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Ord 95-248 ORDINANCE NO. 95-248 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FEDERAL WAY, WASHINGTON, ADOPTING A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AS REQUIRED BY THE GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT OF 1990, AS AMENDED, (CHAPTER 36.70A RCW); SEPARATELY ADOPTING A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 35A.63 RCW; AND REPEALING THE INTERIM COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND THE ELEMENTS THEREOF WHEREAS, the Growth Management Act of 1990, as amended, (Chapter 36.70A RCW) requires the City of Federal Way to adopt a comprehensi~e plan which includes a land use element, a housing element, a capital facilities plan element, a utilities element and a transportation element (the "Plan"); and WHEREAS, the Growth Management Act provides for the adoption of optional elements and the Plan contains the optional elements of economic development, "City Center Plan", and natural environment; and WHEREAS, thè Plan must be coordinated with and consistent with comprehensive plans adopted by King County and other cities which have common borders with Federal Way or which share related regional issues, pursuant to the Growth Management Act; and WHEREAS, Federal Way has cooperated with King County and other suburban cities in the development and adoption by King county and adoption by the suburban cities of the county-wide planning policies ("CWPP") and the Plan has been drafted consistent with the CWPPs; and WHEREAS, the Plan addresses all of the goals and ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 1 COpy """ requirements set forth in the Growth Management Act; and WHEREAS, the city of Federal Way, through its staff, Planning commission, committees, advisory workshops and City council has received, discussed and considered the testimony, written comments and material from the public and the Draft and Final Environmental Impact statements for the Plan prepared pursuant to the state Environmental Policy Act; and WHEREAS, the Plan constitutes an appropriate basis for the exercise of substantive SEPA authority by the City of Federal Way, pursuant to RCW 43.21C.060; and WHEREAS, the Plan was developed over four (4) years through discussion, debate and involvement with thousands of Federal Way citizens, which included the following elements: a. A September 16, 1992 open house featuring displays from all city departments and the various special service districts. b. An October 26, 1992 field trip to Burnaby and Vancouver, British Columbia to examine light rail and high density residential neighborhoods. c. A November 19, 1992 open house to review and evaluate three land use plan alternatives: slow growth, moderate growth focusing new growth in a redeveloped, higher density, mixed-use downtown and higher growth with an expanded office park/business park concept near West Campus and the 348th Street corridor. d. A January 11, 1992 open house in which the CityShape staff team presented three economic development alternatives. e. A March 10, 1993 open house which focused on the vision ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 2 for a City Center. f. A June 2,1993 short course for citizens in transportation planning in which city staff presented five different arterial improvement scenarios. g. A June 22, 1993 public forum on capital facilities planning with a focus on level of service options for streets and parks. h. A December 9, 1993 public forum on capital facilities planning with a focus on financing of services. i. Th~ publication of a draft environmental impact statement in November, 1993, evaluating the various growth, land use, city center, transportation, and capital facilities options. j. Planning Commission work sessions on various chapters of the Comprehensive Plan including Private utilities (March 2, 1994), Housing (March 9, 1994), Potential Annexation (March 16, 1994), Natural Systems (April 13, 1994), Economic Development (April 27, 1994), Land Use and City Center (June 1, 1994), Capital Facilities (August 3, 1994), and Transportation (September 7, 1994). k. A two day city Council retreat on the vision statement on February 24 and 25, 1995. 1. An April 18, 1995 public hearing on the expanded vision statement. WHEREAS, the Planning commission held public hearings on the Plan on July 12, 19 and 26, 1995, August 2, 8, 9, 16, 23 and 30, 1995, and September 6 and 13, 1995, following which, on September 27, 1995, it approved and recommended adoption of the ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 3 Plan; and WHEREAS, the Land Use and Transportation Committee of the Federal Way City Council conducted public hearings consisting of special meetings of the whole City Council on the Plan on October 9 and 10,1995 following which it recommended adoption of the Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires to adopt the Plan as required by the Growth Management Act of 1990, as amended, and also desires to adopt such Plan as the City's Plan required by Chapter 35A.63 RCW; ,NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FEDERAL WAY, WASHINGTON, DOES HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: section 1. Comprehensive Plan Adoction. The City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, a copy of which is on file with the Office of the City Clerk, which document is hereby incorporated by this reference as if set forth in full, is hereby adopted pursuant to the authority granted by Chapters 36.70A and 35A.63 RCW. section 2. Repeal. The interim Comprehensive Plan of the City of Federal Way as well as its associated elements, adopted pursuant to Resolution No. 90-17, is hereby repealed in its entirety. section 3. Pendinq Actions. Repeal of the interim Comprehensive Plan pursuant to section 2 of this ordinance shall have no effect on, nor shall it invalidate, any action or pending action taken with regard to such interim Comprehensive Plan prior to the effective date of this ordinance. ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 4 section 4. Severabilitv. The provisions of this ordinance are declared separate and severable. The invalidity of any clause, sentence, paragraph, subdivision, section, or portion of this ordinance or the invalidity of the application thereof to any person or circumstance, shall not affect the validity of the remainder of the ordinance, or the validity of its application to other persons or circumstances. section 5. Savinqs Clause. Resolution 90-17, which is repealed by this ordinance, shall remain in force and effect until the effective date of this ordinance. section 6. Ratification. Any act consistent with the authority and prior to the effective date of this ordinance is hereby ratified and affirmed. section 7. Effective Date. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force five (5) days from and after its passage, approval, and publication, as provided by law. this PASSED by the city council of the city of Federal Way 2/ day of NDV~ , 1995. CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ~~ &ftJ MAY R, Y E. GATES ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 5 ~R" .7//// r-~ " NDI K. LINDELL FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK: PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL: PUBLISHED: EFFECTIVE DATE: ORDINANCE NO. K:\ORDIN\COMPLAN.JJM 1112195 ORD # 95-248 , PAGE 6 l1--{)1-95 11-21-95 11-25-95 11-30-95 95-248 /4.� : �c(� ��e�e. ��5-;��� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � � .:�. t:� i ,, , - � ' �I l i � -_ - I ,' � i 'I�_ � �, � ; �� ; , i , ; --- From ViSio� �o Pla�y � . ��,�. November 1995 �, . , ��.