materials collected include consumer electronics, latex paint, hazardous materials and universal waste items. such as batteries. In addition to at-home collection services, we also collect fluorescent lamps, batteries, sharps and noncontrolled pharmaceuticals through containers placed at public locations, such as libraries, municipal buildings, pharmacies and community centers. Residents can simply place items in the collection containers, which are managed by a special collections team. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 50 For commercial customers, we offer our Tracker service, which enables businesses to dispose of universal and special wastes through a simple, safe and compliant mail - back method. This comprehensive program includes recycling kits for fluorescent lamps and bulbs, lighting ballasts, batteries, electronics, aerosol cans, thermometers, thermostats and dental amalgam, as well as safe disposal kits for sharps, medical waste and prescription and over-the-counter drugs. Containers, such as the patented Mercury VaporLok° packaging for fluorescent lamps, are specifically designed for safe storage and shipping via national carriers. Customers can obtain kits through our website and receive certificates that provide proof of recycling compliance via email. E-Waste ra F' Electronic waste material (e-waste) — such as old or broken computers, printers, copiers, etc. — is a topic of significant environmental concern and remains the fastest -growing waste + segment in North America, with more than 3 million tons* generated annually in the U.S. alone. Waste Management delivers electronic recycling solutions that are convenient to use, cost-effective and environmentally responsible. Supported by a comprehensive network of third -party processing centers certified and independently audited to the highest standards across the U.S. and Canada, our eCycling services can meet an organization's specific needs, with secure transport options from any point in the U.S. or Canada. All processing partner locations are audited to meet e-Steward', R2°/RIOS certification standards and are obliged to: Prevent hazardous e-waste from entering municipal incinerators or landfills. Prevent the exportation of e-waste to developing countries. Provide for visible tracking of e-waste throughout the product recycling chain. Products can be refurbished and resold for value or managed at the end of their useful life for commodity recovery. Commodities such as gold, silver, copper, plastics and more are recovered, while byproducts such as mercury, lead, barium and cadmium, the inherently hazardous byproducts of electronics, are carefully managed. Waste Management satisfies customer compliance with consumer take -back programs in the 25 states mandating these eCycling programs and provides the same comprehensive management in nonlegislated states as well. Coal Ash Recycling Air pollution regulations require particulates such as fly ash, a byproduct that can be used as a cement replacement in concrete production, to be captured rather than emitted. However, the methods used to capture fly ash lead to increased carbon levels in the fly ash. Power plants use activated carbon injection (ACI) systems to remove mercury from flue gases, which is then recaptured in the electrostatic precipitators or bag houses. *U.S. EPA Facts and Figures, 2015 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 51 This process prevents mercury from escaping the smokestack into the atmosphere, but the resulting fly ash contains elevated carbon levels that negatively affect the durability of concrete. Our patented Carbon Blocker fly ash treatment system is widely used by utilities to improve the quality of fly ash, making it suitable for recycling in concrete product applications. With more ACI systems in use today, fly ash recycling is a growing business for us. Since we acquired this proprietary technology in 2012, revenues have quadrupled, and in 2017 we beneficially utilized 972,894 tons of fly ash, with 863,763 metric tons of carbon dioxide (MTCO2e) avoided. Healthcare Industry Waste Two divisions of Waste Management work with the healthcare industry to reduce infectious medical waste and to provide facility -specific advice on means to reduce waste, recycle and assure protective disposal of the diverse streams of waste coming from hospitals and other healthcare providers. Waste Management Healthcare Solutions (WMHS) focuses on protecting the environment from potential impacts of infectious medical waste. In 2017, WMHS treated over 12.8 million pounds of infectious medical waste, then sent the noninfectious residue for secure disposal at secure landfill facilities. Healthcare Integrated Customer Solutions (ICS) works with healthcare customers, including 80 hospitals and more than 500 smaller locations, to manage their entire waste generation. In 2017, WMHS — ICS hospitals collectively achieved a total waste -to - recycling diversion rate of 20.4 percent and regulated medical waste generation rate of 7.7 percent. Our PharmEcology business unit works with over 300 healthcare customers and has implemented pharmaceutical waste programs at these institutions that have diverted over 2,500 tons of pharmaceuticals from entering our national waters through proper disposal management. Case Study: Progress Adds Up W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 52 CONSULTATIVE USTOMIZED A .14111a, Every organization, no matter the size or type of business or service, is in a different place on their sustainability journey. For this reason, a consultative and customized approach is often necessary. As one of the leading environmental service and solutions companies in the world, we are experts at optimizing efficient operations, minimizing environmental impact, instilling a culture of safety and accelerating performance. We leverage this expertise to customers across a wide range of industries through Waste Management Sustainability Services (WMSS). In the process, customers gain access to Waste Management's resources, technologies and innovations, which comprise the leading portfolio of environmental solutions in North America. Our certified team of experts — executives, engineers, scientists, analysts and innovators — work in collaboration with customers to design, develop and implement a wide range of solutions to meet sustainability, regulatory and cost -saving goals that adapt to a company's evolving needs. We work closely with each customer to offer customized, comprehensive solutions, whether the customer is starting out on the path toward sustainability or has already begun theirjourney. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 53 WMSS engages around the concepts of sustainability with 100 percent of its customers. Understanding how a customer defines sustainability within their own organization is considered a critical first step in discussing their overall business goals and strategy. Every initial conversation requires five questions related to sustainability: 1. Where are you on your sustainability journey? 2. Where do you want to be? 3. When do you want to arrive? 4. What resources (financial, expertise, relationships, upper -level support) do you have to get there in that time frame? 5. What is your company's footprint and what kind of impact do you want to have? Waste Management Sustainability Services FOUNDED IN 1997 AT -A -GLANCE $20OM+ CUSTOMER COST SAVINGS $14m8M SAVED IN 2017 PROFESSIONALS Each customer is assigned their own personalized team of materials management experts who embed themselves in the organization, on site or remotely, to ensure that the programs they construct are executed to drive environmental, social and economic value. Our implementation and management services seamlessly bridge the gap between conception and actualization. We also help track and measure results, amplify progress toward sustainability goals, and promote and celebrate accomplishments. Industries served include: > Petrochemical > Commercial Properties > Construction > Automotive > Manufacturing & Industrial > Healthcare > Transportation & Logistics > Retail > Public Sector > Events & Venues w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 54 For some customers, the best options for sustainable materials management involve leveraging both Waste Management's local assets and a broader network of third -party specialized providers. Customer solutions can span on -site support with local services and remotely managed specialized service providers. In this regard, we can serve as both broker and asset provider to increase efficiencies and meet customer goals for maximum reuse and recycling. Our remote and on -site resources programs place one or more Waste Management staff members on site at a single customer location or cluster of proximal customer locations. Designed for large, complex facilities, these centralized, customized and proactive industrial waste management strategies offset the expense of the dedicated resource. Our on -site, single -point -of -contact experts work upstream into each of the customers processes that generate waste, seeking ways to eliminate cost and capture byproducts at their highest point of value. WMSS's centralized solutions use experienced people, a nationwide network of vendor - partners and an innovative IT software platform to manage environmental programs that achieve business improvement targets, corporate environmental goals and ISO 9001 and 14001 objectives. A materials management expert serves on site, off site, or a combination thereof as a single point of contact to develop and drive all elements of a customer's program or project. Helping Our Customers Meet Their Sustainability Goals PRODUCT SOLUTIONS Product innovation is a critical part of today's business landscape. Consumers are increasingly pressuring manufacturers to innovate products in a manner that provides greater value and minimizes environmental impact. Our team of experts collaborate with our customers during the design phase to minimize the impact of their products on the environment and return valuable materials to the production stream through informed design choices. A key element of that partnership is helping customers Design With Intent, taking a systems -thinking approach that considers the true recyclability of products early in the design phase. This process takes a systems approach to product design that considers three factors: material selection, ease of disassembly and recycling infrastructure capabil- ities. Additionally, our Sustainable Innovation Workshop is designed to train customers on how to develop the insight necessary to make sustainability-driven, value -minded business decisions. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 55 Technology, Innovation and Strateg Alliances SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION WORKSHOPS A Sustainable Innovation Workshop is a facilitated session between Waste Management and our customer that focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of business objectives and challenges, culminating in a collaborative roadmap to achieve goals. Waste Management engages multiple stakeholders to facilitate the process of sustainability strategy development. The process includes data gathering, interviews and bringing stakeholders from various parts of the company together for a guided workshop. We facilitate this by providing an overview of industry trends and shared insights based on our experience in the marketplace to determine where our customer would like to be and how best to get them there. Having conducted a gap analysis of the customer's data and current programs, Waste Management is able to provide specific recommendations and probe for feedback on future sustainability initiatives from the group. By using an interactive, dialogue -based approach, both parties are able to understand challenges and discuss specific opportunities where collaboration can help drive value in the organization. The benefits to customers participating in a Sustainable Innovation Workshop include the ability to benchmark against other leaders in their industry and discover new ideas and strategies to transform their business. In addition, participating in a workshop takes advantage of having a cross -functional team in one place to identify solutions to multiple issues in one day, thus helping to achieve goals in an expedited fashion and sustain project momentum while saving time and money. In addition to meeting with representatives of our customers' environmental teams in energy and operations, transportation, and waste and recycling, Waste Management includes representatives from other departments, including executive leaders, procurement, loss prevention, donations, vendor management, reverse logistics, human resources, marketing and employee education, to learn how various programs integrate with overall company policies and practices. Working alongside one of our manufacturing customers, for example, we were able to help them create the first 100 percent fully recyclable product of its kind on the market by helping the customer analyze collection and processing influences, which validated the input materials for the product from the start. PROCESS SOLUTIONS No matter the industry, we consult with customers on a systematic approach to build on existing processes, infuse best practices and cultural improvements, and enhance an organization's ability to implement healthier, more sustainable practices into its operations. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 56 WMSS consulting teams conduct comprehensive audits of the social, environmental and economic impact of our customers' businesses. Audit findings generate recommendations for cost-effective ways to improve energy efficiency, resource management, waste diversion and alternate disposal opportunities. Then, we develop detailed roadmaps for eliminating waste and executing this strategy on site, often through reduced demand for source material and increased recycling. Our on -site team is embedded with customers seeking sole -source suppliers with the infrastructure and expertise to execute national waste reduction programs. With their understanding of each customer's operations and unique challenges, our on -site employees can deliver low -risk, high -value solutions to complex environmental, business, safety and regulatory needs. How Data and Analytics Can Power Decision Making ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS Measuring environmental, social and economic impacts helps customers assess progress and provides valuable data to use as a baseline in understanding the environmental impact of materials management decisions. WMSS offers customers a portfolio of tools to measure, manage and communicate sustainability progress and goals, with the knowledge that accurate and clearly communicated data analysis is imperative to making these strategic decisions. This effort is led by our Nexus team — skilled developers, analysts and project managers who work to recognize, research, develop and implement technology and reporting solutions. The Nexus team provides solutions to customer challenges via services such as customized web -based business intelligence platforms, streamlined invoicing solutions, automated reporting, app and web develop- ment and comprehensive data analysis. For example, ENSPIRE° is an online business intelligence platform created by our Nexus team that aggregates and repackages raw sustainability data into one interactive dashboard. Waste Management customers use ENSPIRE° as a platform to consolidate all their waste data from the U.S., Canada and Europe for full transparency and ease of reporting. It helps them understand how waste management choices impact their GHG emissions and allows them to set goals for GHG reduction, reuse and recycling. Providing ENSPIRE° is consistent with our overall ap- proach of serving customers by reducing their carbon footprint — and doing so with clear tracking and ambitious metrics. ENSPIRE° has managed more than 15 million tons of materials for customers at more than 60,000 locations. In 2017, material managed through ENSPIRE avoided nearly 7 million metric tons of GHG emissions, thereby meeting the need for an increased focus on corporate transparency. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 57 OTHER PLATFORMS THAT WE DEPLOY ARE: Sustainability Tracker: A leaner version of ENSPIRE°, this tool is designed for smaller customers who want to focus on specific KPIs in a condensed format for quick data evaluation. > INSIGHTS: Launched in 2018, this technology generates and sends customized scorecards to customers on their schedule. Customers automatically have the information they need to make important operational decisions. > DART°: Our Construction group's Diversion and Recycling Tracking (DART) tool helps project planners, contractors, architects and building owners set "green" performance targets and measure their progress during construction, renovation and demolition projects. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 58 Case Study: Waste Doesn't Take Vacations ADVISORY SERVICES Waste Composition Studies Completed waste assessments at full- and limited -service properties to benchmark composition and diversion rates across lines of business Program Implementation and Optimization > Created customized educational tools, including multilingual pocket guides and training materials > Developed tailored signage and bin placement strategies > Recommended programs to reduce newspaper and single -use amenities consumption > Recommended additional investment in on -site food waste digestion technologies > Recommended optimizations to amenity donation, employee engagement and reporting programs to drive progress toward diversion goal Life Cycle Analysis > Used results of waste composition studies and EPA WARM model to determine greatest opportunity for improvement > Layered life cycle thinking with economics of material management to identify the greatest opportunities for carbon and energy use reduction, as well as managing spend on environmental services Strategy Development > Collaborated with customer to develop industry -specific goals with measurable, transparent key performance indicators > Analyzed waste composition, cost of ownership and life cycle data to determine primary drivers for goal achievement > Aggregated data from the entire portfolio regarding waste generation and supply chain impacts to support the hotels' existing efforts to minimize waste W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 59 Researched differences in operations and infrastructure for each global region through interviews and other resources Based on data and global context, developed strategy to implement recommendations in order to reach goals Supply Chain Analysis > Requested data including quantities and types of materials purchased to drive recommendations for supply chain optimization > Developed alternate metrics and methods for obtaining data where it was not available Global Playbook Development > Completed global market analysis to understand regional infrastructure and growth potential, hospitality trends, and cultural and political drivers impacting waste diversion > Provided region -by -region descriptions of how to implement target diversion programs to achieve waste reduction goal > Utilized supply chain analysis to determine how programs should be weighted in order to achieve goal > Applied normalized metrics to the global portfolio to assign percentage diversion reductions per region, per program > Provided tactical guidance for program implementation > Formulated vendor questions to reduce primary and secondary packaging on purchased goods > Included case studies of the newspaper and amenity donation programs For customers who want a comprehensive view of their product's environmental impacts, we offer Life Cycle Assessments that evaluate all stages of a product's life — raw material extraction, manufacture, distribution, use, repair and maintenance, and end -of -life disposal or recycling. WMSS applies carbon reduction factors to material disposition options to maximize the end -of -life solutions for materials a company generates. The analysis provides insights into which stages have the greatest potential to avoid GHG emissions or to conserve natural resources. Using this analysis, WMSS is able to make recommendations for how to manage discarded materials in a way that maximizes the carbon reduction performance of a waste management program. Our vendor scorecards are a supply chain management tool that helps customers assess whether their vendors meet sustainability goals, including compliance with sustainable purchasing policies and packaging requirements. Certifications & Standards Many of our customers seek external verification of their sustainability efforts to underscore the credibility of their efforts and avoid greenwash claims. WMSS serves as a guide through this process, including advising on these third -party rating and certification systems. > Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) > The WELL Building Standard > TRUE Zero Waste Certification > UL Zero Waste Validations > BOMA 360 > Council for Responsible Sport Certifications > ENERGY STAR Certifications > Green Globes Certifications W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 60 Measuring Customer Success Delivering cost savings to customers through our WMSS operations is a primary objective and the key metric by which we measure success. One of our ISO goals is to provide ten percent of annual revenues back to customers as cost savings for contracts of less than five years and six percent for contracts of more than five years. In 2017, of 97 customer facilities under WMSS service engagements, we delivered savings of at least eight percent of revenues, and 23 percent of those facilities delivered savings of greater than ten percent of revenues. That translated into $14.8 million in cost savings on $181.7 million in revenue. 2017 marked the 14th consecutive year that WMSS has delivered more than $10 million per year in savings. Since 2003, the team has delivered more than $200 million in cost savings to customers. 2017 Customer Cost Savings by Industry Sector Automotive Chemical Metals / Manufacturing Petrochemical Remote Other Totals $ 22,781,383 $ 4,013,576 17.6% 5.5% 15.4% 6.0% 27.3% 8.9% 19.5% 26.8% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION RESULTS Customer satisfaction is another way we measure our performance. Every year we ask our customers how satisfied they are with our results and request their response through our Customer Engagement Index, then we measure the results against WMSS's ISO goals. In 2017, 57 percent of WMSS customers participated in the survey. Of those, 98 percent completely agreed that WMSS met their needs and provided valuable service. Cost Savings by Solutions Type ■ Strategic Sourcing: 22% ■ Process Improvement: 47% ■ Optimized Logistics: 9% Recycle/Reuse: 22% W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 61 Measuring Customer Success Our customized, integrated approach is designed to ultimately take our customers' sustainability initiatives to the next level — regardless of where they might be on their sustainability journey. We look at customer success through three different lenses: diversion, safety, and efficiencies and cost savings. Here are some recent examples of customer success. Auto Manufacturer RECYCLED NEARLY 90,000 Tons of materials in 2017 Commercial Property ACHIEVED 77% Diversion up from 20 percent, in less than a year, resulting in a 30 percent increase in cost savings Petrochemical Facilities CUSTOMERS ACHIEVED NEARLY $4 Million in cost savings Metals Manfacturer .................... Through a comprehensive resource recovery plan, customer recovered 20-25 Tons OF BYPRODUCT PER WEEK reaching its landfill reduction goal and generating $500,000 annually in discovered value Retail Food Customer DIVERTED 2,240 Tons of food scraps, increasing diversion from 10 percent to 80 percent in 7 months Construction and Mining Manufacturer Saved $145j000 IN ONE YEAR OF WMSS PROGRAM W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 62 U111 I I : Ll 1 FAII _4. Waste Management has been the title sponsor of the Greenest Show on Grass since 2010. Coming up on our 10th anniversary, the Waste Management Phoenix Open remains the most attended PGA TOUR tournament and largest third -party certified zero waste event in the world. We have consistently used this spotlight to engage with stakeholders on environmental issues, as a platform to show the varied and valuable services we provide, and to raise the bar for sustainable sports globally. The Waste Management Phoenix Open tracks its carbon and water footprints, in addition to being zero waste. Use of water, energy and materials all contribute to the GHG emissions that are warming our planet, and the event commits to balancing all environmental impacts from tournament activities. As the title sponsor of the Waste Management Phoenix Open, Waste Management works tirelessly to create a unique PGA TOUR tournament with a widespread and lasting positive impact. We challenged our commitment to the fans, local communities, and environment, as well as to hosting Thunderbirds, the PGA TOUR and to our own brand by achieving zero waste for the fifth year in a row with another on the way. It's the ultimate model of what is possible in terms of environmental leadership and vision. > Every choice made during the planning process was thoughtfully worked through to ensure that the event lived up to the title of "The Greenest Show on Grass." Year after year, Waste Management is the backbone of this zero waste achievement, making sure all tournament material finds new value — through reuse, recycling, composting, donating or turning it into energy. These efforts are meant to inspire partners, fans and viewers at home to experience and witness what's possible. > Waste Management also looks beyond diversion, prioritizing a reduction of waste in the larger sense and establishing programs for water conservation and restoration, renewable energy, GHG monitoring and carbon offsets. > The Waste Management Phoenix Open is not only a chance to showcase our services and capabilities — it's a platform through which Waste Management strives to drive environmental responsibility. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 63 ., R Waste Management Phoenix Open NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT > 75 million gallons of water restored > 100 percent renewable electricity > All operations and player travel emissions offset > 100 percent landfill diversion > Food and material donation COMMUNITY IMPACTS > Over $10 million to charity from Thunderbirds Charities > $105,000 to environmental organizations FAN & STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT > Zero Waste Station engagement > 100 percent vendor compliance with material requirements TRANSPARENCY & ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS > Council for Responsible Sport — Evergreen Inspire > Golf Environment Organization — GEO Certified° > UL — Zero Waste to Landfill Operations with 13.9 percent Incineration with Energy Recovery W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 64 Waste Management Sustainability Forum The Waste Management Sustainability Forum is an opportunity to convene a wide variety of thought leaders, policymakers, business people, experts, entrepreneurs and entertainers on the subject of sustainability. From its early, modest beginning eight years ago in a conference room at Arizona State University to its 2018 event with wall-to-wall screen and a livestream audience watching from home, the Forum has evolved to inform and inspire. It encourages participants to exchange ideas and learn to transform big thinking into bold actions to create a better world. This year, introductory remarks by The Gates Foundation's President, Bill Gates, and Waste Management's CEO Jim Fish reminded us that sustainability is about more than just environmental goals and measurements. Mike Rowe, Executive Producer and Show Host and Keller Rinaudo, Founder and CEO of Zipline, talked about the amazing power of people, and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel spoke to resiliency. A recording of the day can be found here. As in previous years, the Waste Management Sustainability Forum shifted gears in the afternoon, taking a deeper dive into key issues in our industry. The afternoon panels this year covered international recycling trends associated with China's changing import policies and a high-level analysis of the role of life cycle thinking in the recycling industry. With record attendance for the entire day — right up to the last speaker — attendees heard thoughtful presentations on leading efforts in our industry, and where they are heading. These panels included: Our recycling panel offered a rare opportunity to hear from the ALL ABOUT CHINA largest domestic mill buyer of mixed paper, Pratt Industries, and from one of China's largest mill groups, Lee & Mann. Ross Lee from Lee & Mann provided a unique insight into his company's approach for managing through changing policies that result from the Chinese government's commitments to a cleaner China. Clearly, material quality takes center stage for mills in China. And Myles Cohen, President of Pratt Recycling, explained how his company recycles New York City's mixed paper into pizza boxes, and mixed paper from Waste Management into the recycling containers used throughout the Waste Management Phoenix Open course. These efforts exemplify one of the key messages from this panel, which is the need for sufficient w ` 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 65 demand for recyclable materials if we are to successfully maneuver through the current global oversupply caused by China's import restrictions. A critical topic covered by the panelists was the overwhelming need to focus on quality. Both domestic and international mills reminded us that China's quality requirements have generated much stricter quality requirements across the globe. Linking global markets to state and local policies, the rest of IT'S ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT the afternoon dug deeply into the trends, facts and projects associated with life cycle thinking, as well as looking more broadly at our environmental goals and how we can think differently about our materials management programs to maximize our environmental benefit. We were reminded of why we recycle, and the importance of focusing on those actions which offer the greatest environmental benefits versus simply counting tons recycled. Cheryl Coleman, Director for the Resource Conservation and Sustainability Division within the Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery at the U.S. EPA, described EPA's framework policy, called Sustainable Materials Management, which focuses on using life cycle thinking to evaluate products along their entire life cycle, creating goals and programs that focus on achieving the greatest overall environmental impact — not focusing only on end -of -life programs and goals. This approach has been embraced by the State of Oregon, with senior policy analyst David Allaway, from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality's (ODEQ) Materials Management Program, presenting on his state's programs. Allaway's national leadership on this topic centers on the rationale for considering the environmental impact of materials, versus end -of -life, weight -based recycling goals. Evaluating their own waste stream and the environmental impacts of various materials within it, Oregon has come to focus their efforts on reducing food waste by 25 percent by 2025 and recovering 25 percent of their plastic and carpet by 2025. Mayor Denny Doyle from Beaverton, Oregon, next outlined the efforts that the City of Beaverton is making to reduce food waste, in support of his state's reduction goals. Dr. Tim Townsend, Jones Edmunds Professor of Environmental FROM THE AREA OF ACADEMICS Engineering Sciences in the Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and the Environment at the University of Florida, talked about the work he and his graduate students are doing to reevaluate Florida's recycling goals — reshaping their goals away from simple end -of - life, weight -based recycling goals to energy reduction goals. Similar to Oregon's efforts, Dr. Townsend has reviewed waste characterization data for the state through the prism of GHG emissions and energy. From this, Dr. Townsend described how new goals could reflect a realistic 75 percent energy reduction goal from a 2005 base year, with specific programs geared toward recycling the right things. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 66 This panel brought the national discussion around goals and measurements to a new level by clearly describing the case for change and the concept of creating new and different goals that reflect environmental benefits along the entire life cycle of products and packaging. One of the concerns with a shift to Sustainable Materials MODERATED DEBATE OF LIFE Management or Life Cycle Thinking has been the debate over CYCLE PRINCIPLES whether it is a distraction from important recycling efforts. Perhaps one of the best ways to engage in such meaningful discussions is to bring together thought leaders who do not necessarily agree. One of the highlights of the afternoon was a discussion between senior policy analyst David Allaway and Steve Alexander, President and CEO of the Association of Plastics Recyclers. Through a moderated question and answer session, Allaway and Alexander discussed topics such as whether or not life cycle thinking gives packaging producers license to skip the "design for recycling" component of their obligation for packaging improvement. Policies that drive the greatest environmental benefits simply must be incorporated into programs to ensure a long-term and ongoing effort for continuous improvement. U.S. EPA's Jarrod Bridge, an environmental physical scientist LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS in the Sustainable Materials Management Program, wrapped up the day with a short workshop on EPA's WARM (Waste and Reduction Model) tool, that calculates carbon and energy emissions for various materials in the waste stream. This popular workshop was included specifically in response to previous attendee requests and has since been recreated at other venues. Record In -Person Attendance 415 400 350 320 300 282 20 200 176 ' 150 151 100 ....... .......................................... 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 An additional 442 people participated in the Sustainability Forum online, bringing the total number of participants to well over 800 individuals. More information on past and future Sustainability Forums can be found on our website. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 67 1IV1111 1 rsedW I� Recycling operations involve a complex flow of materials. We collect, and our facilities receive, recyclables from a variety of sources: our own trucks, city collection crews, customers and competitors. Because of the complexity of this network, we realize that it makes more sense to work with partners across the industry than to try to identify and solve business challenges on our own. Waste Management has several key partnerships, including The Recycling Partnership, a nonprofit organization that works closely with cities, counties and states to implement effective programs; Keep America Beautiful, which works with local communities to help teach the fundamentals of recycling to a broad consumer base; and Industry Associations that include the National Waste and Recycling Association (NW&RA), the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) and the Institute for Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI). Our national partnerships on recycling are important means to educate legislators, regulators and the public about ways public policy can maximize the environmental benefits latent in recycling, or impede progress in this area. They are important means to advance the sustainability of recycling over the long term by serving as resources on recycling technology, end markets, and life cycle analyses. Local partnerships are equally important, and we participate actively with groups around the country. Read more in our Communities section. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 68 BETTER PE A CHANGING FOOTPRINT THAT IS LIGHTER, CLEANER AND SAFER. IN THIS SECTION Safe Landfills................................70 Energy Conservation ....................77 Carbon Footprint & Strategy .......79 Fleet..............................................84 Water Conservation .....................90 Waste Management provides solid waste collection services to nearly 20 million customers in North America — from households to public venues to large companies. All told, after recycling or diverting various materials for reuse, we safely manage the disposal of nearly 100 million tons of waste annually, including common municipal trash and highly specialized materials such as medical and industrial waste. To handle this volume, Waste Management operates the largest network of landfills in our industry and works hard to minimize the impact of those facilities on neighbors and the environment. Modern landfills are the products of sophisticated engineering, providing both secure containment systems for the disposal of waste and the opportunity to capture value through the conversion of waste to energy. Waste Management's modern landfills in the United States were developed under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which requires rigorous siting evaluation, site characterization and scientific engineering design, as well as a comprehensive permitting and regulatory approval process that includes public notification and comment. RCRA standards also require a range of measures to prevent environmental contamination, including the use of engineered liners and covers, collection and control systems for landfill gas, and collection and treatment systems for leachate (water that accumulates in and filters through waste). Watch How a Modern Landfill Is Constructed Our modern sites are designed and operated to go beyond regulatory requirements. We continually monitor and work to improve the safety and environmental security of our disposal facilities and are committed to reporting the results of these efforts. We strive to avoid W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 70 conditions that cause concern for neighbors and communities, including odors and noise, regardless of whether those conditions are covered in our regulatory obligations. We also work with waste sector experts to understand what happens within landfills after they are closed. Studies have shown that modern municipal solid waste landfills tend to improve predictably over time, steadily producing less gas and less (and cleaner) leachate. Many of our landfills are designed and managed to ensure they can be used after closure for commerce, industry or even conversion into wildlife habitat or public parks. Surface and Groundwater Waste Management's landfills are living laboratories for testing new technologies to help us improve how we manage stormwater and leachate, and how we design and maintain landfill cover and gas collection systems. We test the effectiveness of new technologies at select sites before broadly employing them at all sites to enhance environmental performance and reduce operational costs. Waste Management utilizes extensive engineering controls and practices to protect surface water and groundwater. We maintain a comprehensive network of more than 6,000 groundwater -monitoring wells around our facilities, and every landfill uses monitoring strategies — many involving sophisticated statistical evaluations — to ensure that water quality in adjacent surface water and groundwater bodies is not impacted. Our modern municipal solid waste landfill liners contain all liquids, which are then managed according to applicable regulations and design standards. We employ a staff of nearly 200 professional engineers, environmental scientists, regulatory experts and technicians who ensure that every facility works to protect surface water, stormwater and groundwater from any potential operational impacts. We use managed basins, tanks, containment structures and separators to redirect liquids for proper disposal and treatment. We also monitor on -site wastewater treatment plants to optimize efficiency and utilize a toolkit of best management practices for our field operations. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 71 Stormwater Filtration Waste Management landfills collect and discharge millions of gallons of stormwater each year. The water must be managed to ensure it is clean enough to meet strict state requirements before being released to water bodies or public treatment plants. One new technology, called Terra -Tubes, has been successfully deployed at several landfills to reduce suspended solids in the stormwater. Terra -Tubes are made of engineered wood and man-made fibers encased in a heavy-duty, knitted cylindrical tube. The tubes are installed at stormwater outfalls and have been successful in slowing water flow to allow for settling and enhanced filtration of the water prior to discharging it off site. Natural & Enhanced Leachate Evaporation Landfills naturally produce leachate from a combination of the breakdown of waste materials and precipitation falling on the landfill. Leachate is typically stored on site in lined impoundments or tanks before it is treated and eventually discharged. Waste Management has been developing and testing technologies to reduce both the volume of water and disposal costs. One technology harnesses a nature. By constructing wetlands and planting grasslands and poplar groves to naturally filter and clean leachate, Waste Management has made use of natural ecological systems to treat water, while also increasing natural habitat for native plants. We have also used a simple technology that recirculates and evaporates leachate using the side slopes of leachate ponds. An electric pump pulls water from the pond and circulates it through lateral pipes that are equipped with sprinkler heads. Water that is not evaporated filters through gravel placed on the side slopes to return to the pond. The system can evaporate as much as 20,000 gallons of liquid per day, reducing the volume of water that must be handled at publicly owned wastewater treatment plants by as much as 30 percent. Another new technology deployed at several western Waste Management landfills uses a solar -powered floating recirculation device that draws leachate from deep within the pond and disperses it at the surface to help maintain warmer surface temperatures that enhance evaporation. Called the SolarBee, the device also eliminates pond scum on the surface that can interfere with evaporation. Waste Management engineers have developed a pilot evaporation system that uses waste heat from the landfill's engine plant that is used to produce renewable electricity. The waste heat warms the Leachate to facilitate evaporation and enhance treatment. Data from the pilot will be used to evaluate other locations where the technology can be deployed. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 72 Innovation in Landfill Cover A closed landfill's final cap or cover is one of its most important environmental protection features. It must be constructed in accordance with federal and state requirements and properly maintained for years into the future. Atypical final cap comprises several layers of plastic membrane, a drainage system and a covering of soil. These covers are engineered to prevent precipitation from percolating through the landfilled waste. With approval from U.S. EPA, Waste Management has permitted over 40 sites for the design and construction of innovative final covers known as evapotranspiration covers. These covers are constructed of soil and selected vegetation and are specifically designed to store water and release it to plants through evaporation. By working with nature rather than resisting it, evapotranspiration covers provide long-term, sustainable protection, are easy to maintain and provide a natural habitat of native plants and grasses. Long -Term Stewardship Just as we strive for safety and environmental quality at all our operating landfills, we want to be stewards of the environment when these facilities come to the end of their useful lives. Since 1991, Waste Management has had an independent, formally designated Waste Management department to manage the company's legacy sites — closed landfills linked with companies Waste Management acquired over the years and facilities closing at end of permit life. The department is separate from ongoing operations, with specialists experienced in the science and engineering of site closure and long-term management of these properties. These experts bring a fresh eye to sites ending their useful lives, and they are attentive to opportunities for secure maintenance of the sites for the long term. The Environmental Legacy Management Group also looks for opportunities for these sites to provide new benefits to the community. These efforts are supported by innovative, peer -reviewed science from Waste Management employees working with leading experts in their fields. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 73 BETTER OPERATIONS > SAFE LANDFILLS COUNTY LINE I OYSTER BAY ' BLACKWELL Oakland, 01 Ontario, Canada > soccerfields > hiking trails > walking trails > BMX track > picnic areas > dog park > dog walking > playground risbee golf i MIDWAY AND SETTLER'S HILL GREENE VALLEY PJP LANDFILL Contiguous sites in West metro Chicago, IL Jersey City, NJ west metro Chicago, IL > golf courses viewing area open to the transferred to the City > cross-country course public at certain times but and NJDEP which allowed ho hat is currently in controlled by the Forest for use as a public park evelopment by the county .,,�'O,Ii_r� Parklands (NJ) L&D (NJ) Hunt Road (MA) Berkley (MA) MT Sullivan (MA) Hudson Stow (MA) Cinnaminson (NJ) Solar Energy Applications at Closed Landfills Our large geographic footprint of landfills and their proximity to existing infrastructure can make them ideal locations for large-scale solar installations. We continue to increase our commitment to solar generation, a strategy that is aligned with U.S. EPA's RE -Powering America's Land initiative. First launched in 2008, this innovative federal program has resulted in nearly 253 installations on contaminated lands, landfills and mine sites, with a cumulative installed capacity of just over 1,397 megawatts nationwide. 10.1 MW (dc) 12.9 MW (dc) 6.0 MW (dc) 3.612 MW (dc) Lease Holder Currently, we lease seven closed PSE&G landfills for solar development, PSE&G working collaboratively with the Waste Citizens Energy Management Renewable Energy group. A summary of the portfolio follows: Captona Energy Partners 2.54 MW (dc) Captona Energy Partners In New Jersey, we have partnered 5.83 MW (dc) Captona Energy Partners with Public Service Electric and Gas 13 MW (dc) PSE&G Company (PSE&G), which, in 2018, constructed a third solar project on the closed Cinnaminson landfill in Cinnaminson, New Jersey. The project is planned to be 13 megawatts and is anticipated to be commissioned by the end of the year. We plan to generate 54 megawatts of power from the solar fleet on closed facilities before 2019. Expertise & Research As the largest operator of landfill networks in the industry, we provide extensive staff training to assure continuing education and dissemination of current best practices. This training includes classes in landfill design, construction and management; landfill gas systems management; and advanced instruction in air permitting and compliance. These courses are complemented by a range of eLearning modules in the management of greenhouse and other gases. Other learning opportunities enhance expertise in almost every phase of safe landfill operation. In 2018, Waste Management opened its first landfill gas technician training center at the former ELDA Landfill in Cincinnati, Ohio. As recognized leaders in landfill gas management, the intent and purpose of the training center is to use internal expertise to train entry-level technicians to provide continuity and consistency across the enterprise. The training center allows for both classroom instruction on the technical aspects of landfill gas and field proficiency assessment. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 75 We also contribute to new bodies of knowledge through research collaborations with expert stakeholders. For example, Waste Management engineers working with an academic research team evaluated and estimated the capacity of an evapotranspiration cover at a subject landfill to oxidize landfill gas emissions by modeling the methane flux from the waste mass to the base of the cover system. The study provides a method for estimating when methane oxidation in a landfill's cover may represent the best available control technology for residual landfill gas emissions. Published in 2018 (Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, D01:10.1080/10962247.2018.1500403) the study should help landfill operators and regulators agree upon the process for determining when to cease active landfill gas system controls. Additionally, in 2017, Waste Management and a research team completed a case study on optimal approaches to long-term landfill management by assessing threat potential from closed landfill assets to eliminate that threat. The research project evaluated the two industry standards for performance -based outcomes (functional stability and organic stability) using actual data from a closed Waste Management MSW landfill. The results were published in 2018 (Waste Management 75 (2018) 415-426), providing the industry its first implementation of performance -based analysis using real -world data to assess threat potential across media. This foundational research is key to identifying long-term stewardship options that are reliable, science -based, and designed to assure safety throughout the transition of closed landfill properties to beneficial re -use after closure. See Appendix to review a list of peer -reviewed technical articles and conference papers published by Waste Management experts in the past several years. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 76 I I Ll ki : ILITIA 1 711 Ensuring energy efficiency and conservation throughout our operations is important, as it impacts both our greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint and our cost structure. Energy use costs represent approximately 5 percent of total annual revenues. In 2017, we consumed 7.6 million MWh of total electricity across our over 1,300 Waste Management sites. We aggressively seek solutions to improve energy efficiency in every facility we operate by implementing a range of technologies and best practices that reduce environmental impacts, improve operational efficiencies and achieve cost savings. These efforts often start with the construction of our facilities, which usually are built to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED standards, regardless of whether we seek certification. Waste Management is both a supplier and a user of renewable energy, increasingly utilizing sources such as wind, solar, waste heat and landfill gas to power and heat our facilities. We focus our efforts on generation of renewable energy rather than internal use of renewables, since our overall use of electricity is comparatively small. We look for capacity to generate renewable energy throughout the organization. For example, in 2017, we hosted the generation of 100 MWh of energy from wind, and we will host up to 54 megawatts of landfill -based solar farms by the end of 2018. We continue to look for opportunities to use solar electricity in support of U.S. EPA's RE -Powering America's Land initiative, which encourages renewable energy development on current and formerly contaminated lands, landfills and mine sites when it is aligned with the community's vision for the site. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 77 Additional innovations and investments to enhance renewable energy production at our landfills include: > Technologies to convert materials into ultra -low -sulfur diesel and other transportation fuels and petroleum products > Small-scale gasification to convert solid biomass feedstock, as well as other combustible feedstocks into a high hydrogen and carbon monoxide -rich synthetic gas > Thermal chemical conversion of waste materials into advanced biofuels such as ethanol, as well as renewable chemicals > Accelerated high solids aerobic and anaerobic digestion to produce renewable energy from organics > Conversion of landfill gas into renewable natural gas used to power vehicles, generate electricity at our landfill gas -to -energy (LFGTE) facilities, generate power off -site, or use as a heating fuel; and > Conversion of biomass into organic salts that can be converted into a high-octane gasoline that can then be blended directly into a refiner's fuel pool, avoiding many of the blending and logistics challenges presented by ethanol. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 78 8 GARBUN FU WHIN I STRATEGY FIM We are transforming our business model to seize opportunities to compete in tomorrow's climate -constrained world. Each day, our customers look for our help to reduce their GHG emissions, and this is also a strategic imperative for our business. We continue to expand the productivity of our recycling operations and explore the many options to reduce our footprint. This includes: > Producing low -carbon fuels from waste. > Transitioning our fleet to renewable natural gas vehicles. > Improving the energy efficiency of our facilities. > Increasing our use of renewable energy. > Expanding the productivity of our recycling operations, with an emphasis on increasing the recycling of those materials that provide the greatest GHG reduction benefit. > Providing climate -related sustainability consulting services to customers who want to improve tracking, reduce their carbon footprints, and/or prepare for potential carbon cap -and -trade or carbon tax scenarios. We have a long track record of leadership in climate -related disclosure, having participated in the CDP (formerly the Climate Disclosure Program) climate reporting for more than a decade. For the past two years, we have been named to the CDP Climate A list, considered the world's most comprehensive rating of companies leading on environmental action. See Appendix for more detail on the CDP and methodology. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 79 Our GHG Footprint 2017 Emissions (metric tons CO2e) Scope 1 776,646 14,913,347 15,689,993 Scope 2 12,119 232,709 244,828 Scope 3 725,693 7,939,892 8,665,585 Scope 1 includes emissions from Waste Management -owned and -operated facilities and vehicles, Scope 2 includes indirect emissions from purchased electricity, and Scope 3 includes purchased goods and services; capital goods; fuel- and energy -related activities; business travel; employee commuting; downstream leased assets. GHG Emissions Impact ' GHG Footprint (Metric Tons CO2e) Process 13,603,232 13,681,187 Transportation 1,696,067 1,597,312 Energy Use 585,822 656,322 Potential Avoided GHG Emissions (Metric Tons COZe) Renewable Energy Generation 2,252,035 2,420,864 Reuse and Recycling of Materials 32,571,862 32,588,647 Carbon Permanently Sequestered 18.536,528 19,481,205 Waste -Based Energy Benefits Tons of Coal Equivalent 2,540,000 2,480,000 Waste -Based Energy Production (million households) 470,000 460,000 Resource Savings Achieved through Recycling* Households Powered Equivalent 1.7 million 1.6 million Cars Taken Off Road Equivalent 6.9 million 6.9 million *Based on EPA WARM model using defaults W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Climate Strategy We incorporate climate change considerations into all aspects of our business strategy. Among the climate change considerations influencing strategy are: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS Weather events can threaten business continuity. We have refined our disaster response plans for disposal facilities, using FEMA flood maps to expand the list of locations with supplemental electrical generating capacity. We also have re-evaluated where emergency equipment should be placed and where we should pre -position fuel and disaster supplies. REGULATORY CHANGES We monitor developments that may affect our operations or our customers' and engage oilwith a broad array of stakeholders, including federal, state and provincial governments, to recommend approaches that produce meaningful GHG reductions at reasonable cost. GREEN BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES WMSS, recycling, renewable energy production and carbon sequestration in landfills are all carbon -reducing services that we provide to customers. We monitor customer advocacy and goals based upon the Paris Agreement for market trends affecting our renewable energy portfolio, recognizing that our multinational customers are shaping their procurement strategies on factors beyond U.S.-driven climate policy. Cross -disciplinary teams continuously monitor our customers' needs to reduce carbon, as well as regulatory development and lower -carbon financial incentives. The latter are analyzed by Senior Leadership as part of our market business strategy annual assessment and used in capital allocation. Ongoing capital allocation for natural gas trucks, as an example, supports our forward -looking, science -based goal to reduce emissions associated with our fleet by 45 percent by 2038, against a 2010 baseline. Recycling and GHG Reduction Tools Our priority is to improve the sustainability of recycling economics by providing tools for our customers to understand the GHG reductions achieved through recycling, thus motivating them to procure services needed to improve recycling quality. Efforts to improve the quality and quantity of recycling are aligned with our science -based goal to increase avoided emissions by 38 percent by 2028, against a 2010 baseline. Recycling will play a critical role in helping to achieve that goal. The method by which customers choose to manage waste materials has a direct impact on the amount of GHG emissions generated. According to the EPA's Waste Reduction Model (WARM), for example, three times the life cycle emissions are generated when mixed recyclable material is disposed rather than recycled. Consider that in 2017, Waste Management avoided the generation of 32,588,647 MTCO2e life cycle emissions by recycling materials or repurposing them to generate renewable energy and create compost rather than disposing them. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2 Innovation & Technology Climate change also influences our long-term strategy, including the development and incorporation of new technologies. We are focused on deployment of lower -carbon technologies that are already commercialized and identifying geographic -area targets for our commercial recycling and green fuel projects over a five-year time frame; for projects seeking to create products from renewable feed stock, our time frame extends to 15 years. Examples of development priorities include: > Expanding existing and identifying new beneficial use projects to manage methane at our landfills. > Developing high -BTU projects that convert landfill gas to renewable transportation fuels for use in our heavy-duty trucks and for sale to third parties. > Investing in innovations to convert waste materials into energy and other low -carbon products while perfecting the technical processes, logistics and match of products to market demand. Read more about our waste -based energy generation on page 43. > Furthering our renewable energy production through investment in companies that are developing sustainable energy technologies. Learn more about waste -based energy production on page 47. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT M CEO -Level Stakeholder Engagement Our strategy to enable four times as many GHG emissions reductions as we generate is led from the top. Waste Management's CEO maintains a public dialogue on GHG emissions reduction as recycling's key benefit and advocates maximizing recovery of targeted commodities, such as cardboard or aluminum cans, that provide the most GHG benefit. Our public -sector team is closely engrained in our local communities, helping implement programs that support local community sustainability priorities. Our consulting arm, Waste Management Sustainability Services, also furthers this effort by helping customers achieve sustainability and climate change goals through "zero waste" services for large events, plus a full range of recycling, waste reduction, renewable energy, water conservation and environmental education services for large corporate customers. Sustainable Materials Management Engagement For the past three years, we have advocated across stakeholder groups for GHG emissions reduction to be the focus of federal, state and local government and private sector recycling goals rather than focusing merely on the weight of materials recycled. We are especially engaged with stakeholders on ways to increase the productivity and economic sustainability of recycling. That's why we helped form the Sustainable Materials Management Coalition on recycling, headed by a former U.S. EPA assistant administrator for solid waste and emergency response. We also dedicated the entire afternoon of our 2018 Waste Management Sustainability Forum to a workshop on Sustainable Materials Management. At the Forum, we engaged over 100 stakeholders in a dialogue around using life cycle thinking to prioritize materials management programs in communities and at businesses across North America. Educating our customers — as well as communities, schools, nonprofit organizations, other businesses and their leaders — about recycling benefits and best practices has been critical to effecting transformational change. Learn more about our education efforts on page 122. We also work with designers and the manufacturing industry to avoid or reduce raw material processing, and to include recycled materials in their products. We utilize our materials recovery facility infrastructure, as well as our consulting group, to teach designers and manufacturers about the recycling process. Waste Management's recycling activities result in a wide variety of GHG reductions that otherwise very likely would not occur. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 83 We charge our fleet of more than 32,000 vehicles with providing reliable everyday waste collection for our customers while minimizing its environmental impact. We've set bold goals, utilized smart solutions and leveraged innovative technology to realize progress. Sixty-six percent of our residential routes run with automated or semiautomated equipment, which reduces the number of times our employees must exit the truck while collecting trash and recyclables, which in turn reduces accidents. That effort started in 2007 when we set our first goal to reduce CO2 fleet emissions by 15 percent, which we achieved in 2011 primarily by transitioning our fleet of collection vehicles from diesel to cleaner -burning natural gas. With a vision to create a near -zero emissions collection fleet, we're now working toward a science -based target to reduce emissions associated with our fleet 45 percent by 2038, against a 2010 baseline, and from 2010 through 2017 we have reduced fleet emissions 28 percent. Key to achieving this ambitious goal is a commitment to invest approximately $400 million annually in the cleanest near -zero -emissions trucks available. At the end of 2017, our natural gas fleet counts 6,536 trucks, which comprise the largest heavy-duty natural gas truck fleet of its kind in North America. Our vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) emit nearly zero particulate emissions, cut GHG emissions by 15 percent and are quieter than diesel trucks. For every diesel truck we replace with natural gas, we reduce our use of diesel fuel by an average of 8,000 gallons per year along with a reduction of 14 metric tons of GHG emissions annually. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 84 Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) BY -THE -NUMBERS 12/13/1 i L-%-�j 38% ROUTED COLLECTION TRUCKS ARE h _ .. NEW PURCHASES ARE NGVs 195000 I METRIC TONS GHGs Reduc._ Annually Using Fossil and Renewable Natural Gas Fuel 6P536 NGVs IN OPERATION 107 >60 MILLION Gallons of Natural Gas Supplied at 107 Natural Gas Stations Each Year 16 MILLION RNG Gallons Produced by Harnessing Methane in Landfills 855 MILLION Diesel Gallons Displaced Over the Useful Life of Existing NGVs W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 85 Fueling Our Fleet Critical to our natural gas strategy is an infrastructure of Waste Management -owned and -operated fueling stations. As of the end of 2017, we operated 107 natural gas fueling stations across North America, with 29 of these also open to the public. Waste Management finances and constructs the stations, as well as purchasing the fuel. Our landfill -gas -to -fuel plants convert landfill gas into renewable natural gas (RNG), a pipeline -quality gas that is fully interchangeable with conventional natural gas and thus can be used in our vehicles in the form of CNG or liquefied natural gas (LNG). This lowers fuel costs and reduces GHG emissions more than 80 percent compared to vehicles powered by diesel. Offsetting Fossil Fuel With RNG RNG is biogas, the gaseous product of the decomposition of organic matter, that has been processed to purity standards. Like conventional natural gas, RNG can be used as a transportation fuel in the form of CNG. Biogas is produced from various biomass sources through a biochemical process, such as anaerobic digestion. With minor cleanup, biogas can be used to generate electricity and heat. To fuel vehicles, biogas must be processed to a higher purity standard. This process is called conditioning or upgrading, and involves the removal of water, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and other trace elements. The resulting RNG, or biomethane, has a higher content of methane than raw biogas, which makes it comparable to conventional natural gas and thus a suitable energy source in applications that require pipeline -quality gas. Offsetting natural gas is comparable to the process of yielding renewable electricity from our landfills. In the case of renewable electricity, energy is added to the electrical grid at one of our landfills, and that same amount of energy is "credited" as renewable electricity by a user at another site within the same electric grid. Key to this process is that the amount of electricity delivered into the grid equals the amount of electricity taken off the same grid. Waste Management has been offsetting electricity with renewable energy for decades using this process. Renewable fuel works in exactly the same way. Biogas is processed and cleaned before the clean biomethane is put into the pipeline at our (or another company's) landfill — and an equal amount is used as fuel within the same pipeline system. As with electricity, the gas input and outflow must be on the same gas pipeline system and must be carefully recorded to ensure that they are the same. The process is carefully W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 86 tracked and verified as renewable fuel by the U.S. EPA when the cycle is complete and only qualifies as RNG after the gas has been used in natural gas vehicles. This certification system is in place at each of our qualified landfills and fueling facilities. Each gas project is reviewed and qualified by the U.S. EPA using engineers who verify that the RNG entering the gas pipeline equals the volume of gas extracted from that same pipeline, and is actually used for vehicle fuel. Closing the Loop: Converting Landfill Gas to RNG Waste Management has the largest fleet of natural gas vehicles in our industry, with 6,536 natural gas collection trucks operating in North America. We support this fleet with our 107 natural gas fueling facilities. Waste Management is unique in that we are both a source of, and an end user of, renewable fuel. We currently fuel over a third of our natural gas fleet with RNG produced from landfill biogas at three of our own facilities plus third -party producers. Our long-term and ongoing investments in RNG production facilities, coupled with a natural gas fleet that can operate on RNG, are moving us closer to a near -zero emissions collection fleet. In 2017, Waste Management's fleet consumed 6,670,000 MMBtu of natural gas in 6,536 natural gas vehicles (NGVs). Of that total usage, we are managing approximately 2,010,000 MMBtu/year, or 30 percent, of biogas that offsets our total fleet needs. This includes internal and external biogas sources. 100 percent of our natural gas fleet in California, Oregon and Washington runs on RNG, which reduces GHG emissions by 70 percent compared to diesel. Currently, Waste Management has four facilities that produce RNG: 1. ALtamont Landfill (Livermore, CA) — In 2009, this facility began producing enough RNG to fuel 300 trucks. Milam Landfill (St. Louis, Illinois) — This site, which debuted in 2014, processes and purifies gas from the landfill and injects it into the Ameren Illinois pipeline. The facility produces about 12,000 diesel gallon equivalents (DGE) per day of RNG, enough to fuel approximately 500 of our natural gas collection trucks. 3. American Landfill (Waynesburg, Ohio) — This facility processes and purifies gas from the landfill and injects it into the Dominion East Ohio pipeline. It produces 6,000 DGEs per day of RNG, enough to fuel about 250 of our natural gas trucks. 4. Outer Loop Landfill (Louisville, Kentucky) — Brought on-line in June of 2018, this facility produces 2,500 MMBtu per day of RNG — enough to fuel about 800 natural gas collection trucks. Our Midwest facilities pump RNG directly into the pipeline, displacing reliance on fossil natural gas. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT IN Volvo LX1 Electric Hybrid Wheel Loader Equipment Efficiencies While our "last generation" natural gas engine cuts smog -producing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by up to 50 percent compared to the cleanest diesels, our 2017 near - zero -emission natural gas engine (ISL-G "NZ") is the cleanest heavy-duty machine ever certified by the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Waste Management helped pioneer this engine with Cummins, and it now provides a 95 percent reduction in NOx emissions compared to the current NOx standard and a 93 percent reduction in NOx compared to the latest diesel engine technology. Additionally, the new engine is already certified at 16 percent below the current GHG emission standard and is 12 percent below the 2027 standard. We also have the largest fleet of hybrid bulldozers in the industry, operating 42 Caterpillar NE's at 39 different landfill locations across the country. The NE's rate of hourly fuel consumption is on average six gallons less than the D8 tractors it replaces, translating into annual savings of nearly one half million gallons of diesel fuel. -. `^ Our collection of Caterpillar D7Es is the largest fleet of hybrid bulldozers in the industry. Wheel loaders are another electric hybrid machine we are exploring. In conjunction with Volvo Construction Equipment, we hosted two field tests forVolvo's prototype LX1 electric hybrid wheel loader at our Redwood Landfill and Moreno Valley Transfer Station, both in California. Data was collected on the wheel loader's fuel efficiency and GHG reduction against a conventional machine. The LX1 achieved approximately a 50 percent and 45 percent fuel efficiency improvement on average, at the Redwood and Moreno Valley sites respectively. Driving Fewer Miles Efficient logistics are an effective way to reduce fleet emissions. The logic is simple: a more efficient route means fewer miles traveled, and that translates into reduced fuel consumption and associated emissions. Since 2017, Waste Management's fleet has reduced miles driven by 2 percent, which equates to an approximate 8.9 million fewer miles a year. Optimizing routes not only reduces our environmental impact, but also increases the quality of service. As we've driven fewer miles, we've improved the number of stops missed for both commercial and residential customers. Credit for much of this progress goes to our Service Delivery Optimization (SDO) initiative, which helps us streamline routes. Under a "Safety, Service, Savings" motto, 95 percent of collection vehicles are SDO certified. SDO technology includes DriveCam°, a video W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 88 BETTER OPERATIONS > FLEET Optimizing Logistics Waste Management's Routing & Logistics organization was established to create route optimization and logistics capabilities within the Collection Operations. We recognize that to be a world class leader in the industry, it is very important to have a centralized orga- nization where route optimization techniques and processes are standardized, refined and deployed. It's proven to be a valuable and consistent method for managing the safety, efficiency and overall quality of our routes across the enterprise. The Routing & Logistics team is made up of 12 Corporate engineers and 40 local area logistics resources. Together, the team partners to create comprehensive logistics plans that identify routing opportunities and key operational metrics. Logistics plans are reviewed regularly with the local area leader- ship to ensure routing efforts are addressing priority opportunities. In 2017, we did 150 reroutes in 80 locations. Our plan is to continue to route the top 20 percent of our commercial and residential routes each year. Overall mile reduction reduces the exposure to risk for drivers. A well -planned route reduces potentially dangerous driving behavior by elimination of U-turns and backing and reduced left turns. A well - planned route executed consistently each day provides the driver with a steady routine that keeps safety in the forefront. Reroutes provide the opportunity to make changes to service days, allowing Waste Management to service customers on the requested service days and times. Servicing customers on the correct day at the correct time provides an improved customer experience. ok, A LK INSFRVATIC Though our operations are not relatively water intensive, as global water consumption increases at a historic pace we work to use water sparingly and responsibly in our operations. Primary water uses include vehicle washing, dust suppression, sanitation and employee consumption. Waste Management operates facilities ranging from landfills and hauling facilities to transfer stations and recycling facilities, dispersed across 17 market areas in the U.S. and Canada. We also own or lease office space throughout North America. Due to the geographic and operational variations in the facilities we operate — as well as the numerous utility providers — obtaining complete operational water consumption data can be a challenge. Enhanced Water Tracking We estimate that our current annual operations use approximately 627.5 million gallons of water. After accounting for the water consumed by our employees and operations, we estimate that approximately 490.8 million gallons of water is returned to either the municipal sewer system or groundwater aquifers, depending on the site's location. In 2016, we began employing a third -party utility bill management (UBM) service to assist in gathering water and energy usage data across our sites. Through the UBM system, Waste Management can now retrieve water withdrawal data by market area, which offers a baseline understanding of consumption patterns on a regional level. Our goal is to complete the enablement of all sites into the UBM system. Utilizing the information gathered from this process, we will be developing more meaningful quantitative goals around water usage. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 90 Water Risk Assessment The ability to pull consumption data by site also enables us to complete water risk mapping. By overlaying our regional water use with geographic information regarding water stress, we can both focus conservation efforts to minimize Waste Management's impacts where they are potentially most detrimental and develop effective risk mitigation and action plans to minimize disruptions to our business that may occur due to inadequate water quantity or quality. Currently, 20 percent of our water consumption occurs at sites located in water -stressed regions. We continually strive to reduce the amount of water consumed in these regions through innovative programs such as using recycled graywater for truck washing to reduce dependence on the municipal water supply. While we are still in the process of applying a standardized process to capture quantitative data on water recycling and reuse initiatives, we are moving forward with implementation of the initiatives themselves. We continually look forways to reduce water consumption across our operations, whether through implementation of graywater initiatives, fixture replacement or other conservation methods. In addition, we engage with other stakeholders by working with policymakers and trade associations on water policy through our work with the RCRA Corrective Action Project (RCAP) and the Sediment Management Work Group on sediment sites. Waste Management reports on our operations and supply chain impacts on water and responds to our customers' and investors' requests for this information through CDP (formerly Carbon Disclosure Project). Finally, we utilize the Waste Management Phoenix Open to highlight water concerns and coordinate restoration efforts. We have reported our water consumption since baselining the tournament's operations, and we implement a graywater capture program that reduces freshwater consumption by 5,000 to 6,000 gallons each year. In 2018, we worked with The Thunderbirds as well as Kohler and M Culinary to restore 75 million gallons, or 283.91 megaliters, to Northern Arizona rivers and streams. Since initiating this effort with Change the Course in 2015, the Waste Management Phoenix Open has been responsible for the restoration of 236 million gallons of water to the Verde River and other freshwater ecosystems in Arizona. Waste Management Phoenix Open Water Restoration Project (in gallons) 80 75 63 63 60 40 35 20 1....... I ...... I ...... 2015 2016 2017 2018 W 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT m OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHANGE THAT RESULT IN ENGAGEMENT AND PROFESSIONAL GROWTH. IN THIS SECTION Our Workforce..............................93 Diversity & Inclusion ....................94 Engagement & Retention ............98 Talent Management ...................102 Safety..........................................103 Security.......................................109 Training.......................................111 Waste Management provides services to nearly 20 million customers — a big job. But we do it one city, one neighborhood, one business and one home at a time. This makes us an integral part of every community where we operate. We have a stake in helping to make our cities, towns and counties better places in which to work and live — not just for today, but for the future. We can't play this important role in the community without the daily contributions of our over 42,000 employees. The success of each employee is what enables Waste Management to succeed, and we strive to give our employees the tools they need to develop and excel in their careers. THINK GREEN is more than a motto at Waste Management. It's what we stand for, who we are and what we do. It is how we demonstrate our fundamental commitments and core values and the basis for our culture. COMMITMENTS VALUES > Our People First: The proud, engaged and > Inclusion & Diversity: We embrace and cultivate resilient members of the Waste Management respect, trust, open communications and family are the foundation for our success. It all diversity of thought and people. starts with us taking care of each other, our > Customers: We place our customers at the center customers, communities and the environment. of what we do and aspire to delight them every day. > Success with Integrity: Our success is based not only on the results we achieve, but how we achieve them. We hold ourselves and each other accountable for being honest, trustworthy, ethical and compliant. > Safety: We have zero tolerance for unsafe actions and conditions and make safety a core value without compromise. > Environment: We are responsible stewards of the environment and champions for sustainability. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 93 Fostering mutual trust and respect for one another is a cornerstone of being an inclusive and welcoming workplace — one that is well - positioned to serve our customers and communities. It's also important that our workforce reflect the diverse customers and neighbors that make up these communities. As an equal opportunity employer, we are committed to maintaining a workplace environment free from discrimination. Employment decisions are made by placing the most qualified person in each job without regard to race, color, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, marital status, age, national origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status, citizen status or other protected group status as defined by federal, state or local laws. In Canada, we comply with the Employment Equity Program laid out by the Canadian Federal Contractors Compliance Criteria. Diversity and inclusion are fundamental values in our Code of Conduct. of Waste Management's executive officers are female, UP 10% YEAR -OVER -YEAR Expanding the Presence of Women in our Ranks The waste industry traditionally has been male -dominated, and even today, a job in environmental services may not be on a woman's radar. Another industry challenge is a serious shortage of drivers and technicians. We're taking steps to address both of these challenges by actively seeking women as a group to recruit, hire and develop. For example, in 2015, we joined the Women in Trucking Association (WIT), which works to support women in the industry. Waste Management is serving on WIT's advisory committee and working closely with the organization and other trucking industry participants to address recruitment. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 94 As we've sharpened our focus on hiring both more women and millennials across our workforce, we were encouraged to receive recognition in 2017 as a "Best Companies for Millennials" by Women's Choice Award. This is the only recognition that reflects the needs and preferences of women based on publicly available data, which aligns with employee and consumer appreciation for corporate transparency. Criteria to earn a place on the list include female representation in the workforce, management and board, and are based on work -life balance benefits; paid time off and vacation days; professional development and support activities; and wellness benefits. Supporting Veterans The recruitment of veterans is another ongoing focus for Waste Management, and one that we place special emphasis on each year. Military is the single largest pool of transportation, logistics and maintenance professionals. In 2017, 8.6 percent (over 1,000) of all our U.S. hires were veterans. Our best year on record was 2015, with 14 percent of all our U.S. hires being military veterans. Through August 2018, 8.7 percent of U.S. hires were military veterans. The retention of military veterans is comparable to the rest of Waste Management's workforce. Waste Management receives between $250,000 and $500,000 annually in veteran hiring tax credits. Waste Management veteran hiring has consistently grown in the past five years due largely to strategic partnerships and marketing efforts with the Department of Labor Career One -Stop centers, Hire Purpose, Corporate Gray, U.S. Veterans Magazine, and active participation in 100+ military -focused job fairs. We are frequently lauded for our veteran outreach, including being named for nine consecutive years as a Top Military Friendly° employer by G.I. Jobs and "Best for Vets" employer by Military Times. Working to Meet the Needs of Individuals With Disabilities We continue efforts to better understand how to accommodate the needs of individuals with disabilities within our workforce. One way to do so is through surveying our employees every five years using a Department of Labor self -identification form CC-305. Because responses are voluntary, we have been challenged to obtain a meaningful response rate beyond 10 percent, a common problem among companies. Based on data collected from this small sampling, employees with disabilities would be projected at less than 2 percent of our workforce, a number that we consider unrepresentative. We continuously benchmark against companies with higher response rates to implement best practices around communication and education on the function of the survey and to enhance our own efforts around our recruitment of and accommodations for people with disabilities. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 95 Waste Management has been proactive in assisting people with disabilities through our Transition to Recovery Program and by working with the Department of Labor on regulatory proposals to support employment of people with disabilities by participating in various professional and industry groups, including National Industry Liaison Group (NILG) and local chapters such as the Greater Houston Industry Liaison Group (GHILG). NILG is the largest consortium of private -industry federal contractors working directly with the Department of Labor in shaping equal employment regulations and understanding their impact on the workforce. A Strong and Diverse Workforce Measuring Progress Diversity and inclusion are an inherent part of our culture, and we work hard to ensure that our workforce reflects the communities we serve. Employing people with different backgrounds, experiences and perspectives creates strength throughout our business, enabling us to foster a more collaborative working environment. Third -party recognition of our commitment to our workforce is a valuable benchmark, and we believe that our focus on inclusion is an essential element in earning these honors. For the past four years, Waste Management has been named one of Corporate Social Responsibility Magazine's "100 Best Corporate Citizens." We have been included on Ethisphere Institute's World's Most Ethical Companies° list in 10 of the past 11 years. Recognition as a "best place to work" is particularly important, and we are proud of our track record as a best place forveterans and our recent recognitions as a best place to work for millennials, Latinos and military spouses, as well as a best company to sell for. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 96 Diversity at Waste Management BOARD OF EXECUTIVE COMPANY OFFICIALS WORKFORCE DIRECTORS OFFICERS & MANAGERS 43% 20% 33% 21% Ethnic Minorities Ethnic Minorities Ethnic Minorities Ethnic Minorities 17% 20% 29% 18% Women Women : ..................................................................................... Women Waste Management Workforce All Private Industry Workforce* ■ American Indian or■ American Indian OF Alaskan Native: 0.6.68% Alaskan Native: 0.5.55% ■ Asian:1.56% ■ Asian:6.33% ■ African -American: 17.37% ■ African -American: 15.02% Caucasian: 56.60% Caucasian: 61.38% Hispanic: 22.57% Hispanic: 14.45% ww', ° Multiracial: 0.82/o Multiracial: 1.81% � w Native Hawaiian or Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander: 0.40% ;; ,;,;;;;,,; Pacific Islander: 0.47% *Total does not equal 100 percent due to rounding. Employees by Age Group (generational breakdown, in U.S. and Canada) ■ Veterans (born 1922-1943): 0.28% ■ Baby Boomers (born 1944-1960): 16.14% ■ GenXers (born 1961-1980): 57.28% I Millennials (born 1981-2000): 26.30% Employees by Region ■ Canada:2,057 ■ India- 490 IIIIIIIIII U.S.:39,625 Employees by Age Group ■ Under 30 (born after 1986): 14.76% IN 31-50 (1966-1985): 53.90% 11111l Over 50 (before 1965): 31.34% Employees by Payment Type IN ■ Hourly: 81 % ■ Salaried: 19% W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 97 �4m I yyASiE MA1YIkC G'Mf NT '_-� USDOT85635jiF 11 MLP Our employees are the lifeblood of the work we do every day. That's why we focus on developing talent at every level of the organization through career path planning and best -in -class training that is specifically designed for success in the service industry. At the heart of our engagement and retention strategy is a steadfast commitment to Waste Management's values of people first and success with integrity. Employee turnover continues to be a concern in the environmental services industry due to high demand in a strong economy for our skilled workers — especially truck drivers, route managers and maintenance technicians. The American Trucking Association estimates a shortfall of 48,000 drivers in 2018, with projections that the shortage could increase to 175,000 by 2025. To combat this growing issue, we strive to be a workplace of choice through competitive pay, solid benefits for long-term financial and personal health, and opportunities for growth across our ranks. We believe strongly in promoting from within and offer a wide array of training opportunities designed to help employees maximize their effectiveness at theirjobs and gain new skills so they can take the next step in their careers. We noted in our 2016 report that our goal is to reduce driver and fleet technician new -hire turnover by 50 percent. As the tracking of turnover on the following page indicates, our voluntary employee turnover remains a real challenge, clearly impacted by low employment rates and stiff competition for drivers and technicians expert at handling the sophisticated equipment and systems we use in the recycling and environmental services industry. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 98 Employee Turnover Rates 25% 23.26% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 22.45% 2225% 2015 2016 2017 Voluntary Employee Turnover Rates 25% 20% 15% 14.34 o 14.83% 15.12% 10% 5% 0% .......... I.......... 2015 2016 2017 Being an employer of choice will be critical to our efforts to reverse the trend on employee turnover, and it motivates us to sharpen our focus on our values that help us retain and empower good employees. We also understand that competitive compensation is important. Earlier this year, we distributed savings from the new U.S. corporate tax restructure to every North American employee who does not participate in a company bonus or sales incentive plan. Approximately 34,000 Waste Management employees received a $2,000 reward in appreciation of their hard work. Engagement Through Communication Employee compensation only goes so far, however, in engaging our workers. Creating a sense of teamwork and shared purposes is vital. Communication among company leaders and employees at all levels fosters honesty, accountability and respect — all critical to retention. Our senior leaders operate with an open door — and open email — policy. Each quarter, this team hosts a Town Hall -style meeting at our Houston headquarters. We have begun expanding participation throughout our operations through live streaming technology. Employees unable to attend also are invited to submit questions by email, and they receive direct responses. Responses to common questions are often included in our company's weekly internal newsletter. In addition, a replay of the meeting is posted on the company's intranet. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 99 91% Our Waste Management Monday newsletter serves as a powerful tool to project company values as it arrives in inboxes and is posted in lunchrooms weekly. The newsletter includes stories on employee safety, leader communications, potential job hazards and — most importantly — employee success stories. We also update our workforce on key aspects of employee welfare, including benefits, career opportunities, and useful tools and tips for employees at work and elsewhere. We emphasize engagement as a way to empower employees. We stress our commitment to fair treatment of all employees and strive to apply company policies consistently throughout the organization. For our union employees, this goal must be handled according to the practices and expectations agreed to within the collective bargaining unit. For non -union employees, we look for ways to reinforce our fair treatment and continuous - learning culture. Our Waste Management Drivers Council, for example, captures the wisdom of our front-line employees, who are represented by 17 drivers, one from each market area in the organization. In addition to providing us with feedback on removing barriers that prevent drivers from delivering exceptional customer service, we also have engaged the Council for ideas to help reduce voluntary turnover and promote the retention of drivers and technicians. Constant and collaborative engagement is also the foundation of our Service Delivery Optimization program; our Mechanic Service Delivery Optimization; our Peer Review safety program; our Sales Delivery Optimization program; and the fair treatment and respect that comes from the adherence to our Code of Conduct. Gauging Our Progress To make sure our engagement and retention efforts are meeting the needs of our workers, we ask for their feedback. In 2017, we completed a workplace study for our corporate headquarters. The study allowed us to evaluate our current work environment and better understand how we interact and engage to support field operations. This involved measuring space utilization, conducting visioning and focus group sessions with corporate employees and conducting an employee survey. Houston Employee Survey Highlights (66% RESPONSE RATE) 93% 63% HAVE Ek ,;CESS feel that Waste to make good to resource/technology Management is an decisions about where in the office INSPIRING PLACE and when to work to work that invests in its people Word to describe Waste Management: #1 FAMILY #2 FRIENDLY W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 76% `L-L- L_PA.;iw_Y �RECOGNIZED by colleagues when passing them in the hallway We surveyed all Waste Management Market Areas to gauge the effectiveness of our community support programs, with a response rate validating the information as representative of all areas of our operations. 82 percent of employees rated Waste Management's overall community support as good or very good. The rating for specific programs (charitable donations, Wildlife Habitat Council and Keep America Beautiful) scored even higher at 89 percent positive. In a striking finding, only 2 percent of those surveyed believed company efforts to benefit the communities where they do business were "unimportant." We also solicited input on the kind of activities the company supports (e.g., environmental, safety, youth programs) to align our community engagement to employee priorities. In addition, we issued a talent retention survey earlier this year to nonexempt front-line employees via text message. The survey was sent to drivers, technicians, dispatch and equipment operators. For employees who opted out of receiving text messages or did not have a cellphone number on file, the survey was also delivered via paper format. Hourly employees with a Waste Management e-mail address received the survey electronically. We conduct department -specific engagement surveys as well as the broader, cross -functional surveys. One business segment conducts an annual electronic survey to find the locations with lower expressed employee satisfaction in order to devote resources to improve training and communications. Another segment conducts in -person "Stay Interviews" to elicit insight into employee concerns, satisfactions and perspectives on what makes Waste Management a good place to work, as well as why an employee might choose to leave. Looking ahead, we are researching ways to further enhance employee engagement, including continually improving our culture as well as our use of technology and our physical work environment. Each of these affect social collaboration and networking across functions and geography and will have a long-term impact on our ability to retain employees and attract the next generation of Waste Management workers. The results will inform our engagement framework for 2019. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 101 The importance of our people and the skill sets they bring to work each day cannot be overstated. Education and training are part of talent development — but proactive management to recognize good work and support opportunities for growth and improvement are also important. We are cultivating this through our talent management program to reach managers and employees at all levels. Hiring, selecting and developing future leaders, as well as evaluating our employees in alignment with our values, is standard across the enterprise. Waste Management's talent management program provides continual learning opportunities in areas such as professional development, sales, leadership, technical training and compliance training. We take a "learner -centric" approach with a mix of options, including face-to-face training and conversation, as well as mobile and online communications. Our talent management program consists of three major components: > Performance management core areas: goal setting, check -in conversations and annual performance evaluations. The program sets accountability expectations for employees with the understanding that progress is monitored throughout the year. > Talent reviews and succession planning are designed to recognize and reward high -performing and hard-working employees. Waste Management has identified definitions for "high potentials" and "high performers," which are used throughout the company to ensure we set high standards — and equal standards — for our leaders of today and tomorrow. > Training and development is provided to all employees who participate in both traditional formal training programs and real-time training utilizing technology. Read more on our Training and Development programs in our Training section and in the Workforce Appendix. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 102 7+ M2",z El s, Safety is our top priority, and every Waste Management employee has a critical role in understanding potential safety risks — most notably those associated with transportation incidents and unique workplace hazards. Safety on the Road Waste Management Safety Services' behavior -based safety culture is focused on teaching and building knowledge while coaching every Waste Management employee on addressing unsafe conditions. Our Mission -to -Zero program was created in 2002 and is driven by the pursuit of having zero unsafe actions, behaviors or conditions. The program is designed to engage employees around prevention rather than simply tracking outcomes. Driving safety risks are inherent to our industry. Collection drivers not only have to be well -trained when it comes to operating vehicles, but they have to constantly be on the lookout for other drivers on the road, mainly those in a hurry to pass our collectors during stops. The National Waste and Recycling Association has made significant progress in getting "Slow Down to Get Around" (SDTGA) legislation passed in 21 states thus far. The legislation requires drivers to slow down when passing refuse trucks. As part of our shared responsibility to safety by employees and leadership alike, we created our Peer Review safety program, a process in which drivers and technicians may voluntarily choose to appeal safety -related rule violations to field -based "Peer Review Boards" comprised of fellow employees chosen at random. Since 2011, Peer Review has expanded to 70 sites, covering over 5,600 employees. During a Peer Review hearing, both the affected employee and management present evidence, with the scope of review limited to whether the rule at issue was violated. At the conclusion of the hearing, the Board votes anonymously whether to sustain or overturn management's decision. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 103 Safety Progress Total Recordable Incident Rate (TRIR) is the rate used by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to track and report work -related injuries and illnesses. When comparing Waste Management to the published Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Total Recordable Incident Rate (TRI R) data for the waste management and remediation services industry, Waste Management has consistently Waste Management vs. BLS Industry Average TRIR outperformed the industry since 2005. Waste Management is taking 25 active steps to prevent injuries 20 21.0 through programs such as its 15 11.3 Injury and Illness Management 10 14.7 8.8 7.6 7.1 6.5 6.4 8,3 5.5 5.2 4.5 4.8 5.3 4.7 5.1 4.5 4 program, Hazardous Energy 5 7.6 6.1 4.9 4.4 3.6 3.2 3.3 3.1 . .1 3.2 3.0 .8 Control Program and other 0................................................................................................................................... 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2017 initiatives timed with seasonal ■ WM ■ BLS risks such as heat illnesses in the summer and slips, trips and falls Total Recordable Incidence Rate (TRIR) has decreased nearly 90 percent from 2000, when Mission -to- in the fall and winter. Zero was launched, to 2017, and continues to beat the industry average. Days Away/Restricted or Transfer (DART) rate is the rate used by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to track and report work -related injuries and illnesses that result in lost time, restricted duty or transfer to another work function. When comparing Waste Management to the published Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) DART data for the Waste Management and Remediation Services industry, Waste Management has consistently outperformed the industry since 2005. In addition to the programs and awareness campaigns undertaken to prevent Waste Management vs. BLS Industry Average DART all injuries and illnesses, Waste Management has also taken a 10 structured approach to reducing 8 6.6 5.6 the severity of incidents through 6 s.7 °' 3.9 4.1 safety processes that limit risk 4 5.3 4 2 3.2 3.3 3.0 2,9 3.4 3.4 3.4 3,° 2 6 t0 employees wherever possible. 2 3.1 2.6 2.3 2.2 3.3 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.0 Waste Management also works 0.................................................................................................................................... 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2017 to provide prompt and complete ■ WM ■ BLS medical care to employees who have suffered a work -related injury We continue to have fewer days away than industry standard and are pleased that our 2017 Days or illness to support their return to Away/Restricted or Transfer Rate (DART) marked a significant improvement. full duty as quickly as possible. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 104 Vehicle Accident Recordable Rate (VARR) is the rate used by Waste Management to track vehicle -on -vehicle accidents. In 2016, Waste Management chose to exclude specific incidents where Other Vehicles Initiated Impact (OVII), resulting in a significant improvement in the overall metric Waste Management VARR 25,000 20,000 19,376 15,000 13,545 14,195 10,379 14,443 17,913 10,000 8,974 12,053 13,312 3,778 2,539 5,000 7,553 8,587 0.................................................................................................................................... 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2017 This chart reflects our 12-year history tracking Vehicle Accident Recordable Rate (VARR), showing an over 250 percent increase in accident avoidance since 2005. In recent years, we have determined that our improvement in VARR as tracked from 2005 to 2016 was increasingly affected by collisions where our vehicle was struck by a third -party vehicle, due to a noted increase in distracted driving. VARR reporting was increasingly reflective of other parties' rather than our own drivers' performance. In this report, Waste Management has adjusted the 2016 and 2017 metrics to exclude this third -party type of incident and thus more accurately represent our safety program and improvement in our drivers' performance. performance between 2015 and 2016. Note the 2016 and 2017 VARR excludes OVII incidents. Beginning in 2018, Waste Management is switching from the VARR to the Hourly Accident Recordable Rate (HARR) metric to encourage a focus on behaviors rather than on outcome of vehicle accidents. Hourly Accident Recordable Rate (HARR) is the rate used by Waste Management to track vehicle accidents, including vehicle -to -vehicle and vehicle -to -property type accidents. In 2016, Waste Management chose to exclude specific incidents where Other Vehicles Initiated Impact (OVII), resulting in a significant increase in the overall Waste Management HARR metric performance between 2015 and 2016. Note the 2016 and 2017 HARR 12,000 excludes OVII incidents. The HARR 10,000 7618 9,458 g�7,858 9,090 metric encourages completing a root 8,000 8,898522 9,034 causeinvestigation on all incidents 6, 000 7,419 2937 3,976 6,721 involving a Waste Management 4,000 2,913 4,612 926 vehicle to help identify interventions 2,000 3,337 .................................................................................................................................. 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 2017 to prevent future accidents. We are including Hourly Accident Recordable Rate (HARR) in this report to expand our public safety reporting, showing an over threefold improvement since 2001. As is the case with VARR, we adjusted our metric in 2016 to exclude collisions where our vehicle was struck by a third -party vehicle. This revision more accurately represents our safety program and improvement in our drivers' performance. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 105 BETTER WORKFORCE > SAFETY L4 n Safety Programs We track safety monthly performance by area, service function and even equipment use, monitoring accident trends such as slips, trips, falls, sprains, lost wheels and more. The Waste Management Safety Services team leads regular performance reviews for our fleet operations, focusing on leading indicators and any areas needing attention. As an industry safety leader, Waste Management strives for continuous improvements as our commitment to the employees, shareholders and communities we serve. As a result, Waste Management engages other transportation and service sector leaders to share best practices and exchange in dialogue over trends, issues and opportunities. Examples include training, recruiting, retention and technology. rsr ftjR \12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Safety Programs • Standardized Training: Waste Management offers standardized training to 4 ensure understanding of our operating policies and procedures. Standardized 0000 •®0 training delivers a consistent message to all new hires going through the u■■ program and identifies opportunities for continuous improvement. Driver Science Series: Each month, drivers and managers view a defensive driving awareness video, typically8-12 minutes in length, that reinforces safer driving behaviors. Sample topics include managing intersections, pedestrians, bicyclists, rollover prevention, following distance and braking. These awareness videos align nicely with discussions, observations and coaching. 00 Employee Observation Program: Waste Management has a structured observation program for all front-line employees to bring safety into employee behavior at all times. The practice of structured observation covers all aspects of our operations, from driving, loading, unloading, lifting and lowering, and arriving prepared for Work. At disposal operations, significant accidents are subject to root -cause briefings, with company standard rules updated to eliminate recurrence as part of our continuous improvement programs. Injury and Illness Prevention Program: The Waste Management Injury and Illness Prevention Program is a data -based approach to identifying injury and illness causes and testing the success of interventions on prevention. The program examines equipment, processes, policies and other potential causes of injury and illness for employees and will evaluate possible interventions for these potential causes. Performance Management: The Waste Management Safety Services team *** leads regular performance reviews, focusing on leading indicators and lagging tt* results. Each month, a Monthly Safety Call is broadcast via video webcast that * offers a suite of key metrics, opportunities for Waste Management, industry issues and special guests, including Senior Leadership. These performance reviews and routine report distribution drive accountability and recognition, while encouraging healthy competition among field managers to outperform one another. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 107 Safety at Facilities Just as we work with the industry trade association to encourage legislation to improve the safety of our fleet personnel, we also work with our trade associations, customers and the communities in which we operate to identify how they can do their part to enhance facility safety. A priority for 2017 has been increasing safety in recycling facilities. Discovering the wrong thing in the recycling bins we pick up can have serious consequences for recycling processing. "Tangiers" like garden hoses and Christmas lights thrown into the recycling bin create hazards for employees, as do banned materials like propane tanks and batteries. Lithium batteries have become a significant safety hazard at Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs). They are used in numerous appliances and cause fires when their casing is compromised. Waste Management is working with other industry stakeholders to educate the public on the hazards associated with these batteries. We work with our communities to emphasize the safety benefits of recycling Light in order to reduce safety hazards at our recycling facilities. Our internal safety manuals and training for our landfills and processing facilities are extensive, focusing on full compliance with safety standards and policies, use of required protective equipment, preventive maintenance, good practice guidance and mandatory monthly training. We have a tailored program for the protection of facilities with limited personnel demands. At some closed landfills, renewable energy plants and recycling drop-off facilities, staffing may be limited to a single person. What if a lone worker needs emergency assistance while on the job? Our Call for Safety program offers a tool that can provide protection. The Lone Safe Monitoring Device is about the size of a cell phone and attaches to a belt. Its motion sensors detect if an employee has been motionless for a period of time, which triggers an alert. Unless the alert is deactivated, a signal is sent to our Security Operations Center in Houston, Texas, which contacts the employee or emergency responders. The device also features a silent panic button and GPS tracking in case a worker falls or an impact occurs. .01 .mr 0 r: IP 71 ITV For more than a decade, Waste Management Security Services, Inc. (WMSSI) has provided overall protection of our more than 2,000 facilities and $25 billion -plus in assets. Today, WMSSI not only serves Waste Management, but we have expanded it as a service offering to customers. WMSSI monitors alarms and provides innovative programs that can enhance business operations by minimizing risk of loss. Our security services team uses intelligent video monitoring and a state-of-the-art Master Control Center to alert both internal and external clients instantly when a covered situation arises. Services provided by WMSSI include video monitoring, mobile surveillance systems, fire and intrusion alarm monitoring, access control, intelligent operations (software application), systems administration, fleet GPS tracking, lone worker safety, executive home protection and security systems integration. Cybersecurity As the Waste Management customer experience increasingly moves online, we recognize the need to enhance our internal training and protect IT resources from cyberthreats. Waste Management's Digital department is constantly reviewing information on emerging threats and manages security systems that include SPAM management, a simple -to -access phishing alert and management tool, real-time response to potential threats r W 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT and entity -wide training. We conduct an annual enterprise -wide test and a minimum of two systemwide tests per year, but also continuously scan our e-commerce sites for vulnerabilities and engage an external party to validate them quarterly. Employee education, training and coaching is an important element of data security. Our intranet provides a full -service resource for information on how to identify and resist social engineering attempts; tips on the latest phishing techniques and how to spot them; company policies and support on encryption; computer and data security internal procedures and authorizations; and policies on use of mobile devices. In mid-2017 as part of an enhanced risk identification and management process, we began to include scenario planning for minor to severe cyberthreats with an eye to improving system resilience. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 110 U1 „,M,r —, -14 Providing the opportunity for every employee to reach their full potential is perhaps the most important way that we can maximize workforce engagement and retention. This is why we offer expansive learning and development solutions to meet the needs of our business and our people, as well as providing coaching, feedback and annual performance reviews on a consistent basis. We believe environmental excellence and compliance are the hallmarks of sustainability and reflect Waste Management's core values. As such, compliance with applicable regulatory standards and internal policies and procedures is part of the performance review structure for employees. To foster a culture of collaboration, we use daily huddles and regular check -ins to solicit feedback and share information. Our goal is to provide continual learning opportunities in areas like professional development, sales, leadership, technical training and compliance training. We take a "learner -centric” approach to provide employees with a mix of options. All employees participate in annual training that includes job -specific programs as well as a variety of general professional development trainings. We offer training programs delivered face-to-face, as well as virtually, through mobile and online communications. The latter is facilitated through technology that delivers 'just -in -time" learning, streamlines the learner's experience, creates online communities to build collaboration and provides individualized development plans. The company partners with colleges and credit -granting organizations to provide employees, and, in some cases, their families, with tuition discounts, scholarships, grants and waived fees. Our focus is to create a continuous learning culture that drives performance, improves our talent and supports a superior customer experience. Overall, our intranet university, the Waste Management talent central system, has nearly 3,000 training modules available to all employees, with course plans that cover all aspects of the company's operation and key aspects of career advancement. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Each major Waste Management department conducts job -specific training and development. Some of the most critical positions in the company are drivers, fleet technicians and post collections workers, such as heavy equipment operators. One of the methods we use to train these employees on health, safety risks and good working practices is a Safety Awareness Training Calendar. Site managers use the calendar to schedule training for employees throughout the year on required training topics, including emergency response, heat injury and illness, asbestos OSHA training for landfill and maintenance, personal protective equipment, hazard communication and procedures for handling of chemicals and hazardous substances, just to name a few. With a vast and decentralized workforce, we are also utilizing training videos specific to four key areas of Waste Management's operations: hauling teams, post collection employees, maintenance teams and our Energy Services division. The videos detail topics related to each worker's role, such as specific threats that must be managed throughout the workday. Driver Training As a key component of our Mission -to -Zero program, Waste Management's Training Center in Fort Myers, Florida, seeks to standardize driver training and help us work to reduce driver and fleet technician new -hire turnover, as well as the number of vehicle accidents. The center includes classroom work, interactive computer lab learning, hands-on learning stations, actual and simulated driving, and immediate coaching from our skilled driver trainers. Since 2012, more than 8,000 drivers have trained at the center in intensive, two -week sessions. In 2016, we began training fleet technicians at our center. Since then, we have trained over 500 and are looking to increase capacity for more in the years to come. We believe that the Training Center is a key element in our continuous improvement in safety metrics, such as Total Recordable Injury Rate and Vehicle Accident Recordable Rate. Additionally, drivers are now certified in the SAFETY system, an advanced training program that teaches the critical skills of safe driving. The principles learned through SAFETY are revisited monthly through an ongoing video series focused on drivers' daily operating environments. Topics can include managing intersections, pedestrians, bicyclists, rollover prevention, following distance and braking. These awareness videos align well with discussions, observations and coaching. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 112 Training BY-THE-NUMR'- 42 000 100% 29 EMPLOYEES TRAINED EMPLOYEES OFFERED AVERAGE HOURS ANNUALLY TRAINING OF TRAINING Per Employee ..................................................................................... 500 275 000 . 100% AVERAGE SPENT ANNUAL TRAINING HOURS DRIVERS RECEIVE ON TRAINING Per Full-time Employee SAFETY TRAINING Per Full-time Employee ..................................................................................... : ANNUALLY 100% 100% 100% ENVIRONMENTAL CURRENT EMPLOYEES WASTE MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONALS TRAINED ON CODE OF OPERATIONAL RECEIVE SAFETY ; CONDUCT ; DIVISIONS RECEIVE TRAINING ANNUALLY TRAINING ANNUALLY r t _lfti'_ Injury and Illness Prevention Training Our Injury and Illness Prevention program is focused on preventing injuries among our post collection employees. The program examines equipment, processes, policies and other potential causes of injury and illness for employees across our facilities and properties and evaluates possible interventions and the success of these interventions on prevention. Data gathered may be used to formulate or refine monthly training topics under our Safety Awareness Training Calendar. Other ongoing initiatives include our Hazardous Energy Control Program, as well as programs timed with seasonal risks such as heat illnesses in the summer and slips, trips and falls in the fall and winter. To read more on our full list of employee training programs, including the Hazardous Energy Control Program, see the Training section of the Workforce appendix. Sales Force Training Our Sales Department has a Learning & Development division dedicated to developing sales professionals from on -boarding coaching to on-the-job skills development to mentoring for career advancement. Our 10+years tenure with our top sales employees reflects internal opportunities to expand and grow in the job. From 2015 through 2018, we have been named one of Selling Power's "50 Best Companies to Sell For." Contractor Training To educate all subcontractors working on our sites about potential risks or hazards, we have developed a Contractor Safety Orientation program. In 2016, we updated the program to include a revised Basic Safety Program module, Landfill Safety module, Landfill Gas module, Electrical Safety module and a Renewable Energy module. Presently, 235 Waste Management landfills are active on the program, with 2,000 contractor companies and 12,000 contractor employees registered. We also have a toll -free helpline available to contractors 24/7. For more detail on Waste Management training, see the Training section of the Workforce Appendix. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 114 CONTRIBUTIONS THAT BRING POSITIVE CHANGE TO WHERE WE LIVE AND WORK. IN THIS SECTION Local Communities ....................116 Environmental Preservation .....118 Public Education ........................122 Community Vitality .....................125 Charitable Donations .................129 Disaster Relief ............................131 Stakeholder Engagement on National Issues......................133 L ���x �deit � 6 11� •.iJ� n' �.4v. .. 0—k v Though our operations span nearly 20 million customers in the U.S. and Canada, we are very much a local business that is an integral part of the communities we serve. We want to help make our communities, cities, In 2017, we sought feedback towns and counties better places to work and live — today and on the responsiveness to our for the future. To do so, we support events, programs and community engagement among the people we serve. We found that 0% r r% A OF CUSTOMERS are aware that we are engaged in the community. .................... In contrast, 82% OF OUR EMPLOYEES rate the company's community support as good or very good. Our goal will be to reduce the gap between employee and community awareness of what we do to improve the areas in which we work. organizations that are as varied as the thousands of communities and individuals we serve. We concentrate on initiatives that enhance our environment, promote education and improve the livability and resiliency of our communities, all of which ties to our sustainability goals to increase and improve recycling, produce renewable energy, reduce emissions and preserve wildlife habitat. We have long been involved in environmental projects that preserve and protect healthy ecosystems, and we optimize ourwork with national organizations such as Keep America Beautiful (KAB) and the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC). Their respective national programs allow us to have local impact at hundreds of sites across our operating areas. Our employees also work in partnership with community -based groups, as well as conservationists, universities and environmental organizations, to support healthy ecosystems. 2017 was an especially tough year with respect to natural disasters, as some of the worst hurricanes on record — Harvey, Irma and Maria — rocked communities across the U.S., including Hurricane Harvey's devastation in Houston, Waste Management's headquarters. As a company, we directed $4 million toward relief efforts in the U.S., and through the Waste Management Cares Fund, our people stepped up to help 550 impacted fellow employees during their time of need. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 116 How We Give Back 20j000 90 >4,000 PROTECTED ACRES OF WILDLIFE HABITAT COMMUNITY EVENTS WILDLIFE HABITAT PROGRAMS Hosted and/or Participated in by Waste Management $17 Million PROGRAM TOTAL CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS (cash and in -kind donations) 300j000 PEOPLE Participating in Environmental Stewardship and Community Betterment Activities Including K-12 Youth and College Students PRESERVATi�fIN'.,�a Waste Management owns a wide range of properties — large and small, urban and rural. At our larger properties, in the substantial areas that we set aside as buffer zones, we make a concerted effort to enhance the natural value of the land by providing habitat for wildlife and offering educational opportunities and natural beauty to the surrounding community. One of our key partners in protecting and enhancing wildlife habitat is the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC), a nonprofit organization recognized as the authoritative conservation program for businesses. Our long-standing partnership with WHC has resulted in the creation of 90 WHC-certified projects at Waste Management sites. Through project certification, the WHC recognizes commendable wildlife habitat management and community environmental education programs. Together, these properties encompass nearly 20,000 acres created, enhanced or protected for wildlife across North America. The projects often feature a community environmental education component. Our projects are included in the WHC's Conservation Registry, an interactive database that maps conser- vation, restoration and wildlife habitat -enhancement projects worldwide, allowing us to better understand the impact of our conservation programs. We con- tinue to expand certified sites to include small urban habitats at transfer stations, recycling facilities and other smaller Waste Management facilities. Beyond the wildlife habitats certified at our active and closed facilities, we lease our unused property for productive use by farmers and ranchers. As of 2017, more than 22,300 acres in the United States and Canada were used for this purpose. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 118 In addition to our work with WHC in certifying wildlife habitat and environmental education at our sites, Waste Management works with WHC on collaborative efforts among nonprofits, government agencies and companies to create conservation strategies. For example, the Corporate Pollinator Ecosystem Project (C-PEP) brings together companies with the United States Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify pollinator habitats on corporate land and ultimately help revive declining pollinator populations. Upon project culmination, the C-PEP Survey will be presented to the federal government as a response to President Obama's 2014 goal to restore or enhance 7 million acres of land for pollinators. Today, Waste Management has more than 50 programs dedicated to protecting pollinators throughout North America. We also support the Highways Bettering the Economy and Environment Pollinator Protection Act (Highways BEE Act). If passed, the law would facilitate efforts by states to use more pollinator -friendly highway landscaping practices, including reducing mowing and planting native plants and grasses that provide habitats and foliage for bees and monarch butterflies and bees. Another dimension of our commitment to environmental preservation is demonstrating the value of biodiversity to children to instill the importance of being good environmental stewards. We incorporate STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education into most of our wildlife habitat programs. For example, our Springhill Landfill in Campbellton, Florida, hosted its 50th environmental education tour with local elementary students in November 2017. During the guided tour, students learned how a landfill operates, created edible landfills, observed stormwater ponds and visited natural forested wetlands, among other activities. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 119 WILDLIFE HABITAT 2017 HIGHLIGHTS BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA Habitat conservation at our Bucks County Landfills received Gold Certification from WHC and dual honors in 2017, capturing the Pollinators Project Award and the Landscaping Project Award. Our Bucks County team actively manages 6,000 acres for wildlife habitat, including transforming a previously open field into a sustainable pollinator habitat for bees, cabbage moths, beetles and monarch butterflies. This multigenerational project brings employees, families, seniors, students and other members of the community together to learn how to manage and promote protection of pollinators species and habitats. LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY Our Campground Natural Area, a retired facility managed in partnership with Michelin, garnered a WHC Grasslands Project Award nomination in 2017. Cub Scouts earn conservation patches here by participating in educational activities on the site's pollinator, forest, grassland and wetland habitats. SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Corporate Wildlife Habitat of the Year 2013 winner, and nominated for the WHC's 2017 Reptiles and Amphibians Project Award and Species of Concern Project Award, our Kirby Canyon Recycling and Disposal Facility devotes 600 acres solely to habitat enhancement projects and scientific study. Projects include developing a suitable wetlands habitat for the threatened California red -legged frog. HAMILTON, ONTARIO We actively manage more than half of the City of Hamilton-Glanbrook Landfill site for wildlife habitat, including grasslands, wetlands, forests and riparian areas. Working with community partners, our teams have installed and monitored songbird and wood duck nest boxes and installed pollinator gardens designed to attract species like the monarch butterfly. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 120 WILDLIFE HABITAT 2017 HIGHLIGHTS MENOMONEE FALLS, WISCONSIN Partnered with local community conservation groups to restore and maintain wildlife habitat at the Orchard Ridge Recycling and Disposal Facility site. The site has a very successful bluebird and wood duck nest box program, including 28 bluebird boxes and 12 wood duck boxes. In just one nesting season, they had 17 bluebirds fledge, 34 hooded merganser hatchlings and 32 wood duck hatchlings. BALLGROUND, GEORGIA At Pine Bluff Landfill, high school seniors worked to fulfill their graduation duties for a senior project. The students started with building a modest butterfly and pollinator garden. Since the partnership started, the garden has grown to over two acres that now house a pavilion and hundreds of pollinating plants and species. Guided tours and educational presentations are given to local school students, boy and girl scout troops and home -school groups, as well as area garden clubs. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 121 Recycling is an essential part of reducing the impact we have on our environment. Forty years ago, the recycling challenge was about getting people and businesses to embrace a new way of discarding waste: bundling newspapers, sorting plastics and glass, and resisting the old habit of throwing all our waste in the garbage. Today, with evolving waste streams, single -stream collection methods and advanced processing systems, recycling has become more complex. Recycling the right materials in the right way really does matter, but it doesn't always happen: it's estimated that 25 percent of materials put in recycling bins are not actually recyclable. As the recycling landscape has evolved in recent years and become more challenging for consumers, we are working to educate people about the benefits not only of recycling, but also recycling properly. Our Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° campaign helps consumers understand what can and cannot be recycled. A key feature of the Recycle Often. Recycle Right. campaign is a toolkit that includes brochures, posters, ads, radio clips, blog posts, videos and more, used to spread the message. In addition, the toolkit provides K-12 curricula with supporting national science standards and is available to visitors to the campaign's microsite. We launched a new version of the campaign website in 2017 to provide customers with more updates and more engaging, interactive and motivational resources to help them make the right recycling choices. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 122 W%R. 1DI h4Y05 kE30— Get snrtC NeN'H30ti1 59 1 " L Recycling Basics RECYCLE OFTEN� RECYCLE RIGHT."' ` N-d hey. i-1119 Itnrt1Y.) n Ic: n III —n — Ie.l'ILI !<—1 .:d -1— 1. 9M It —I et 4— ID Fi�] ffE El My[Nb: s— 1—, I;r�ram CNtlo,, 5ig,, Our Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° campaign is national in scope and joins partners for recycling education such as The Recycling Partnership, of which we're a funding partner, AMERIPEN, the National Waste & Recycling Association and others. We work hard to make these education programs come alive locally. Many of our sites across North America host educational activities, programs, community events and facility open houses to inform and educate people about better managing waste. For example, our team in Kansas City partnered with Bridging the Gap (a local nonprofit) and a Keep America Beautiful chapter to put together a Facebook Live broadcast on America Recycles Day that offered viewers practical recycling tips plus a behind -the -scenes look at the Kansas City recycling facility. We also use our social media channels to educate people about recycling through our #Recycling101 campaign, in addition to other sustainability information. In 2017, we posted more than 270 messages about sustainability and recycling education on social media, reaching approximately 8.5 million people. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 123 BETTER COMMUNITIES > PUBLIC EDUCATION Our own workforce speaks multiple languages (our employee � 'W 414 newsletter goes out in English, Spanish and French), so it's no surprise that the diverse communities we serve would benefit from receiving information in their own language, too. We offer Spanish -language resources on our Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° website, and our municipal partners often provide translated versions of local recycling guidelines on their websites as well. Here are some other ways we engage with multicultural communities about recycling: > One of our recent Think Green Grants went to the Vietnamese American Community Center of the East Bay in Oakland, California. The center wanted to help Vietnamese restaurants and grocery stores incorporate compost collection services to avoid fees and penalties regarding new and unfamiliar composting rules and regulations. The grant went toward translating an English ad about composting requirements into Vietnamese and training staff and volunteers about the recycling ordinance so they could help over 30 local businesses make informed decisions about compliance. > In Southern California, our team employs integrated outreach efforts to make recycling messages relatable to Spanish speaking communities. One emphasis of our recent engagement includes the development of localized videos and social media content inviting Latino communities to join our efforts to further sustainability through reducing and reusing and recycling right. In Washington state, our Recycling Corps interns often speak more than one language and use those skills to broaden our engagement with the public and businesses about reducing waste and changing recycling behavior. One of our 2017 interns, Xiao Dong Liu, used his Cantonese and Mandarin fluency to share recycling education with businesses in Seattle's Chinese community. Learn more about his experience in this video. In 2017, our Washington state team also implemented a recycling education pilot and campaign aimed at Spanish -speakers in Snohomish County. The campaign educated residents about recycling and tested the effectiveness of texting, TV and radio ads, direct mail and door-to-door outreach. Using the information learned from this pilot, Waste Management developed a new education campaign geared toward the Spanish-speaking community. The "Odes to Recycling" campaign is inspired by the work of Pablo Neruda and his odes to everyday elements, paying homage to recyclable plastics, paper and cans that can be reborn for the benefit of the planet and future generations. Based on the importance the community places on recycling and the environment, odes are a culturally significant way to share recycling best practices for priority materials. In addition, we launched a new bilingual English/Spanish storytelling program that targets multicultural communities within schools. The hands-on, visual and interactive nature of the program made it accessible for all students, regardless of native language. These efforts would go on to win our team a 2018 Recycler of the Year award for Multicultural Engagement from the Washington State Recycling Association. :"; I Through our partnership with Keep America Beautiful (KAB) and other environmental organizations, Waste Management supports thousands of community environmental education and beautification initiatives that highlight our desire to help create and maintain vibrant communities. We have supported KAB's annual America Recycles Day for 28 years. In 2017, we were a national sponsor of this initiative, which drew 1.9 million attendees to more than 1,200 events dedicated to promoting, encouraging and celebrating recycling. Our Think Green' Grants are part of an initiative through which we provided 55 grants totaling $170,000 in 2017. Grants went to nonprofit organizations and KAB affiliates for programs focused on community beautification and recycling education such as: > Improving public education on what can be recycled to reduce contamination in the curbside collection program in Akron, Ohio. > Helping students at a school for the blind in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, develop job skills as they deliver recycling bins to classrooms, maintain the bins and collect and sort recycled materials. > Supporting the development of a new community park in Norwood, Massachusetts. Before the new park, the area was an unused, overgrown eyesore in the middle of town. Now there are trees and benches for use of town residents. > Planting 50 trees along a city parkway in Berwyn, Illinois, to replace trees damaged by an insect infestation. > Protecting waterways in Tampa, Florida, by educating the public about recovery and recycling options for monofilament fishing line and installing collection tubes in targeted areas. > Supporting scholarships that give low-income students free field trips to Hershey Gardens to learn about sustainable gardening. > Creating an educational recycling decal for the inside lid of recycling bins in Sandy, Utah, to reduce contamination. > Providing a park bench for a newly developed butterfly garden planted by community volunteers in the Village of Chicago Ridge in Illinois. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 125 Waste Management also sponsors environmental education and beautification initiatives run by community -based organizations. For example, our Hoot Landfill, a closed site in Fouke, Arkansas, welcomes about 100 sixth -graders each year to an outdoor school led by the Sulphur River Waterfowl Association. The three-day event teaches students about the natural environment as they rotate through stations on topics that correlate with their classroom curriculum, such as plant and wildlife identification, nature sounds and a creek study. We also lend our expertise in recycling education to special events, such as our ongoing partnership with the Houston Marathon Committee to reduce waste at its annual marathon and half -marathon. This event received gold certification from the Council for Responsible Sport for the fifth consecutive year in 2017 after achieving a waste diversion rate of 77, aided by our focus on educating volunteers and vendors about recycling. Prior to the race weekend, marathon staff toured our Gasmer Road material recovery facility, where we also spent time training lead volunteers on the proper use of different types of recyclable boxes. At our booth promoting recycling at the marathon EXPO, members of our team collected 543 pairs of tennis shoes from runners, then donated them to SEARCH Homeless Services in Houston, Texas. Keeping Neighbors Safe When Waste Management drivers are working their routes in the wee hours of the morning, they have a unique opportunity to be the eyes and ears of the neighborhoods they serve. For more than a decade, our Waste Watch' community program has leveraged this advantage by training our drivers to recognize and handle situations that just don't seem right. The program teaches drivers how to observe and report suspicious activities and emergencies to local public safety and law enforcement agencies. Introduced in Forest Grove, Oregon, Waste Watch has trained thousands of employees to keep an eye out in more than half the U.S. communities we serve. To become recognized as a Waste Watch Certified Driver, an employee participates in a formal training program, which includes instruction from Waste Management corporate security and local law enforcement personnel, and then passes a written examination. We also partner with other safety -related organizations and programs, including AMBER Alert, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Community Crime Stoppers and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Over the years, the Waste Watch program has received widespread national acclaim, earning recognition from local municipalities and the National Sheriffs' Association's Award of Excellence in Neighborhood Watch. Our drivers have been lauded for reporting suspicious activity ranging from thefts to vandalism. Drivers have also helped save lives by calling in emergency medical assistance for individuals in physical distress. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 126 Here area few examples of helpful orjust plain heroic actions by our Waste Watch Certified Drivers: > At our Atlantic Waste Disposal Landfill in Sussex County, Virginia, Waste Management employees James Clary and Nelson Laine worked with the Sussex County of Public Works to design and install a helipad at the landfill. The helipad provides aviation crews a dedicated site to land unaided and the rescue squad to deliver the patient during an emergency in a rural part of the county. Driver Juan Aguilar ran to the rescue of a customer in Denver, Colorado, who had fallen and hit his head on a curb. He followed emergency dispatch instructions until paramedics arrived, then stayed on to place the customer's lawnmower and shovels safely in the garage. When a boy and girl flagged down his truck and told him a 14-year-old girl had fallen into a frigid river in Timmins, Ontario, Armand (Sam) L'heureux helped her from the water, then called 911 and his local office. His district operations manager turned up with blankets and a jacket to help the girl avoid hypothermia. Resaving Pets Waste Management worker William Gambrill in Sacramento, California, found six kittens in a dumpster and turned them over to the SPCA. Sharing Kindness Ryan Murray, a driver in Sudbury, Ontario, took the time to show a child on his route how his recycling truck worked. The family was so impressed with Murray's compassion that they nominated him for a local media organization's 12 Days of Kindness award. > In Lewisville, Texas, driver Larry Bowery saw a car get rear -ended by a gravel truck and pushed over a bridge into a lake. Bowery used a crowbar to smash a window so he could pull the injured driver free and stayed with him until emergency crews arrived. > Driver James Thomas received thanks from the fire department in Seattle, Washington, for helping to save the life of a customer on his route who was experiencing a medical emergency. In addition to Waste Watch, our drivers and helpers are always on the lookout for ways to connect with their communities and our customers. Here just a few of our "fan favorites": > Driver Bryan Deets has a special bond with a 6-year-old customer with multiple sclerosis in Calgary, Alberta. Whenever Deets empties the bin under the boy's window, he gives the bin a couple of extra dumps to brighten the boy's day. He also gave his super fan a toy Waste Management truck to enjoy even when it's not trash day. > A Montgomery, Minnesota, high school student with autism who is fascinated by Waste Management trucks received a thrill when driver Jim Hahn presented him with a miniature Waste Management truck, official hat and water bottle. > A heartfelt card along with a bag of holiday goodies was sent to our Eastern Canada team in Mount Forest, Ontario, from a neighbor who lives near the site. The neighbor's children walk to school down Sligo Road each day where there are no sidewalks and find that they often have to run into the ditch to avoid trucks that haven't slowed down or given them enough space. The children noticed that this is never the case when it comes to Waste Management trucks and that our drivers always take the time to slow way down or come to a complete stop if there is traffic, to allow space for the children to walk. When the Mount Forest team discussed this at a meeting, one of the drivers came up with a slogan that they continue to use at meetings and huddles — We Are Guardians of the Road. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 127 Local Economic Impact Our day-to-day operations — from $3.5 billion in wages and benefits to the $562.4 million in income taxes paid in the U.S. and Canada — boost economic growth in the communities in which we live and work. In 2015, we spent $6.5 billion on supplies, one-third of which involved purchase of collection and operating fleet. Supporting small businesses through the materials and supplies we purchase also contributes to local and national economic growth: In 2017, we spent $191 million with diverse suppliers as part of our commitment to diversity and inclusion. Income Taxes Paid (in millions) 800 $714.0 600 $524.3 400 $408.4 200 $44.0 $33.2 $38.1 0 ............. ...... ............... ............. 2015 2015 2016 2016 2017 2017 U.S. Canada U.S. Canada U.S. Canada Real Estate Taxes Paid (in millions) 60 $57.4 $58.3 $58.0 48 36 24 12 $5.6 $5.8 $5.6 0 .............. IM.......I...... ............... .............. 2015 2015 2016 2016 2017 2017 U.S. Canada U.S. Canada U.S. Canada W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT ff EM Waste Management gives back to communities throughout the U.S. and Canada through financial contributions, in -kind giving, participation on an organization's board or the sharing of our expertise. Whenever possible, we engage with local stakeholders to understand specific community needs. Volunteering in Our Communities We pride ourselves on having an employee base dedicated to revitalizing our local communities through kind acts of volunteerism. In 2017, volunteers reported contributing nearly 781 hours during paid working hours. This total does not reflect the thousands of hours we know our employees volunteer on their own time. As part of our work with Keep America Beautiful and the Wildlife Habitat Council, we encourage our employees to volunteer in their local areas on projects we sponsor throughout the year. Here are a few examples of how Waste Management employees supported their communities in 2017: Collecting Food in Canada After weeks of campaigning, collecting goods, planning logistics and devising participation incentives, our Eastern Canada Leadership Forum — a group of 12 future leaders — collected 2,230 pounds of food and $2,333 in cash donations for The Mississauga Food Bank in Ontario. Fourteen volunteers from our corporate IT team spent eight hours painting, cleaning and doing minor repairs to the home of a senior citizen in Houston, Texas, as part of the team's "Impact Day" initiative, which aims to give back to the community and build stronger relationships among employees. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 129 > With more than 25 participating sites, our Southern California employees came together to collect more than 1,900 toys for their annual holiday toy drive benefiting the California Highway Patrol's Chips For Kids and the LAPD Devonshire PALS program. > Our team in West Valley City, Utah, partnered with Make -a -Wish Utah to give a 15-year- old boy with cystic fibrosis — who happens to love garbage trucks — a ride in a Waste Management truck. The truck delivered him to a reveal party where he found out that his wish to visit Walt Disney World was coming true. > The Mount Forest, Ontario, team in Eastern Canada once again created a float masterpiece, with the theme this year being "Canadian Christmas." The majority of the float was comprised of recycled materials, with about 20 employees contributing their free time to create this award -winning float that was featured in three local parades. Charitable Contributions (in millions) 20 16 $17.16 12 $11.961.$'.-g. $13.67 $15.26 8 $11.77 $10.07 4 $1.89 0$1.90 2015 2016 2017 Total Cash Charitable Contributions In -Kind Charitable Contributions W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 130 IISASIFR The extraordinary devastation caused by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in the fall of 2017 only strengthened our resolve to provide safety, support and services to our employees, customers and communities. We are proud of how our employees responded to the 2017 hurricanes: with professionalism, compassion and a deep commitment to safe operations. We work to prepare our teams for disasters as part of our culture of safety and resiliency. Prior to Hurricane Irma making landfall, for example, our Florida and Mid -Atlantic teams prepared for the emergency by updating online service alerts, ensuring site managers had complete lists of employee contact information, distributing pre -storm preparation information to customers and emergency operating centers, planning social media content to communicate with customers, securing water for sites, keeping tanks full of fuel and moving vehicles to higher ground if needed. Taking Care of Our Waste Management Family We donated $3 million to Harvey aid relief and an additional $1 million in support of Hurricane Irma recovery efforts. Our team members also stepped up to help one another through the Waste Management Employees Care Fund, which provided financial assistance to nearly 550 employees impacted by Harvey or Irma. In the wake of Hurricane Irma, all 67 Waste Management business units within the Florida Area were closed due to the scope, path and severity of the storm. Within 48 hours, however, Waste Management drivers were back on the job servicing customers statewide. And in the Florida Keys, service resumed on the fifth day after the storm, with drivers taking their time, navigating trouble spots and dealing with the excessive amounts of storm debris and garbage curbside. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 131 While no Waste Management employees were injured in the storm, many did suffer extensive property damage and needed to relocate. The Waste Management Employees Care Fund quickly provided more than 260 Waste Management employees in Florida with company assistance totaling nearly $20,000. How We Responded to Hurricane Irma Post -storm, 38 Waste Management "Green Team" members from around the country arrived to assist with hauling and post -collection operations, staying on the job for several months. The Florida team worked diligently to meet customers' needs. Sales, Dispatch and Operations coordinated seamlessly to deliver nearly 2,500 containers the week after the storm to priority customers, including the 16 Florida Power & Light staging areas for first responders. Waste Management volunteers took care of our communities as well, by delivering bags of ice to Everglades City and the South Winds Trailer Park in Sarasota; 500 hot meals to the Gifford Youth Achievement Center in Indian River County; and lunch to the Florida Power & Light linemen restoring power in Okeechobee. Although we no longer have operations in Puerto Rico, we could not ignore the terrible devastation of Hurricane Maria. In response, we donated the use of a Waste Management corporate aircraft to help transport medicine and other supplies coordinated by an aviation services company that had run out of room on its own planes. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 132 Waste Management actively works with stakeholders that operate within our value chain, such as customers, employees and suppliers, as well as stakeholders outside our value chain, including industry peers and multistakeholder groups. We have regular open discussions about topics that are relevant to our operations and impact our society. These conversations play a key role in shaping how we execute our strategy, materiality and business strategy, as well as how we work to help improve our communities. Our Approach We take a systematic approach to stakeholder engagement, starting with public accountability. Every two years we identify the key stakeholders with whom we engage — from environmental and community groups to business and manufacturing leaders, from government associations to scientific academies. These stakeholders can be found across multiple sectors and within our communities. All are essential in helping us stay abreast of current trends, perspectives and policy matters that affect our industry, our customers and our communities. Our engagement takes many forms. When working on facility upgrades and new construction, we map our community footprint and seek to engage groups and individuals in open dialogue through Community Advisory Councils or more informal routine interactions, open house events, public meetings, tours and more. With our larger customers, we host innovation labs and sustainability forums that focus on ways to reduce costs, lessen environmental footprints and increase the reuse of resources. Each year we complete dozens of surveys on economic sustainability and governance (ESG) to keep investors and customers informed and help customers with their own sustainability reporting. The feedback loop is W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 133 continuous. As we receive questions about our ESG practices, we benchmark opportunities to improve and then communicate that progress in future responses. Participation in policy discussions supplements our dialogue at the local level and ensures that we are working with stakeholders from many perspectives. We give dozens of presentations each year on topics involving recycling, renewable energy and fuel and civic engagement. Since 2011, we have sponsored three terms of multistakeholder dialogues on the core issues affecting our industry and those impacted by it: the road to more sustainable materials management; the way life cycle thinking can pave the way to better characterization of environmental impact over time; and ways stakeholders can achieve more recycling productivity. We believe there is enormous value in bringing together diverse viewpoints in a sustained effort to find common ground and mutual understanding of difficult environmental challenges. Waste Management believes that disclosing our networks of memberships and associations working on policy issues is important. Our employees are enriched by broad interaction with stakeholders and informed dialogue on key issues like materials management, renewable energy, climate change and adaptation, responsible governance, conservation — and a host of other topics. For a full listing of associations and memberships, see stakeholder engagement in the Communities Appendix. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT -,,PE IN THIS SECTION Company.....................................137 IN THIS SECTION Company.....................................137 Operations..................................157 Workforce...................................186 Communities..............................196 I is The appendix provides supplemental information to the Waste Management 2018 Sustainability Report, which is available at www.wm.com/sustainability. All Z1911`►W Economic Impact....................................................................137 Non-GAAP Measures......................................................137 Governance.............................................................................137 Board of Directors Diversity............................................138 Strategy and Management Processes................................138 Our Performance Evaluation Process ...........................139 Sustainability Oversight..................................................140 Risk Management..................................................................141 Training Employees on Risk Identification ....................144 Risks and Opportunities Related to Climate Change.. 145 Code of Conduct.....................................................................146 Clawback Policies..................................................................147 SupplyChain...........................................................................147 Supplier Code of Conduct...............................................147 Supplier Sustainability Risks..........................................148 Improving Supply Chain Sustainability ..........................148 Supply Chain Stakeholder Engagement .......................150 Supplier Diversity.............................................................150 Public Policy............................................................................151 Stances on Key Policy Issues.........................................151 Renewable Energy...........................................................151 Energy Security and Alternative Fuel Production ........151 Natural Gas and Alternative Fuel Vehicles ...................151 Sustainable Materials Management.............................152 Mandatory Recycling Programs and Policies...............152 Managing State and Local Policy Developments ......... 153 International Trade..........................................................153 Climate Change...............................................................154 Stakeholder Engagement on Policy Issues .......................155 Political Contributions.....................................................156 Public Policy Overseas....................................................156 OPERATIONS Emissions................................................................................157 Environmental Compliance..................................................158 Significant Spills.....................................................................158 Environmental Expenditures...............................................159 Carbon Footprint Calculation Methodology .......................160 Corporate Air Program.........................................................164 Containing Hazardous Substances......................................165 Commitment to the Built Environment..............................166 Environmental Management...............................................167 Processes.........................................................................16 7 Environmental Management System (EMS).................168 Leadership in Environmental Science................................178 Continuous Improvement in Customer Service................182 Waste.......................................................................................185 N I I i► R i N Diversity and Recruitment....................................................186 HumanRights.........................................................................187 Policy Against Trafficking of Humans and Modern Slavery ...............................................................188 Contingent Labor Program............................................188 Collective Bargaining............................................................189 Collaboration Through Peer Review..............................190 Employee Benefits................................................................191 Tailored Training Programs.................................................192 Collections and Fleet......................................................192 Fixed Facility Training......................................................193 Systems Training.............................................................194 Transition Assistance............................................................195 COMMUNITY Environmental Justice..........................................................196 Areas of Dense Population.............................................197 Stakeholder Engagement on a Daily Basis ........................198 National Partnerships...........................................................199 State Partnerships.................................................................201 Local Partnerships................................................................205 111311:,aMIIuIJ� Economic Impact NON-GAAP MEASURES The "Economic Impact" section of our Sustainability Report presents Adjusted Income from Operations, Adjusted Operating Margin, Adjusted Operating EBITDA, Adjusted Operating EBITDA Margin, and Adjusted Earnings Per Diluted Share (Adjusted EPS), each of which exclude certain items affecting comparability of our results and are not defined by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). We believe that non-GAAP measures provide useful information to investors by excluding items that the company does not believe reflect its fundamental business performance and/or are not representative or indicative of our results of operations. The company defines Operating EBITDA as income from operations before depreciation and amortization. The "Economic Impact" section of our Sustainability Report also presents Free Cash Flow, which is a non-GAAP measure. The company discusses Free Cash Flow because we believe that it is indicative of the company's ability to pay its quarterly dividends, repurchase common stock, fund acquisitions and other investments and, in the absence of refinancing, to repay its debt obligations; however, the use of Free Cash Flow as a liquidity measure has material limitations because it excludes certain expenditures that are required or that the company has committed to, such as declared dividend payments and debt service requirements. The company defines Free Cash Flow as net cash provided by operating activities, less capital expenditures, plus proceeds from divestitures of businesses and other assets (net of cash divested). Non-GAAP measures should not be considered a substitute for financial measures presented in accordance with GAAP. Operating EBITDA and Free Cash Flow may not be comparable to similarly titled measures reported by other companies. For quantitative reconciliations of non-GAAP measures to the most comparable measure calculated in accordance with GAAP, please see the financial tables accompanying Waste Management's press release dated February 15, 2018, announcing full -year 2017 earnings and comparisons to 2016. Governance How we govern and manage our own company and footprint raises issues vital to the communities in which we operate, the people we employ and the customers we serve. How we address these issues is also vital to demonstrating the sincerity of our commitment to sustainability. While many companies work hard to protect the environment from their business, at Waste Management, protecting the environment is our business. That's why our sustainability strategy is fully integrated into our governance and management systems and reflected in a set of ambitious sustainability goals. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 137 Following is a discussion of the governance and environmental management systems that help us both to deliver services with the highest environmental standards and identify emerging opportunities to capture additional value from waste streams. Additional information on our governance strategies is posted on our website. Eight members serve on the Waste Management Board of Directors, seven of whom, including the Chairman of our Board, are independent as defined by the New York Stock Exchange. The Board Chairman has been non -executive and independent for 14 years. Waste Management's President & CEO is the eighth director. Board members are each elected annually. There are three standing committees: The Audit Committee, the Management Development and Compensation Committee, and the Nominating and Governance Committee. Our Board of Directors does not delegate responsibility for sustainability and corporate responsibility to a committee; rather, such issues, including recycling, fleet optimization and energy are integral to our business, and aspects of these issues are discussed by the full Board of Directors at every meeting. Our Board of Directors' biographies, committee charters, and our governance guidelines are posted on our website. BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIVERSITY The Nominating and Governance Committee seeks Board candidates who bring a variety of perspectives and industry knowledge relevant to Waste Management's business. Candidates are evaluated for personal and professional integrity and sound judgment, business and professional skills and experience, independence, potential conflicts of interest, diversity and potential for effectiveness in serving the long-term interests of shareholders. While there is no formal policy with regard to weighing diversity in identifying director nominees, the Nominating and Governance Committee considers diversity in business and professional expertise, as well as gender and ethnic background, when evaluating director nominees. The Committee considers a matrix of experience, skills and expertise when identifying candidates. Before being nominated, director candidates are interviewed by a minimum of two members of the Nominating and Governance Committee, including the Non -Executive Chairman of the Board. Of the current directors, two are female, one is Hispanic and one is African -American. Strategy and Management Processes Environmental excellence and compliance are hallmarks of sustainability and core elements of our management framework. An important tool for integrating sustainability into our business has been our strategic business framework, which includes 'scorecard" tracking of key metrics to reinforce alignment with key objectives. (See figure on page 139.) Using this performance framework, we align stakeholder perspectives and market opportunities that will guide the entire organization for the year and beyond. Compensation is affected by alignment with company goals (including, as applicable to a business unit, sustainability goals), and compliance and sustainability are part of our performance review structure. Our senior leadership uses this performance process to ensure that our entire organization (field operations and staff functions) focuses on strategic objectives. The measures also assist with legal and regulatory compliance and support environmental performance, stewardship goals and promotion of our values. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 138 STRATEGIC INPUTS > Strategic Planning > Scorecard Results > Stakeholder Perspectives > Reputation Tracking Strategic Planning Process INITIATIVES REPORTING Tied to Objectives Key Performance and Targets Indicators (including financial, customer/ community, process, compliance and learning/people development) STRATEGIC • OBJECTIVES > Financial > Operational > Environmental I > People > Safety TARGETS > Compliance Quarterly and > Customer Annual OUR PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PROCESS 1. When establishing our strategic objectives, we take into account the perspectives of our customers, shareholders, employees, community members, regulators and other stakeholders, as well as our performance against key internal metrics and our reputation as measured with key audiences. We often employ "heat maps" that identify the geographic scope and intensity of risks and opportunities. 2. and 3. We align our major financial, operational, environmental, community, people, safety, compliance and customer objectives with those specific companywide programs and initiatives that have been approved and funded as critical to achieving our strategic objectives. Performance expectations are communicated throughout the organization, and senior leadership assigns quarterly and annual targets to which our field operations are held accountable. An ongoing initiative focuses all employees on knowing our customers better, optimizing assets, innovating in technologies, creating more efficient systems and extracting maximum value from the waste stream. Notably, this initiative closely aligns with our 2038 sustainability goals. 4. We set targets as part of our annual budgeting process. The targets represent commitments we have made to our stakeholders and include improvements and metrics that are factored into employee evaluations. For example, targets have been created on the following topics: > Financial: Traditional financial measures that our investors have found to be important to > Customer/Community: Customer engagement, improving customer interactions and service, and our community relations programs. We seek to improve Waste Management's reputation by developing and maintaining strong community partnerships and measuring our reputation among key stakeholders. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 139 Process: Efficiency and cost -per -unit measures across our collection, disposal, recycling and waste -to -energy operations. > Compliance: Our primary safety measures and overall environmental scores. > Learning and People: Employee engagement, recruitment, development, retention and training. Our operations at all levels report progress in reaching the targets. At the corporate level, monthly and quarterly reports are prepared and presented to the Board of Directors at each of its meetings. There are Monthly Business Review and Quarterly Business Review meetings to continually engage layers of management on progress toward company goals. This format and target -setting process (using specific key performance indicators) were integrated into our annual performance planning process to ensure consistency among strategy, performance planning, and performance measurement and accountability. SUSTAINABILITY OVERSIGHT Waste Management's sustainability service offerings are discussed at most Board of Directors' meetings because these services are linked so closely with company strategy. Topics discussed include recycling goals; market conditions and operations; generation of renewable energy; and innovations in operations to increase efficiency and provide environmentally superior service. Customers' sustainability goals (e.g., waste reduction, recycling and materials reuse, expansion of renewable energy capacity) are discussed annually during Waste Management's Senior Leadership Team's strategic planning meeting. The Audit Committee of our Board is responsible for assisting the Board in monitoring the company's compliance with legal and regulatory requirements. Accordingly, the Audit Committee and the Board regularly receive environmental, health and safety compliance reports from management. Our Compliance Audit Services department supports these efforts and oversees compliance audits at all company -owned, -operated and -controlled facilities and operations. For more than nine years, Waste Management's annual strategic planning initiative has included benchmarking of national accounts and municipal customers to determine the scope and nature of our customers' sustainability goals. Our formal materiality review for this report has been incorporated into this benchmarking. The Senior Leadership Team reviews this data to ensure that new developments in sustainability are an integral part of our business strategies. This strategic planning process has proven valuable over time, helping to identify trends that were a key factor in our decision to acquire new recycling assets in 2011 and 2012, to shift our focus in 2014 and 2015 to the efficiency and productivity of our recycling network, and to concentrate in 2016-2018 on contamination in recycling — how to avoid it and how to accommodate contaminants within a sustainable recycling financial model. In early 2018, a multi -disciplinary task force of Waste Management executives reported to the Senior Leadership Team on opportunities to grow the sustainability-oriented aspects of our business, including not only our public and private sector customers, but ESG-focused investors as well. The task force's report reflected detailed interviews and documents reviews from employees, customers, NGOs focused on sustainability, and investors. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 140 Risk Management Waste Management's executive officers have primary responsibility for risk management within the company. The Board of Directors oversees risk management to ensure that the processes designed, implemented and maintained by our executives are functioning as intended and adapted when necessary to respond to changes in the company's strategy as well as emerging risks. The primary means by which the Board oversees our risk management processes is through its regular communications with management and by regularly reviewing our enterprise risk management (ERM), framework. We believe that our leadership team's engagement and communication methods are supportive of comprehensive risk management practices and that the Board's involvement is appropriate to ensure effective oversight. At the company level, Waste Management uses an ERM process involving senior leaders and subject matter experts from all major divisions to assess the materiality of all risks across the enterprise. Facilitated by our Treasury & Risk Management department, a standardized risk profile created for each headline risk is submitted to the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and the Board of Directors. If a risk is identified as a Priority Risk, it receives a more granular assessment, including additional risk quantification and elevation for further discussion with the SLT and the Board of Directors. Risks and opportunities are prioritized according to (financial) impact, likelihood (of event), outlook (of risk exposure) and confidence (in risk management). The executive team that manages our ERM reporting to the Board reviews all submissions for consistency in determining scope of impacts, as well as comprehensiveness in determining the adequacy of current support by internal staff, the sufficiency of financial support for contractors or mitigation measures needed to manage and reduce risk, sufficiency of legal support, and the extent and sufficiency of third -party consulting support. All headline risks have a standardized scorecard which includes individual ratings for sub -risks, identification of whether any sub - risk is a Priority Risk, forward -looking action plans with measurable indicators and progress updates on action plans from previous assessments. The environmental impacts, risks and opportunities, including climate -related, that may be presented to our carbon reduction service lines are discussed each year. Waste Management's Digital organization briefs the Board twice a year on potentially disruptive technologies, sometimes related to customer expectations with regard to carbon reduction services. Moreover, the staff working on the ERM documentation coordinate with those drafting the risk factor description for the Annual Report on Form 10K to assure thoroughness in response. The recycling industry provides a clear example of transitional risk. The potential adoption of extended producer responsibility legislation at the state level puts national curbside recycling at risk, and China's policy decision to halt imports of recyclables has an impact on commodity pricing. Both impact life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction benefits associated with recycling and meeting sustainability goals for Waste Management and our customers. This complex risk and opportunity was analyzed and discussed by the SLT and the Board, who determined Waste Management should be a sector leader, engage customers, and educate consumers and customers. Waste Management therefore created a focused campaign to engage our customers, both municipal customers and commercial and industrial customers, by providing information necessary to maximize GHG reductions to be achieved by effective (contamination -free) recycling of the commodities providing the greatest life cycle reductions W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 141 at the lowest cost. Results are ongoing, but we estimate that our educational campaigns reach approximately 90 percent of our total customers. Our Recycle Often. Recycle Right.° campaign shows that our municipal customers with demonstrated long-term commitments to public recycling experience a 10 percent contamination rate versus the national average of 25 percent. In 2017 we reduced our contamination throughout our portfolio of recycling facilities. In addition, we are engaging with our customers during contract discussions to assure partnership to reduce contamination and increase quality. The ERM process is supported by regular inquiries of the company's Senior Leadership Team and additional members of management, including operations leadership, as to the risks, including emerging risks, that may affect the execution of our strategic priorities or achievement of our long-term outlook. We identify a number of risks that we believe could affect our business and financial statements for 2018 and beyond in our Annual Report. Key areas of assessment include: Technology. Waste Management's Digital and Corporate Venturing departments provide risk mitigation regarding new technologies that would affect the company's business model. The SLT is updated quarterly formally and on an ad hoc basis in between. The SLT sets priority areas. The Board of Directors is briefed at least once a year, with an emphasis on identification and strategic planning regarding technologies potentially disruptive to the company's business model. Waste Management has direct investments in third -party companies that possess promising technologies and business models that could change the competitive landscape in the markets in which we compete. These investments match our current expertise, particularly in current sorting and waste conversion technologies as well as complex logistics and local market analysis, with the developers of new and potentially disruptive technologies. Additionally, Waste Management is invested in three venture capital funds in North America and Europe that provide us with visibility into emerging "Cleantech" technologies. Waste Management, through its Corporate Venturing department, reviews approximately 100-150 companies annually, looking for technologies and business models that could improve our cost competitiveness and help us and our customers/communities achieve sustainability goals regarding waste reduction/consulting, upcycling, recycling, waste conversion, fleet emissions reductions and green energy production. As Waste Management seeks to expand its business and modify its traditional business model to address local, state or federal policies and requirements, the Corporate Venturing department maintains a large database, derived from global sources, that routinely provides information to key Waste Management line managers about the efficacies of an array of technologies offered by competitors. Subject to nondisclosure agreements, this information can be used by officials and regulators to help shape public policy on the environment by providing real-time data on testing, performance, verification and economics of environmental technologies. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 142 Legislative/regulatory risk and opportunity. Corporate Public Affairs and Area Government Affairs report biweekly and confer monthly on key legislative and regulatory developments affecting Waste Management's business. In an annual strategic planning meeting, in-depth discussion of priority issues helps identify strategic legislative and regulatory risks and opportunities that we plan to address. A central Public Policy team is charged with managing risk on priority issues affecting the company entity -wide. Public Affairs and Area Government Affairs staff survey risks and opportunities in terms of likelihood, severity and financial impact, and specific risk -management goals are set and tracked through the company's formal performance management system. Key risks addressed in 2017 included the economics of recycling, potential emergence of disruptive technologies or materials management frameworks, federal and state climate change programs benefiting or challenging Waste Management service offerings, and barriers and incentives to Waste Management's attempts to transition its fleet from diesel fuel. In 2017, the Board of Directors was briefed on Waste Management's extended producer responsibility strategy along with the company's government affairs update. Operational risk. Continual assessment of potential risk associated with current technologies and structures is provided by engineering and environmental management specialists. For a detailed account of this system, read a discussion of Environmental Management Processes and Systems in the Operations Appendix. Waste Management is a founder and current Research Council member of the Environmental Research and Education Foundation, which focuses on sustainability performance, environmental stewardship and higher -process knowledge within the environmental service industry. In 2017, we undertook best -practice, third -party benchmarking and have committed to communicating our resulting programmatic goals and progress to the Board periodically. Employee safety and health. Our Safety personnel employ risk matrices to review and create mitigation plans for identified health and safety risks, continually updating based upon new information. Depending upon the severity of the consequence of the risk and its likelihood, the department manages according to a hierarchy of controls, eliminating the highest risk and utilizing interventions to limit exposure to risk where appropriate. Reputation and reporting accuracy. As a service organization, Waste Management relies upon its reputation for reliable service, compliance, safety and sustainable innovation. Managers receive daily clips reporting the reputational footprint of Waste Management and our competitors. These insights are supplemented by field staff focused on gauging reputation and accurate representation of the company in all major markets. Communications on sustainability topics are coordinated centrally with a cross -functional team also charged with sustainability disclosure (including Communications, Public Affairs, National Accounts and Waste Management Sustainability Services), including response to RFPs and supply chain sustainability questionnaires with consistency and accuracy. Trends identified in customer and stakeholder questions and feedback are then inputted into the risk management process. New acquisitions evaluation for environment, health, safety and social indicators. Waste Management's acquisitions are almost exclusively in North America, and our risk assessment procedures reflect our ability to rely upon the rigor of national environment, safety and human rights law. Most acquisitions are subsumed into existing Waste Management operations and management and become fully subject to Waste Management standards and policies, including our Code of Conduct and its monitoring. Employees of acquired companies are onboarded as new Waste Management employees, subject to our mandatory enforcement of immigration laws and company background checks and drug screening. In the less frequent event of a stock acquisition, we look closely at the seller's employment, labor, safety and working conditions (including working hours, overtime, benefits, compensation), both in terms of meeting Waste Management's standards and practices and in terms of potential liabilities for past practices. The Legal and Human Resources department are active members of the due diligence team. With regard to safety metrics, Waste Management senior staff are active in engaging with ANSI Z245 standards for our industry. ANSI Z245 standards are voluntary, but many — including those that are the basis for Waste Management policy and procedures — have been adopted into federal OSHA regulations. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 143 Recycling market risks. Waste Management has invested in the assets to meet customer demand for recycling and waste reduction, with costs of processing and recovery through commodity sales as part of our economic model. As a result, our exposure to commodity prices has created a risk that can impact revenues by hundreds of millions of dollars. Waste Management Recycling is acting to mitigate the commodity risk through sales practices and contract terms. The recycling export team moves material to customers in China, India, Europe, North America and South America in an effort to diversify the price risk and ensure that markets remain in balance. During a period of low commodity prices in 2012, we began the multi -year process of changing contracts to prioritize increased transparency and cost sharing in our contract language to ensure movement of material, utilize market pricing on inbound material and mitigate our commodity risk. Customers are asked to pay processing fees for recycling their material with the remaining value split by both parties. These new terms may limit some upside benefits, but the risk mitigation protects Waste Management from the risk of volatile commodity prices. Moreover, this more transparent pricing policy strengthens our ability to withstand sustained down markets in commodities and retain core recycling capacity. Municipal contracts. Waste Management's Finance department conducts ongoing, in-depth audits on large contracts annually. A separate audit team manages SOX Contract 7 compliance on all new or renewal contracts with over $1 million in annual revenue. We have contract compliance teams in franchise markets who proactively audit all contractual requirements, reporting, fee payments, billing, etc. Our Public -Sector Services department employs a financial model going through multiple levels of approval up to the Senior Leadership Team. That model includes risk characterization factors such as market conditions, regulatory risks, etc. TRAINING EMPLOYEES ON RISK IDENTIFICATION Our Safety, Internal Audit, Internal Controls, Compliance and Enterprise Risk Management departments perform tailored trainings and information sessions to employees with the focus on building a culture of risk awareness and response. Risk identification and reduction is considered a core element of every employee's responsibilities. Our Safety and Operations departments have integrated tools to support a culture of zero tolerance for unsafe behaviors and conditions. The objective is to conduct operations in a manner that engages our employees to be safe, operate efficiently, protect the environment and respect our neighbors. There are specific meetings by discipline area (Safety, Internal Audit, Internal Controls, Compliance and Enterprise Risk Management) and reporting tools (such as Safety's Incident Reporting Tool) to identify and report risks throughout the organization, and employees are encouraged to do so. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 144 RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES RELATED TO CLIMATE CHANGE We report on the physical and financial risks and opportunities arising from climate change in our annual submission to CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project). Additionally, we discuss such risks and opportunities in our Annual Report on Form-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, under the headings "Regulations" and Risk Factors." Our CDP disclosure can be found at www.cdp.net, https:Hsustainability.wm.com, and in our Annual Report. The key risks and opportunities are summarized below. Periodically, the Board is briefed on potential regulatory and market responses to climate change that may have near- or longer -term impact on our finances or the value of services we provide. > Regulatory risks. Emerging greenhouse gas (GHG) policies at the state and federal levels will likely affect our operations, though the nature of the impacts is uncertain. Regulatory programs to address reductions of GHG emissions will present significant challenges and opportunities for the company since we have operations that emit GHGs but also employ innovative technologies that reduce and prevent GHG emissions. We have active and ongoing engagement with federal and state regulators to identify and address potential regulatory changes, including new federal air regulations for landfills. Carbon tax proposals are unlikely to see activity until at least 2020. Waste Management engaged with fossil fuel customers on a plan that does not impair economic growth. > Disaster preparedness. To prepare for the possibility of extreme weather emergencies that have the potential to disrupt our business, we have instituted emergency contingency plans and staged emergency equipment and fuel to ensure continuity of service or a return to service in the shortest time possible. These plans are based on an assessment of the types of disasters that could affect each business region and the ways in which each type of disaster would impact our employees, business operations and community needs. Experience with recent extreme weather events has confirmed the adequacy of the plans. > Changing customer preference/behavior. Customer preference for Waste Management "green" offerings are unabated by varying federal approaches to climate change. The desire to plan for climate change and reduce GHG emissions has proven stable over time for both our public and private sector customers. Opportunities. Renewable energy and GHG cap -and -trade policies could provide opportunities for Waste Management to develop additional landfill methane offset projects and waste -based energy projects. Similarly, emerging low -carbon fuel standards and other incentives allow us to realize benefits from our continuing investment in innovative alternative fuel technologies, including converting landfill gas to renewable natural gas and biodiesel. Finally, our recycling division provides indirect benefits as manufacturers turn to the use of recycled feedstocks to reduce their GHG footprint, thereby increasing demand and potentially price for recycled commodities. Waste Management has participated in CDP's assessment of corporate emissions and policies since 2004, and we review questions asked by NGOs, rating agencies like DJSI and Sustainalytics, and customer supply chain sustainability surveys to continually improve our responsiveness. Some of our significant investors discuss with us the ways in which we are evaluating our carbon footprint and the market opportunities for our low -carbon products and services. Many institutional investors inquire about negative impacts from various forms of regulation and legislation addressing GHG emissions, and they are looking at potential impacts to earnings. Two members of our senior management team — the Senior Vice President, Operations, Safety and Environmental Compliance and the Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer — oversee the work of our carbon footprint and climate risk analyses. These senior leadership members report on various issues relating to our service offerings that address customer goals relative to climate change to our Board of Directors at least twice a year. The Board, in turn, provides them with strategic advice for the business. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 145 Code of Conduct Compliance with our Code of Conduct is central to our business success, and all employees of the company, as well as all officers and directors, are provided a copy or have access to it online. The Code provides standards for ethical behavior across the scope of our business, including providing equal employment opportunities, ensuring employee safety, maintaining quality in our services, honoring relationships with suppliers and vendors, preserving privacy and confidential information, controlling access to electronic information and equipment, and complying with all applicable rules and regulations, including those related to bribery and corruption (see our Anti -Bribery Policy). We also developed a specific Human Rights Policy which is aligned with and operationalized by our Code of Conduct. Our goal is for all employees to receive training on the Code of Conduct within 60 days of joining the company and periodically thereafter. In 2017, 99 percent of employees completed Code of Conduct training. In addition to this training, the Integrity Helpline process and general investigations outcome statistics are shared with employees periodically, utilizing the company's internal newsletter and other internal communication methods. In 2017, Waste Management's Compliance and Ethics group increased its focus on enhanced compliance communications. Tone -from -the -top continues to be demonstrated through frequent messages from the Chief Legal Officer and the Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer to both the Senior Leadership Team specifically, as well as to all employees in general. Communication plans for 2017 and 2018 were developed and implemented. These plans include messages describing Waste Management's culture of compliance; its Compliance Strategy, Mission, Vision and Standards that relate to all areas of our business; our "Speak Up" culture; and topics targeted for managers — such as immigration compliance. In 2018, we also benchmarked best practices for Code of Conduct communications, and a cross -departmental team led by the Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer is refreshing our Code for readability and ease of use. In 2018, Waste Management created several cross -departmental committees to promote a culture of compliance and ethics throughout the company. These committees include a Compliance Training Committee and Compliance and Ethics Steering Committees for Safety, Environmental and Employment Practices. Videos that provided employees an opportunity to see and hear from the Chief Legal Officer and the Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer on the importance of compliance and integrity to the company's continued success were created and distributed. In addition to making the videos, both officers, along with other senior leaders from compliance -related areas, embarked on compliance field tours across the company, meeting with many field employees to understand their compliance concerns, to solicit their suggestions for improving Code of Conduct training and to further demonstrate the importance of compliance at Waste Management. The Code applies to all employees, and signed acknowledgments are periodically required, attesting that each recipient understands the responsibilities outlined. We expect all employees to timely report any compliance or ethics questions, issues or concerns, as well as any possible violations of the Code of Conduct, Employee Handbook, internal policy or an external law, rule or regulation. Waste Management highlights a variety of internal reporting resources that employees can utilize when speaking up, which include their supervisor, human resources representative, any member of management, or a Waste Management employee in a different department such as Compliance and Ethics, Legal, Corporate Security, Safety, Internal Audit, or Environmental Protection. If an employee doesn't feel comfortable reporting an issue or concern to a Waste Management employee, or if they've previously raised an issue W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 146 and did not get a satisfactory response, they can contact the Integrity Helpline. It is maintained by a third -party where reports can be made anonymously, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Waste Management is committed to a Speak Up culture wherein when employees speak up, we will listen up and follow up. Any form of retaliation against any employee who speaks up in good faith is strictly prohibited. In addition, a Code of Conduct Questionnaire is sent to select employees, allowing them an opportunity to report any issues or concerns which may not have been previously reported or properly addressed. Clawback Policies Our Executive Severance Protection Plan contains a clawback feature that allows for the suspension and refund of termination benefits for subsequently discovered cause. Our equity award agreements also include compensation clawback provisions that provide that the employee refund any amounts received under the equity award agreements if the Management Development & Compensation Committee of our Board of Directors determines that an employee either engaged in or benefited from misconduct. Misconduct generally includes any act or failure to act that caused or was intended to cause a violation of the company's policies, generally accepted accounting principles or applicable laws and that materially increased the value of the equity award. Further, our Management Development & Compensation Committee has adopted a clawback policy applicable to our annual cash incentive awards that is designed to recoup annual cash incentive payments during a specified time period when the recipient's personal misconduct affects the payout calculations for the awards. Supply Chain Through our Procurement department, Waste Management has the opportunity to demonstrate our environmental and social commitments by making purchases with an awareness of our impact on the environment. We also have unique opportunities to work collaboratively with suppliers to help them cut waste, use recycled materials and leverage their expertise to help us reach our sustainability goals. Our Procurement Policy defines value as 'the best combination of quality, cost, delivery, service technology, sustainability and risk in equipment, materials, goods or services." For third -party waste service providers, we require environmental assessments that review compliance with all applicable environmental, health and safety requirements. (For a discussion of Waste Management's role in the global supply chain, visit www.thinkgreen.com/ceo.) The Waste Management Supply Chain team receives training on the Procurement Policy and Procedures when the procedures are updated and new members join the team. SUPPLIER CODE OF CONDUCT Our suppliers are expressly bound by the Waste Management Code of Conduct for Consultants, Contractors and Suppliers, which is included in all contracts for all significant amounts. This Code of Conduct has been amended recently with a provision referencing the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), and our expectation is that all suppliers will respect UNGC principles. The provision is included in our master template that is used for both new and renewal contracts. Our Supplier Code of Conduct also is posted on wm.com to provide notice to all seeking to do business with Waste Management. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 147 We conduct periodic business reviews with critical suppliers to ensure contract and Code of Conduct compliance. The Code includes these obligations: > Strict bans on offering or accepting bribes, kickbacks, payoffs or other unusual or improper payments; > A ban on making a political contribution on behalf of Waste Management; > An affirmative obligation to be a good corporate citizen and a trusted and valued community partner and to safeguard the environment and natural resources; > A guideline strictly limiting gifts and entertainment; > An expectation of accurate books and records; > A requirement to comply with all applicable laws and regulations; and > An obligation to report all work -related incidents relevant to the contract immediately. The Supplier Code of Conduct also lists a domestic and international Waste Management Compliance and Ethics Helpline number. The Code is monitored through the Helpline, which is available to all consultants, contractors and suppliers as a resource in case of questions. All consultants, contractors and suppliers are obligated to report any known or perceived violation of laws, regulations, Waste Management policies or our Code of Conduct. We reserve the right to audit and inspect supplier operations during the term of the contract and for a limited time after termination. SUPPLIER SUSTAINABILITY RISKS We work to minimize risks in our supply chain by analyzing our spending on all critical categories of materials, goods and services as part of our strategic sourcing and category management procedures. We manage critical categories within a documented process to ensure there are adequate numbers of suppliers in place for each critical category to guarantee supply. Critical suppliers are defined as those whose absence could jeopardize our business objectives. In 2017, we identified approximately 990 Tier 1 suppliers which, combined, account for 78 percent of our total procurement spend, and reviewed 100 percent of the suppliers for sustainability risk. We estimate that no more than 1 percent of Waste Management's supply chain expenditures involve purchases from companies located outside North America and Europe. IMPROVING SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY We work with our suppliers to envision a closed -loop supply chain by purchasing recycled products and supplying our vendors with waste materials that can be recycled into new products. The following are some examples: > We have a policy of purchasing paper with a minimum of 30 percent recycled content. > Where the market is available, we recycle our equipment by grinding up plastic garbage cans to make new plastic containers, reclaiming steel from scrap containers, repurposing used tires into cutting edges for scrapers and dozers, and having used oil recycled for other purposes. We use new products such as enhanced -longevity motor oil and new materials to reduce the weight of fleet trucks. We pay attention to the degree to which plastic containers can be recycled into other plastic containers and buy accordingly. All of our suppliers are working to increase the amount of recycled plastic in our products. Learn more about our fleet in the Operations section of this report. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 148 Our Real Estate department oversees the deployment of recycled and energy -efficient materials in its Capital Projects and Construction Management Program, identifying vendors for controlled lighting and HVAC, occupancy sensors, recycled -content carpet and furniture, and low -emitting paints and adhesives. The single -largest category in our supply chain spending in any given year is collection equipment and the fuel to run it (over 20 percent of total spending). We assess suppliers for safety standards related to compressed natural gas (CNG) and quality standards, such as ISO certifications. By mid-2018, Waste Management assessed all nine of our fleet partners for safety standards. With our heavy equipment suppliers, we perform similar reviews, as well as supporting their development of product innovations such as alternative fuels in hybrid electric/diesel development. For nearly a decade, we have focused on equipment efficiency and innovations to reduce the GHGs associated with this aspect of our supply chain. Our truck fleet continues to transition from diesel to natural gas, cutting GHG emissions by 15 percent with each new truck. More than 80 percent of the trucks we purchased in 2017 had natural gas engines, and in 2017 we began a transition to trucks with the latest -technology "Near Zero" natural gas engines. We increased our use of renewable natural gas (RNG), created from landfill biogas, which further reduces our emissions by over 80 percent. Waste Management used RNG in 33 percent of our CNG trucks in 2017. In addition, we have worked for years with truck suppliers to develop ways to lightweight our vehicles, using new types of materials as technology develops and safety specifications allow. Waste Management has also been a leader in the use of hybrid vehicles, piloting them for use in our industry. We have the nation's largest fleet of hybrid heavy-duty bulldozers operating at landfills. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 149 SUPPLY CHAIN STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT Waste Management believes that active engagement in business groups and broad -based stakeholder groups is one of the best ways to continually challenge ourselves to do better. Improving the sustainability of our fleet requires collaboration, such as membership in the National Clean Fleets Partnership. This partnership operates more than 1 million commercial vehicles nationwide, and it is committed to finding ways to improve the fuel efficiency of U.S. trucks. We are also members of the U.S. EPA's SmartWay Transport partnership and of the Energy Security Leadership Council of Securing America's Future Energy (SAFE), both of which are dedicated to improving heavy-duty vehicle efficiency and reducing emissions throughout the transport supply chain. SUPPLIER DIVERSITY Total Diversity Spend At Waste Management, we work to create an environment where (in millions) everyone has an opportunity to succeed. As part of our commitment, we identify and reach out to underrepresented groups, such as minority-, 200 $250.0 women- and service -disabled -veteran -owned businesses, to work with 150 $191.0 us and add value to our supply chain. $131.5 100 $86.9 Our ongoing supplier diversity program focuses on maintaining a balance 50 between high levels of service, quality and competitive pricing, while ° """"" """""' """""' assisting businesses that have been historically overlooked in the 2015 2016 2017 2030 GOAL procurement process. The program ensures that these businesses We are on pace in 2018 to exceed our 2017 diversity spend. participate in each bid process where such a supply base exists. In 2017, we purchased nearly $191 million in products and services from certified diverse suppliers. In 2018, we set a diversity spend goal for 2030. Our tracking system is in place to begin reporting our progress on this important goal to highlight our commitment to diversity and our focus on nurturing women participating in our industry sector. Moreover, we endeavor to have our suppliers pay forward our commitment to diversity purchasing. All our Product and Service Agreements contain language that promotes our diversity program. The target is for our suppliers to have processes in place that encourage them to spend 10 percent of the total dollar amount of related purchases of services and materials with certified minority, women, veteran or other certified diverse suppliers. Waste Management does not have an internal diversity Diversity Spend (in millions) 250 $210.0 200 150 $131.5 $191.0 $175.0 100 $86.9 50 $95.6 •, o ................. ..................2018 .. 