�. ,�.: �c(�-na.r�e e.. ��5-,2��% :� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSI VE PLAN � ' ' �o Pian� Fr:o�.m .ViSio� � _ �r ��� November 1995 ;.�,�� Table of Contents CITY OF FEDERAL WAY Comprehensive Plan Draft November 1995 Chapter One Chapter Two Chapter Three Chapter Four Chapter Five Chapter Six Chapter Seven Chapter Eight Chapter Nine Chapter Ten Introduction Land Use Transportation Economic Development Housing Capital Facilities City Center Potential Annexation Areas Natural Environment Private Utilities Page I-1 II-1 III-1 IV-1 V-1 VI-1 VII-1 VIII-1 IX-1 X-1 , � � � � � � List of Tables Chapter Two - Land Use Table II-1 Maximum Commercial and Office Capacity Table II-2 Maximum Capacity of Residential Designations Table II-3 Maximum Residential Capacity of Non-Residential Designations Table II-4 Existing and Proposed Development Table II-5 Land Use Classifications Chapter Three - Transportation Table III-1 � Table III-2 Table III-3 � Table 111-4 Table III-5 � � Table III-6 Table III-7 Table III-8 Table III-9 Table III-10 � ' � � � ��i ' � Table III-11 Table III-12 Table III-13 Table III-14 Table III-15 Table III-16 Table III-17 Table III-18 Table III-19 Table III-20 Transportation Plan Chapter Subsection Key Service Providers Characteristics of Functional Classifications of Streets Typical Cross-Sections for Street Classifications Access Classification System Chapter 468.52 WAC (7-14-94) Level of Service and V/C Ratio Congested Roadway Conditions (PM Peak Hour) Major Street and Roadway Improvements TSM Strategies Applicable to Federal Way Intelligent Traveler Systems ITS Applications Federal Way Purposes of Walking and Biking Trips Non-Motorized User Problems and Solutions TIP Non-Motorized Improvements TDM Strategies Federal Way Mode Split Survey Results METRO Improvement Plan Projects in Federal Way Work Trips and Mode Split Estimates TIP HOV Improvements Federal Way Transportation Improvement Plan Transportation Improvement Plan Chapter Four - Economic Development Table IV-1 Summary of Development Potential in Southwest King County Cities Table IV-2 Economic Development Areas and Actions � Table IV-3 Development Zones: Description Table IV-4 Development Zones and Land Use Table IV-5 Development Zones and Land Use Chapter Five - Housing Table V-1 Annual Household Income by Household Size Table V-2 Affordable Housing for Retail and Service Employees Chapter Six - Capital Facilities Table VI-1 Summary of Existing Parks and Open Space Table VI-2 Parks & Recreation Needs - Year 2010 Table VI-3 Parks & Recreation Financing Plan Table VI-4 Surface Water Management - CIP Table VI-5 Summary of Existing Facilities Capacities Table VI-6 Federal Way School District Student Forecast Table VI-7 School Funding Plan Table VI-8 Lakehaven Utility District 1995-2004 Capital Improvements Projects Summary - Water Department Table VI-9 Lakehaven Utility District 1995-2004 Capital Improvements Projects Summary - Sewer Department Chapter Seven - City Center Table VII-1 Existing Land Use Development Chapter Ten - Private Utilities Table X-1 Table X-2 Sub-station Loads and Capacity Active Customer Count/Construction Costs � � Chapter Two - Land Use List of Maps � Map II-1 Map II-2 Generalized Existing Land Use Comprehensive Plan Designations Chapter Three - Transportation � Map III-1 Map III-2 � Map III-3 Map III-4 Map 111-5 � Map III-6 � � � Map III-7 Map III-8 Map III-9 Map III-10 Map III-11 Map III-12 Map III-13 Map III-14 Map III-15 Map III-16 Map III-17 Map III-18 Travel Patterns from Residential Areas in the Federal Way Planning Area Existing Significant Streets & Highways Signalized Intersections Average Weekday Traffic (1992) Functional Classification of Streets - Existing Designations Functional Classifications of Streets - Proposed Designations Federal Way Access Management Classification Congested Streets If No Improvements Congested Streets with Recommended Plan Improvements Recommended Major Street Improvements Inventory of Sidewalks on Major Streets Non-Motorized Facilities Plan Existing Transit Service Proposed Transit Service Helicopter Landing Areas Recommended Heliport Siting Areas Through - Truck Route Plan 1996 - 2010 TIP Locations Chapter Four - Economic Development Map IV-1 � � , � Southwest King County and North Pierce County Sub-Region Chapter Six - Capital Facilities Map VI-1 Map VI-2 Map VI-3 Map VI-4 Map VI-5 Major Parks & Open Space Parks Plan Planning Areas Hylebos & Lower Puget Sound Basins Surface Water Trunk Systems City of Federal Way Arterial Classifications � � � Map VI-6 Map VI-7 � Map VI-8 Map VI-9 Map VI-10 � Map VI-11 � � � � � �' � Chapter Seven - City Center Map VII-1 Map VII-2 Map VII-3 Map VII-4 Map VII-5 Map VII-6 Map VII-7 Map VII-8 Map VII-9 Map VII-10 Map VII-11 Chapter Eight - Potential Annexation Areas Map VIII-1 Map VIII-2 Map VIII-3 Map VIII-4 Map VIII-5 Map VIII-6 Map VIII-7 Map VIII-8 Map VIII-9 Map VIII-10 Federal Way School District #210 Lakehaven Service Area Location of Existing Water Facilities Lakehaven Service Area and Basins Location of Sewer System Components King County Fire District #39 Vicinity Map Boundaries of City Center Area The Concept Plan City Center Land Use Designations Enhanced Street Network Principle Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections Potential Transit Alignments and Stops Potential Open Space and Bicycle Routes Phasing Concept, 1995 - 2005 Phasing Concept, 2005 - 2015 Phasing Concept, 2015 - 2025 King County Fire District #39 Federal Way School District #210 Parks Plan Planning Areas Lakehaven Utility District Lakehaven Service Area & Basins Hylebos & Lower Puget Sound Basins City Federal Way Arterial Classifications 25 Foot Contours Advisory Committee Recommendation Potential Annexation Area Boundary ! Chapter Nine - Natural Environment � Map IX-1 Map IX-2 Map IX-3 Map IX-4 Areas Susceptible to Ground Water Contamination Surface Water Resources Geologic Hazards Priority Habitats & Species � I' Chapter Ten - Public Utilities � � � Map X-1 Map X-2 Map X-3 Map X-4 � Map X-5 Map X-6 +� l_J � � �� � � Council Approved PAA Boundary Washington Natural Gas Supply Mains System Pressure on a Very Cold Day (10 Degrees Fahrenheit) Proposed Improvements Existing and Proposed Improvements to the Sub- Transmission System Cable Service by Viacom & TCI � � � � � � � � � � � �� _ Chapter Two - Land Use Figure II-1 List of Figures The Concept Plan Chapter Three - Transportation Figure III-1 Figure III-2 Figure III-3 Figure III-4 Figure III-5 Figure III-6 Figure III-7 Figure III-8 Figure III-9 Figure III-10 Figure III-11 Figure III-12 Figure III-13 Figure III-14 Chapter Five - Housing Hi.storical Transportation Infrastructure Current Multimodal Transportation Systems Cross Section A Cross Section B Cross Section C Cross Section D Cross Section E Cross Section F Cross Section G Cross Section H Cross Section I Cross Section J Cross Section K Land Use Intensity vs. Transit Demand Figure V-1 Federal Way Age Distribution by Population in 1990 Figure V-2 Federal's Way Income Groups Figure V-3 Federal Way's Housing Stock Figure V-4 Projected Households vs. Historic Housing Growth Chapter Seven - City Center Figure VII-1 Aerial View of City Center Figure VII-2 Potential Core Area Development Figure VII-3 Potential Frame Area Development Figure VII-4 Potential Redevelopment of Surface Parking Areas Figure VII-5 Street Cross Sections for Completing the City Center Road Network Figure VII-6 Illustration of City Center, 1995 Conditions Figure VII-7 Illustration of City Center Evolution, 2005 Figure VII-8 Illustration of City Center Evolution, 2015 Figure Vtl-9 Illustration of City Center Evolution, 2025 LJ 1 Chapter Ten - Private Utilities 1 Figure X-1 Typical Washington Natural Gas Distribution System Figure X-2 Electricity Supply from Source to Customer � Figure X-3 Cable - Source to Customer � � � � � � � List of Charts Chapter Two - Land Use Chart II-1 Percent Gross Land Area (Based on Current Zoning) Chart II-2 Percent Gross Land Area (By Comp Plan Use Designation) Chart II-3 Population Projection Introduction �- _-1- _ _ -� ��� --- ��_�� � _ - - -- _ _ _ 1---- ;--- r . _ �' � ) i � _ ------ � -- - -�; � - � - �-- - , \ � ---- --� C � a►. 0 .�.. � 0 .�. �� � `� � � �� V� � � � � � LJ � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Introduction 1.0 INTRODUCTION t age five, the City of Federal Way is proud to adopt its second Comprehensive Plan. This Plan lays out a vision for the future of Federal Way during the coming 20 years. The Plan retains Federal Way's commitment to maintain the residential chazacter of a large portion of the City, focusing higher density residential and retail growth along the Pacific Highway South corridor. This Comprehensive Plan also responds to the requirements of the Growth Management Act (GMA) of 1990 and amendments of 1991. The Plan carries out Vision 2020, the Puget Sound region's multiple urban growth centers concept, and K1NG County's Countywide Planning Policies, which also call for multiple urban centers and a strong urban growth boundary. This chapter gives an overview of the comprehensive planning effort, profiles Federal Way's past and present, and concludes with a discussion of Federal Way's vision for its future. This plan does not contain a glossary of terms. However, as time permits, the City may provide a glossary as an addendum to this Plan. 1.1 THE COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING EFFORT � Why Plan? � � � � � �� V Federal Way plans for people. People need a safe and secure place to live, an economy that provides jobs, a transportation system that allows them to get around, schools, colleges, and recreational opportunities. It is the city government's responsibility to provide public services and facilities, develop policies, and adopt regulations to guide the growth of a city that meets the needs of its people. From incorporation to the present, the guide for Federal Way's growth and development has been the Comprehensive Plan. What Is a Comprehensive Plan? The role of the Ciry of Federal Way's Comprehensive Plan is to state clearly our community's vision for its future, and to articulate a plan for accomplishing this vision over the next 20 yeazs. The Plan seeks to answer a number of questions: ■ What areas are most suitable for development or redevelopment? ■ What areas should be preserved in their natural state? ■ Where should growth occur? ■ How can we manage that growth to realize our vision for the community? ■ How should we address traffic congestion? ■ How many parks do we need, of what size, kind, and where? ■ How can we encourage preservation of our historic resources? ■ How can we ensure an adequate supply of affordable housing for all income levels? ■ What utilities and public services will we need? ■ How will the community pay for all of these things? Each of the Plan's chapters addresses these questions and more in the azeas of transportation, land use, historic preservation, economic development, capital facilities, utilities, and housing. The answers form the policies , which guide implementation of our community vision. The policy statements within each chapter aze used to guide new or revised zoning and other regulations. The Plan also sets a clear framework for where the community will need to spend money on capital facilities, how much, and identifies available funding sources. As a whole, this Comprehensive Plan offers a flexible framework for Federal Way's future, allowing for adaptation to real conditions over time. Why Revise Our Plan? This document represents the first complete Comprehensive Plan for Federal Way. The first plan, prepared in 1990, was an interim plan for the purposes of incorporation. When the interim plan was produced, the Ciry was approximately 19.9 squaze miles and had a population of 67,554 persons. Today, the Ciry's land area has increased to 21.2 square miles, the City's i-i population has grown to an estimated 74,290. This rapid growth and change in the chazacter of the City has naturally provided impetus to revise and update the Comprehensive Plan. This new Comprehensive Plan, and the code amendments which will follow it, reflect the unique characteristics of our community and more than three years of public input on Federal Way's vision for its future. Requirements of the Growth Management Act The Crrowth Management Act (GMA, RCW 36.70A. 140), was passed by the Washington State Legislature in 1990, with amendments added in 1991. The Legislature passed the GMA in recognition of the rate of growth which was occurring throughout the State, particulazly on the west side of the Cascades. The Legislature was responding not only to the rate of growth, but also to the type and location of growth. Two-thirds of the State's population and household growth in the 1980's took place in unincorporated areas, and produced sprawling subdivisions, commercial strips, and urbanization of land, which only ten years before, was rural. This rapid growth pattern resulted in increased traffic congestion and inadequate public services, and have threatened forest land, agricultural land, and environmentally sensitive areas such as wetlands. These impacts have been felt in Federal Way, just as they have been felt in other parts of the State. The GMA requires that each jurisdiction produce a comprehensive plan which contains, at a minimum, elements pertaining to land use, transportation, capital facilities, housing, and private utilities. These elements must be consistent with one another. Jurisdictions also are required to adopt policies and regulations protecting resource lands and critical areas, such as agricultural land, wetlands, and hillsides. Each jurisdiction must coordinate its plan with the plans from surrounding jurisdictions. The Act also requires that each city designate an urban growth boundary, or potential annexation area as they aze called in King County. The potential annexation azea defines the area within which the city anticipates it could provide the full range of urban services at some time in the future. It also represents the azea within which the ciry will consider annexations and the boundary beyond which it will not annex. Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - Introduction Perhaps what most distinguishes the GMA from previous planning statutes is the requirement that public services must be available or funded at some designated level of service before development may occur. If a jurisdiction cannot provide services to an area, then it may not permit development in that area. The 1991 amendments to the GMA require all counties planning under the act to adopt countywide planning policies. The jurisdictions in King County formed a group called the Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC) composed of elected officials from the King County Council, City of Seattle, and suburban cities. The mission of the GMPC was to draft the Countywide Planning Policies for King Counry. These policies were adopted in 1992 and aze binding on the jurisdictions in the County. In 1994, amendments to the Countywide Planning Policies were proposed by the GMPC. These amendments were subsequently adopted by King County and aze binding on all jurisdictions in the Counry, although it should be noted that Federal Way voted not to ratify. The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan has been prepared according to the provisions of the GMA and the Countywide Planning Policies. However, Federal Way's plan also contains many components which aze not referenced in the GMA; these additional components aze included in the plan due to their importance to the Federal Way community. Although Federal Way's goals and policies for growth and the provision of services are guided by GMA requirements, and are based in part upon State and regional goals, they primarily reflect the vision and goals of our own citizens. � � � � L� � � � � � � How Was the Plan Develo ed? � P The ideas in this Plan were developed over four years through discussioq debate, and the creative thinking of thousands of Federal Way citizens, working with City staff and elected officials. Consistent with the GMA, the City of Federal Way provided early and continuous opportunities for citizens to participate in CityShape. CityShape is the name given to the City's compre- hensive planning project. CiryShape is the process that was used to develop this Comprehensive Plan and is also the name of the Plan itself. I-2 � L� � � � � � � � i � � � � � �l �I � LJ r � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Introduction CityShape, the process, started in the Fall of 1992 with a series of open houses and field trips. The first open house was held on September 16, and featured displays from all Ciry departments and the various special service districts. The event had two objectives. The first was to explain to citizens how urban services are delivered, how much those services cost, and how citizens could be involved in the development of the Ciry's new Plan. The second objective was to have people describe their likes and dislikes about the City as it existed in 1992 and shaze their thoughts about what the City ought to look like in 20 years. The second major CityShape event occurred on October 26, 1992. The event was a field trip to Burnaby and Vancouver, British Columbia, to look at one possible future for Federal Way. The Vancouver azea has a light rail system called Sky Train and Burnaby has a high density suburban shopping mall 20 miles southeast of downtown Vancouver. The City took 70 members of its various Boards and Commissions to look at how light rail works; how land use is influenced by rail and vice versa; what a redeveloped, mixed use, high intensity shopping mall looks like; and how attractive higher density residential neighborhoods can look, given specific development guidelines. On November 19, 1992, the City conducted a second open house. This time the objective was to review and evaluate three land use plan altematives. The first altemative was a slow growth concept with a land use pattern that was fairly similar to what currently exists in the City. The second was a moderate growth concept that focused the majority of new growth in a redeveloped, higher densiry, mixed use downtown. The third alternative was a higher growth scenario which included the downtown concept of alterative two, but also envisioned an expanded office pazk/business pazk concept in the viciniry of West Campus and the 348th Street corridor. Those present seemed to favor a hybrid with chazacteristics of alternatives two and three. Economic development and growth was the topic of the third open house held January 21, 1993. The CiryShape staff team presented three economic development altematives with low, medium, and higher growth concepts. Participants expressed support for a medium to high growth scenario which diversified the economic base in Federal Way and gave the community about as many jobs as there are projected households in the year 2012. The next open house was held on March 10, 1993, and focused on the vision for a City Center. Attendees completed two exercises. The first was to evaluate three alternative orientations for a downtown: easdwest along 320th Street, north-south in the vicinity of 20th Avenue, and along a diagonal from Steel Lake Park to 320th and Highway 99. The second exercise was to use building blocks to accommodate projected growth in the downtown. The higher the density, the smaller the area for downtown. The lower the density, the more spread out the downtown. Participants concluded that a lrigher densiry, pedestrian-friendly downtown oriented north/south from the center of SeaTac Mall made good sense and accommodated a lugh capacity transit system in fine fashion. On June 2, 1993, the City gave interested citizens a short course in transportation planning. The presentation identified the congested street corridors as they were in 1992 and projected how and where congestion would increase by 2012, given the impacts of growth. Staff also presented five different arterial improvement alternatives which would either maintain or reduce congestion by 2012, together with some estimate of the effectiveness of particular arterial improvements for resolving transportation problems in the communiry. The participants concluded that the maximum construction option called "super widening" was not appropriate or even feasible. They did, however, favor a more modest list of arterial improvements, including a "diagonal parkway" along the BPA power line, which generally maintained the 19921eve1 of service. The last two public forums dealt with capital facilities planning. The first of these was held June 22, 1993. At this session, staff gave participants level of service opdons for streets and parks, provided cost estimates associated with each level of service, and asked participants working in groups to agree on the level of service they wanted for streets and pazks based on their willingness to pay for service. With a high level of consensus, participants were willing to pay for a parks level of service of 10.5 acres per thousand population. Given the cost for streets, the desired level of service was to lower the standard about 60 percent from the 19931eve1. The second capital facilities public forum was held December 9, 1993, and focused on how to pay for services. At this forum, each work group was given a work sheet that described total capital costs for parks and streets, and data describing the revenue sources I-3 available to cities and how much revenue each source could potentially generate. The objective was to develop a fmancing package, including recommended taxing levels, which would pay for the desired street and park system. There was a lot of disagreement, but voter- approved bond issues, impact fees, and to a lesser extent, utiliry taxes received some support as the prefened revenue sources. On the other hand, there was near total agreement that there should be no business and occupation tax in Federal Way. In November, 1993, the Ciry published a draft environmental impact statement that evaluated the various growth, land use, Ciry Center, transportation, and capital facilities options. In addition, the staff- consulting team began writing the various chapters of the Comprehensive Plan, consistent with the direction which emerged from the field trips, open houses, and public meetings. Eazly in 1994, the City's Planning Commission began holding work sessions, to which the public was invited, to review each of the chapters as they were written and provide comments