2015 2016 2016 Forecast ■ NMSDC ■ WBENC —Target Goal certification program, but rather recognizes third -party public- and private -sector certifications, such as the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) and the Women's Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC). In 2017, we conducted an audit of all registered minority -owned businesses for the purpose of: > Tracking and reporting our spend with diversity suppliers accurately; Ensuring that registered diversity suppliers have current certifications on file with the NMSDC or the WBENC and their Regional Partner Organizations; 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 150 Bringing high -potential diversity suppliers together with our category managers and area procurement managers; and > Identifying strong diversity suppliers who can potentially support us by leveraging other companies with well -developed programs that have identified their base of relevant diversity suppliers. The audit allowed us to ensure our database is up to date, and that all registered minority -owned businesses have the proper certification on file. Additionally, a new process was introduced so that suppliers can update and upload diversity certifications. This process also sends an automated email reminder from our TSMS system prior to expiration of certificates. Public Policy STANCES ON KEY POLICY ISSUES The environmental services industry is highly regulated and complex. And it's in flux. Increasingly, Waste Management is doing much more than managing waste. We are producing energy, restoring habitats and helping local governments and citizens to reduce, reuse and recycle materials. As we work with our customers and the communities we serve to create a more sustainable future, we believe we have an important voice to add to the discussion around several key policy debates, as noted below. These issues represent significant challenges for our industry and are areas of special focus for Waste Management. We welcome engagement from stakeholders around these issues and strive to work with representatives from government, the business sector, community groups and environmental advocates to build consensus for positive change. RENEWABLE ENERGY In the absence of federal clean -energy standards, state and provincial governments in the United States and Canada bear the burden of developing renewable energy requirements. This has resulted in widely divergent standards. Waste Management supports the development of a federal energy policy that would facilitate the widespread development of renewable energy sources, including municipal solid waste. Federal energy standards would also allow us to make significant strides in reducing GHG emissions associated with fossil fuel consumption. ENERGY SECURITY AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRODUCTION Achieving energy security relies on lessening our dependence on foreign oil, and domestic production of fuel from renewable sources contributes to this goal. As a partner in energy security discussions, Waste Management supports policies, including existing federal renewable fuel standards, that encourage and facilitate the production of fuel from renewable sources such as municipal solid waste, as well as tax policy that encourages development of alternative fueling infrastructure, and the conversion of diesel vehicles to cleaner -burning natural gas and renewable natural gas from waste. Studies have shown that waste -derived fuels typically have the lowest carbon intensity of all biofuel sources. NATURAL GAS AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES Waste Management's fleet policy calls for a transition to natural gas vehicles. Further, we are transitioning to renewable natural gas (RNG) fuel in our natural gas trucks. This transition is necessary to achieve our goal of offsetting the emissions of our own operations by four times while increasing the emission reductions that we provide for ourselves and our customers. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 151 In 2011, we encouraged federal and state regulatory support for the transition of heavy-duty fleets to natural gas as the preferred fuel for our industry. The natural gas vehicle platform provides an opportunity to use RNG derived from waste materials, further improving air quality. SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS MANAGEMENT As we have sought to maximize the value of the material we manage, we have reviewed U.S. EPA's waste hierarchy — reduce, reuse, recycle, recover and then dispose — as well as state -level solid waste and recycling priorities. Our review revealed that regulations regarding solid waste, recycling, energy policy and renewable fuels often compete and produce unintended results. Newer technologies designed to divert material from landfills also do not fit neatly into U.S. EPA's hierarchy. As U.S. EPA and state governments address the environmental impacts of waste disposal, recovery and recycling, we encourage them to consider life cycle approaches that view waste not merely as a problem to be solved, but as a resource. Moreover, life cycle thinking highlights the measurable benefits of material management in its opportunities to reduce GHGs and use of energy. In 2011, Waste Management funded the Sustainable Materials Management Coalition to discuss these issues, and the Coalition issued its report in July 2012. The Coalition — composed of representatives of business and industry, academic institutions, environmental and community organizations, and state and local government organizations — came together to develop consensus recommendations on the path forward for sustainable materials management. In 2013, the Coalition developed a second report urging stakeholders to use life cycle thinking to reduce the environmental footprint of products and services. Continuing our policy collaboration, the Coalition turned to how to improve the productivity of recycling and how to better communicate progress. That report was released in Fall 2016, and the Coalition members continue to reach out to other stakeholders about the importance of seeking and measuring sustainable materials management. The reports are available here. In 2017, the entire afternoon of the Waste Management Sustainability Forum was dedicated to a Sustainable Materials Management Workshop, with presentations and discussion on life cycle thinking. At the Workshop, over 100 stakeholders from across the supply chain brainstormed solutions for moving toward life cycle thinking in our industry. Also, in 2017, Waste Management enlisted external experts to validate our multiyear life cycle thinking "Spectrum" project, which is an intensive deep -dive effort into the environmental and economic impacts of all the materials managed in our industry across the U.S according to the services that we provide. This validation effort involved a third -party consulting firm to review the assumptions used in its Spectrum project, an academic institution to evaluate the process that was developed, and the academic institution as well as a nonprofit research organization to analyze the outcomes of Spectrum. The result of the validation effort supported and improved upon our original Spectrum Life Cycle Thinking results, which prioritize the efforts around waste reduction and recycling programs in the U.S. MANDATORY RECYCLING PROGRAMS AND POLICIES Governments at all levels are seeking ways to divert waste from landfills through increased recycling and recovery. Some jurisdictions have implemented mandatory recycling programs, and we support such programs when they make economic sense, have the support of customers and communities, and reflect the planning and preparation sufficient to ensure success. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 152 MANAGING STATE AND LOCAL POLICY DEVELOPMENTS We have a broad recycling footprint across North America, with 102 total recycling facilities, 44 organics processing facilities, four CORe° facilities and 11 construction and demolition facilities at the end of 2017. Our Government Affairs department coordinates information on recycling, its benefits and challenges, and innovations in state and local regulatory standards, as well as policies in support of the company's overarching goal to make recycling as environmentally productive as possible. Recycling, organics and waste reduction policies are largely driven by local and state initiatives, and it is important to participate and share experience wherever these policy debates arise. Waste Management MRF Facilities by Location (12/2017) ■, ■ ■+ r-q ME ■ ■ ■ L ■ ■ ■ [■ ■ 44 Single Stream ■ 28 Paper Only or Other Commercial Materials 14 Other 11 Construction and Demolition Debris 2 Dual Stream INTERNATIONAL TRADE OR As China implemented new policies restricting imports of recyclables, Waste Management worked with stakeholders including the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, the office of the United States Trade Representative, the US -China Institute and others to understand the policies and to help states, cities and other customers adjust their programs according to China's new policies. China's policies have global economic implications but are considered necessary if the country is to achieve its own environmental goals. We have worked with a broad range of industry stakeholders to develop short- and longer -term plans for managing the recyclables that can no longer be shipped to China. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 153 CLIMATE CHANGE Our CEO has set, and our Board has approved, aggressive sustainability goals with ambitious GHG emissions -reduction benefits from the time we formulated our sustainability goals in 2007. The scope of emissions -reduction activities available to a highly diversified company like Waste Management is vast. Waste Management gives priority to implementing opportunities that have the best potential to deliver high degrees of emissions reduction at low cost or to deliver emissions reductions combined with a positive return. Our goal setting and disclosure of progress on production of renewable energy, recycling and fuel efficiency drive our investment strategy. This approach to addressing the challenges of climate change is integrated into the evaluation of all significant activities and potential investments — from collection fleet and logistics to administrative functions and operating facilities. For example, Waste Management has engaged collaboratively with U.S. EPA and state regulators, environmental organizations, and other public and private owners to develop technical information and recommendations on enhancing regulatory control of landfill gas emissions. Waste Management is working with U.S. EPA and the trade associations for public and private landfills on technical issues with current regulation of landfill gas controls that should facilitate the beneficial use of this renewable resource. Similarly, we continue to work with U.S. EPA, the U.S. Department of Transportation, engine and vehicle makers, fleet owners and environmental groups to provide recommendations on the next phase of fuel efficiency and GHG-reduction standards for heavy-duty trucks. We are hopeful that the new rules will provide a regulatory framework for our continued investment in clean -burning natural gas and potential electric and hydrogen powered trucks. As evidenced by our participation in the CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) since 2004 and disclosed publicly since 2008, Waste Management is committed to the annual disclosure of our carbon footprint and to reporting in our sustainability reports on the innovations we are pursuing to reduce GHG emissions in our operations and for our customers. We are actively working with stakeholders from all perspectives to assess how GHG emissions can be accurately inventoried and disclosed, as well as how that information can be used in climate change initiatives that improve environmental quality and are consistent with a healthy economy. We participate not only with the CDP — and in 2017 were listed as a Climate Leader — but also with the Dow Jones Sustainability Index and numerous NGO and customer sustainability evaluation services. In 2018, we were honored to be named the Dow Jones Sustainability Index Sector Leader for Commercial Products and Services. We have also commented on federal, regional and state frameworks for addressing climate change. Extensive comments, all of which are a matter of public record, and recommended strategies have been discussed with the following: > U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Energy and Commerce > U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Science and Technology > U.S. Environmental Protection Agency > U.S. Department of Transportation Environmental Council of the States > California Air Resources Board > U.S. House of Representatives, Committee Western Climate Initiative on Ways and Means > U.S. Senate, Energy and Natural Resources Committee > U.S. Senate, Finance Committee > Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative > Climate Registry > Climate Action Reserve W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 154 In addition, in 2018 we were very active with all stakeholders and customers on the public dialogue surrounding recycling, its potential as a potent mechanism for GHG reduction, and the economic challenges facing the industry in 2017 and 2018. Stakeholder Engagement on Policy Issues Waste Management actively works with stakeholders that operate within ourvalue chain, such as customers, employees and suppliers, as well as stakeholders outside ourvalue chain, including industry peers and multistakeholder groups. We have regular open discussions about topics that are relevant to our operations and impact our society. These conversations play a key role in shaping how we execute our strategy, materiality and business strategy, as well as how we work to help improve our communities. We take a systematic approach to stakeholder engagement, starting with public accountability. Every two years we identify the key stakeholders with whom we engage — from environmental and community groups to business and manufacturing leaders, from government associations to scientific academies. These stakeholders can be found across multiple sectors and within our communities. All are essential in helping us stay abreast of current trends, perspectives and policy matters that affect our industry, our customers and our communities. Our engagement takes many forms. When working on facility upgrades and new construction, we map our community footprint and seek to engage groups and individuals in open dialogue through Community Advisory Councils or more informal routine interactions, open house events, public meetings, tours and more. With our larger customers, we host sustainability forums that focus on ways to reduce costs, lessen environmental footprints and increase the reuse of resources. Participation in policy discussions supplements our dialogue at the local level and ensures that we are working with stakeholders from many perspectives. We give dozens of presentations each year on topics involving recycling, renewable energy and fuel, and civic engagement. Since 2011, we have sponsored multiple multistakeholder dialogues on the core issues affecting our industry and those affected by it, the road to more sustainable materials management, the way life cycle thinking can pave the way to better characterization of environmental impact over time, and ways stakeholders can achieve more recycling productivity. We believe there is enormous value in bringing together diverse viewpoints in a sustained effort to find common ground and mutual understanding of difficult environmental challenges. Waste Management believes that disclosing our networks of memberships and associations working on policy issues is important. Our employees are enriched by broad interaction with stakeholders and informed dialogue on key issues like materials management, renewable energy, climate change and adaptation, responsible governance, conservation — and a host of other topics. For a full listing of associations and memberships, see Stakeholder Engagement in the GRI Index. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 155 POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS We periodically make financial contributions to candidates who we believe recognize the importance of the environmental services we provide and who support a fair, free-market approach as the best way to deliver cost-effective services. We do not expect the candidates to whom we contribute funds to agree with our positions on all issues at all times. Contributions made to political candidates must be authorized by our Government Affairs department and must comply with all applicable laws, including public disclosure of political contributions and lobbying expenses. Our contributions are reported under federal, state and local campaign finance laws and are available for review by the public. Following each two-year federal election cycle, our Board of Directors receives a detailed accounting of all contributions. Beginning in 2016, the company enhanced its disclosure related to political contributions, posting on its website an annual listing of contributions made to candidates for federal office and political organizations engaged in federal elections, as well as information on the portion of payments made by the company to trade associations and social welfare organizations that were used for political purposes, as identified by the trade association or organization. This information is available as Annex A to our Participation in the Political Process policy and is subject to certain dollar amount thresholds stated therein. The full policy and Annex A can be found on our corporate website. PUBLIC POLICY OVERSEAS To ensure compliance with domestic and international law, Waste Management has adopted an Anti -Bribery Policy and established an Anti -Bribery Committee. All employees involved in foreign business projects must receive FCPA training. In addition, the Waste Management Code of Conduct includes a section on doing business overseas to ensure our compliance with local laws as well as U.S. laws that govern our activities in international markets. Note that 99.99 percent of Waste Management workers are located in North America. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 156 all 311:;iIIJ:,fi1111 Emissions Energy reduction and GHG sustainability initiatives are deeply ingrained in our business, addressing our customers' needs, as well as serving as an integral part of our own operations. The need to address climate change and GHG regulations is a primary driver of our customers' goals to increase recycling and use lower -carbon fuels. Most of our current and planned capital projects will lower GHG emissions in both our own and our customers' supply chains. As global competition for raw materials and fuel increases, sustainable solutions for managing materials will become a necessity, and, by offering sustainable, lower -carbon management options, Waste Management is becoming competitive in new areas and insulating ourselves from long-term losses. We work hard to continually innovate in landfill management technologies, generating energy and reducing methane emissions. Landfill Gas Emissions Landfill Gas Flared 45% Landfill Gas Recovered 55% Total Flow LFG (MSCF) 207,355,449.90 Average CH4 (%) 47% Total CH4 Flow (MSCF) 98,460,603.69 Total Flared (LFG MSCF) 92,868,436.00 45% Total Engine/Turbine (LFG MSCF) 95,202,075.60 46% Total Other Beneficial Use (LFG MSCF) 19,284,938.70 9% Other emissions: Based on the total amount of landfill gas recovered, Waste Management's operations generated 0.0000562 ton of NOx, 0.0000076 ton SOx and 0.000001 ton non -methane organic compounds (NMOC) per ton of solid waste handled at our facilities with gas collection in 2017. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 157 Environmental Compliance Our goal for environmental compliance is simple: zero deviations from regulatory standards and sound environmental practice. The goal of our Environmental Management System is to correct conditions that could lead to a violation before the violation happens. We have not yet achieved our goal of zero violations, but we continue to take every departure from regulations, no matter how small, very seriously. In 2016 and 2017, Waste Management was cited for five violations that constituted formal enforcement action. The figure below charts our year -over -year performance — from 2009 through 2017 — with respect to environmental notices of violation (NOVs) received. For 2016 and 2017 we are using the metric recommended by SASB, formal enforcement actions alleged to have environmental impacts. Number of Violations 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 40 36 35 30 30 30 29 28 25 25 21 23k 22 22 23 22 25 23 23 21 21 23 20 20 18 20 20 20 17 16 15 13 11 10 5 2017 2 2 1 0 ............. .............. .............. ......... ............. ... ..........2....1M... . Lm 01 02 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 I Q1 02 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 I Q1 Q2 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 I 01 02 03 04 Significant Spills Waste Management is committed to reducing the number and volume of leaks and spills that occur as part of our operations. We track the volume of fluids our trucks use and train drivers to report any leaks or spills they observe; we also require all significant spills to be reported to the corporate office via the Environmental Incident Notification System. The chart at right summarizes all spills of a size significant enough that we were required to report them to the National Response Center. Number of Reportable Spills 10 10 8 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 3 p............. n... =............. a ..... *...... 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 158 Environmental Expenditures As an environmental service infrastructure provider, our environmental expenditures are necessarily interrelated with our operations. These expenditures include compliance, environmental protection, control and research costs, as well as the capital and operating costs for our waste -handling options — from waste reduction and reuse consultation to recycling, waste -to -energy and disposal facility construction and operation. Our environmental expenditures for the reporting period are shown below. Environmental Expenditures' 2010 $3,999 $10,339 38.7% 2011 $4,181 $11,256 37.2% 2012 $4,490 $11,798 38.1 % 2013 $4, 644 $12,904 36.0 % 2014 $4,521 $11,697 38.7% 2015 $4,050 $10,916 37.1 % 2016 $4,165 $11,314 36.8% 2017 $4,399 $11,848 37.1 % 1 Includes costs associated with the environmentally responsible management of waste and the creation of renewable fuel. Excludes costs associated with sales, general collection operational and administrative cost, merger costs and unusual items. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 159 Carbon Footprint Calculation Methodology Waste Management's carbon footprint comprises the anthropogenic Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect) GHG emissions from facilities and activities under Waste Management's operational control in the United States, the U.S. Territories and Canada, as well as Scope 3 (indirect) GHG emissions. Scope 1 emissions include direct emissions for process -based emissions from landfilling, power generation, fuel for support services and heating, fleet vehicles and refrigerants. Scope 2 emissions include indirect emissions from purchased electricity. Scope 3 emissions include purchased goods and services, capital goods, fuel- and energy -related activities (not included in Scope 1 or Scope 2), business travel, employee commuting and downstream leased assets. Our carbon footprint calculation relies on company operating data collected from auditable corporate business, legal and accounting records, which have undergone internal quality - assurance checks. Emission factors and methodologies are from the following sources: 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Mandatory Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule (MRR), 40 CFR Part 98 2. EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks 3. EPA, eGRID Technical Support document, Chapter 3 4. ECCC, National Inventory Report 1990-2014: Greenhouse Gas Sources and Sinks in Canada (Part 3, Annex 13) 5. DOE, 1605(b) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, Technical Guidelines 6. DOE Energy Information Agency (EIA), Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, Documentation and Emission Factors International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2006 Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 8. International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Fifth Assessment Report 9. International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Fourth Assessment Report 10. Solid Waste Industry for Climate Solutions (SWICS) Protocol by SCS Engineers, version 2.2 11. EPA, Climate Leaders Program, Technical Guidance 12. World Resources Institute (WRI) and World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD), The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol 13. U.S. Community Protocol for Accounting and Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Method WW. 14 We participate in multiple forms of data verification. First, in conformance with applicable state or provincial GHG emissions -reporting programs, an independent third party is hired to review original data and provide a verification certificate. Accordingly, the emissions from the landfill subject to the Alberta Provincial Specified Gas Emitters Regulatory reporting program were third -party verified by RWDI AIR Inc. for 2014 and by GHD for 2015, 2016 and 2017. As for state reporting programs, Massachusetts modified its GHG inventory program to no longer require third -party verification of facility GHG reports effective as of third quarter 2015. Of the four landfills in California for which we are required to report GHG emissions, third -party verification is required for only one landfill. Analytical Environmental Service (AES) completed verification of the 2015 and 2016 mandatory GHG emissions report in July 2016 and 2017, respectively, as required by the State of California mandatory reporting program. All our facilities are subject to the federal Mandatory GHG Reporting Rule for 2017, which includes nearly 240 landfills that are subject to rigorous validation checks by U.S. EPA as part of its compliance assurance and enforcement program for the reporting rule. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 160 In 2017, Waste Management again engaged Lloyd's Register (LRQA) to conduct a third -party verification of the company's 2016 carbon footprint. In 2018, Waste Management hired Environmental Services, Inc. (ESI) to conduct the third -party verification of the company's 2017 carbon footprint. Both verifications were conducted in accordance with ISO 14064-3:2006 specification with guidance for validation and verification of GHG assertions to provide limited assurance that the Scope 1, Scope 2 and Scope 3 GHG data was prepared in conformance with World Resource Institute/World Business Council for Sustainable Development GHG Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard and the internal Waste Management Inventory Management Plan, First Edition. As a result, 100 percent of our carbon footprint is verified by a third party. In a second form of verification, we report to a third party such as a government -affiliated data tracking program, which provides QA/QC to the data in some form but does not provide a verification certificate. Our transportation data is verified through the U.S. EPA SmartWay program; our GHG inventory from energy generation is verified by U.S. EPA; and our GHG inventory from California, reported to the California Air Resources Board, is verified by SCS. Our GHG inventory reflects the most accurate means available to calculate GHG emissions within our industry sector. We worked with leaders in government, industry and academia — including staff of the multistate Climate Registry and the U.S. EPA — in developing our inventory processes and protocols. Because a broadly accepted protocol for estimating the carbon mass balance of landfills does not yet exist, Waste Management, along with other public and private owners/operators of landfills, funded development of the Solid Waste Industry for Climate Solutions (SWICS) protocol by SCS Engineers. The protocol represents a first step in refining existing U.S. EPA models and protocols using peer -reviewed, published research to improve landfill GHG emission estimation. We employed the SWICS protocol in estimating the emissions associated with the landfill operations reported in our company -wide carbon footprint and the voluntary GHG reporting protocols in which we participate. (U.S. EPA's Science Advisory Board views some sources of biogenic carbon dioxide emissions — including landfill gas and biogenic materials in waste — as carbon neutral, so these are not included in our footprint.) Beginning with 2013 emissions, we aligned our reporting with that of U.S. EPA, which continues to refine its default assumptions and scope of reporting under its mandatory reporting program. If we find that U.S. EPA's rule omits a facility previously included in our carbon footprint, we will calculate a default representing the proportion of emissions thereby omitted and increase the reported emissions included in our footprint to allow our emissions to be compared year over year. As part of this process of aligning our reporting with that of U.S. EPA, beginning with our 2013 emissions reporting, we are using the modified 100-year global warming potentials (GWPs) promulgated by U.S. EPA in its November 29, 2013, revisions to 40 CFR Part 98 (78 Fed. Reg. 71904). Pertinent to Waste Management's carbon footprint, U.S. EPA revised the GWP for methane from 21 to 25 and the GWP for nitrous oxide from 310 to 298. Waste Management has contracted with Enel, a leader in energy intelligence software, to collect and pay utility invoices, as well as to track usage data as part of an enterprisewide utility bill management (UBM) program spearheaded by our supply chain procurement managers. The UBM system has the ability to track compressed natural gas, natural gas, propane, landfill gas, delivered heat and water service, and internally generated waste. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 161 Information from the UBM program is audited prior to bill redirection by Waste Management to ensure correct processing of all future invoices. We review data through Enel's online dashboard and have the capability to run reports on consumption, cost and MTCO2e on a facility, region, division, country and enterprisewide basis. With this new approach, our data collection and reporting program is more robust and transparent than ever before. Through the UBM system, Waste Management can pull data by market area, which offers a base understanding of energy and water consumption patterns on a regional level. Our goal is to complete the enablement of all sites into the UBM system to understand baseline water consumption levels across all areas of our operations. Our calculation of the potential GHG reductions or "avoided emissions" that our operations enable includes the following: > Production of renewable waste -based energy that replaces electricity generated from fossil fuels. > Potential avoided GHG emissions associated with annual production and use of renewable natural gas (RNG). > Recycling of postconsumer materials (e.g., paper, aluminum and plastics) using U.S. EPA's WARM Model. > Permanent carbon storage in landfills of biogenic materials that do not decompose in an anaerobic landfill environment. Carbon storage in landfills can significantly offset GHG emissions from landfills as recognized by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, U.S. EPA's U.S. Inventory of GHG Emissions and Sinks, the Oregon Climate Trust and the California Air Resources Board — all of which recognize carbon storage in landfilled material as a "sink" in calculating carbon emissions inventories. We have used the SWICS protocol to calculate the amount of carbon permanently stored in landfills from the annual disposal of organic waste — i.e., carbon that will not decompose in the landfill to produce methane. In 2014, we first prepared for review by the Board of Directors a benchmarking of companies projecting a cost of carbon, and we continue to update the Board on changes in Waste Management's footprint, with the ongoing obligation to update the Board in the event of a major change in customers' disclosed carbon pricing strategies. We review how carbon pricing models or cap -and -trade programs are applied in North America. We have concluded that because of the complex nature of our business and high variability in state approaches, with carbon emissions offset by carbon -reducing services like Waste Management Sustainability Services consulting, recycling, renewable energy production and carbon sequestration in landfills, the absence of a clear regulatory framework for carbon pricing for our sector makes price projections unreliable. Our assessment has been further complicated by recent U.S. position changes on climate strategy, and we monitor state government and customer response strategies closely. Anticipating a price on carbon is part of our initiative to change reporting on recycling productivity from tonnage to GHG reductions gained. We believe our ability to provide verifiable metrics on carbon reduction to our customers will be a competitive advantage. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 162 Electricity Consumption Data by Region Closed/Inactive Sites 9,042,736 Corporate Office 10,094,207 Waste Management of Ark Tenn Alabama Kentucky 17,058,050 Waste Management of Eastern Canada 27,690,110 Waste Management of Florida 38,427,979 Waste Management of Four Corners 24,727,360 Waste Management of Greater Mid Atlantic 63,698,537 Waste Management of Gulf Coast 27,494,075 Waste Management of Illinois Missouri Valley 40,680,897 Waste Management of Michigan Ohio Indiana 42,759,359 Waste Management of New England 25,208,012 Waste Management of Northern California 17,206,795 Waste Management of Pacific Northwest BC 28,016,007 Waste Management of South Atlantic 15,498,316 Waste Management of Southern California 27,495,319 Waste Management of Texas Oklahoma 32,436,817 Waste Management of Western Canada 4,356,018 Waste Management of Wisconsin Minnesota 31,839,040 Waste Management of WPA MD WVVA 45,659,236 Waste Management SBS 1,514,021 Total 530,902,891 Energy Consumption Total 7,628,999 Fossil Fuels 7,573,374 Renewable Fuels 55,625 Percentage Renewable 0.73% 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 163 Corporate Air Program Waste Management established a Corporate Air Program function in the early 2000s. The Corporate Air Program is staffed by a Senior Director and two Directors who support the field operations with permitting and compliance obligations. The Senior Director reports to the Corporate Vice President of the Environmental Management Group. Waste Management also employs a field team dedicated to assist with California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Alaska state -specific air permitting and compliance needs. This team consists of one field manager and several environmental specialists who assist field operations and coordinate with Corporate Air Programs to maintain consistency with federal rule implementation. The Corporate Air Program creates, communicates and issues policies, procedures, best management practices, directives, guidance and strategies relating to the protection, control and management of air quality with field operations. The Corporate Air Program also creates and issues standard templates for recordkeeping and reporting GHG emissions pursuant to the USEPA and Canadian GHG reporting programs. Standard recordkeeping and reporting templates have also been developed and used by field operations to meet other applicable federal requirements such as New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). The Corporate Air Program develops and delivers webinar and classroom training on air permitting requirements and recordkeeping and reporting templates to drive compliance with federal rules. The Air Program's team develops short-term and long-term permitting and compliance strategies to accommodate existing site conditions and projected new or modified operations at our disposal operations. This includes assisting field operations with permitting beneficial use processes used to convert methane to electricity and renewable fuels. The Corporate Air Program identifies local, state and federal regulatory impacts to Waste Management field operations. The Air directors interpret environmental data and provide guidance, direction and recommendations to field operations with preparing/reviewing compliance reports, permit applications and draft permits. The team interfaces with air regulators during the permit process and regulatory interpretative issues and supports field operations in responding to and resolving violations, warnings or other potential noncompliance issues. Waste Management's Air Program also prepares/compiles and presents scientific data white papers and other technical support to facilitate changes to federal rules and guidance. Corporate Air Program directors coordinate with our field operations, as well as the legal and community affairs departments, to work directly with regulators at the federal and state level. Together, they facilitate changes to federal anc state rules and permit conditions, as well as responding to proposed regulatory changes. We also partner with industry stakeholders, academia and internal engineering to develop new and evaluate existing technology and processes to mitigate emissions from disposal operations such as combustion and conversion technologies, as well as leachate evaporation technologies. This includes supporting development and testing of emerging methane measurement techniques for landfill emissions. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 164 Number of air emissions noncompliance incidents (formal enforcement only) Two alleged violations with formal proceedings during CY 2017 (Douglas County/Pheasant Point and Stony Hollow). 1. March 2017/May 2018 — Douglas County/Pheasant Point received the initial proposed settlement letter from EPA Region 7 in March 2017. Site is finalizing settlement agreement with EPA Region 7; county alleges site did not have adequate gas collection coverage in certain parts of site per the federal NSPS WWW requirements. 2. May 3, 2017 — Stony Hollow, Ohio received Director's Final Findings and Orders (DFFO) from Ohio EPA regarding alleged odors and well temperature exceedances per NSPS WWW requirements. Interim Orders were issued November 28, 2016. Containing Hazardous Substances Waste Management owns six hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities and one underground injection facility, subject to U.S. EPA's Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a data repository compiled to inform the public about the presence of chemicals in their communities. In U.S. EPA's most recent inventory of TRI releases (2016), 3.44 billion pounds of chemicals were reported to have been released in the United States, 3 percent of which came from the hazardous waste management sector. Even though TRI-reportable releases must be within levels authorized by permit or regulation, the TRI was initiated to provide a supplement to the permitting process that would provide communities with information about chemicals from all the facilities in their vicinity — those releasing emissions to air and water and those containing toxins within structures on their property. Disclosure of the total releases emitted in each community was intended as an indirect means of encouraging pollution prevention, and it has, in fact, served that purpose. Volume of Toxic Chemical Releases by Industry (percent) ■ Metal Mining: 44% ■ Chemicals: 14% ■ Electric Utilities: 10% Primary Metals: 10% All Others: 9% Paper: 5% Food: 4% Hazardous Waste: 3% U.S. EPA continues to reiterate its view that increased quantities of TRI materials in containment can represent "a generally positive environmental trend because these facilities are in the business of managing hazardous waste and do so under strict controls." For example, in explaining what TRI data mean to a community, U.S. EPA, in its most recent commentary about the TRI inventory, prioritized sites by subtracting emissions to land reported by RCRA Subtitle C regulated units because those units were considered to be physically controlling toxic releases rather than emitting them. Moreover, releases are reported differently based on whether they involve placement in RCRA Subtitle C landfills versus other kinds of landfills, in recognition of the stringent regulation of Subtitle C landfills. This distinction is continued in EPA's most recent update, p. 16. Waste Management's emissions under TRI are reported annually to the U.S. EPA. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 165 Continuing delays in obtaining permits for new units at two hazardous waste landfills have had two impacts: (1) a sharp decline in containment in the RCRA Subtitle C units on -site and (2) a corresponding increase in transfers off -site as new arrangements needed to be made to accommodate customer needs. U.S. EPA reports the actual releases and containment at the seven Waste Management hazardous waste facilities as follows: TRI Chemical Releases and Containment at Waste Management Hazardous Waste Facilities (in Pounds) Air 19,047 62,128 19,838 2,246 8,258 15,017 13,300 15,401 Water 30 16 14 16 15.708 40.52 0 0 RCRA Subtitle C 34,040,988 24,479,007 26,143,719 24,214,088 21,930,366 19,280,924 23,822,274 32,276,337 Underground Injection 5,025,712 9,574,712 9,253,272 7,374,493 9,949,743 8,842,344 10,968,603 10,144,130 Transfer Off -Site to Treatment/Containment 1 71,948 171,240 111,704 124,394 580,720 523,149 296,284 160,623 *Note that we use U.S. EPA's official reporting on TRI for consistency in numbers; EPA's 2017 report was not available at time of reporting. Also integral to Waste Management's focus on eliminating exposure to hazardous substances is our work with customers, using our experience in safely containing hazardous waste in our permitted facilities to work in -plant, on -site with industrial customers to eliminate, reduce and avoid potential exposures from hazardous waste at their facilities. Our Waste Management Sustainability Services employees work with customers to reduce the generation of hazardous waste at the outset, in the design process. Commitment to the Built Environment An ever-growing internal and customer focus on third -party authentications for health and wellness, green building and landfill diversion drives Waste Management to continually expand its commitment to LEED, WELL, TRUE and UL's zero -waste validation. In 2017, Waste Management: > Performed LEED 2009 Materials and Resources Credit 6 solid waste audits, LEED V4 Materials and Resources Prerequisite 1 evaluations, and other initiatives to help our customers achieve LEED certification. > Initiated offerings with a variety of certification tools and three WELL APs on our Sustainability Services consulting team to guide customers through the WELL Building Certification process, from registration and preliminary evaluations through feature support and recertification. • The WELL Building Standard is a rating system devised by the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) that explores how design, operations and behaviors within the places where people work and live can be optimized to advance human health and well-being. Covering seven core concepts of health and hundreds of features, WELL is a flexible building standard and represents the future of modern design. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 166 > Developed service offerings centered around the new TRUE Zero Waste certification, with TRUE Advisors on our Sustainability Services consulting team. • TRUE Zero Waste certification is a rating system devised by Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) that enables facilities to define, pursue and achieve their zero -waste goals, cutting their carbon footprint and supporting public health. Maintained UL Zero Waste validations for the Waste Management Phoenix Open and GreenBiz. • The UL waste diversion validation program focuses on monitoring and measuring material flows that are not part of an organization's final product. UL offers four landfill waste diversion claim validations to recognize companies that handle waste in environmentally responsible and innovative ways — from energy production via incineration to reuse, recycling and composting. These efforts demonstrate Waste Management's commitment to its internal transformation, as well as emerging trends in sustainability, while also helping reduce long-term negative environmental impacts. Environmental Management Environmental stewardship is the core of our business — our promise to customers, our competitive advantage and our obligation to the communities in which we operate. How we manage potential environmental impacts and opportunities is a critical element of being a sustainable enterprise. In a business as highly regulated as ours, protecting the environment, maintaining compliance and innovating to improve operations requires unwavering focus, expertise, comprehensive systems and internal checks and balances. Our approach has evolved over decades, with a focus on integrating environmental functions into key management systems. Information on our environmental policies, as well as on our management team, practices and training, is available on our website. PROCESSES We have a long track record of both supporting high regulatory standards and striving to go beyond them. Our environmental management approach has led us to undertake the following actions: > Urge the U.S. EPA in 1991 to revise regulations implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act's Subtitle D and to establish strong and prescriptive federal standards for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). We supported specific, rigorous, government -sanctioned and publicly reviewed standards to ensure environmental protection at all MSW landfills. > Provide consistent encouragement to the U.S. EPA to consider revisions to the RCRA hazardous waste regulations with respect to the management of hazardous waste pharmaceuticals, including extensive feedback on the proposed "Management Standards for Hazardous Waste Pharmaceuticals Rule" published in the Federal Register September 25, 2015. > Innovate beyond compliance. As part of Waste Management's internal formal performance review, the results of regulatory inspections, internal audits, external audits, and regulatory compliance issues and their precursors are all tracked, managed and remedied as part of the company's continuous improvement process. Members of senior management, up to and including the Board of Directors, review performance. > Extend the company's commitment to environmental performance related to events that are not necessarily regulatory in nature but that, nonetheless, are public concerns, such as noise, litter and odors. Such events are tracked, managed and remedied in real time. We also employ best management practices and conduct routine training to eliminate the dissemination of dust from our facilities. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 167 > Test our internal systems to ensure their thoroughness and accuracy. We periodically conduct gap analyses of our Environmental Management System against the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 standards to ensure the sufficiency of our systems for landfills, transfer stations, hauling operations, waste -to -energy plants, hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities and recycling facilities. These systems continue to be evaluated and supplemented as appropriate. > Certify all 1,387 facilities served by Waste Management Sustainability Services (WMSS) comport with the globally recognized ISO 14001 and ISO 9001 standards. WMSS's operations represent 67 percent of all the facilities either owned, operated or serviced by Waste Management*. > Audit the rest of our operations through an independent environmental audit team that employs nationally recommended compliance audit practices approved by the American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the Board of Environmental, Health and Safety certification standards for professional auditors. Nearly all of Waste Management revenues come from operations subject to environmental management systems that are audited. Test our facilities to assure stakeholders that our operations protect human health and the environment. Our environmental experts hold a number of patents on innovative monitoring and analysis technologies, and we often provide monitoring data to outside parties to evaluate how our systems are performing. *Although 100 percent of Waste Management facilities are not ISO -certified, each is managed under an Environmental Management System, described below, that is benchmarked to ISO standards. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS) 1. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY Our Corporate Environmental Policy establishes the vision for our EMS. The Policy states, in part: Waste Management is committed to protecting human health and the environment. This commitment is a keystone of all that we do, reflected in the services we provide to customers, the design and operation of our facilities, the conditions under which employees work, and our interactions with the communities where we live and do business. We will be responsible stewards of the environment and protect the health and well-being of our employees and neighbors. We have policies and standards for specific environmental and related aspects of our operations. The following principles are applicable to company operations worldwide: > Protection: Conduct all operations in a manner that protects the environment and our employees, neighbors and customers. Proactively work to implement procedures and programs to prevent pollution. > Compliance: Comply with all legal requirements and proactively implement programs and procedures to ensure compliance. > Conservation: Practice and promote the conservation of nature and the earth's energy resources. > Communication: All Waste Management employees are responsible for helping the company identify and remedy possible violations. Suspicion of violations of law or Waste Management's Core Values of Ethical Conduct and Practices shall be communicated in accordance with the company's Business Ethics and Compliance Policy and Environmental Reporting and Incident Notification Policy. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 168 The company has developed processes, procedures and tools for use in achieving its high standards for environmental performance and compliance. They collectively form the Waste Management EMS. The company's operations, across all lines of business, are responsible for implementation and adherence to the Waste Management EMS at each operating location. This applies to all business endeavors in which Waste Management has a 50 percent or more ownership. Management regularly monitors operations and makes recommendations to the Board of Directors on programs to continuously improve the environmental performance of the company. When necessary, environmental goals and objectives are established, reviewed and approved during management review. The Waste Management Board of Directors and executive management regularly monitor environmental performance to ensure adherence to the principles of this policy across the company. 2. PLANNING Our EMS focuses on preventing, correcting and ultimately reducing impacts associated with our operational activities. Specifically, we focus on the following: > Eliminating environmental impacts, including spills or leaks from vehicles, landfill gas impacts on the air or subsurface and releases to surface water or groundwater; > Eliminating community impacts, including odors, litter, noise, dust, and spills or leaks; and Eliminating regulatory impacts, including regulatory inspection -alleged issues, warning letters, violations and enforcement actions. We also use several databases, systems and processes designed to help facility managers plan, implement, check and respond to their site -specific environmental requirements. Legal and Other Requirements Our EMS tools continually evaluate and determine what regulations, permit conditions and contract requirements apply to facilities. These tools include the following: > CyberRegs. An online source for all state and federal statutes and regulations > Regulatory outreach. Active involvement by our technical professionals in state and local activities associated with environmental regulation development and policymaking Waste Management's environmental teams work closely with our Legal and Government Affairs departments, and they utilize the above resources to ensure that all facilities have access to relevant laws and regulations. Objectives and Targets We use indicators to quantify environmental performance, including: > Environmental impacts to the environment > Community environmental concerns and impacts > Regulatory violations W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 169 Our Environmental Incident Rate (EIR) measures our performance and tracks progress toward these goals at the facility level. The EIR is used to drive continuous environmental improvement on a year - over -year basis. 3. IMPLEMENTATION Roles and Responsibilities Our EMS relies on our corporate, geographic area and facility -level personnel with job -specific functions, roles and responsibilities for planning, implementing and evaluating the EMS components. The specific departments and personnel involved include the following: Environmental Protection (EP). Develops environmental policies, tools and training, and provides strategic or technical advice, with the goal of 100 percent compliance. Oversees environmental performance and ensures environmental impacts and issues are resolved, including correction and prevention. > Corporate Engineering Science. Manages research and engineering science to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between our disposal processes and the environment. > Environmental Engineering (EE). Provides expertise in the planning and design of our facilities to ensure that operational activities have limited environmental impact. Performs annual planning and forecasting of life -of -site costs for our landfills, including Financial Accounting Standard 143 retirement obligations. The engineering and accounting controls exercised during this process are extensive and are subject to SOX 404 controls (from section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act) that are reviewed annually by independent external auditors. > Air/Landfill Gas Management (AGM). Develops and implements the corporate GHG and carbon emissions tracking and reduction strategies. Sets policies and standards. Is responsible for the planning and development of air quality and landfill gas management tools. > Groundwater Protection (GP). Provides expertise and direction on groundwater protection programs and ensures that environmental monitoring networks are installed and operating to specifications. Provides laboratory services that ensure accuracy and quality control in the analytical testing of environmental samples. > Laboratory Services (LS). Provides oversight and guidance to the commercial laboratories that support Waste Management's monitoring programs in order to manage risk associated with the analytical testing of environmental samples. Provides support to all facilities that collect certain routine environmental data as detailed by the Groundwater Protection Program. > Waste Approvals. Ensures permit compliance and safe and environmentally sound waste acceptance procedures and controls. > Government Affairs. Monitors and engages with key federal, state and local governmental entities to ensure that we are at the forefront of developing trends and regulations. > Legal. Provides guidance, support, and advice to our sites and market areas. Monitors compliance trends. Manages the company's process of analyzing the root cause of any failures. > Site Managers and Front -Line Employees. Are responsible for all environmental aspects at the site level, with key environmental tasks assigned to appropriately trained local staff. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 170 Training Waste Management recognizes that in order to achieve environmental performance goals, employees must possess the knowledge and skills to manage and conduct operations in environmentally responsible ways. Our environmental training targets a range of operational and functional levels within the company. All new employees participate in corporate ethics and compliance training, which includes our company's standards for environmental practices. Corporate and local staff with responsibility for environmental leadership are trained in the company's environmental practices. Employees with environmental leadership responsibility are provided training through the following programs: > Talent Central Learning Portal — Environmental Protection Learning Series (EPLS) online modules. Monthly online site management trainings on a different environmental subject each month. Completion is mandatory, and knowledge is tested and tracked. > In -person training sessions. On -site trainings conducted by our field EP and/or operations professionals for facility management and technical staff on environmental and compliance subjects. In addition, Waste Management has environmental training programs targeting operational and functional levels. Our Environmental Compliance Awareness Program (ECAP) provides mandatory monthly training for front-line employees and managers, covering a different environmental subject each month. Knowledge is tested and tracked at the site level. Monthly topics are aligned between these programs whenever possible. Local training is also provided periodicallyvia in-house classroom training, on-the-job training and outsourced training. In addition, staff with responsibilities related to specific environmental requirements for our operations sometimes need job -specific training, which is provided to employees and managers at all Waste Management operations. We have instituted Landfill GHG worksheets that must be completed by all on -site employees, and we offer a Gas Collection and Control System Design and Installation Guidance Manual to ensure landfill employees are utilizing best practices. For more on our employee training, see the Workplace Appendix. We also provide training to customers, for example on DOT hazardous waste handling requirements. Communications Communicating environmental commitment and performance to our customers, communities, regulators and investors strengthens our ability to be an environmental leader in our industry. Internal communications regarding environmental commitment and performance help to create an atmosphere where all employees work toward the common goal of continuous improvement. We communicate our environmental commitment within the company using the following methods: > Waste Management's Environmental Incident Alert Notification System gives immediate, companywide notification of significant environmental or regulatory events — including reportable quantity (RO) spills, environmental impacts (e.g., stormwater, leachate), alleged violations and enforcement actions. Waste Management's CASES Database and Public Commenter Systems provide real-time notification of any customer -related environmental issues to site managers for response and resolution. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 171 > Environmental performance results, including the following impacts, are tracked monthly and communicated companywide and to senior leadership via the EP Dashboard: Environmental impacts such as spills, leaks, gas migration, groundwater contaminant exceedances, certain releases to ambient air and stormwater discharges in excess of applicable standards • Regulatory impacts such as alleged violations, inspections and enforcement actions • Community impacts such as off -site spills/leaks, odors, noise, pests, mud and litter Waste Management Visor, our intranet system, updates reporting systems to help manage tracking of landfills, tanks, authorized vendors and environmental compliance. Overall compliance performance is reported to management according to the EP reporting structure, via routine activity reports. We also communicate our environment efforts with our communities, customers, regulators and investors through other methods, including the following: > Waste Management's corporate website highlights significant research, environmental awards and unique achievements in environmental management. > Community comments are centrally managed and tracked through response and, if necessary, correction. > Our environmental scientists and professionals present achievements and research at national and international environmental conferences. > Our Corporate Communications department is responsible for communication of environmental issues at the company. > Our local managers support community outreach programs. Documents and Operational Controls Waste Management has several internal systems for maintaining documents and records related to the EMS. The location of any particular document or record depends on the specific application, since many of the EMS tools are multiple -purpose programs. The two main internal systems are the following: > Waste Management Visor Environmental Protection Website. Visor is the company's intranet, with links to all formal corporate environmental policies, standards, documentation and resources, including the EMS, training materials, web -based tracking systems and databases. Visor is available to all company employees and is reviewed and revised on a routine basis to ensure that it is up-to-date and includes the most recent documents. Waste Management Environmental Program SharePoint. The EP SharePoint webpage is used to store and share environment -related documents, guidance, training materials and other electronic resources. All Environmental Program and Technical Managers have access to the EP SharePoint website. The SharePoint is available for interactive program tracking, e.g., site visits, order tracking, document development, idea development and sharing, and document sharing. The EP SharePoint page is regularly reviewed and updated. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 172 We have a wide range of environmental databases including the following: > Cycle. The compliance assurance task calendar program for identifying and tracking completion of site environmental tasks regarding permits, regulations, site plans, policies, etc. > Environmental Reporting System (incident alerts). The repository for reported agency -identified violations (AIVs), environmental exceedances and public comments. > Dakota Auditor and Tracer. A third -party audit management system used to manage compliance representation letters. Also used to track environmental and safety audit findings and corrective actions. > Environmental Enforcement Database (EED). The Legal department's violation tracking database for tracking significant violations through completion and reporting the results to senior management and corporate governance. > Storage Tank Database. Used to manage aboveground and underground storage tanks, including registrations for insurance purposes. > Applied Landfill Information Analysis System (ALIAS). A relational database used to cross- reference landfill characteristics (e.g., cover, liner, waste type) to monitoring points and results. > E0uIS. Contains our groundwater, surface water and other analytical data provided by contract laboratories. Used for reporting, data integrity and management purposes. > Landfill Gas Management System (LGMS). Houses operational and performance data relating to landfill gas collection and control systems. > PharmE Waste Wizard. Maintains hazardous waste categorization for over 220,000 pharmaceuticals on the market, updated weekly. In addition to the above, each facility is responsible for maintaining its own operating record, including documents, inspections and reports required by regulation. Emergency Preparedness and Response We're always working to refine and improve the disaster response and preparation plans for our facilities. We maintain an Emergency Situations and Evacuation Plan Policy, which communicates management objectives for addressing emergency situations. Facilities may also be required to maintain specific emergency response plans, including the following: > Hurricane Preparedness Plans and annual simulation exercises. > Disaster Preparedness and Management Plans in areas subject to natural disasters (e.g., tornados, fires, earthquakes), for safe handling of disaster -generated debris. > Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plans for facilities that store certain volumes of petroleum products and are required to prevent, contain and control spills. Our employees are trained and drilled to comply fully with Emergency Situations and Evacuation Plans, Local Preparedness Plans and Spill Plans. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 173 4. ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE ACTION Monitoring and Measurement We use the following programs as a multipurpose, integrated system to monitor, measure, report and track environmental aspects and impacts through closure/completion: > Environmental Protection (EP) Dashboard — Environmental Incident Rate (EIR). This online system is used to measure, track and report performance across three areas: the environment, our communities and regulations. Our performance goal is continuous year -over -year improvement in El performance (Environment, Community and Regulatory). Environment. Environmental incidents that occur at our operations are compiled, including the following: — Spills/leaks that hit the ground from vehicles — Groundwater impacts that exceed regulatory criteria or that show increasing trends — Stormwater impacts above benchmarks or reportable release levels — Leachate impacts — Air impacts that include surface emission overages or reportable air emissions — Landfill gas impacts registered by perimeter gas probes • Community. To underscore the company's commitment to the communities it serves, Waste Management developed and deploys a public comment management system. When a comment is received, the information necessary for a prompt response and remedy is routed to the closest responsible manager. The manager is empowered to take action appropriate to the circumstances and track remedies through to completion. • Regulatory. Regulatory incidents and, more important, their precursors are tracked, managed and recorded for each occurrence as part of the company's compliance program and continuous improvement process. Lessons learned are shared via the company's EP Dashboard and program of weekly and monthly reporting. Senior management, including the Board of Directors, is briefed on performance on a regular basis. The position of Chief Compliance Officer exists to elevate the issue of regulatory compliance. > EP Dashboard — EP Toolkit. The EP Toolkit is used to evaluate environmental performance system metrics for the company's business operations every month. EP Toolkit metrics help ensure that all cycle tasks, audit findings and environmental incidents are completed in a timely manner, and effective corrective actions and preventive measures are implemented. > EP Dashboard —System Reports. A System Report is a month -end environmental performance summary that is automatically sent to EP Dashboard users of record. • Dashboard reporting tool also provides users with the ability to review and report environmental performance results on a real-time or scheduled basis. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 174 Corrective Action and Preventive Measures Local EP Managers are responsible for ensuring resolution and prevention of issues identified through the EP Dashboard, EP Toolkit and other environmental database reports. Facility and EP Managers are responsible for ensuring that all identified incidents are closed out completely and correctly. Measures or actions that are not effective are subject to reopening of the incident. > Environmental Incident Rate incidents are documented and tracked until all corrective actions and preventive measures are implemented. Performance related to completion of the corrective and preventive measures is tracked via the EP Toolkit. > Public Comment Management Program is the process for addressing environment -related calls from our customers and communities. Environmental comments received at Customer Service Centers are entered into a program called CASES, while calls received directly by the facility are entered into Public Commenter by the site staff. Any comment requiring corrective action is routed to the local entity for response and resolution. Environment -related comments uploaded into either system are centrally tracked through correction and preventive measure implementation. The Waste Management Integrity Helpline is our portal to internally identify potential instances of noncompliance with company or regulatory procedures. We communicate to employees that it is available for their use and promote a Speak Up culture wherein when they speak up, we will listen up and follow up. Every inquiry is logged and tracked to ensure that the issue is resolved, up to and including any required corrective actions. The Legal department and EP work together to assess whether the incident has any national implications and to ensure that the corrective action is spread across the organization — so that a lesson learned in one location is rippled across the organization. The Helpline is maintained by a third party where reports can be made anonymously 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Our facilities are expected to ensure that corrective actions and preventive measures are effective. Environmental issues are not closed out in any of these systems without the concurrence of the EP Manager. Compliance Audits Waste Management's Corporate Compliance Audit Services (CAS) conducts independent environmental, health and safety (EHS) and transportation compliance audits. Each year the department conducts hundreds of audits at facilities owned, operated or controlled by the company. Audit planning and scope are based on risk assessment principles, including the nature of operations and consideration of emerging regulatory and EHS trends. CAS reports to the Vice President and Assistant General CounseVRegulatory, Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer and Legal department. Audit practices are modeled on the nationally recommended compliance audit practices approved by the American Standards for Testing and Materials and the standards for professional auditors approved by the Board of Environmental Health and Safety Certifications. CAS evaluates and supports improvement of the company's EHS performance through the following activities: > Conducting systematic, documented and objective evaluations to verify compliance with environmental regulatory requirements; > Assisting the company in evaluating and improving the effectiveness of existing EHS and transportation systems and policies; and > Assisting the company and its managers in preventing, detecting, correcting and proactively addressing compliance issues. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 175 CAS processes and procedures include the following: > Assessing risk and selecting facilities to audit; > Training of staff conducting audits; > Developing audit protocol documents; > Planning and conducting audits; > Identifying noncompliant activities; > Resolving audit findings; > Documenting management and retention; > Reviewing and updating program directives and procedures; > Auditing quality control and assurance; and > Communicating of audit results. Facility staff use designated programs (e.g., Dakota Tracer) to document resolution of all audit findings. CAS reviews all findings before they are closed and conducts verification audits to ensure that the finding resolution was effective. CAS communicates the audit results to relevant local and corporate management and follows up to ensure the timely resolution of issues identified through its compliance audits. As part of our auditing and compliance process, we ensure we can monitor the final destination of our waste, measure to assure that no hazardous waste is transported from developed countries to developing countries, and ensure products sent from developed countries to developing countries for repair or resale are not waste. Waste Management's electronics recycling division is Responsible Recycling (0:2013, ISO 9001:2015, ISO 14001:2015 and RIOS:2006 certified. The Responsible Recycling (R2):2013 Standard requires certified organizations to comply with all applicable import and export laws covering shipments of Focus Materials generated from the processing of electronics in accordance with the Basel Convention and with Section 6 (1) of the Standard, for Reusable Equipment and Components, Tested and Full Function, R2/Ready for Reuse requirements. Waste Management's electronics recycling division is audited regularly for compliance to the standards it subscribes, which includes monitoring of final destinations for destruction, recycling, refurbishment, reconditioning, and/or resale. Records Certain data elements are reported with routine frequency, while others are reported on a nonspecified schedule. Certain groundwater and surface water test data are collected on a routine basis and tied to sampling events specified in operating permits, licenses and applicable permits (usually quarterly or semiannually). These results are housed centrally through our laboratory management program and are reported as they are generated. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 176 Incidents related to unanticipated releases to the environment (e.g., spills, environmental impacts) are required to be reported within 48 hours to the corporate office, on a real-time basis. Notification of these incidents ensures the appropriate resources are made available to address the particular situation and to minimize potential impact to the environment. Response actions are also monitored for effectiveness and timeliness. Records relating to analytical results, environmental performance elements and compliance assurance tasks are all maintained online within our IT, Legal and/or Environmental Protection departments. Documents and technical resources are available and maintained on ourVisor and Share Point intranet sites, as are training, guidance and standards resources. Key environmental metrics are reported and compiled on a weekly basis, monitored and reported to senior management monthly, managed and stored online. Environmental aspects of our business, including notices of violation, are reflected in senior management reporting and through an internal environmental metric system that is provided to senior management and housed in the Environmental Enforcement Database (EED). Landfill gas collection system performance is monitored monthly with metrics designed to detect and correct upsets. All our facilities must certify annually their compliance with all applicable permits and regulatory requirements through our centralized Compliance Representation Letter process, which is reviewed by senior management yearly. 5. MANAGEMENT REVIEW Our management teams participate in a management review process to determine the level of success in achieving environmental goals. In doing so, they complete the following tasks: > Review environmental policies > Review Waste Management's EMS > Review the EP Dashboard environmental performance, issues and incidents on a routine basis > Evaluate corporate and local environmental goals and objectives > Amend the EMS as needed, including policies, procedures, goals and objectives Management review and response to environmental performance measures, incidents and issues are used to drive operational changes and ensure that continuous improvement goals are met. Our Internal Audit department performs compliance evaluations on an ongoing basis. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 177 Leadership in Environmental Science Waste Management's professional staff are encouraged to participate in the public and scientific community dialogue on environmental science and the performance of the environmental service facilities and technologies the company employs. Described below are key contributions our experts have provided: Control of Methane by Landfill Caps Abitchou, T., Johnson, T., Mahieu, and Chanton (2010) "Developing a Design Approach to Reduce Methane Emissions from California Landfills" Proceedings of the 21st Geocongress, West Palm Beach, Florida. Abitchou, T., Kormi, T., Yuan, L., Johnson, T, and Escobar, F. (2015) "Modeling the Effects of Vegetation on Methane Oxidation and Emissions Through Soil Landfill Final Covers Across Different Climates" Waste Management, Vol., 36, pp 230-240. Cabral, A. R., Moreira, J.V., Jugnia L, B. (2010) "Biocover Performance of Landfill Methane Oxidation: Experimental Results" Journal of Environmental Engineering, August 2010, pp. 785-793. Johnson, T. (2009), Course on "Landfill Capping, Emissions and Methane Oxidation — A Closer Look." Alberta Research Council, Edmonton Alberta, January. Johnson, T. (2009), "Presentation on Landfill Gas Control and Emissions for Landfill Cover Systems" Minnesota Environmental Initiative (MEI) Stakeholder meeting, St. Paul, MN. May 2009. Johnson, T. (2009), "Workshop on Landfill Gas Control and Emission and ET Cover Case Studies" RWQCB Water Board, Fresno, CA May. Khire, M., et.al. (2012), "Estimation of Vertical Flux in an Instrumented Earthen Cover," Global Waste Management Symposium 2012 Proceedings, Phoenix, AZ. Letourno M., Cabral, A.R., and Johnson, T. (2011). "Evaluation of candidate materials for the construction of a passive methane oxidation biocover." Thirteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium — Sardinia, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy. Morris, J.W.F., Caldwell, M.D., Obereiner, J.M., O'Donnell, S.T., Johnson, T.R., and Abichou, T., (2018) "Modeling Methane Oxidation in Landfill Cover Soils as an Indicator of Functional Stability with Respect to Gas Management," Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association, DOI: 10.1080/10962247.2018.1500403 Nandanga, E., Cabral, A.R., Bradley, R. and Johnson T. (2013). "Potential effect of Vegetation on Methane Oxidation efficiency of biocovers: Laboratory and Field Experiment". Fifteenth International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium — Sardinia, S. Margherita di Pula, Cagliari, Italy. Roncato, C., Letourneau, M., and Cabral, A.R. (2010) "Comparison between field and laboratory Methane Oxidation Rates" Proceedings of the 21st Geocongress, West Palm Beach, Florida. Water Management in Landfill Structures Gross, B., et. al. (2011), "Numerical Examination of Runoff in the Water Balance of an Evapotranspirative Cover", Journal of Environmental Quality (pending journal review). Hardt, C. (2008), "Numerical Evaluation of Preferential Flow through Evapotranspirative Landfill Covers," Masters Thesis, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Michigan State University, Dec. Johnson, T. (2009), "Ecological Restoration Plan, ET Covers, Stormwater Controls and Wildlife Habitat — Dickinson LF IDNR Meeting, Des Moines, IA May. Johnson, T. (2009), "Workshop on ET Cover Technology" WDNR Meeting, Madison, WI April. Johnson T. (2010), "Modern Landfill Water Balance, and Alternative Final Covers and Landfill gas and Emission control" USEPA ET Cover Workshop, Austin, TX. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 178 Johnson, T. (2011), "ET Cover role in Ecological Restoration" IDNR Offices, Des Moine, IA March. Johnson, T. (2011), "Modern Landfill Water Balance, and Case Studies From Waste Management's Alternative Final Cover Program" USEPA ET Cover Workshop, Denver, CO May. Kaushik, T., Khire, M.V., Johnson, T.J., and Caldwell, M.D., "Surface Runoff at an Instrumented Catchment - Scale Water Balance Final Cover", 2014 ASCE Geo-Congress Symposium, Atlanta, GA, February 2014 (ACCEPTED). Khire, M. et.al., (2014), "Catchment -Scale Hydrology of a Water Balance Final Cover located in Texas", Global Waste Management Symposium 2014 Proceedings, Orlando, FL. Khire, M. and Johnson, T. (2010), "Effect of Geocomposite Drainage layer on Water Balance of Evapotranspiration Cap Lysimeters," Global Waste Management Symposium 2010 Proceedings, San Antonio, TX. Khire, M., and Mijares, M. (2008), "Influence of Waste Layer on Percolation Estimates for Earthen Caps in Sub -Humid Climates," GeoCongress 2008, American Society of Civil Engineers, New Orleans, LA, 9-12 March. Khire, M.V., "Geoclimatic Design of Water Balance Covers for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills in Texas", Lone Star Chapter of SWANA, August 2016. Mijares, M., Khire, M. and Johnson, T (2009), "Soil Water Storage in Lysimeters versus Actual Earthen Caps for Landfill Applications," Geo Florida 2009, American Society of Civil Engineers, West Palm Beach, FL (Feb), in preparation. Mijares, R. G., Khire, M. V. and Johnson, T. R. (2011). "Field Scale Evaluation of Lysimeters versus Actual Caps". Geotechnical Testing Journal, Vol. 35, No. 1. Mijares, R., Khire, M., Benson, M., and Simunek, J. (2009), "Preferential Flow through Earthen Caps," Water Resources Research, in preparation. Alternative Landfill Covers & Biocovers Bull, L.P. (2009), "Alternative Landfill Covers — Technical and Regulatory Considerations for Continued Progress" Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Workshop, Denver, CO. Bull, L.P. and Dwyer, S. (2006), Evaluating the VADOSE/W Model for Deployment of Evapotranspiration (ET) Covers in Cold and Wet Climates, Waste Tech Symposium, Phoenix, AZ. Bull, L.P., Dwyer, S.F. "Establishing a Practical Flux Performance Criterion for Subtitle D Alternative Final Cover Systems, Global Waste Symposium, October 2008. Bull, L.P. and Dwyer, S. (2008), "Performance Criteria for Alternative Final Cover Systems on Lined RCRA Subtitle D Landfills" Global Waste Symposium, Copper Mountain, CO. Bull L.P., Dwyer, S.F., and Wampler, S. (AquAeTer) (2010) "Alternative Final Cover (AFC) Design Report" prepared for U.S. EPA and Tribal EPA — Tooele County, Utah. Johnson, T. (2008), International Phytotechnology Society, Alternative Covers Workshop, Raleigh, NC, Dec. 2008. Lakhouit, A., Shirmer, W., Johnson, T.,Cabana, H., and Cabral, A.R. (2014). "Evaluation of the Efficiency of an Experimental Biocover to Reduce BTEX Emissions from Landfill Biogas," Chemosphere, Vol. 97, 98-101 Obereiner, J (2009), "Alternative Landfill Covers — Building a Sustainable Final Cover at Greater Wenatchee Regional Landfill WDOE and CDHD Meeting, Wenatcheee, WA June. Prucha, C.P., Johnson, T.J. (2008), "Alternative Landfill Covers — Current Practice and Key Technical Considerations", Presentation at Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Annual Conference. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 179 Groundwater Assessment Bull, L.P., Obereiner,. J, Verwiel, M., and Wampler, S. "Reducing Potential for Landfill Gas Impacts to Groundwater, Another Potential Advantage of Alternative Landfill Covers," (2004) SWANA, 9th Annual Landfill Symposium, Monterey, CA. Bull, L.P., Wampler, S.W., "Landfill Impacts to Shallow Groundwater: What is the real issue?" Presentation at Colorado SWANA Conference, October 2006. Caldwell, M.D., and Fischer, D.A., "Remote Analytical and Telemetry Systems for Groundwater Monitoring", Global Waste Management Symposium, Copper Mountain, Colorado, September 2008. Caldwell, M.D., and Baker, J.A., "Aerobic Bioremediation of Vinyl Chloride in Groundwater at a Solid Waste Landfill Using a Vadose Zone Air Injection Trench", WasteTech Landfill Technology Conference Proceedings, Phoenix, Arizona, February 27, 2006. Caldwell, M.D., and Wallis, E.E., "An Empirical Evaluation of Impacts to Groundwater from Subtitle D-Lined Solid Waste Disposal Cells", WasteTech Landfill Technology Conference Proceedings, Phoenix, Arizona, February 27, 2006. McGrath, A.E., Upson, G.L., and Caldwell, M.D., 'Evaluation and Mitigation of Landfill Gas Impacts on Cadmium Leaching from Native Soils', Groundwater Monitoring and Remediation, No. 4 Fall 2007, pp. 99-109. Morel[, D., Verwiel, M., Thrupp, G., and Fowler, W., "Study of Basalt Dikes Influence on Groundwater Flow, Waimanalo Gulch Sanitary Landfill, Oahu, Hawaii, International Solid Waste Symposium, Sardinia Italy (2007). Ramaley, S.B. (2011). Use of Investigative Tools to Evaluate the Source of Landfill Impacts to Groundwater. Clemson Hydrogeology Symposium Verwiel, M., Thrupp, G., Purdy, S., "Landfill Expansion Beneath the Water Table in Central Arizona" May 2001, International Landfill Symposium Proceedings, Sardinia Italy (September 2001). Verwiel, M., Obereiner, J., Seyfried, S., "Effects of Landfill Gas on Groundwater Quality at a Municipal Solid Waste Facility", June 2000, Arizona Solid Waste Conference, Tucson Arizona, Arizona Landfill Symposium (2000). Verwiel, M., Prucha, C.P. (2006). "The Effects of Well Integrity on Groundwater Monitoring and Conceptual Model Development", Presentation at Engineering Society of Detroit Annual Conference. Characterizing Landfill Gas Hagedorn, B., Kerfoot, H., Verwiel, M., Matlock, B. (2 February, 2016). "Assessing landfill gas age and attenuation characteristics — Geochemical constraints from a municipal solid waste landfill in Southern California," Proceedings G WMS, Indian Wells, CA. Kerfoot, H., Hagedorn, B., and Verwiel, M. (2013) "Evaluation of the age of landfill gas methane in landfill gas -natural gas mixtures using co-occurring constituents. Environmental Science Processes & Impacts. Kerfoot, H., Verwiel, M. (2012) "Evaluation of Methane Sources in Mixtures of Natural Gas and Biogas," Battelle Conference, Monterey California. Verwiel, M. (2008). "Case Study on the Role of Monitoring Well Structural Integrity on a VOC Monitoring Program at a Hazardous Waste Facility in the Western United States," ESD 17th Annual Michigan Solid Waste Conference. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 180 Landfill Operations Bull L.P., and Franc M. (2015). NORM/TENORM Waste Acceptance Considerations (White Paper) — prepared for U.S. EPA and Tribal EPA. - Tekoi Landfill, Tooele County, Utah. Gibbons, R.D., and Bull, L.P. (2006). "Statistically Based Data Evaluation Methodologies for Municipal Solid Waste Leachate," in Proc. Waste Tech Landfill Technology Conference, Phoenix, AZ. Khire, M.V., Saravanathiiban, D.S., Verwiel, M., Prucha, C.P., Johnson, T.J. (March 2015). "Stormwater Sediment Filtration Using Sand versus Synthetic Fibers", American Society of Civil Engineers, Geotechnical Special Publication. Ramaley, S.B., Wiseman, L., Sterling, L., Gabel, C., Foster, J. (2015). "Challenging Traditional Regulatory Approaches to Landfill Permitting and Construction", Presentation at WASTECON. Suchomel, M., Verwiel, M., G. Thrupp (2011). "A New Method for Calculating Waste Acceptance Criteria for Soil at Landfills." International Solid Waste Symposium, Sardinia Italy. Verwiel, M., Cetrullo, J., Baquerizo, E., Jercan, M., Caldwell, M. (2007). "Applied Landfill Informational Analysis System (ALIAS): Development of a Relational Database System Used to Analyze the Effects of Landfill Operational Performance Characteristics," International Solid Waste Symposium, Sardinia Italy. Assessing and Implementing Post -Closure Care of Landfills Caldwell, M.D., Obereiner, J, and Morris, J.W. (February 2016). "Case Study for Prediction of a Performance -Based PCC Term for LFG Collection Systems using Passive Controls", Global Waste Management Symposium, Indian Wells, CA. Gibbons, R.D., Morris, J., Prucha, C, Caldwell, M.D., and Staley, B. (2014). "Longitudinal data analysis in support of functional stability concepts for leachate management at closed municipal landfills", Waste Management 34. Gibbons, R.D., Prucha, C.P., and Caldwell, M.D. (13 March, 2007). "Longitudinal Analysis of Leachate Data from Closed MSW Landfill Cells", WasteTech Landfill Technology Conference Proceedings, Miami, Florida. Morris, J.W., Caldwell, M.D., and Bull, L.P. (June 2008). "Leachate Trends, End Use, and the 'Sustainable' Landfill", SWANA 13th Annual Landfill Symposium, Palm Springs, CA. Morris, J.W., Caldwell, M.D., and Bull, L.P. (October 2012). "Application of a Performance -Based Methodology to Evaluate Optimization and Completion of Post -Closure Care at a Municipal Landfill", Global Waste Management Symposium, Phoenix, AZ. Morris, J.W., Caldwell, M.D., Bull, L.P., Crest, M., and Ackerman, A. (October 2013). "Functional Stability and Completion of Post -Closure Care at Municipal Landfills: Findings from Application of a Performance - Based Methodology", 14th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Sardinia, Italy. O'Donnell, S.T., Caldwell, M.D., Barlaz, M. A., Morris, J. W.F. (February 2018). "Case study comparison of functional stability vs. organic stability approaches for assessing threat potential at closed landfills in the USA', Waste Management 75(2018) 415-426. Prucha, C.P. (2004). "Ending Post Closure Care", Presentation at Waste Management — Niagara Frontier Section Annual Meeting. Verwiel, M., Baker, J. (2005). Implementation of the EREF Guidance for Post Closure Care Modifications: A Case Study of Olympic View Sanitary Landfill," Waste Expo, Las Vegas Nevada. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 181 Remediation at Landfills Bull, L., (2010). "Sustainable Remediation Panel — Is It Cost -Effective and Feasible to Implement Renewable Energy Solutions at Remediation Sites?" Wiley Periodicals, Inc. D0I: 10.1002/rem.20266. Holland, K., Bull, L., et al. (2011). "Remediation, The Journal of Environmental Cleanup Costs, Technologies & Techniques" Volume 21, Number 3, Summer 2011. Holland, K., Lewis, R, Bull, L., et al. (2011) "Framework for Integrating Sustainability Into Remediation Projects" Wiley Online Library; D01:10.1002/rem.20288, Remediation Summer 2011. Patents Air Injection Into The Vadose Zone To Aerobically Degrade Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater and Inhibit Subsurface Landfill Gas Migration — US Patent #7,618,547 Continuous Improvement in Customer Service Customer Relationship Management We think of ourselves as a "customer -centric" company and continually seek to improve the customer experience and our ability to manage reliable, excellent service. 1. A number of tools are essential to our CRM system: a. Salesforce.com (our Customer Relationship Management /CRM tool): We deployed Salesforce.com (SFDC) in 2010 and have spent the last eight years enhancing, improving and expanding its reach throughout our sales organization. Our current CRM model helps us to be more customer -oriented when we manage data, develop performance plans and lead our sales teams. Key components of Salesforce.com are our FOCUS 2.0 and Relationship Health sales programs. With these two programs, we are using predictive analytics and proactive outreach to serve our customers' needs more effectively. Our FOCUS 2.0 program uses advanced analytics to predict which customers may be likely to defect and/or be unhappy with their current service received/value exchanged. FOCUS allows us to concentrate our time and attention on potential "at risk" customers to ensure we remove roadblocks, solve any service issues, and overcome any perceived challenges the customer has in order to get their service/value exchange back in alignment. c. Our Relationship Health dashboard is another program we use to track and manage the strength of the connections we have with our customers. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 182 For our call center sales team specifically, we deploy a tool called InsideSales.com. This platform uses a sophisticated sales prioritization algorithm to rank and route customer calls (and/or dial out to prospects) that have the greatest current need from us. This sales enablement tool, in conjunction with the analytics derived from FOCUS and our SFDC platform, positively impacts our ability to be more effective with our customers most in need of attention. Performance Management. We firmly believe that better performance management leads to better overall performance, which ultimately leads to a more sustainable business model. Last year we deployed a sales performance methodology called Sales SDO that created a standardized approach to sales performance throughout our sales organization. Sales SDO was mirrored after a similar program created in our Operations department (SDO/Service Delivery Optimization) and further refined by Fleet and Maintenance teams (MSDO). This holistic approach to performance standards has given us a better approach by which to monitor our routines and build a sustainable business model connecting our Operations and Sales departments. Gauging Our Progress CUSTOMER SATISFACTION (CSAT) Waste Management's customer service survey, called CSAT, began in 2012. CSAT tracks the average score of all customers on three key questions about Waste Management: overall experience, likelihood of continuing to do business, and likelihood of recommending Waste Management. We also track the percentage of our "loyal" customers (those that give us a 9 or 10 on key questions), and those that are "at risk" (1-5 on the key questions). Other areas of focus are operations, customer service/account management, communications, problem incidence and resolution, and our overall brand. The surveys are sent to active customers. 92 percent are sent by email, and the remainder of the surveys are completed over the phone. Waste Management receives 10,000-12,000 surveys each month, with a response rate of 9.0 percent, which is considered a high rate for a long-standing survey. The results are monitored monthly and coordinated between customer service and our operations teams. RESULTS Survey results have remained consistent over the years, and Waste Management achieved its 47 percent loyalty goal in 2017. The average enterprise -wide CSAT score in 2017 was 8.27 on a 10-point scale. This is an improvement over time from our 2014 score, but slightly down from 2016 (0.02 points). Our goal is a 10, but we understand that many factors impact scores; in particular, severe weather events which have geographic impacts along all lines of business. Average Enterprise Customer Satisfaction Score 10.0 9.0 8.29 8.16 8.26 8.27 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 183 Other Measures CUSTOMER CARE — PHONE QUALITY SURVEYS Waste Management also monitors the quality of our calls, including use of third -party auditor BPA and post -call surveys for commercial customers. The results show consistent improvement in customer satisfaction for our National Account customers, an important part of our customer base and among our most sophisticated and demanding: Third -Party Quality Audits Goal90% or greater 100 ° 90 87% 90% 93 /0 90% 80 70 60 50 1 ...... I ...... I ....... 2015 2016 2017 GOAL Post Call Survey Goal score of 9.0 or greater 10.0 9.0 8.9 9.1 9.1 9.0 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 1 ...... I....... I ...... 2015 2016 2017 GOAL BPA phone quality > BPA is a third -party quality provider that provides services to all Waste Management service teams > Seven calls per agent monitored on a monthly basis Customer satisfaction post call survey > Offered on 50% of all inbound calls received (-15K calls/month) > Historically 2.6% response rate (- 400 calls/month) These surveys provide immediate feedback, as well as valuable trend information over time. RELIABILITY SURVEYS An important aspect of customer satisfaction is assurance that service will be reliable. In 2017, our "Customer Experience Quality of Service" scores for our collection services were: > Commercial = 98.24% > Roll -off = 96.76% > Residential = 98.93% W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 184 Waste Nearly all waste handled by Waste Management is generated by others rather than the company itself. Nevertheless, we are providing information on our internal waste production and the amount recycled. Note that because of the relatively minimal waste produced, it tends to be handled at the facility where generated for the sake of efficiencies and reduced transportation. In the following, total waste generated in operations is calculated using an average waste and recycling generation tonnage per employee per day for each of our facility types (landfill, MRF, office or transfer station). The waste and recycling generation tonnage is based on audits conducted at each facility type. 2011 2,746.88 571.14 3,318.02 2012 2,755.50 580.74 3,336.24 2013 2,734.81 582.06 3,316.87 2014 2,632.37 550.5 3,182.87 2015 2,651.49 452.33 3,103.82 2016 2,759.23 510.67 3,269.89 2017 3,185.13 658.92 3,488.25 W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 185 all 3 11 :;Ah1l I I L14 ,I : I] L, Diversity and Recruitment As part of our ongoing effort to discover and attract the most talented workforce, Waste Management has built outreach relationships with many national and community -based organizations to proactively share opportunities with diverse and versatile populations. The following are examples of our partners: > Ability Jobs (supporting individuals with disabilities) > Black Chamber (Greater Houston) > Campus Pride > Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion (CCDI) > Disabled American Veterans (DAV) > Diversity > Goodwill Industries > Hispanic Latino Professional Association > Human Rights Campaign > Military Spouse Corporate Career Network > NAACP and its local chapters throughout the country > National Society of Professional Engineers and its local chapters > National Urban League, Houston chapter > Texas Diversity Council > Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) > Universal Technical Institute — Diesel Maintenance > Women in Trucking Many of Waste Management's career opportunities are posted on specialized career sites designed to target a diverse range of qualified candidates. Examples include the following: > Athlete Network > Disability.gov > Extend -A -Family Toronto > Getting Hired —Jobs for People with Disabilities > Hispanic -Today > IMDiversity > Military Spouse Corporate Career Network > National Labor Exchange (NLE) > Ready, Willing & Able > Senior Jobs Network > The Black Collegian Online > VetCentral > Women in Business and Industry In addition to the above outreach partners, our talent advisors and hiring managers maintain an active presence at networking/recruitment events sponsored across North America. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 186 Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Waste Management will make reasonable accommodations for the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability. Employees and applicants of Waste Management who are covered under the ADA are eligible unless undue hardship would result to the company. In order to help our employees gain a better understanding of the ADA, the ADA Amendment Act and the process associated with it, we have distributed a frequently asked questions (FAQ) to front-line managers. We also provide training to managers on accommodation responsibilities. Snapshot of Waste Management Workforce 1.1-Exec/Sr 63 11 17.46% 52 82.54% 1.2-First/Mid 4,140 750 18.12% 3,390 81.88% 2-Professionals 1,439 654 45.45% 785 54.55% 3-Technicians 19 6 31.58% 13 68.42% 4-Sales Worker 2,428 1,235 50.86% 1,193 49.14% 5-Administration 4,300 3,244 75.44% 1,056 24.56% 6-Craft Worker 3,077 15 0.49% 3,062 99.51% 7-Operatives 2,0648 364 1.76% 20,284 98.24% 8-Laborers 2,280 303 13.29% 1,977 86.71% 9-Service Worker 23 2 8.70% 21 91.30% Grand Total 38,417 6,584 17.14% 31,833 82.86% Human Rights Waste Management has operations and relationships in the United States and Canada, as well as a service center in India (Waste Management Logistics). In January 2014, Waste Management divested its investment in China but continues to provide some technical services. This entity has an employee handbook in place that covers local compliance policies and practices. The Waste Management Code of Conduct provides the protections afforded by international human rights frameworks and covers Waste Management employees who are located in North America and India. Employees are required to report any noncompliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) to the Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer or to the Waste Management Ethics and Compliance Integrity Helpline at 1-800-265-9381 in North America and 0001-877-801-2359 in India. Waste Management's Code of Conduct is in alignment with the Ten Principles of the United Nations Global Compact. Early in 2018, Waste Management developed, approved and put into place a written Human Rights Policy to underscore our commitment to human rights. The Waste Management Code of Conduct and Supplier Code of Conduct are currently being revised to include references to this policy. Suppliers are notified that we expect them to respect these principles as well. All employees are trained in the Waste Management Code of Conduct, and we expect all to comply. More information on our Code of Conduct can be found on our website. We believe in networking with groups focused on ethics in corporate management to keep abreast of best practices. We are a member of the Ethics and Compliance Initiative (ECI), Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics (SCCE), Greater Houston Business Ethics Roundtable (GHBER) and the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation (MAPI) — Ethics & Compliance Council. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 187 Policy Against Trafficking of Humans and Modern Slavery With increased concerns about human trafficking and modern slavery, in late 2017 Waste Management developed and put into place a written Policy Against the Trafficking of Humans and Modern Slavery to bring awareness of this important issue as our employees work and travel, both for business and otherwise. The Waste Management Code of Conduct and Supplier Code of Conduct include references to this policy. We do not believe any of our operations are at risk of infringing on the right to freedom of association, nor do we believe ourworkforce is at risk for incidents of child or forced/compulsory labor. Finally, Waste Management complies with all applicable rules governing minimum wage in North America. For the fraction of a percent of our employees living abroad, we comply with all applicable rules and pay locally competitive compensation rates. CONTINGENT LABOR PROGRAM Our Contingent Labor Policy is applicable to all contract workers, temporary workers or other nonemployee workers providing time- and expense -based work at Waste Management outside of a Statement of Work agreement with Waste Management National Services, Inc. All contingent workers at Waste Management are managed through the Contingent Labor Program, the program approved by the Waste Management Senior Leadership Team for the management of contingent workers at Waste Management and residing inside of Corporate Human Resources, for which key conditions are outlined as follows: > Contingent workers are sourced only through staffing suppliers that have an executed master services agreement (MSA) with Waste Management; > Contingent workers are subject to background checks and drug testing as required; > The life cycle of a contingent worker is managed in collaboration with the managed service provider (MSP), the internal or third -party administrator providing management and administration of the program, and includes: • Requisition through the vendor management system (VMS), the system of record utilized to manage contingent workers; • Onboarding contingent workers; • Ensuring that staffing suppliers and contingent workers are aware of and comply with applicable Waste Management policies and procedures; • Submitting and approving time worked through the VMS in accordance with Waste Management's Timekeeping Policy and Timekeeping Procedure; • Managing time charge and expense approvals and invoices through the VMS; • Managing staffing supplier payments in collaboration with the MSP; and • Offboarding contingent workers at the end of the work assignment. Waste Management considers the use of contingent contract labor a matter of strategic business planning. Our Contingent Labor Program delivers top quality contract labor across Waste Management's operations, helping to filljobs with skilled workers while judiciously managing W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 188 cost, quality of service and risk to the company. The Program enables us to use reliable preferred vendors to fill specialized positions quickly and deploy qualified talent to manage changes in service demand, temporary need for specialized expertise and/or short-term labor shortages. We approach contingent workers with the same vision for teamwork, dignity and mutual respect with which we approach employees. Our safety vision fully extends to contingent workers. Contingent workers are evaluated for opportunities for direct employment with Waste Management and career development, with Waste Management managers encouraged to seek opportunities for new contract labor when full-time opportunities open. Oversight of Waste Management's Contingent Labor Program is centralized in our Talent Acquisition Department with the Program Director monitoring service provision, policy compliance, and internal client satisfaction. Guidance and training are provided that cover timekeeping, onboarding procedures, use of temporary staffing suppliers, field management compliance obligations and corporate oversight. Onboarding training includes compliance with Waste Management policies on safety, security, the Waste Management Code of Conduct and Integrity Helpline and applicable regulations. Contractor personnel must sign certifications after having received the relevant safety training. Worker hours are monitored with the same centralized time -keeping system used throughout the organization to assure compliance with Department of Labor, OSHA and all other applicable regulations. Waste Management uses the same prequalified security screening vendors for both employees and staffing suppliers/contingent workers. These vendors are specialists in background, compliance and safety screening. The vendors are evaluated quarterly for compliance with the terms of their contract and all applicable policies and regulations. Workers otherwise referred to the company ("self -sourced" contract associates) are managed by the MSP Waste Management Service Team to assure full compliance with all Waste Management hiring standards. No worker is ever asked to pay a fee for engagement at Waste Management. Local wage regulations are tracked centrally to assure compliance of contract terms with those regulations. Collective Bargaining We continue to be fully supportive of our employees' right to self -organization; to form, join or assist labor organizations; and to bargain collectively through representatives of their own choosing. We also recognize that our employees have a statutory right to refrain from such activities. Our company policies and procedures adhere to all applicable domestic laws concerning freedom of association and collective bargaining, nondiscrimination, forced labor and underage workers in the workplace. Moreover, we have organized employee engagement councils aligned with the principles of collective bargaining to elevate the cooperative dialogue between employees and managers throughout Waste Management. Our Driver and Route Manager Councils capture the wisdom of representatives throughout the 17 Waste Management Market Areas, providing advice on best practices, means to reduce voluntary turnover, and means to retain drivers and technicians. Through our various subsidiaries, our company has successfully negotiated and now administers collective bargaining agreements that cover 7,948 employees — about 20 percent of our workforce — in approximately 266 facilities. In 2016 and 2017, Waste Management employees held zero strikes and/or lockouts . W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 189 COLLABORATION THROUGH PEER REVIEW Our Peer Review safety councils bring the spirit of collaboration to implementation of our fleet safety program. Peer Review is a process where drivers and technicians may voluntarily choose to appeal safety -related rule violations to a "Peer Review Board" comprised of fellow employees chosen at random for that particular case. Peer Review was initially conceived and created in 2011 as part of a joint effort between management and employees at a single hauling site to address safety -related issues and perceived inconsistent disciplinary practices. The program has since expanded to 70 sites, covering over 5,600 employees. Installation at additional sites is ongoing. During a Peer Review hearing, both the affected employee and management present evidence, with the scope of review limited to whether the rule at issue was violated. At the conclusion of the hearing, the Board votes anonymously whether to sustain or overturn management's decision. If management's decision is sustained, the discipline administered under the site's progressive disciplinary policy for safety violations remains. If overturned, any discipline administered under that policy is removed. The decision of the Board is final. It is important to note that the Peer Review Board does not act in an advisory capacity. Instead, Peer Review is available to appeal management's decisions. Similarly, Peer Review is voluntary — employees counseled or disciplined for safety rule violations are not required to utilize the process. Finally, Peer Review is limited in scope to whether the safety rule at issue was violated. Any discipline imposed depends upon where the employee resides under the site's progressive disciplinary policy. An important aspect of the Peer Review program is the emphasis on employee engagement. For example, most procedural aspects of the Peer Review program are determined locally during installation, requiring significant input and consensus from employees at each site. Each employee also undergoes critical analysis training, centered on both root cause analysis and deeper understanding of our safety policies. In many cases, many market areas have adopted the Peer Review focus group concept and engage employees directly on both the creation and subsequent modifications of safety disciplinary policies. Similarly, Peer Review has proved to be a valuable management tool. For example, as each decision may be subject to review, managers are incentivized to engage in more thorough root cause investigations prior to issuing discipline. Adverse decisions often highlight a need for more effective management training, identify a potential "disconnect" between management and the employees' understanding of a particular rule or signal employee "disengagement," requiring immediate attention. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 190 Employee Benefits We offer our employees competitive wages and benefits, including medical, dental and prescription drug coverage; short- and long-term disability; life insurance and accidental death benefits; retirement plans; and a stock purchase plan. The company also offers other important benefits such as legal services (e.g., wills, powers of attorney), flexible spending accounts, adoption assistance, paid vacation and holidays, employee discounts, education savings accounts and scholarship programs. The Waste Management Health and Welfare Benefits Plan allows employees to choose from among different levels and types of coverage. This allows each employee to put together a mix of benefits that meets their needs while receiving significant tax advantages by paying for benefits on a pre-tax basis (as allowed by law). About 96 percent of our employees choose to participate in a Waste Management health and welfare plan. Waste Management pays the full cost to provide its employees with short-term disability benefits, long- term disability benefits, basic life insurance for the employee and dependents, and employee and family assistance benefits. The costs for some coverage, such as medical and dental, are shared with employees, with Waste Management picking up a majority of the expense. We are particularly proud of our wellness programs. We have a team of "Get Well Guides" — a group of nurses and coaches who help employees and their families get access to the help they may need for a variety of life challenges. Employees can dial a toll -free phone number for confidential support and assistance from reliable, compassionate professionals who are trained as nurses, coaches, dieticians, clinicians and financial counselors. Employees and their families also have access to 2nd.MD, a virtual service that provides real-time consultation with doctors specializing in a variety of practices. Our Waste Management Wellness Champ initiative was launched in 2016. To recognize Waste Management sites for their wellness -focused efforts, we created the Well Worksite Recognition Program in conjunction with the initiative. Just two years later, more than 775 sites have a Wellness Champ and nearly 450 sites are participating in the Well Worksite Recognition Program. Across the company, the Wellness Champs have spearheaded several initiatives such as the Couch-to-5K, Jump Start Your Resolution, Fruit and Vegetable challenges, Tobacco Cessation programs, and Biggest Loser -style challenges at their sites, in addition to supporting other companywide initiatives through wellness promotion. In 2017, the Well Worksite award was given to 373 sites. The award is broken into three categories : • Gold recognizes a site's comprehensive involvement and dedication to employee wellness. • Silver recognizes a site's expanding involvement and dedication to employee wellness. • Bronze recognizes a site that is providing programs to support employee wellness. For 2017, 177 sites earned gold, 103 silver and 93 bronze. Our wellness programs also include on -site flu vaccination clinics and health fairs, where we provide blood pressure tests, blood lipid tests and other screenings that aid in the early detection of health risks. A health coach also meets individually with all participants to review their results and suggest action items to improve their health. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 191 A Transition to Recovery program helps injured or ill employees return to work sooner in temporary assignments that are consistent with their medically documented capabilities. These assignments help the employees remain productive and speed their medical recovery. See also Short -Term Disability benefits above. We also provide plans to help employees save for the future. The Waste Management Retirement Savings Plan provides employees with diversified fund options in which to invest for retirement. Employees can choose to make pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) contributions, with the company providing a market -competitive match with immediate vesting. Employees receive free investment advice through a call center staffed with licensed advisors, as well as through a suite of online tools. About 61 percent of employees participate in our savings plan. Another valuable program is our Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which provides employees an opportunity to buy shares of Waste Management common stock at a discount of 15 percent or more. About one-third of eligible employees participate in this plan. Additional benefits, such as the legal services plan, flexible spending accounts and education savings account, are voluntary, and employees participate only if they choose to do so by making the required contributions. Benefits for Canadian employees, as well as for certain collectively bargained U.S. employees, may differ in some respects from those described above. For example, in Canada, the broader reach of standard health coverage makes Get Well Guides less useful, and our Return to Work program is not identical to Transition to Recovery. Tailored Training Programs We continuously strive to empower our employees and managers to deliver excellent and safe service to our customers and the communities in which we work. We providejob-specifictraining in all applicable lines of business on how to safely operate and maintain our key equipment and the behaviors expected to increase overall performance as an employee and manager. We believe environmental excellence and compliance are the hallmarks of sustainability and reflect Waste Management's core values. As such, compliance with applicable regulatory standards and internal policies and procedures is also part of our training philosophy. COLLECTIONS AND FLEET Employees in our collection and fleet operations are provided with opportunities to train on the following: > Technician Air Brake: an on -site field course designed to develop and standardize maintenance programs; a similar class is geared toward educating drivers on the functions and inspections of air brake systems. > Basic Hydraulics for Refuse Bodies: field course designed to teach participants about the design and maintenance of the hydraulics features of our fleet. > Compass M5: web -based modules housed in our Talent Central Learning Portal that focus on key shop processes. > Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Awareness: course to enhance awareness of control of hazardous energy and work under the protection of a LOTO permit; another course is geared toward authorized persons who perform or supervise work requiring a LOTO permit. > Hazard Energy Control Programs: three courses offered in our Hazard Energy Control program to train different levels of employees on working around hazard energy controls. > Fleet 101: an entry-level workshop for new and developing fleet leaders learning the skills required to effectively execute the primary duties of a Fleet Manager and Shop Supervisor. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 192 > Driver Air Brake: an onsite field course designed to educate drivers on the functions and inspection of the Air Brake systems used on Waste Management assets. > Allison Transmission: an onsite field course designed to teach technicians how to troubleshoot Allison transmission complaints. > Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) for Authorized Persons: a course that provides information about control of hazardous energy and work under the protection of a Lockout/Tagout permit for persons performing or supervising work requiring a Lockout/Tagout permit. > Fleet 201: a career development workshop for Fleet Managers building upon competencies learned during the Fleet 101 workshop and expanding upon these skills; it's the next learning step in the career development of the Fleet Manager preparing for assuming higher roles in the organization. FIXED FACILITY TRAINING Employees in our post collection operations are provided the following training opportunities: > Disposal Operations Management Trainee Program: builds a foundational understanding of the issues most important in day-to-day landfill operations. > Environmental Protection Learning Series: consists of key environmental training modules that focus on various topics regarding our environment, e.g., air regulations or customer - generated waste. > Gas Collection and Control System Design and Construction: provides standards for design strategy and design components to produce efficient and cost-effective landfill gas control systems. > Introduction to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Management: teaches participants about GHGs, including what they are, how they originate, how emissions work and what Waste Management is doing to reduce our impact. > Basics of Landfill Gas: provides a basic knowledge surrounding landfill gas. > Low Voltage Electrical Safety: teaches employees safety procedures forworking around electricity, including checking voltage, resetting breakers and more. > Heavy Equipment Training Series: training on key equipment at our landfills — including articulated dump truck, wheel loader, compactor and dozier. > MRF Maintenance and Operations Programs: designed for our recycling employees who manage and maintain our recycling operations. > Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program: covers all protective equipment including clothing, shields and barriers for eyes, face, head and extremities. Each year monthly required and optional training sessions are mapped so employees can accommodate theirwork schedules to these opportunities. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 193 SYSTEMS TRAINING We engage employees throughout the organization with what we call Service Delivery Optimization (SDO) programs. Our first application was in fleet, where SDO provided strong benefits in terms of team collaboration, coaching — and progress on fleet performance and safety. We took this template and moved to our maintenance technicians. Maintenance SDO — or MSDO — has been launched at 13 Waste Management locations for site, district and fleet managers, helping them engage with their technicians by asking open-ended questions and listening. The comprehensive MSDO program is a 16-week process involving eight weeks with corporate coaches and another eight weeks in a second location, using a "train the trainer" model. And to bridge the gap for those awaiting full MSDO implementations, Waste Management has introduced "MSDO Lite," which allows new sites to start working right away to improve their maintenance process and prepare for MSDO implementation. Next we addressed our sales team. Our "Sales Service Delivery Optimization program, "SSDO," begins with Individual Development Plans (IDP) tailed to every sales employee. The plans are tailored to each individual's growth needs and identifies areas of strengths and skill gaps. IDPs facilitate the kinds of interactive and positive coaching sessions that are the backbone of the SDO platform. Every sales representative is given a "peer mentor" to help them acclimate into their roles. There are weekly role-play sessions, and each month the teams compete using video technology to help them hone their skills. We work hard to build understanding of field operations among those in the corporate office who support them. Driver ride-alongs and visits to recycling facilities, landfills and other Waste Management area assets are common, ranging from new hire orientation to refresher experiences for our most senior management. Employees have access to both instructor -led and self -study courses from our online library, and frequently in -person training at Corporate offices for a broader understanding of Waste Management's scope of services, sales process, pipeline management, negotiation, time management and more. Ongoing training is tailored based on the employee's individual development program and future growth plan. The Sales Department has found that this intense training effort pays off in retention when other Fortune 500 companies target our sales employees for recruitment. We try to tie our internal development program to broader engagement with the academic community, taking on projects such as volunteering time to build sales curriculum at Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe, Arizona, offering ASU business students real -world leadership development programs and mentorships, and participating in sales forums at National Collegiate Sales Competitions. Managers and corporate staff can sometimes have their own challenges finding time to hone their skills and work toward new opportunities in the company. We offer consistent training for our leaders and managers that supports the skills and behaviors we expect, as well as accelerated learning programs designed for high potentials moving to front-line, mid -level and executive leadership roles. A new "Business and Professional Training Library" was launched in early 2018 that includes 800 online courses. As part of our "I Learn" campaign that focuses on individual growth, employees can access these moduleE when they want, as often as they want. Even a 10-minute video learning session can break the usual routine and enhance knowledge. Particular focuses are business analysis, project management, communication skills, software skills and customer service. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 194 Training Specifics Safety Training — Driver and Technician Huddles (Daily) 2016-2017 Code of Conduct Training 2016-2017 Break Time Is Your Time for Hourly Employees 2016-2017 Managing the Hourly Employee Meal Break Policy Security Awareness Training 2017 Preventing Harassment/Discrimination Training Sexual Harassment — For Salaried Employees (U.S.) Preventing Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation — For California Salaried Employees Preventing Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation — For Canada Salaried Employees Preventing Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation — For Connecticut Salaried Employees Preventing Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation — For Maine Salaried Employees Professional Training All Drivers and Technicians 20,500 All Waste Management 42,768 Employees U.S. & CAN Waste Management Hourly 31,676 Employees in U.S. Managers in U.S. 3,650 All personnel who use company 18,917 and computer network Waste Management Employees 4,478 with EEOC: A-Executive/Sr Level Officials B-First/Mid-Level Officials ALL employees 1 12,968 We continually look for ways to provide fresh, profession -specific training. For example, to address workforce shortages in technical fields, our Technician Apprentice Program (TAP) provides us — and its participants — a way to match up talented technicians with long-term careers that can include web -based and augmented reality applications. The TAP program offers part-time apprenticeship opportunities to students enrolled in approved technical training schools. As the program grows across North America, we hope that apprentices will seek long-term careers with Waste Management in essential technical positions. Transition Assistance Reorganization is a fact of life in a rapidly changing, dynamic business sector. Waste Management provides transition assistance, including severance benefits and outplacement services, to eligible employees whose employment is terminated in connection with a reorganization event. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 195 all 3 11 : L'a K I Environmental Justice Waste Management continues to engage actively on the important issue of environmental justice. The scatter graph to the right shows the distribution of all of Waste Management's operations. In the upper quadrants are our facilities that are located in communities with income above the state average (measured at the 5-kilometer radius); in the lower quadrants are facilities found in communities with lower -than -average income in that state. In the right-hand quadrants are sites located in areas above the state average income in non -Hispanic white representation; the left-hand quadrants show facilities in communities under the state average income. Our methodology is that employed by noted environmental justice academic experts and by U.S. EPA in its regulatory programs. For more information on the methodology used to formulate this graph, please see p. 35 of the Appendix to our 2010 report. HIGHER INCOME _A HIGHER INCOME % LOWER WHITE % HIGHER WHITE % •s LOWER INCOME % LOWER INCOME % LOWER WHITE % 1 HIGHER WHITE % = Autoclave ® Electronics processing i Transfer facilities fsl Gas -to -energy wo Landfill » Waste -to -energy facdltleS = Mauling Materials recovery facility = Incinerator Satellite hauling When we first released this type of demographic footprint for our landfills and waste -to -energy facilities in 2010, we reached out to environmental justice experts to determine whether this was useful and whether our disclosure could be improved. The response was a request to expand our reporting to include all of our facilities, and we provide this here. The following table includes the breakdown of the types of waste and recyclables management facilities we operate and their demographics. The entire picture for Waste Management depicted in the scatter chart is generated automatically from a Microsoft Excel chart of our locations, U.S. census data, and state average race and income data. w 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 196 Autoclave 64% 45% Landfill gas -to -energy 35% 72% Hauling companies 58% 56% Medical waste incinerator 0% 100% Electronics processing 50% 100% Landfill 41 % 68% Materials recovery facilities 59% 47% Satellite hauling 48% 66% Transfer stations 54% 55% Waste -to -energy 76% 41 % Total 48% 58% In 2015, our demographic footprint was modified by under five percent due to divestitures and acquisitions, and yearly changes have been smaller since that time. We did not undertake a comprehensive revision of our mapping in 2017 but did review the demographics of both divestitures and acquisitions and found their pattern would be somewhat higher in income and lower in non -white representation than our current footprint. We will update this information when a new census is conducted or when Waste Management undergoes an acquisition or divestiture sufficient to change our demographic footprint (whichever comes earlier). AREAS OF DENSE POPULATION Waste Management engaged with the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) on consensus reporting standards for waste facilities. There was robust dialogue about means to use GIS-based systems to understand community concerns and potential impacts. SASB determined that the most useful measure across sectors would be mapping of potential air impacts from facilities in urban areas. We have provided the mapping they request. Waste Management has retained the demographic information requested by communities and regulators in prioryears, but we also have mapped our landfills for location in areas of dense population. The following map provides the locations of closed and operating landfills Waste Management owns or operates. W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 197 Landfills in Urbanized Areas Within an urbanized area Within 5 km of an urbanized area Outside a 5 km perimeter of an urbanized area ■ ki' a LegeM .� • fya9lr�Ae uiEvuN ■ ■ �� ■ WM Landfills & Urbanized Areas United States 49 active, 73 closed 122 76 active, 59 closed 135 133 active, 68 closed 201 Stakeholder Engagement on a Daily Basis Waste Management is one of hundreds of national, state and local organizations dedicated to solving environmental and social challenges. This diverse, extensive network helps us understand how we can provide value to the communities in which we operate through environmental stewardship and natural resource conservation. All of our municipal solid waste and hazardous waste landfills and waste -to -energy facilities have some form of stakeholder engagement process — ranging from formal advisory groups to conservation projects, ongoing service to schools, engagement in local community groups, issuance of newsletters and creation of dedicated facility -specific web pages. Customer feedback is actively solicited at www.wm.com/contact-us.isp. 2018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 198 National Partnerships BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS ALTe Powertrain Technologies (advisory board member) American Bar Association, Waste and Resource Recovery Committee (vice chair) American Biogas Council (board member) American Chemistry Council (affiliate member) American Diabetes Association (CA) AMERIPEN (board member) Association of General Contractors of America Association of Lighting and Mercury Recyclers (board member) Association of Plastics Recyclers (board member) Biomass Power Association Business Council for Sustainable Energy Business for Social Responsibility Business Network for Environmental Justice (chair) Coalition for American Electronics Recycling The Coalition for Renewable Natural Gas Edison Electric Institute (affiliate member) Energy Security Leadership Council (board member) Environmental Technology Council Food Industry Environmental Council Geosynthetic Institute (board member) Green Biz Green Sports Alliance Healthcare Waste Institute Institute of Scrap Recycling, Inc. Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation (MAPI) — Ethics and Compliance Council National Association of Manufacturers (board member) National Minority Supplier Development Council National Waste & Recycling Association (board member) Natural Gas Vehicles America Council for Responsible Sport (board member) RCRA Corrective Action Project The Recycling Partnership Securing America's Future Energy (board member) Security Industry Association Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics Superfund Settlements Project The Sustainability Consortium (CorpExec council member) Sustainable Brands Sustainable Packaging Coalition Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council Women In Trucking Association (advisory committee) Women's Business Enterprise National Council U.S. DOE National Clean Fleets Partnership W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 199 MULTISTAKEHOLDER GROUPS Air & Waste Management Association American Institute for Packaging and the Environment (AMERIPEN) (board member) ASIS International Association of Climate Change Officers ASTM E50.04, Green and Sustainable Corrective Action Task Group The Auditing Roundtable Board of Environmental Health & Safety California State University Fullerton, College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — Central Station Alarm Association Chesapeake Bay Foundation Climate Action Reserve Conference Board, Council of Corporate Security Executives Construction Materials Recycling Association (board member) The Council of State Governments Crime Stoppers (board member) Democratic Attorneys General Association Democratic Governors Association Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee Diversity Best Practices Electronics Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse Environmental Media Association (corporate board member) Habitat for Humanity Institute of Hazardous Materials Management International City/County Management Association International Security Management Association Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council — Green and Sustainable Remediation team Keep America Beautiful (national board member) National Association of Counties — Resilient Counties Initiative National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials National Association of Local Government Environmental Professionals National Black Caucus of State Legislators, Corporate Roundtable National Burglar and Fire Alarm Association National Conference of State Legislators National Environmental Conference Board (board member) National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program (board member) National League of Cities National Organization of Black Elected Legislative Women (NOBEL) National Recycling Coalition (board member) Northeast Recycling Council, Electronics Recycling Coordination Clearinghouse (founding member) Product Stewardship Institute Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI Solid Waste Association of North America (three board members) Sustainability Working Group (Dean's Advisory Council member) Sustainable Materials Management Coalition Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF) U.S. Composting Council U.S. Conference of Mayors — Business Council Steering Committee U.S. Conference of Mayors — Climate Protection Council U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board Work Group on Environmental Justice in Rulemaking U.S. Green Building Council U.S. Zero Waste Business Council Wildlife Habitat Council (chair and board member) W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 200 State Partnerships BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS Arizona Chamber of Commerce (board member) Association of Commerce & Industry — Environment Committee Association of Oregon Recyclers Association of Washington Businesses (board member) Business and Industry Association — New Hampshire California Chamber of Commerce California Contract Cities Association California Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition (board member) California Refuse Recycling Council California Resource Recovery Association California Waste Association (board member) Californians Against Waste CALSTART Chemical Industry Council of Illinois Clean Energy Coalition Colorado Association of Commerce & Industry Colorado Motor Carriers Association (board member) Delaware Chamber of Commerce Environmental Business Council Massachusetts First Tee (local chapters; board member) Florida Chamber of Commerce (Board of Governors and Political Institute) Florida Recycling Partnership (chair) Florida TaxWatch Georgia Chamber of Commerce Illinois Food Scrap Coalition (IL Chapter of US Composting Council) (board member) Illinois Manufacturers Association Independent Energy Producers Association Independent Oil and Gas Association (WV) Indiana Manufacturers Association Iowa Recycling Association Iowa Society of Solid Waste Organizations James River Association (VA) Latino Caucus of California Counties Leadership New Mexico Louisiana Municipal Association Louisiana Solid Waste Association Maine Chamber of Commerce Marcellus Shale Coalition (PA) Maryland -Delaware Solid Waste Association (NWRA) — (Board Member) MASSRECYCLE Michigan Chamber of Commerce Michigan Manufacturers Association Michigan Municipal League Michigan Recycling Coalition Michigan Township Association Michigan Waste & Recycling Association (MWRA) Minnesota Chamber of Commerce Minnesota Chamber of Commerce — Environment and Natural Resources Committee (vice chair) Minnesota Chamber of Commerce — Waste Subcommittee (chair) Minnesota Clerks & Finance Officers Association Minnesota Environmental Initiative Mississippi Association of Supervisors Mississippi Municipal League Municipal Solid Waste and Resource Advisory Council (chair) National Waste & Recycling Association Chairman — Carolinas, Florida, Maryland, Ohio, Colorado Chapters) New Jersey Business and Industry New Jersey State Chamber of Commerce W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 201 New Mexico Recycling Association New York State Business Council North Carolina Chamber of Commerce North Central Texas Council of Governments — Resources Conservation Council North Dakota Chamber of Commerce North Dakota Solid Waste & Recycling Association Ohio Chamber of Commerce Environmental Initiative — Business & Environment Series Ohio Environmental Service Industries Ohio Manufacturers' Association Ontario Environment Industry Association Ontario Waste Management Association Oregon Refuse & Recycling Association (board member) Pennsylvania Business Council Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry Pennsylvania Resources Council Pennsylvania Waste Industries Association (NWRA) Police Jury Association of Louisiana Professional Recyclers of Pennsylvania (board member, president) Recycle Florida Today (legislative committee chair) Recycling Association of Minnesota Rethink Recycling Ronald McDonald House South Carolina Business & Industry Political Education Committee (BIPEC) South Carolina Chamber of Commerce South Carolina Manufacturers Alliance Southeast Recycling Conference Southern Waste Information eXchange Space Coast Field of Dreams — Brevard County State of Texas Alliance for Recycling (board member and officer) Sustainable Florida (board member) Take Care of Texas Texas Association of Business Texas State Bar Utah Trucking Association Utilities Telecommunications & Energy Coalition of West Virginia (board member) VIRGINIAforever (board member) Virginia Recycling Association Virginia Waste Industries Association (NWRA) (Vice Chair) Washington Refuse & Recycling Association (board member) Washington State Recycling Association Waste 2 Resources Advisory Committee Waste Cap Resource Solutions West Virginia Haulers Association West Virginia Landfill Managers Association West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association Western Washington Clean Cities Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce Working Californians W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 202 MULTISTAKEHOLDER GROUPS Alaska Native Village Corporation Association American Public Works Association (New York and Michigan) Apogee Retail/Lupus Foundation Associated Recyclers of Wisconsin Association of Minnesota Counties Association of New Jersey Recyclers Association of Washington Cities Association of Washington Counties The California Climate Action Registry California Cumulative Risk Advisory Committee California Product Stewardship Council California Stormwater Quality Association Carolina Recycling Association CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (LA)) Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Foundation Clean Communities Clean Energy Coalition, Michigan The Climate Registry Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education Colorado Association for Recycling (board member) Colorado Counties Foundation (board member) Colorado Environmental Coalition Colorado Municipal League Corona Chamber of Commerce (board member) Denton County Behavioral Health Leadership Team (Texas/Oklahoma) Environment Virginia Epilepsy Foundation Federation of New York Solid Waste Associations Federation of Oklahoma Lewisville City Council Florida Association of Counties Goodwill Industries International Greater Gulf Coast Apartment Association Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce (advisory board of directors) Great Plains Institute Greens Bayou Corridor Coalition Indiana Hunter Education Iowa Governor's Anti -Litter Task Force Iowa League of Cities Ivy Tech College — Sustainable Energy Advisory Board (Indiana) Kansas Energy and Environmental Policy (KEEP) Advisory Group Keep America Beautiful (gold sponsor) Keep America Beautiful — State Chapters (board members and officers) Keep Florida Beautiful Keep Louisiana Beautiful (board member) Keep Michigan Beautiful Keep Mississippi Beautiful (board member) Keep North Carolina Beautiful (board Member) Keep Texas Beautiful Keep Virginia Beautiful (board member) Las Virgenes Unified School District — Environmental Stewardship Leadership Council of Southwestern Illinois League of Arizona Cities and Towns League of Minnesota Cities Louisiana Motor Transport Association (board member) Maine Nature Conservancy Maryland Commission on Climate Change (commissioner) Maryland Recycling Network (board member) Michigan Association of Environmental Professionals (board member) Michigan Department of Natural Resources — Solid Waste Advisory Committee Minnesota Energy Smart (board member) Minnesota Environmental Initiative (board member) Minnesota Multi Housing Association W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 203 Minnesota Pollution Control Agency —Construction, Demolition and Industrial Landfill Work Group Minnesota Waste Wise Foundation (board member) Mississippi American Public Works Association Mississippi Economic Council Mississippi Hotel Restaurant Association Mississippi Manufacturers Association Mississippi Recycling Coalition (board member) Muscular Dystrophy Association National Audubon Society (state chapters) Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin New Mexico Association of Counties New Mexico Environment Department — Working Groups on Environmental Justice and Recycling New Mexico Governor's Task Force on Greenhouse Gases New Mexico League of Cities and Towns New Mexico Recycling Coalition New York League of Conservation Voters North Dakota League of Cities Northwest Florida League of Cities Ohio Materials Management Advisory Council Oregon Business & Industry Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection — Water Resources Advisory Committee's "Total Dissolved Solids" Stakeholder Group Pennsylvania Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (board member) Pheasants Forever Recycle Florida Today (board member) Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative Salvation Army SHINE Foundation — Board of Directors (Texas/Oklahoma) Solid Waste Association of North America, State Chapters (board members and officers) Solid Waste Management Districts — Citizens Advisory Boards (multiple — Indiana) Solid Waste Steering Committee for Environment (Texas/Oklahoma) State of Texas Alliance for Recycling (board member and legislative committee chair) Susan G. Komen for the Cure Take Care of Texas (TX) Texas Association of Environmental Professionals — Treasurer Society Texas Audubon Society (board member) Texas Commission on Environmental Quality — Pollution Prevention Advisory Committee Texas Society for Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Madison Arboretum U.S. Green Building Council — Los Angeles Chapter Utah Association of Counties Utah League of Cities and Towns Utah Recycling Coalition Virginia Association of Counties Washington Conservation Voters, Western Climate Initiative W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 204 Local Partnerships BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce (LA) Battle Creek Chamber of Commerce (Michigan) Boys & Girls Club of East County — El Cajon/Santee, CA (board member) Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce (NY) Broussard Chamber of Commerce Buffalo Niagara Partnership (New York) Cajon Valley Union School District Board (El Cajon, CA) Canton Road Business Association (board member) (Georgia) Cardenas Family Foundation — local scholarships (CA) Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce (CA) Carson Citizens Cultural Arts Foundation (CA) Cashmere Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Catholic Big Brothers/Big Sisters (CA) Chamber of Commerce of the Mid -Ohio Valley City of Destin Chamber of Commerce (FL) City of Madison Chamber of Commerce City of Niceville-Valparaiso Chamber of Commerce (past chairman/current board of directors) Clean Pittsburgh Commission Clinton River Watershed Council (Michigan) Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce (Michigan) Dothan Chamber of Commerce Downtown El Cajon Business Partners (El Cajon, CA) DSNY Columbia Society (NY) DSNY Emerald Society (NY) Duluth Chamber of Commerce (Minnesota) Duvall Chamber of Commerce (Washington) East County Economic Development Council (El Cajon, CA) East County Transitional Living Center (El Cajon, CA) Eastpointe/Roseville Chamber of Commerce (Michigan) Economic Alliance Snohomish County (Washington) (board member) El Cajon Rotary Club (El Cajon, CA) Evergreen Exchange (NY) Ferris Main Streets Advisory Board Festival International de Louisiana Flowood Chamber of Commerce Foothill Area Booster Association (Pacoima, CA) Forest Area Chamber of Commerce Friends of Los Angeles River (FoLAR) (CA) Friends of Rouge (Michigan) Gladstein, Neondross & Associates (Methane Symposium) (CA) Golden Chamber of Commerce (Colorado) (board member) Greater Dallas -Fort Worth Recycling Alliance (secretary) Greater Elizabeth Chamber of Commerce Greater Houston Business Ethics Roundtable Greater Houston Partnership Greater Jackson Partnership (FL) Greater Kirkland Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Greater Spokane Incorporated (Washington) Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce (Washington) (board member) Green Acres Interactive Therapy (GAIT) (CA) Green Oceanside Business Network (CA) Harrison County Chamber of Commerce (Texas) Hispanic 100 (CA) Hollywood Beautification Team (CA) Houston Bar Association Huron River Watershed Council (Michigan) Independent Cities Associations (ICA — Manhattan Beach) (CA) Irvine Chamber of Commerce (CA) Irvine Public Schools Foundation (CA) Jackson County Chamber of Commerce (FL) Kalamazoo County Council of Governments (Michigan) W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 205 King George Family YMCA (VA) Kittitas County Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Lafayette Rotary (board member) Lake Houston Area Chamber of Commerce Laguna Beach Chamber of Commerce (CA) League of California Cities — Latino Caucus (CA) Livingston Parish Chamber of Commerce (LA) Local Chambers of Commerce (New Hampshire, Illinois and Indiana) (board members) Long Beach Education Foundation (CA) Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE) (CA) Los Angeles Police Dept (LAPD) Devonshire PALS (CA) Madison County Business League Maspeth Chamber (NY) Mid -Valley Family YMCA (CA) Mission Viejo Chamber of Commerce (CA) Mobile County Chamber of Commerce Newcastle Chamber of Commerce (Washington Niagara USA Chamber (New York) North Texas Corporate Recycling Association North Valley Family YMCA (CA) Oceanside Chamber of Commerce (CA) Okaloosa County Chamber of Commerce One Acadiana Chamber of Commerce One Redmond (Washington) Orion Area Chamber of Commerce (Michigan) Pacoima Beautiful (CA) Pearl Chamber of Commerce Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Pike Chamber of Commerce Portland Business Alliance (Oregon) Rainier Valley Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Rankin First Chamber of Commerce Reno/Sparks Chamber of Commerce (Nevada) Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce Rio Rancho Regional Chamber of Commerce (New Mexico) Saint Madeline's Sophie Center (El Cajon, California) Salt Lake City Chamber of Commerce (Utah) San Diego Downtown Partnership San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce Board Member (El Cajon, California) San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce (CA) Santa Ana Chamber of Commerce (CA) Santee Chamber of Commerce Board Member (Santee, California) Santee Lakeside Rotary Club (Santee, California) Santee School District Board (Santee, California) Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Seattle Southside Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Simi Valley Chamber of Commerce (board member) Simi Valley Kiwanis Illegal Dumping Task Force Committee Southern California Sustainability Support Group Southwest Louisiana Chamber of Commerce Spokane Chamber of Commerce Sterling Heights Regional Chamber of Commerce & Industry (Michigan) Sumter County Chamber of Commerce Tempe Chamber of Commerce (Arizona) Tree People (CA) Texas Society for Ecological Restoration (secretary) Tri-City Regional Chamber of Commerce (Washington) United Way of Great L.A. (CA) USC — Sol Price of Public Policy (CA) Vicksburg -Warren County Chamber of Commerce Wallington Chamber of Commerce Board Member (Washington) Walton County Chamber of Commerce Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce (Washington) West Seattle Chamber of Commerce (Washington) Westside Economic Alliance (Oregon) Youngsville Chamber of Commerce W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 206 MULTISTAKEHOLDER GROUPS Air Alliance of Houston Air & Waste Management Association — Alamo Chapter Alaqua Animal Refuge (FL) All -Earth Ecobots Challenge American Cancer Society — Metro Golf Classic (board member) American Leadership Forum American Public Works Association — Monroe County ARISE Detroit! — Neighborhoods Day Bayou Preservation Association (board member) Belleville Area Council for the Arts Benedictine University — Business with Science Applications Program (board member) Big Brothers/Big Sisters (board member) Boy Scouts of America (multiple chapters in many states) Boys & Girls Clubs Bremen Food Pantry (Indiana) The Brunswick Starr (NY) Bucks County Parks and Recreation Board (chair) Buffalo Bayou Partnership (board member) Cannon River Watershed Partnership Children in Crisis (FL) Chippewa/Luce/Mackinac Conservation District Christian County, Illinois — Economic Development Corp. (board member) Churchville- Riga Chamber of Commerce Executive Board (New York) City and County of Honolulu — Solid Waste Advisory Committee City of Baltimore — Cleaner Greener Fund City of Elgin, Illinois — Sustainability Task Force City of Oklahoma City — Office of Sustainability (steering committee member) City of Peoria, Illinois — Sustainability Commission City of Simi Valley, California — Sustainability Committee Clare County, Michigan, Solid Waste & Recycling Committee (two board members) CLEAN (Committing to Litter Enforcement and Adopting Neighborhoods) Initiative (Peekskill, New York) Clinton River Watershed Council Cobb County Neighborhood Safety Commission (board member) Community Character Coalition — Elk Grove Village, Illinois County of Manitowoc — Clean Sweep Program (Wisconsin) DeKalb County Economic Development Corporation (Illinois) Detroit Green Task Force Detroit Motor City Makeover Drexel University Office of Research — Biosafety Committee (board member) EASE (Emergency Assistance Service Effort) Foundation (Davie, Florida) (board member) Emerald Coast Apartment Association (FL) (board member) Fairmont Medical Center Food for Thought Outreach (FL) Friends of the Rouge (current supporter, former board member) Greater Houston Partnership (board member) Green Houston (board member) Hermann Park Conservancy (board member) Hopelink (Washington) Houston Arboretum & Nature Center (board member) Houston Food Bank Houston Wilderness (board member) Humble ISD Education Foundation (Texas/Oklahoma) Illinois Mathematics and Science Partnerships Program —Aurora University Intertwine Alliance (Oregon) Junior League of Houston Keep America Beautiful Organization — Detroit Keep It Moving Keep Baton Rouge Beautiful (board president) W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 207 Keep Brevard Beautiful (Florida) Keep Collier Beautiful (Florida) Keep Detroit Beautiful (Michigan) Keep Houston Beautiful Keep Jackson Beautiful (Mississippi) Keep Omaha Beautiful Keep Reservoir Beautiful (Mississippi) (board member) Keep Saginaw Beautiful Keep Shawnee County (KS) Beautiful Keep Truckee Meadows Beautiful (Reno, NV) King County Solid Waste Advisory Committee Kirkland Downtown Association (Washington) Lake Orion Education Foundation Lake St. Clair South Channel Light Keepers Lake Washington School Foundation (Washington) LaSalle County, Illinois —Citizens Advisory Board Leadership Broward (Broward County, Florida) Leadership Houston (board member) Life Time Fitness — Torchlight 5k Macomb Conservation District (supporter) Marquette Area Blues Society Merrimack Valley Economic Development Council, Inc. (Lawrence, Massachusetts) Michigan Alliance of Environment and Outdoor Education Michigan Association of Environmental Professionals (board member) and chair of environmental education grant committee) Monroe County Recycling Advisory Committee Montgomery County Keep America Beautiful (Ohio) Morrison, IL Rotary Club (member) Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust (Washington) (board member) National Wild Turkey Federation (Tioga Chapter, Indiana) Nat Moore Foundation The Nature Conservancy of Houston (board member) Neighborhood House, Peoria, Illinois New York City Center for the Urban Environment New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund (NYLCVEF) Niceville High School Youth Advisory Council NY Sun Works (NY) Oregon Food Bank Oregon Green Schools Orion Art Center PARA — Pace Athletic and Recreation Association of Santa Rose County (FL) (board member) The Park People (board member) Partners for Environmental Progress (Mobile, AL) Partners in Education (Broward County, Florida) Pheasants Forever Chapters (board member) Portland Metro Solid Waste Advisory Committee Recycling Task Force, Solid Waste Agency, Lake County, Illinois Relay for Life Richmond Regional Youth Facility Roundy's Foundation/Milwaukee Public Library SEARCH (board member) Seattle Solid Waste Advisory Committee Simi Valley Boys & Girls Club (board member) Simi Valley Cultural Arts Association (board member) Simi Valley Education Foundation (board member) Simi Valley Family YMCA (board member) Simi Valley Police Foundation (board member) Simi Valley Police Officers Association (board member) Six Rivers Land Conservancy SoBro (NY) South Baltimore Learning Center (board member) Southside Manor Apartments, Peoria, Illinois St. James Farm Forest Preserve (volunteer) St. Nick's Alliance (NY) Suburban Cities Association Sun Valley Beautiful Sustainable DC Working Group Swim Teal Lake — Diabetes Benefit W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 208 Taylorville, Illinois, Development Association (board member) Taylorville, Illinois, Midland Community Bank (board member) Taylorville, Illinois, Vision Way Christian School Board (board member) Three Rivers Festival Committee (Channahon, Illinois) University of Southern California — Sustainable Enterprise Executive Roundtable (SEER) Project Urban League (local board member) U.S. Green Building Council — Inland Empire Chapter Ventura County Economic Development Association Village of Lake Orion Downtown Development Authority Washington DC Metropolitan Scholars board members) Waterfowl USA (supporter) Whiteside County (IL) Fair (board member) Whiteside County Sheriffs Merit Commission (IL) (board member) Will County, Illinois, Center for Economic Development Wisconsin Clean Cities, Southeast Area Women in Distress, Inc. Women's Center (board member) YMCA of Broward County YMCA of Miami -Dade County W 12018 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 209 This guide includes tips and resources to improve garbage and recycling at your business. Others have found it easy to achieve success using these resources. Remember, we're here to help! What' New? RECYCLING IS REQUIRED! New City Code 19.125.150(7) requires businesses to recycle. Businesses can sign up with any recycler, but must use Waste Management for garbage service. Save Time & Money Garbage charges vary by size of container and number of pickups. Current rates: wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay Encourage recycling. By increasing recycling and reducing garbage collection, you can reduce your monthly bill. Ensure adequate garbage and recycling service to avoid overage charges. Place garbage and recycling containers together for easy access by staff. Recycle More • Recycling, paper, cardboard, bottles and cans can go in the same container! Other recycling companies may have different rules. • Contact the City to request small interior recycling containers to place next to desks, copiers and in break rooms. (While supplies last.) • Refer to the "Off -site Recycle and Disposal Options" flyer for bulky/banned items. • Invite Recycling Outreach staff to help set up your recycling program and speak at staff meetings. Food Rescue & Composting Donating excess food can help our community members in need and reduce waste at your business. Contact the City for assistance. • Contact the City to request assistance and supplies to start diverting compostable waste from your garbage. Keep Enclosures Clean • Ensure adequate garbage and recycling service so material doesn't get left on the ground. • Close container lids to deter pests and keep rainwater from entering your container. • Request free replacement of broken/damaged Waste Management containers. • Encourage staff to flatten boxes. Recognition • Sign up for the Envirostars program to become a certified green business and get ideas to become more sustainable. envirostars.greenbiztracker.org 9 - F 7AM- PM, Sat arr of M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM � Federal Way wASVE FAAN OFMCINIT Information en espanol / Multi -language materials available CFW_CommResources2018-19 f F a 4 �? Many items are recyclable, but can't be included in your regular recycling container. Here are some options. Call ahead for hours, rates and details. COMPUTERS & TVS • Deseret Industries 2200 S 320th St #1 A, Federal Way 253-839-9045 • Goodwill 32521 Pacific Hwy, Federal Way 253-946-0447 ECycleWashington.org ELECTRONICS • PC Trades 253-661-1083 pctrades.com Take It Back Network 49 206-477-4466 Take ltBackNetwork.org FLUORESCENT TUBES & BULBS • Northshore Ace Hardware 35419 21 st Ave SW, Federal Way i,i 253-835-5052 • Batteries Plus Bulbs 31830 Pacific Hwy S, Federal Way 253-666-9898 Light Recycle Washington LightR ecycle.org FOAM • Styro Recycle 23418 68th Ave S (West Valley Hwy), Kent 253-838-9555 StyroRecycle.com (pickup available) MICROWAVES SURPLUS FOOD It's easy to donate surplus food to local feeding programs. State and national Good Samaritan laws protect you — plus there could be tax deductions. Find out how simple it is for your business to donate food, cut waste disposal costs, and help feed hungry people in our community by contacting recycle@cityoffederalway.com. CLOTHING & HOUSEHOLD GOODS Donate your used clothing and household goods to local clothing banks and second hand stores. Ripped, stained and damaged clothes, shoes, and linens are accepted. kingcounty.gov/ThreadCycle UNUSABLE FURNITURE & BULKY ITEMS • Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/SolidWaste CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS Many construction materials (concrete, unpainted wood, scrap metal, and drywall) can no longer be thrown away as garbage. Area vendors accept these materials when kept separate from other debris. kingcounty.gov/GreenTools & SCRAP METAL • Calbag Metals 1602 Marine View Dr, Tacoma 253-572-6800 Calbag.com -9995 1-F7AM- PM,Sat M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM Informaci6n en espanol / Multi -language materials available WASTE MAIYAPEMEIVY BATTERIES • All Battery Sales and Service 888-562-9501 AIIBatterySalesAndService.com call 2 recycle.org HAZARDOUS WASTE Items labeled "caution," "danger," "warning" or "poison" are considered hazardous and should not be placed in the garbage, recycling or down the drain. Free disposal for small quantity generators. HazWasteHelp.org • 253-263-8899 Auburn Outlet Collection (Wastemobile) 1 101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn (Outside loading dock area by Nordstrom Rock) Saturdays & Sundays, 10AM - 5PM Accepted Items: Batteries • Cleaners • Chemicals , • Pesticides 1AL • Propane tanks LOOK IT UP! Find out how to recycle almost anything —paint, ink/toner cartridges, furniture, carpet & more. King County "What Do I Do With... 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/whatdoidowith POST AN ONLINE AD Reusable items can be sold or given away. Try posting a free ad. You will be amazed at what other people might want. • Craigslist • OfferUp • Nextdoor • Facebook Marketplace CITY OF 'a� Federal Way . . 1 Collection 2 Collections 3 Collections 4 Collections 5 Collections per Week per Week per Week per Week per Week 64 Gallon Cart $29.50 --- --- 96 Gallon Cart $39.21 --- --- --- __- 1 Yard Container $99.05 $181.88 $264.73 $347.57 $430.40 1.5 Yard Container $132.70 $244.79 $356.85 $468.94 $581.00 2 Yard Container $166.45 $307.71 $449.04 $590.32 $731.62 3 Yard Container $234.42 $437.24 $639.99 $842.75 $1,045.50 4 Yard Container $295.60 $555.23 $814.83 $1,074.46 $1,334.07 6 Yard Container $422.30 $798.55 $1,174.79 $1,551.05 $1,927.30 8 Yard Container $533.92 $1,012.98 $1,492.00 $1,971.01 $2,450.04 Extra Yardage $24.38 -- -- --" Recycling: All -in -one (Mixed) or Single Material Free Mixed Recycling Up to two 96-gallon carts per business - free of charge. Each individual business is eligible for two (96-Gallon Carts) recycling carts emptied weekly, even if using shared garbage service on site. More Recycling Contact us to learn how Waste Management's recycling services will reduce your bill. (Charges apply) NEW! MANDATORY RECYCLING The City of Federal Way has adopted a new recycling code which requires all businesses to recycle. Waste Management wants to help you meet these requirements. Questions? Email us at recyclenw@wm.com or call 1-800-592-9995. 1 Collection per Week 2 Collections per Week 96-Gallon Cart $11.36 $22.77 More Compost Service Contact us to learn how Waste Management's compost services will reduce your bill. Interested in a larger container? Contact us for rates. Garbage Compactor / Drop Box $210.32 per haul Compactor Haul Drop Box Haul $204.85 per haul Garbage Disposal $140.82 per ton (continued on back) 1-800-592-9995 - CITY OF M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM - Federal Way wASrE MajMAX; f ,,E;,,r Informaci6n en espanol / Multi -language materials available CFW ComRa[es2019-20 Federal Way Business Monthly Garbage Rates Effective March 1, 2019 thru February 29, 2020 - Temporary...Container Service Charge Daily Rent Delivery Temporary 1 Yard Container $38.42 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 1.5 Yard Container $46.37 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 2 Yard Container $58.99 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 3 Yard Container $90.25 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 4 Yard Container $108.61 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 6 Yard Container $146.34 $1.42 $45.15 Rates do not include taxes or applicable fees. For service changes, please contact Waste Management at 1-800-592-9995. M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM Visit wmnorthwest.com/federalway for access to recycling information, rates and more! Want a convenient way to access your account, pay your bill or find out your pickup schedule? View online at wm.com/paymybill or download the :-�1, . Waste Management app (available on Apple and Android). W WASYr MANAGcm ENT Pay Your Bill P.Piioe Request and Manage Roll Off Manage Payments View Pickup Schedule IDEnroll in Automatic Payments U View Estimated Pickup Time Signup for Paperless Billing a View Holiday Schedule A[ITY OF =�- Federal Way CFW ComRates2019-20 Gle�re a va and nnat PAPER AND CARDBOARD PLASTIC BOTTLES, JUGS AND TUBS How{ TIPS: Remove plastic liners from dry food boxes METAL CANS AND SCRAP METAL Including: • Small non -working metal appliances, pots, tools (Limit 2 ft. x 2 ft. x 2 ft., 35 lbs.) • Empty, non -hazardous aerosol cans TIPS: Place lids in can, crimp the can shut No sharp or greasy metal s TIPS: No plastic bags The numbers no longer matter; only recycle these shapes (bottles, jugs and tubs) GLASS JARS AND BOTTLES i TIP: Empty of all food or liquid (labels OK) Lids and caps go in the garbage No other types of glass accepted �1 Easy Recycling Rules: _ Clean, dry '` No food No plastic bags. .�5 and empty or liquids. No bagged items only. ` ` recyclables. wmnorthwest.com/federalway 1-800-592-9995 CFW-MFREC2019 M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM PAPEL Y CARTON � i 14 kl�" 1*lillllllllo,' 7rw�- . rrvalwc is Esto incluye:'"" Libros, catalogos y revistas en copia rustica Papel para envolver que no sea de aluminio Aplane todas las cajas (No las amarre) Retire los recubrimientos de plastico de las cajas secas de comida METAL ALUMINIO Y LATAS, CHATARRA DE METAL Y LAMINAS LIMPIAS fik e Esto incluye: Pequenos artefactos de metal que no funcionen, como cacerolas, herramientas (limite de 2 pies x 2 pies x 2 pies, 35 libras) Latas vadas de aerosol Coloque las tapas dentro de la lata y comprimala Ningun metal filoso o grasoso. Forme bolas compactas con el papel de aluminio limpio PLASTICO BOTELLAS, VASIJAS, CUBETAS Sin ningun alimento o liquido (sin tapas) VIDRIO - FRASCOS Y BOTELLAS Sin ningun alimento o liquido (No importan las etiquetas) www.wmnorthwest.com 1-800-592-9995 De lunes a viernes, de 7 am a 7 pm; sabados de 9 am a 1 pm KingSno_REC_2018 TVS & COMPUTERS TVS, laptops, computers and monitors are not allowed in the garbage or on -site recycling, and should be taken to one of the locations below for free recycling — working or not. eCycleWashington.org Deseret Industries 2200 S 320th St #1A, Federal Way Goodwill 32521 Pacific Hwy, Federal Way ELECTRONICS Printers, cell phones, stereos, and other household electronics are not allowed in the garbage or recycling and should be properly recycled. TakeltBackNetwork.org 4,14 P IF U Tekk 219 Frontage Rd N, Pacific 206-497-9979 HAZARDOUS WASTE Items labeled "caution," "danger," "warning" or "poison" are considered hazardous and should not be placed in the garbage, recycling or down the drain. Free disposal at Wastemobile. HazWasteHelp.org, 253-296-4692 Auburn Outlet Collection Wastemobile 1101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn ^ Outside loading dock area by Nordstrom Rack ,. Saturdays & Sundays, 10AM -- 5PM 1 Accepted Items: Fluorescent Bulbs & Tubes Batteries & Automotive Batteries +k Motor Oil • Antifreeze • Household Cleaners Chemicals • Pesticides • Propane Tanks,; CLOTHING Donate your used clothing to second hand stores. Ripped, stained and damaged clothes, shoes, and linens are accepted. 206-477-4466 KingCounty.gov/ThreadCycle NEEDLES & SHARPS Used needles and sharps do not belong in the garbage or recycling because they can injure workers and spread diseases. Put in a puncture resistant container with a tight -fitting lid such as an empty plastic bottle. Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila Public Health 33431 13th PI S, Federal Way MEDICATION Drop off leftover, expired and unwanted medication for free and safe disposal during business hours. MedicineReturn.org Police Department 33325 8th Ave S, Federal Way HealthPoint 33431 13th PI S, Federal Way Kaiser Permanente Pharmacy `. 301 S 320th St, Federal Way FURNITURE & BULKY ITEMS If you can't recycle or give away your bulky items, then you will need to pay to dispose of them as garbage. Do NOT leave at your apartment complex or you may be charged. Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila Algona Transfer Station 35315 West Valley Hwy S, Algona 206-477-4466 KingCounty.gov/SolidWaste GIVE IT Reusable household items can be sold or given away. Try posting a free on-line ad. You will be amazed at what other people might want. AWAY Buy Nothing Group (Facebook) • Craigslist • Facebook Marketplace • Nextdoor • OfferUp CITY OF Solid Waste & Recycling Division • 253-835-2771 • www.cityoffederalway.com/recycling Federal Way 0 Printed on recycled paper. August 2018 1 Grant funded by the King County Solid Waste Division TELEVISIONES Y COMPUTADORAS AGUJAS Y OBJETOS FILOSOS Los televisores, las computadoras portatiles, otros tipos de computadoras y los monitores no se permiten en los botes de basura o de reciclaje del edificio y se deben Ilevar a uno de los siguientes lugares, donde se pueden reciclar gratuitamente. Este regla aplica tanto pare aparatos que funcionan como aparatos que no funcionan. eCycleWashington.org (sitio web en ingles) Deseret Industries 2200 S 320th St#1A, Federal Way Goodwill 32521 Pacific Hwy, Federal Way ELECTRODOMESTICOS Las impresoras, los telefonos celulares, los estereos y otros electrodom6sticos no se permiten en los botes de basura o de reciclaje y deben Ilevarse a uno de los siguientes lugares para reciclarlos de la manera correcta. TakeltBackNetwork.org (sitio web en ingles) _ y� UpTekk 219 Frontage Rd N, Pacific 206-497-9979 Las agujas usadas y los objetos filosos no pertenecen en la basura ni el reciclaje porque pueden lastimar a los trabajadores y propagar enfermedades. Col6quelos en un contenedor resistente a las perforaciones con una tapa herm6tica, como una botella de plastico vacia. Estaci6n de transferencia de Bow Lake 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila Departamento de salud p0blica 33431 13th PI S, Federal Way MEDICAMENTOS Lleve sus medicamentos expirados, no deseados o que le sobraron a las siguientes ubicaciones durante horas laborales para deshacerse de ellos gratuitamente. Departamento de policia 33325 8th Ave S, Federal Way DESECHOS PELIGROSOS Los articulos etiquetados con palabras como "caution" (precauci6n), "danger" (peligro), "warning" (advertencia) o "poison" (veneno) son considerados peligrosos y no deben ser colocados en el bote de basura o de reciclaje o tirados por el desagae. Puede deshacerse de estos materiales gratuitamente en el Wastemobile. HazWasteHelp.org (sitio web en ingles), 253-296-4692 r, Auburn Outlet Collection Wastemobile 1101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn a Zona de carga afuera de Nordstrom Rack a� Sebados y domingos, 10AM-5PM M ' Articulos que se aceptan: • Aceite de motor • Anticongelante • Baterias y baterias de autom6vil • Bombillas y tubos fluorescentes • Pesticidas • Productos de limpieza • Productos quimicos • Tanques de propano Done su ropa usada a una tienda de segunda mano. Se acepta ropa rasgada, manchada y dahada, al igual que zapatos y sabanas. 206-477-4466 KingCounty.gov/Reciclamas CITY OF Federal Way L-9 King corny HealthPoint 33431 13th PI S, Federal Way Farmacia Kaiser Permanente 301 S 320th St, Federal Way MUEBLES Y ARTICULOS GRANDES Si no puede reciclar o regalar sus articulos grandes, entonces tendra que pagar para deshacerse de ellos como basura. NO los deje an su edificio o le pueden cobrar una multa. Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila Algona Transfer Station 35315 West Valley Hwy S, Algona 206-477-4466 9 KingCounty.gov/SolidWaste (sitio web en ingles) REGALELO Los articulos reutilizables se pueden vender o regalar. Intente publicar un anuncio gratuito en Iinea. Se sorprendera de Io que otras personas podrian desear. • Buy Nothing Group (Facebook) • Craigslist • Facebook Marketplace • Nextdoor • OfferUp 206-477-4466 • KingCounty.gov/Reciclamas t31mpreso en papel reciclado. Agosto de 2018 1 Financiado por fondos de la subvenci6n de la Divisi6n de desechos s6lidos de King County This guide includes tips and resources to improve garbage and recycling at your property, Others have found it easy to achieve success using these resources. Remember, we're here to help! Save Time & Money Garbage rates vary by size of container and number of pickups, but there is no additional cost for recycling service. Current rates: wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay Encourage recycling. By increasing recycling and reducing garbage collection, you can reduce your monthly bill. • Ensure adequate garbage and recycling service to avoid overage charges. • Place garbage and recycling containers together for easy resident access. • Consider contracting out garbage enclosure monitoring and maintenance. • Consider requesting locked containers and slotted lids for recycling dumpsters to reduce contamination. Keep Enclosures Clean • Ensure adequate garbage and recycling service. • Close container lids to deter pests and keep rainwater from entering your container. • Consider posting signs stating that dumpsters are for resident use only. • Request free replacement of broken/damaged Waste Management containers and lids. Encourage residents to flatten boxes. Pick up any litter or debris around containers frequently. Bulky Items & Hazardous Waste Garbage trucks cannot pick up bulky furniture. Hazardous waste is banned from the garbage/recycling containers. Distribute "Off -site Recycling & Disposal Options" flyer to residents. Contact us to request additional copies. Remove bulky items and hazardous waste from enclosures. See enclosed "Off -site Recycling & Disposal Options" flyer. Organize bulky item collection so residents can pay you to dispose of items that don't fit in the dumpster. • Consider installing cameras to monitor enclosures and institute fines to deter illegal dumping. 1-800-592-9995 CITY OF M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM Federal Way P wAs>reFAAFMA(;FMr Xr Information en espanol / Multi -language materials available THINK GREEN: CFW_MFResources2019 Resident Education Ensure containers and enclosures are properly labeled. Distribute reusable tote bags for residents to collect and carry recycling. Distribute recycling guides to residents. Multiple languages available. m. Distribute custom letters addressing specific issues such as tips for kids who take out the trash. Invite Recycling Outreach staff to resident meetings and events to provide fun and informative recycling presentations for residents. m Ready to take it to the next level? Request assistance and supplies to start or expand food scrap composting. Mandatory Recycling, Illegal Dumping & Theft of Service City Code 19.125.150(7)(h) requires residents to recycle, and properties to offer as much recycling service as garbage service. Request assistance and/or use resources listed on this guide to come into compliance. "Illegal dumping" is garbage being placed on the ground instead of a container, regardless of who does it. If reported, Code Compliance will require property owner to arrange for clean up. "Theft of service" is off -site material getting dumped in your garbage container without your permission (stealing your garbage service). • Report to Police Department: 253-835-2121 pd.cityoffederalway.com/onlinereport W WASTE MANAQEMEIVT 1-800-592-9995 (M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM) RecycleNW@wm.com wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay PAPEN •ryi? LA,hyyaP.,f I '1,^J� _NCITY OF 's- Federal Way 253-835-2771 253-455-4804 (Cell) recycle@cityoffederalway.com cityoffederalway.com/Recycling 1 Collection 2 Collections 3 Collections 4 Collections 5 Collections per Week per Week per Week per Week per Week 20 Gallon Cart $15.99 --- --- --- 32 Gallon Can $18.62 - --- --- 35 Gallon Cart $20.74 -- --- --- 64 Gallon Cart $28.33 - --- --- --- 96 Gallon Cart $38.05 --- --- - Extra Bag, Box or Bundle $6.45 - --- --- --- 1 Yard Container $115.99 $215.59 $315.19 $414.78 $514.37 1.5 Yard Container $154.86 $300.19 $439.87 $579.58 $719.24 2 Yard Container $205.09 $384.84 $564.59 $744.36 $924.15 3 Yard Container $280.08 $528.16 $776.25 $1,024.29 $1,272.41 4 Yard Container $348.16 $660.00 $971.77 $1,283.62 $1,595.42 6 Yard Container $488.73 $930.94 $1,373.21 $1,815.45 $2,257.64 8 Yard Container $614.20 $1,173.01 $1,731.82 $2,290.61 $2,849.38 Extra Yardage $30.99 --- --- Recycling Carts, Any Size No additional cost for unlimited recycling Containers, Any Size No additional cost for unlimited recycling Drop Boxes, Any Size No additional cost for unlimited recycling NEW! MANDATORY RECYCLING The City of Federal Way has adopted a new recycling code, which requires all properties to have equal capacity for recycling and garbage. Waste Management wants to help you meet these requirements. You are eligible for free unlimited recycling included with your garbage service. Questions? Email us at recyclenw@wm.com or call 1-800-592-9995. Compost:... Scraps & Yard Debris I 1 Collection per Week 2 Collections per Week 96 Gallon Cart $11.36 $22.77 Interested in a larger container? Contact us for rates. Garbage Compactor / Drop Box 10 Yard 15 Yard 20 Yard 25 Yard 30 Yard 35 Yard 40 Yard Compactor Haul --- $245.06 $256.55 $268.13 $279.66 $289.11 $302.85 Drop Box Haul $196.46 --- $219.58 $231.17 $242.70 - $265.85 Garbage Disposal $140.82/ton (continued on back) 1-800-592-9995 MY OF M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM Federal Way N WASTE MAApEMENTA Informacion en espanol / Multi -language materials available CFW_MFRates2019-20 Monthly Garbage Rates for Federal Way Multi -Family Properties (continued) Effective March 1, 2019 thru February 29, 2020 - Temporary...Container Service Charge Daily Rent Delivery Temporary 1 Yard Container $38.42 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 1.5 Yard Container $46.37 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 2 Yard Container $58.99 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 3 Yard Container $90.25 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 4 Yard Container $108.61 $1.42 $45.15 Temporary 6 Yard Container $146.34 $1.42 $45.15 Rates do not include taxes or applicable fees. For service changes, please contact Waste Management at 1-800-592-9995, M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM Visit wmnorthwest.com/federalway for access to recycling information, rates and more! Want a convenient way to access your account, pay your bill or find out your pickup schedule? View online at - wm.com/paymybill or download the Waste Management app (available on Apple and Android). 1-F7AM 7PM,S M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM WA$i@ MANAGIENRCRnr2-9995 � Informacion en espanol / Multi -language materials available W 9 Pay Your Bill Manage Payments Enroll in Automatic Payments Signup for Paperless Billing W5. Request and Manage Roll Off View Pickup Schedule OView Estimated Pickup Time MView Holiday Schedule Federal Way CFW MFRa[es2019-20 PAPER AND CARDBOARD PLASTIC BOTTLES, JUGS AND TUBS MW .,� 4 TIPS: Remove plastic liners from dry food boxes METAL CANS AND SCRAP METAL J RM Including: • Small non -working metal appliances, pots, tools (Limit 2 ft. x 2 ft. x 2 ft., 35 lbs.) • Empty, non -hazardous aerosol cans TIPS: Place lids in can, crimp the can shut No sharp or greasy metal TIPS: 1 No plastic bags The numbers no longer matter. Only recycle these shapes (bottles, jugs and tubs) Lids and caps go in the garbage GLASS JARS AND BOTTLES C TIPS: Empty of all food or liquid (labels OK) Lids and caps go in the garbage No other types of glass accepted Easy Recycling Rules: allo plastic bags. _ Clean, dry No food No bagged .� ;— and empty or liquids. recyclables. items only. wmnorthwest.com/federalway 1-800-592-9995 CFW MFREC2019 M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM PAPEL Y CARTON PLASTICO BOTELLAS, VASIJAS, CUBETAS rAil' Wam AC.. j...•.,.1t.RCQl7LST Esto incluye: Libros, catalogos y revistas en copia rustica Papel para envolver que no sea de aluminio Aplane todas las cajas (No las amarre) Retire los recubrimientos de plastico de las cajas secas de comida METAL ALUMINIO Y LATAS, CHATARRA DE METAL Y LAMINAS LIMPIAS FA tit J Esto incluye: Pequenos artefactos de metal que no funcionen, como cacerolas, herramientas (limite de 2 pies x 2 pies x 2 pies, 35 libras) Latas vacias de aerosol Coloque las tapas dentro de la lata y comprimala Ningun metal filoso o grasoso. Forme bolas compactas con el papel de aluminio limpio Sin ningun alimento o liquido (sintapas) VIDRIO FRASCOS Y BOTELLAS Sin ningun alimento o liquido (No importan las etiquetas) www.wmnorthwest.com -ll-uvu-oyz—yyy3 De lunes a viernes, de 7 am a 7 pm; sabados de 9 am a 1 pm CFW_MFREC2019 RESOURCES & CONTACT INFO W wmnorthwest.com/federalway 1-800-592-9995 (M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM) pnwrsservices@wm.com Waste Management App now available on Apple and Android. Find us on Facebook at Think Green Federal Way. Missed collection Missing/damaged carts Collection rates Bulky item collection (mattresses, appliances, etc.) Construction/demolition containers (remodeling, etc.) Carry -out service for people with disabilities Vacation service hold (advance notice only) Spanish & other language info Federal Way Recycling and composting information 253-835-2771 / cityoffederalway.com/recycling recycle@cityoffederalway.com Sign up for email notifications: cityoffederalway.com/notifyme C1 Printed on recycled paper 2018-19 wmnorthwest.com/ Federal Way 1-800-592-9995 L9 King County Transfer Stations Facilities for disposing of garbage for a fee (recycling available at Bow Lake Transfer Station) 206-477-4466 / kingcounty.gov/solidwaste Algona (35315 W Valley Hwy, Algona) Bow Lake (18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila) Hazardous Waste Assistance with reducing and disposing of household hazardous waste (see page 5 for more information) 206-296-4692 / HazWasteHelp.org Auburn Hazardous Wastemobile (1 101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn) COMPREHENSIVE LOCAL RECYCLING DATABASES r "What Do I Do With...?" 206-477-4466 / kingcounty.gov/whatdoidowith Washington State Recycling Database 1-800-RECYCLE (732-9253) / 1800recycle.wa.gov edWa'V_2C19 SAVE FOR REFERENCE COLLECTION & ACCOUNT INFORMATION Weather Delays If weather conditions delay collection, up to twice the regular amount of garbage, recycling, and yard waste will be collected at no additional charge on your next regularly scheduled collection day. Please note that recycling is collected every two weeks. In the event of two successive weather delays, make-up collection will be made the next possible day. Credits will not be issued for delays due to inclement weather. For updated weather information, visit wmnorthwest.com/weatherboard. To receive weather alerts, ensure your phone number is updated in your Waste Management account. Cart Placement Tips • Place containers at curb by 7AM. • 2' apart with lids opening toward street. • At least 3' from cars, trees, mailboxes, fences and utility boxes. • Please remove containers as soon as possible after collection. Holiday Schedule Collection service is provided on all holidays except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day. If your collection day falls on or after these holidays, your scheduled collection will be delayed one day that week. For example, if your regular collection day is Friday, holiday collection will take place on Saturday. Extra recycling and fresh holiday trees picked up at the curb for free. Fees apply to extra garbage collected. wmnorthwestxom/FederalWay 2 1-800-592-9995 416 Plastic Bottles, Metal Food & Paper Flattened Cardboard Food & Beverage Jugs & Tubs Beverage Cans & Paperboard Cartons See page 8 for full curbside recycling details. DISPOSAL OPTIONS BULKY ITEMS Bulky item collection service is available through Waste Management for a charge. Please call 1-800-592-9995 for rates on specific items and to schedule pick-up. If you can't recycle or give away your bulky items, you will need to drop them off at a King County transfer station. Charges apply. Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/solidwaste Algona Transfer Station 35315 West Valley Hwy S, Algona 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/solidwaste wmnorthwest.com/ FederalWay GIVE IT AWAY Reusable household items can be sold or given away. Try posting a free ad. You will be amazed at what other people might want. Buy Nothing Group (Facebook) Craigslist Facebook Marketplace Nextdoor OfferUp 3 1-800-592-9995 RECYCLING OPTIONS BRANCHES & STUMPS Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/solidwaste Contact Waste Management at 1-800-592-9995 to order regular or large quantity collection. BUILDING & REMODELING MATERIALS Habitat for Humanity ReStore 4824 S Tacoma Way, Tacoma 253-779-8149 tpc-habitat.org ReHarvest Center 1 113 St Paul Ave, Tacoma 253-531-5845 CLOTHING & HOUSEHOLD GOODS Donate used clothing and household goods to clothing banks and secondhand stores. 1N Ripped, stained or damaged clothes, shoes, and linens aren't garbage anymore. Most secondhand stores accept these. kingcounty.gov/threadcycle Desert Industries 2200 S 320th St, Federal Way Goodwill 32521 Pacific Hwy S, Federal Way CONFIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS The Washington State Office of the Attorney General publishes a list of free community _ shredding events. 1-800-551-4636 atg.wa.gov/shredathon.aspx LARGE APPLIANCES & SCRAP METAL Calbag Metals 1602 Marine View Dr, Tacoma . 253-572-6800 calbag.com REFRIGERATORS & FREEZERS Refrigerators and freezers must be specially handled due to coolants, so recycling options are more limited and costly than other appliances. Bow Lake Transfer Station' 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/solidwaste MATTRESSES Spring Back / NW Furniture Bank 2301 Dock St Tacoma 253-302-3868 SpringBackRecycling.com wmnorthwest.com/ Federal Way 4 NEEDLES & SHARPS Put needles in a puncture resistant container with a tight fitting lid. Public Health 33431 13th PIS, Federal Way Bow Lake Transfer Station 18800 Orillia Rd S, Tukwila - -- 206-477-4466 kingcounty.gov/solidwaste PLASTIC BAGS Clean plastic bags, dry cleaning bags and -" other types of film plastic can be recycled at most grocery stores. PlasticFilmRecycling.org STYROFOAMTm BLOCKS & PACKING PEANUTS Styro Recycle 23418 68th Ave S (West Valley Hwy) Ke nt 253-838-9555 StyroRecycle.com USED COOKING OIL Used cooking oil can be recycled into biodiesel. Pour oil into the black collection tank. French Lake Dog Park 315311stAve S Federal Way 1-800-592-9995 IL_ -Ak' HAZARDOUS WAS) i Caution. Danger. Warning. Poison. These four words are on the labels of many products we use in our homes and businesses and are considered hazardous. Auburn Hazardous Wastemobile Drop -Off Site Auburn Outlet Collection, 1101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn —outside loading dock area near Nordstrom Rack Saturdays and Sundays, except holiday weekends, 10AM - 5PM Accepted items: Aerosol cans (with contents; if empty, dispose in the garbage) Automotive products (antifreeze, brake fluid, gasoline, motor oil; do not mix any fluids) Batteries, automotive batteries Fluorescent light bulbs & tubes Household cleaners (ammonia, bleach) Gasoline Pesticides & garden chemicals Hobby chemicals Oil -based paints & stains (no water -based or latex paints) Propane tanks Pool & spa supplies Road flares that do not contain an explosive charge Products that contain mercury (thermometers, thermostats) Thinners & solvents Not accepted: x Latex paint x Explosives x Empty containers x Marine flares x TVs, computers x Medicine x Tires x Garbage x Electronics Never dispose of hazardous waste such s the items on this page in the garbage, eCyCling, yard waste or down the drain. BATTERIES City Hall 33325 8th Ave S, Federal Way Federal Way Community Center 876 S 333rd St, Federal Way Also accepted at the Wastemobile. TVS & COMPUTERS Free recycling, working or not. ecyclewashington.org 4Q Deseret Industries 2200 S 320th St, #1A, Federal Way 253-839-9045 Goodwill 32521 Pacific Hwy, Federal Way 253-573-1333 FLUORESCENT BULBS & TUBES lightrecycle.org w Northshore Ace Hardware r 35419 21 st Ave SW, Federal Way 253-835-5052 Batteries Plus Bulbs 31830 Pacific Hwy S., Federal Way Also accepted at the Wastemobile. More Information: HazWasteHelp.org 206-296-4692 wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay ELECTRONICS takeitbacknetwork.org UpTekk 219 Frontage Rd N, Pacific 206-497-9979 uptekk.com MEDICATION medicinereturn.org im Police Department 33325 8th Ave S, Federal Way Kaiser Permanente / Group Health 301 S 320th St, Federal Way HealthPoint / Health Department 33431 13th PI S, Federal Way USED MOTOR OIL Curbside Collection: Place oil in sealed clear gallon jugs with your name and address on your recycling day (limit 3 gallons per pickup). Also accepted at the Wastemobile. USE GREENER ALTERNATIVES Visit HazWasteHelp.org for green cleaning recipes and other helpful information. 5 1-800-592-9995 GARBAGE GARBAGE Bag these and put them in your garbage (green cart or personal can). Collected weekly. TIPS Non -recyclable Plastic Double Bag pet waste, vacuum dust, sawdust L and cold ashes. F ti+ No Liquids Please DO NOT put liquids, yard waste, hazardous waste or recycling in the garbage. Latex Paint cans may be placed in the garbage if paint is solidified. To Non -recyclable Glass Non -recyclable Paper solidify, mix in cat litter, shredded paper, sawdust, or paint ' = hardener. Once paint is *11t'� dry, leave the lid off the l can and place in your 4' garbage. Non -recyclable Metal Other Garbage Extra garbage can be y 9 collected for a charge. Many items are recyclable off -site. See page 4 for options. wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay 6 1-800-592-9995 FOOD & YARD WASTE These go in your grey food & yard waste cart. Collected weekly. Food Scraps & Leftovers All food including meat, cheese and bones. w Plants, Flowers & Yard Waste bbw-�C- Place holiday trees in yard waste cart Tree branches under for collection; cut in half if over 6' 4' long, 4" diameter Paper Must be uncoated (not shiny) r Y y 't,l k FOOD SCRAPS TIPS 1 Gather food scraps from your kitchen in: Paper grocery bag Reusable container with a lid Wrap in newspaper Approved compostable .» . bag (recyclefood.com) 2 Layer food scraps with newspaper or shredded paper. ic3 Empty container into the food & yard waste cart frequently, and rinse out. EXTRA YARD WASTE (collected for a charge) Place next to food & yard waste cart in any of the following: Heavy brown paper yard bags (available at hardware stores) 32-gallon cans labeled "Yard Waste" (65 lb. limit) Bundles tied with natural twine (4 x2' limit) NO YARD WASTE IN PLASTIC BAGS wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay 7 1-800-592-9995 RECYCLING REYCLING Place only the items listed below in your blue recycling cart. Collected every other week. TIPS IN : L0"11 ST T11) P L7A Clean Paper & Cardboard Aluminum & Tin Cans Labels OK Place lids in can, crimp shut Scrap Metal Glass Jars & Bottles Labels OK, no lids WWI Small, non -working metal appliances, pots, tools, etc. Limit 2' x 2' x 2, 35 Ibs; no wood, plastic, or rubber attachments; no sharp metal Plastic Bottles, Jugs & Tubs Only recycle these "shapes" of plastic containers - don't worry about the recycling symbol or number Empty and rinse out all food residue. Labels do not need to be removed. Extra recycling is free! Place extra recyclables in a bin or cardboard box at the curb next to your recycling cart. If you often have extra recyclables, order a larger or second cart for free. No plastic bags. Empty clean recyclables out of bags and boxes into the cart so that they can be easily sorted. The numbers no longer matter. Recycle plastic only if it is a bottle, jug or tub. wmnorthwest.com/FederalWay 8 1-800-592-9995 CNI Mi SW INEAWMAN-TLAM rFFg (T #Q R EEmm) .Al +tj !4 I � (R� :2Xf2x29C-Rx2X-R , 35 ) y ; www.wmnorthwest.com 1-800-592-9995 © 2016 WM Intellectual Property Holdings, L.L.C. Mpj—t-E 7:OOAM — 5:OOPM 9:OOAM-1:OOPM KING/SNO_CHINESE oolELI 18Xl lip k' •�i�i, �fzj�'3�, •szol 0FLi -]�-Eoxl QT dLIE[ (-Tj 11FtjkI4) ;lam oFXl-��al zoi°,!� zzf�l ozlz Xi1.i& LIE =y O —F z r[]IL , °o3`aH�, 73`z 71H� F z s+ rr (21E1 X 2ulE X 2!E , 3GL-f -C SF�, 71001 °F �1LIr- .VH-k_ 0-fLfi Pad'LIF- •0101 �H"Aerosal Cans"z dle�l�f. 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TIC 4zIfN/{'kW { i,l B TOM 4Ylcne 6aH04KV1 OT Ta6neT0K He n0 peL4enTy (KpoMe ny3blpbKOB OTneKaperB no peLien-ry) I IndCTmaCCOBble L4BeTO4Hble ropwKVl Vl 5-rann0HHble BeApa (6e3 3eMnm) 04V1CTV1Te OT OCTaTKOB eAbl Vl BbineOTe Bce COAep1KV1MOe (6e3 KpblweK) CTEKJIO 5YTbU1K1A H CTEKJ1AHHblE COCYAbl He AnA OCTpbIX V1n14 3acaneHHbIX MCTaN144eCKV1X BbITpAXHVITe OCTaTKVI eAbl M Bbineke BCe cOAep wmoe npeAMeTOB. L1WCTYI0 4)Onbry CKpyTV1Te B wap. (HaKneNKW MOMHO ocTaBblTb) www.wmnorthwest.com 1-800-592-9995 © 2016 WM Intellectual Property Holdings, L.L C. Fl0H. — nT.: 7:00-17:00. Cy6.: 9:00 -13:00 KING/SNO-RUSSIAN Property Manager Composting Toolkit W 000 COMPOST get 6 Why compost? COMPOSTING AT YOUR PROPERTY HAS MANY BENEFITS: 1 Contribute to a more sustainable community. Save Money By composting your food scraps, you're helping to By composting, you can reduce 2 create a nutrient rich soil amendment used on local the size of your garbage farms and gardens. container and save money. Add a valued amenity to 3 your property. People want to do the right thing and reduce their waste. Offering a compost program makes your property more attractive to tenants. W WASTE MANAGEMENT What to compost? Your property can compost all food scraps (including meat and bones!), uncoated paper, and yard debris. Save money and reduce landfill waste by composting all leaves, grass trimmings, and branches associated with landscaping at your property. See our full compost guide at wmnorthwest.com. FOOD SCRAPS UNCOATED PAPER 4�*4 G TIPS FOR RESIDENT COMPOSTING: • Empty your kitchen container into the compost regularly • Freeze food scraps to prevent odor and bugs • Collect napkins, paper towels, and shredded paper with your food waste to absorb excess liquids • Sprinkle your compost container with baking soda to neutralize odors YARD DEBRIS Setting up a successful Compost Program Identify P Communicate withMMents what Ccan cludei e re gallon compost cart for in the compost program through an emai , letter and/or meeting. Consider setting aside time for a every 100 units. Compost carts should be paired kickoff meeting or open house event to answer next to the garbage and recycling containers. questions about the new program. a Ia'a:: yo property experienTbs frequently contaminated recycling, it is best to focus on recycling before adding composting. Check out the Recycling All Stars Toolkit at wmnorthwest.com to learn ' how to set up a successful multi AV family recycling r program. r something that would be used at your property. 9ter A • - • mo ii, t "e ompd` t program to new residents and provide copies of waste guidelines (available at wmnorthwest.com). an eye on what is ending up in the compost cart and communicate with residents when the wrong materials are being put in. R?ECOMMENDED ''W: ST—E Pair compost cart next to garbage and recycling. Clearly label all waste containers. Resources available for your property Waste Management is here to help your property get started with a composting program that is simple and effective! For free educational services, including fliers, compost pails, on -site trainings, and technical assistance, contact recyclenw@wm.com. Compost Flyer FAQs Move -In Move -Out Resources COM POST I YARD DEBRIS & FOOD SCRAPS OUT PUT IN KEEP VV ....dhw Qom 1-9O0.5924995 Infonvtldn en Espeial TN INKG EEN' What if 1 wcomto Post cancel my Service? be Compost sen"ce c b at any e y Canceled l Capin$ Customer Service { 8,,,592.99c)5, Cart Decal Won't composting smell and attract pests? Not Food waste is being thrown away at your multifamily community whether or not a compost program is in place. The only difference is which container that food waste will end up in - one that is going to a landfill, or one that is going to be composted. Encourage residents to collect their food scraps in compostable bags that can be tied shut and to compost all their napkins, paper towels, and shredded paper to soak up any liquid. And remember to always keep the lid closed on the compost bin. Hazardous Waste Information Where can residents buy compostable bags? f Itlis imPrtant to note that not g labeled compostable" or "biodegradable" actually break down at our local compost facility. For a list of approved including COmpostable bags, BioBags, Glad, and Iiploc compostable bags, visit cedar-grove.com. Many of these bags can be found at Your local grocery store! OOPS! PLEASE DO NOT PUT THESE ITEMS IN YOUR RECYCLE CART! t Do Not Bag Recyclables No Plastic Bags (and no garbage) No Garbage, Food or Liquid No Clothing or Linens (empty all containers) �e No Tangiers No Big Items (no hoses, wires, (no wood or furniture) chains or cords) ox No Pizza Boxes No Foam (no food -soiled containers) (no blocks, peanuts, containers, etc.) Other NEXT TIME WE WON'T BE ABLE TO EMPTY YOUR CART IF WE SEE THESE ITEMS. QUESTIONS? Contact Us! 1-800-592-9995 WASTE MANAVCME.NTr M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM wmnorthwest.com recyclenw@wm.com CANS CARTONS GLASS Aluminum Food and Bottles and Steel Cans Beverage and Jars 0 Clean and empty Clean and empty Clean and empty PAPER Mixed Paper, Newspaper, Magazines, and Cardboard PLASTICS Bottles, lugs and Tubs (kitchen, laundry, bath, dairy) Clean and empty, no plastic bags W WASTE MANAOEMENTn QUESTIONS? Contact us for a copy of the complete recycling guide. 1-800-592-9995, M-F 7AM-7PM, Sat 9AM-1 PM wmnorthwest.com recyclenw@wm.com Informacion en espanol. Multilingual materials available. Graphics provided by The Recycling Partnership FOOD SCRAPS AND LEFTOVERS • EMI nA ljPLANTS AND YARD DEBRIS ► yie* y Including: • Uncoated, non -shiny paper, containers, plates, and boxes Greasy and soiled paper are ok Including: Plants, grass clippings, and weeds (Remove plastic pots, twine, gardening tape and twist ties) Leaves, trees, branches, and roots (Cut 4 -foot sections and be smaller than 4-inches in diameter) Remove candles from Jack o lanterns NO PLASTIC, COOKING OIL, PET WASTE, GLASS, METAL OR LIQUIDS It's easy to do! 74 Here's what you can use to collect food scraps before you add it to you compost cart: 0 A stylish compost pail. Empty collected food scraps into your compost cart. Your compost cart will be picked up on your next collection day. www.wmnorthwest.com © 2017 WM Intellectual Property Holdings, L.L.C. 2 111 A reusable kitchen container, such as an old pitcher. A paper bag or an approved compostable bag. Extra Yard Waste: There is a charge for extra yard waste. Put extra yard waste in large yard and leaf paper bag or 32-gallon containers with handles and lids (65 lb. limit),- label "yard". Use the yard and leaf paper bags to store extra yard debris only. Food scraps and uncoat4 ust be placed in the compost cart. r 9995 Mon -Fri 7am-5pm, Saturday 9 am-1 pm RESTOS DE COMIDA Y SOMAS 4P* y a. Esto Ind uye: • Papel, recipientes, platos y cajas no recubiertos y no brillantes El papel grasiento y sucio esta bien PLANTAS Y DESECHOS DE JARDIN Esto incluye: Plantas, tortes de cesped y maleza (El imine macetas de plastico, cordeles, cintas dejardineria y precintos de seguridad) Hojas, arboles, ramas y raices (Corte secciones de 4 pies y que sean menores de 4 pulgadas de diametro) Retire las velas de Iamparas de calabaza NADA DE PLASTICO, ACEITE DE COCINAR, DESECHOS DE MASCOTAS, VIDRIO, METAL 0 LIQUIDOS iEs muy facil! . Esto to que puede usar para recolectar restos de comida r antes de agregarlos a to contenedor de compost: Una elegaJ11' ara compostaje Vacie los restos de comida recolectados en su contenedor de compost. Su contenedor de abono sera recogido en el pr6ximo dia de recolecci6n que corresponda. 1; -0 - www.wmnorthwest.com © 2017 WM Intellectual Property Holdings, L.L.C. 2 Cl .a. Un contenedor de cocina reutilizable Una bolsa de papel o una como una jarra vieja, por ejemplo. bolsa biodegradable aprobada. Desperdicios de jardin adicionales: Existe un cargo por desperdicios d jardin adicionales. Coloque los desperdicios de jardin adicionales en una b, de papel grande para jardin y hojas o en contenedores de 32 galones con manijas y tapas (limite de 65 libras) y col6quele una etiqueta que diga "ja Utilice bolsas de papel para jardin y hojas solo para almacenar desechos adicionale del ardin. Los restos de comida y papel sin recubrimiento deb ser colo I contenedor de compost. 1-BOO-592-9995 Lunes a viernes de 7 am a 5 pm, los sabados de 9 am a 1 pm NON -RECYCLABLE PAPER NON -RECYCLABLE PLASTIC Including: • Disposable wipes • Hardcover books • Foil wrapping paper • Coated, shiny paper plates • Facial tissue • Shredded paper (TIP: Can be placed loose in compost cart) NON -RECYCLABLE METAL Including: • Caps, lids (Less than 3 inches in diameter) •Empty oil containers • Empty latex paint cans (Remove lids; dried, hardened paint ok) Sharp or greasy metal NON -RECYCLABLE GLASS 17 Including: • Light bulbs (Fluorescent light bulbs and tubes need special disposal) Bag plastic bags and bring them back to the grocery store. Including: • Styrofoam products • Plastic plates • Caps and small lids • Plastic plates and utensils • Empty prescription vials OTHER GARBAGE Including: • Cold ashes • Vacuum bags and dust • Broken office supplies • Pet waste, cat litter • Plastic packaging for food and other products 1-800-592-9995 Mon -Fri 7am-7pm, Saturday 9 am-1 pm www.wmnort PAPEL NO RECICLABLE PLASTICO NO RECICLABLE Esto induye: • Toallitas desechables • Libros de tapa dura • Papel de aluminio para envolver Platos de papel brillantes recubiertos • Panuelos faciales Papel triturado (SUGERENCIA: se puede colocar suelto en el contenedor de compost) METALES NO RECICLABLES 4e Esto induye: Tapones, tapas (menos de 3 pulgadas de diametro) Contenedores de aceite vacios Latas de pintura de latex vadas (retire las tapas; la pintura seca y endurecida no tiene problemas) Metales filosos o grasosos VIDRIOS NO RECICLABLES AWL L fivot Esto induye: Bombillas (las bombillas y tubos fluorescentes requieren un proceso de eliminacion especial) Coloque bolsas pibsticas dentro de otras bolsas pl6sticas y Ilfivelas de vuelta a is tienda de comestibles. Esto induye: •Productos de espuma de poliestireno •Platos plasticos Tapones y tapas pequenas •Platos plasticos y utensilios Frascos de prescripcibn vacios OTROS RESIDUOS Esto induye: • Cenizas frias • Bolsas de aspiradoras y polvo • Articulos de oficina danados • Residuos de las mascotas, arena para gatos • Empaques plasticos para alimentos y otros productos www.wmnorthwest.com 1-800-592-9995 KingSno_Garbage 2018. Lunes a viernes de 7 am a 7 pm, los sabados de 9 am a 1 pm