and feedback as appropriate. The Commission started with the Private Utilities chapter on Mazch 2, followed by Housing (3-9- 94), Potential Annexation (3-16-94), Natural Systems (4-13-94), Economic Development (4-27-94), Land Use and Ciry Center (6-1-94), Capital Facilities (8-3-94), and ended with the Transportation Chapter on September 7, 1994. In Fall 1994, staff was ready to began assimilating the individual chapters to create an integrated Comprehensive Plan. As part of that process, staff concluded it was again time to touch base with the City Council to ensure the Plan was on target with their expectations. To facilitate the discussion, staffprepazed a two page vision statement that summarized the Plan. The City Council reviewed the vision statement at a retreat on February 24 and 25, 1995, and indicated it was on target. The vision statement was subsequently expanded to a 20 page executive summary of the Plan, including general policy direction. On April 18, 1995, the City Council conducted a public hearing on the expanded vision statement and, based in part on the testimony, proposed some amendments to it. On May 2, the City Council formally reviewed the expanded vision statement and directed staff to complete the Comprehensive Plan as soon as possible. Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - Introduction To this point, the narrative has focused on the formal public participation process. Concurrently, there were a series of ineetings to which staff was invited to talk about the future of Federal Way, vision, land use planning in general, and the Comprehensive Plan more specifically. There were hundreds of these meetings over the course of two yeazs. They included slide shows, small discussion groups, meetings with neighborhood associations, the Chamber of Commerce's monthly luncheon and its subcommittees, real estate brokers, property owners, elementary and high school classrooms, displays at the mall, civic organizations, and many others. The result was broad based interest and participation in the development of the City's new Comprehensive Plan. At the time the Plan was released, the mailing list contained over 700 names, all of whom were notified that the Hearing Draft Comprehensive Plan was available for public review and comment. The Hearing Draft of the Comprehensive Plan was completed and released for public review on July Sth, 1995. Organization of The Plan While we cannot predict the future, we can attempt to shape the type of community in which we live, work and play. The Comprehensive Plan will function as the City's statement of how it will meet the challenges posed by growth in the next century. The heart of the Plan is the nine individual elements which outline goals and policies. The Plan includes five elements which are mandated by the Growth Management Act: land use, transportation, capital facilities, housing, and private utilities. It also includes four elements which the GMA does not mandate, but that are very appropriate. The first is an economic development element that is not only recommended by the Countywide Planning Policies, but also recognizes Federal Way's position as a major employer in South King County. The second is an annexation element as has been discussed eazlier in this chapter. The third is a chapter which describes the City's commitment to the preservation of the physical environment and the policy direction to make it happen. Finally, the Plan includes a subarea plan for the City Center which reflects the City's vision for the future and helps to implement the regional vision for a hierarchy of urban centers in the Puget Sound. I-4 � � � � � � t J� � � � � � �� � � � � � I� U �J ' � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plen - Introduction Each of these elements has been coordinated with the others, resulting in a Plan which is internally consistent. Each of the goals in the Plan, while expressing a specific policy directioq also functions as part of a coordinated expression of the City's vision for the future. Plan implementation is the next step and is discussed in the final section of this chapter. 1.2 FEDERAL WAY'S COMMUNITY PROFILE: PAST AND PRESENT Planning for the future requires a good understanding of how our community has grown and changed in the past. The following discussion provides that backdrop as a context for subsequent chapters. The eazliest recorded accounts of the Federal Way area tell of Native American families who resided in the area of the Muckleshoot Reservation on the east side of the Green River Valley and traveled west to the shores of Puget Sound for the plentiful fisheries resources. Generations of Muckleshoot Indians wore a westwazd trail across the heavily forested plateau to the area which is now Saltwater State Pazk. The arrival of the white man in the nineteenth century resulted in a steady decline in the Indian population and by 1890, neazly the entire population had disappeazed from the area. Isolated on a triangular shaped plateau rising steeply from the Puget Sound, the Federal Way area had little waterfront access or roadways and accordingly, was sparingly developed compared to Tacoma and Seattle. As late as the turn of the century, the original settlers at Dash Point and Dumas Bay had to row to Tacoma for supplies and mail. Old Military Road, extending north from Fort Steilacoom, past Staz Lake to Seattle and Fort Lawton was the first road through the area, constructed azound 1856. Over time, narrow dirt roads were added to provide east/west access and by 1900, a road was constructed between Star Lake and Redondo. The second cross road, the "Seattle Road," connected old Military Road and Kent. The Seattle-Tacoma Interurban Line, completed in 1901, provided a fast and easy way to reach these urban cities. Improved access brought many visitors to the area and Star Lake became a popular summer recreation site. By the 1920's, Federal Highway 99, the interstate which linked the western states from north to south, was � complete. At this time, Federal Way was still primarily forest and farmland. Fred Hoyt had a cabin on Dumas Bay and started a road to Tacoma (still called Hoyt Road). The timber companies, which had a major logging operation going, built an early railroad line and were instrumental in getting Marine View Highway (now Dash Point Road) built in the early 1920's. This roadway spurred development along the coastline. Soon thereafter, Peasley Canyon Road was built to connect Military Road with the Auburn Valley. This road later became known as South 320th Street. In these early days, roadways set the stage for development in the area and are the same ones that play an important role in the Ciry today. By the start of World Waz II, a number of small, thriving communities made up the area that is now Federal Way. Some communities were clustered around lakes, such as Steel Lake, Star Lake, and Lake Geneva. Others were sited to take advantage of the view of Puget Sound, like Adelaide and Buenna. As each of these communities grew, residents built small schoolhouses for their children. By the late 1940's, King County consolidated the many individual red schoolhouses into the Federal Way School District, from which the City gets its name. During this same period, a library was built along the edge of Highway 99, and between 308th Street and 320th Street, a small "downtown" developed with a general store, lumber yard, realty office, beauty parlor, feed store, and gas station. By the end of the 1950's, the ten blocks between 308th and 320th Streets became the first roadside commercial district. One of the more unique developments was Santa Faire, a family oriented theme park. New shopping azeas were added azound the pazk, helping to create a`community focus' for the residents of the area. As this commercial azea developed, the rest of Federal Way was changing as well. The Boeing Company expanded their operations in Renton and the Kent Valley and began advertising nationally for engineers. Those engineers in tum began roaming the wooded acreage in Federal Way in search of housing. One of the eazliest residential developments was Marine Hills, built in 1958 overlooking Puget Sound. Weyerhaeuser, one of the eazly timber companies, had large land holdings in the azea and began to develop their land into high quality housing with amenities like golf courses. I-5 Weyerhaeuser's development company also began developing commercial property, creating the West Campus business park. The plan was to integrate offices and businesses with lush landscaping. Though initially the corporate office market was not strong, West Campus has grown almost to capacity, providing space for many civic buildings such as City Hall, the police station, the area's major health care centers, and higher density housing. Another major landmark in the area is Sea-Tac Mall, built in the mid-1970's on what was farmland south of 320th Street. The Mall is one of the lazgest in South King County and is the anchor for retail development in the area. The Mall was a result of population growth in the region and its location was determined by the 320th Street intersection with Interstate 5. The Interstate supplanted Highway 99 as the main artery for commuter traffic in the County. By the mid 1980s, South King County was growing quickly. Retail growth occurred along Highway 99, especially at the 320th Street intersection. Road and office space were developed to accommodate the increased growth. Residential growth was also prominent following plans developed by King County, with a large number of apartment homes. The changes to the community, with increased housing and traffic, created a movement for greater self deternunation. In 1989, the citizens of this area voted for incorporation and the City of Federal Way was born. Federal Way's Future Vision Federal Way's challenge for the future is to protect what the communiry believes is most important, while meeting the State's growth management goals. The following pazagraphs describe what Federal Way will look like in the yeaz 2012, and beyond, if it balances these growth management mandates with the needs and desires of Federal Way citizens. Federal Way is a great place to live, work, and play because of its: Government For and By the People: All governmental entities reflect the can-ilo attitude of Federal Way citizens and partner with them to provide quality services, often through volunteerism. Governmental entities reflect the community's values of diversity, Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Introduction innovation, and participation. Together, the communiry and its neighborhoods have built a sense of identity and ownerslup for Federal Way and its future. Fiscally conservative, innovative fmancial and management (contracting model) strategies, along with economic growth, have allowed the community to enjoy a moderate tax rate, with bond issues approved to support major projects. The community vision has maintained a focus and continuity for staff and fiscai resources on the defined vision. Responsible Growth: The community realized that some level of growth in all segments of the community (economic, populadon, housing, etc.) was inevitable, and chose to channel that growth into very specific development goals. The overall chazacter of the community has remained much as it was 20 years ago. Infrastructure has been developed concurrently with growth, preserving the community's quality of life. Development goals have fostered the preservation of a primarily residential community and open natural areas with concentrated urban development in the Ciry's Center. An increase in the number of corporate headquarters, some annexation, and build out of available single family sites, at competitive prices, has accommodated modest population growth. Some new multifamily development is concentrated in the City Center/99 corridor azea, primarily through downtown condominiums. This pedestrian friendly, multi-use City Center, with multi-story and underground parking facilities works well for many. Most Federal Way citizens enjoy the pedestrian plazas of the City Center. Statewide planning goal #6 states that, "Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions." The City supports the preservation of private property rights, however, property rights must be balanced with the health, safety and general welfaze of the community. Economic Vitaliry: Strategically located in the Pac�c Rim, between SeaTac Airport and the Port of Tacoma, Federal Way provides jobs as an international and regional retail and employment center. As an"edge city," Federal Way is also home to several corporate headquarters located in and around the Weyerhaeuser campus. Companies choose Federal Way for its sense of neighborhood identiry, mix of housing stock, proximiry to natural resources (mountains, oceans, and waterways), i � � � � � � M � � � , � � ' � � � , �L_J ' L� � � � � � � C� � , , � �i � ' � � Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Introduction and safety. The growth in the corporate headquarters segment of the economy has netted economic spinoffs for Federal Way's small business communiry, as small business provides support services for the corporate park companies. Growth in the small business economy has generated some redevelopment of previously lazge retail warehouse facilities to accommodate office, retail, and light manufacturing. Qualiry jobs have boosted disposable income, supporting expansion of Federal Way's retail and commercial sectors. The resulting enhancements to the community's t� base have helped to support a high quality of community life. Ef,�'icient Traffic System: Federal Way's transportation system links neighborhoods with the City Center, and Federal Way with other communities in the Puget Sound region. Concentrated economic growth in the corporate campus and City Center have allowed mass transit to connect Federal Way's economic core with the economic and leisure hubs of Puget Sound communities. Concentrated growth has allowed the community to maintain the infrastructure in outlying areas, focusing new infrastructure in the City's Center. Youth have found the transportation system easy and safe to use in getting to school. Safety, Infrastructure, and Utilities: This issue has been addressed at the neighborhood level, where community- based policing philosophies and citizen efforts to create a sense of neighborhood with real and perceived safety are most effective. A professional and compassionate law enforcement force communicates clearly with the communiry's diverse populations and business communiry, providing a visible communiry presence, as well as acceptable emergency call response times. Ixnprovements in safety have been a cornerstone for the communiry's economic and residential growth. The utiliry and fire districts share this communiry vision and have targeted their efforts and resources to continue to provide effective and efficient delivery of water, sewer, telephone, television, power, and fire services. Increased coordination between these districts and the City, and these districts and their regional counterparts, have ensured adequate service expansion to make the community's development vision a realiry. Caring for Our Own: Governmental and social service agencies work in concert to provide a caring and safe environment for all Federal Way citizens. Ever- improving educational institutions, public and private, serve all interests and ages throughout the community. Neighborhoods have joined with the schools in their area to improve student achievement, school facilities, and resources. Strong educational institutions and the leadership of the Federal Way School District and Highline Communiry College have contributed to the community's economic growth, providing a trained work force and qualiry education for the families of employers who locate here. The Ciry has been the catalyst for creating a one-stop shopping center for human services, with progratns at all levels of government requiring greater participation from clients in improving their individual situations. Quality Culture, Environment, and Play: Parks, trails, sports, and cultural arts facilities cater to the active lifestyle of Federal Way citizens. By partnering with the Federal Way School District and other agencies, the community has developed a long range plan for facilities, parks, and services which is yielding more and better facilities and joint facility utilization than any one agency could provide alone. A performing and cultural arts center has been built, although it will require operating subsidies for its first eight yeazs. The Federal Way area is blessed with a bounty of natural beaury and scenery. This bounty includes dramatic vistas of Mt. Rainier; numerous lakes, streams, and wetlands; the pastoral setting in the Spring Valley area; and views of Puget Sound and Vashon Island from the saltwater ridge. The City is committed to preserving this vast natural resource for the citizens and future citizens of Federal Way. Regional Player: Finally, Federal Way institutions and citizens aze regional partners and participants in the economic, political, and cultural life of Puget Sound. This participation has yielded funding opportunities for community facilities, including housing and human services. Other regional efforts have safeguarded the community against outside impacts that detract from our community's quality of life. Regional participation has crossed the seas with sister city relationships wluch aze supported by Federal Way citizens. These relationships have had significant cultural, educational, and economic benefits for the communiry. This vision will not be easily achieved. It will require dif�icult choices. In order to grow gracefully, and remain a healthy and desirable community, tomorrow's higher densiry growth areas must be accompanied by improved amenities for urban life. More resources will be required to maintain the high quality of life we currently enjoy, thanks to our pazks, streets, and other public services. A ia combined effort of the public sector, neighborhood groups, businesses, schools, and individual citizens will be required. The early and continuing cooperation and collaboration of these groups in this process will ensure this vision will be realized. Getting to the Future from the Present This Plan is intended to manage growth and change in Federal Way over the next 20 years. The future described in the Plan cannot be achieved all at once. Over the life of the Plan, growth will likely occur more slowly at times, more rapidly at others, and in somewhat different patterns and sequences than is currently foreseen. The best a Plan can be is a well-educated guess about how to accommodate people and conditions that cannot be Irnown in advance. An effective Plan must be flexible enough to succeed within a range of likely conditions and can be adjusted as those conditions are monitored and evaluated, while maintaining a steady aim at its ultimate goals. How Will The Plan Be Implemented? Adopting a Comprehensive Plan is the first step toward realizing the City's vision. The vision is achieved when the Plan is implemented. Federal Way's implementation program is comprised of a combination of short-term and long-term actions. Some of the short-term actions include amendment of the City's zoning code and approval of rezones that match the Plan's land use designations. Other actions include the annual update of the City's six yeaz Capital Improvement Program which describes the street, pazk, and surface water utility projects the City intends to build. There aze also long- term actions including subarea planning, monitoring, evaluating, and amending the Plan as conditions change; and developing a capital investment program that allocates resources to projects that will spur the City's development in the direction envisioned in the Plan. Subarea Plans: Will follow the adoption of the Plan and will produce amendments that tailor the Plan's citywide perspective to individual areas, whether they aze neighborhood retail nodes, light manufacturing areas, or even the Ciry Center. Subazea plans are expected to continue to aid in adjusting and fine-tuning the Plan over time. Federai Way Comprehensiva Plan - Introduction Coordination with Other Jurisdictions: Is occurring through the regional planning processes. Federal Way representatives have participated with King Counry, other cities, and the Puget Sound Regional Council in numerous discussions. Some issue have been addressed and others have been identified for additional discussion. Undoubtably, continued regional planning fonuns will need to be created to meet the Growth Management Act's challenge for regional action towazd creating, implementing, and funding a shared vision for the greater Puget Sound region. Regulatory Provisions: To implement the Plan will include retaining, modifying, and/or replacing existing regulations, and/or drafting new regulations consistent with the policies and goals of the Plan. A Strategic Investment Strategy: Will describe a framework for making resource allocation decisions in an environment where wants and needs always exceed the finite resources available. Tradeoffs among many possible investment choices will be made to achieve the Plan's goals. The framework will add dimension to the Plan's goals by enabling them to be addressed over time. Human Services, Public Safety, and Environmental Planning: Will continue to build upon the foundation established by the Plan. Much of the Comprehensive Plan, as developed to fulfill the Growth Management Act, addresses physical development and its related regulatory and fiscal support. Federal Way works with other levels of govemment, non-profit providers, and citizens groups to support an array of activities and services that contribute to the quality of life of Federal Way's citizens. These include public safery, health, cultural, educational and environmental activities, and human services. To ensure that the interrelationships of all aspects of urban life are addressed, planning will be undertaken by the City in a way that is supportive of and coordinated with the Plan. Monitoring and Evaluation: Will be done periodically to assess progress toward achieving Comprehensive Plan goals as well as to measure the conditions and changes occurring within the City. Monitoring and evaluation will help ensure consistency within and among the Plan elements, as well as with the Growth Management Act and County and regional growth plans. Monitoring and evaluation will lead to both Plan amendments and improved ability to project future conditions. �-s � � ' � � � � � � � � � ' � � � , � � LJ ' � u � � � L�J LJ � � � � � �� �' , ' � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Introduction Citizen participation in City processes will build upon the dialogue between government and citizens that began with the development and adoption of the Plan. The City will strive to find improved means to communicate with, and involve citizens in planning and decision-making. The City will strive to provide information that can be easily understood and to provide access for public involvement. Tlus will include processes for making amendments to and implementing the Plan. Appiication of the Plan The principle purpose of the Comprehensive Plan is to provide policies that guide the development of the City in the context of regional growth management. These policies can be looked to by citizens and all levels of government in planning for the future of Federal Way. The Plan format generally presents a discussion about an issue followed by a goal, and some policies related to that goal. Goals describe what the City hopes to realize over time, and are not mandates or guarantees. Policies describe actions that will need to be taken if the City is to realize its goals. Policies should be read as if preceded by the words, "It is the City's general policy to..." A policy helps guide the creation or change of specific rules or strategies (such as development regulations, budgets, or program area plans). City officials will generally make decisions on specific Ciry actions by following ordinances, resolutions, budgets, or program area plans that themselves reflect relevant Plan policies, rather than by referring directly to this Plan. Implementation of most policies involves a range of City actions over time, so one cannot simply ask whether a specific action or project would fulfill a pazticular Plan policy. For example, a policy that the City will "give priority to" a particular need indicates that need will be treated as important, not that it will take precedence in every Ciry decision. Some policies use the words "shall" or "should", "ensure" or "encourage", and so forth. In general, such words should be read to describe the relative degree of emphasis that the policy imparts, but not necessarily to establish specific legal duty to perform a particular act, to undertake a program or project, or to achieve a specific result. Whether such a result is intended must be determined by reading the policy as a whole, and by examining the context of other related policies in the Plan. Some policies may appear to conflict, particularly in the context of a specific fact situation or viewed from the different perspectives of persons whose interests may conflict on a given issue. A classic example is the oft- references "conflict" between policies calling for "preservation of the environment" and policies that "promote economic development." Because Plan policies do not exist in isolation, and must be viewed in the context of all potentially relevant policies, it is lazgely in the application of those policies that the interests which they embody are reconciled and balanced by the Legislative and Executive branches of City govemment. Before this Plan was adopted, the City of Federal Way had many policies in place which were approved over the course of many yeazs, and which affect the full range of programs and services provided by the City. To the extent a conflict may arise between such a policy and this Plan, the Plan will generally prevail, except that policies that aze used in the application of existing development regulations shall continue to be used until those regulations are made consistent with the plan pursuant to RCW 36.70A. 040. Discussion is provided to explain the context in which decisions on goals and policies have been made, the reasons for those decisions, and how the goals and policies are related. The discussion portions of the Plan do not establish or modify policies, but they may help to interpret policies. Appendices to the Plan contain certain required maps, inventories, and other information required by the GMA, and in some cases further data, discussion, and analysis. The appendices are not to be read as establishing or modifying policies or requirements, unless specified for such purposes in the Plan policies. For example, descriptions of current programs in an appendix do not require that the same program be continued, and detailed estimates of how the City may expect to achieve certain goals do not establish additional goals or requirements. Acknowiedgments The City Council and staff thank the hundreds of citizens who have made the CityShape project a success. We look forward to working with you over the next 20 years to make your vision Federal Way's future. � I-9 r m � a � N � �� � � i j � ��; -- I I '' � � i i , r --� \� , � ,� � � � i' � From V�S�o� to Pian � 0 Faderal Way Comprshanaive Pian - Land Use 2.0 INTRODUCTION � hrough the CiryShape and Vision process, the community produced a general concept of what the Ciry should look like and function like in the , future. This general concept was used to form the basis of the Land Use chapter. The Land Use chapter serves as the foundation of the Comprehensive Plan by providing , a framework for Federal Way's future development, and by setting forth policy direction for Federal Way's current and future land uses. ' i � � � Development of land, according to adopted policies and land use designations discussed in this chapter, should result in an appropriate balance of services, employ- ment, and housing. The land use policies are supple- mented by a land use designation map that provides a visual illustration of the proposed physical distribution and location of various land uses. The Land Use map allocates a supply of land for such uses as services, employment, parks, open space, and housing to meet future demand. 2.1 THE LAND USE CONCEPT , Federal Way's existing land use pattern (the physical location of uses) exists as a result of development administered by King County until 1990. Presently, over , 54.91 percent of Federal Way's gross land area allows for single family development, 8.17 percent for multiple family development, and 16.49 percent for office, retail, � and manufacturing uses (see Chart II-1). The Compre- hensive Plan will not substantially modify the City's existing land use pattem. , � , i , What will change is how various pieces of the land use pattem interact to achieve common land use goals. Figure II-1 depicts the land use concept. The land use concept should result in the following: ■ Transformation of the retail core into an intensely developed City Center that is the focus of civic activity which provides a sustainable balance of jobs and housing; ■ Preservation and enhancement of existing residential neighborhoods; Chart //-7 PERCENT GROSS LAND AREA BASED ON CURRENT 20NING OTHEF OPEN SPACE (0.8 PARKS (6.4096) MULTI-FAMILY (8.1796) n,_ . R�a� �s.a�%� SINGLE FAMILY (54.91%) MANUFA�C. (6.2096) OFFICE (3.98%) ■ Creation of a network of parks and open space areas; ■ Diversification of the City's employment base by creating distinct employment azeas; ■ Promotion of new opportunities for residential development neaz transit centers; ■ Provision of community and commercial services to residential communities; ■ To the extent practicable, preservation of environmentally sensitive areas; ■ Promotion of convenient residentially scaled shopping for residential neighborhoods; ■ Promotion of housing in the City's commercial azeas close to shopping and employment; ■ Promotion of redevelopment of "strip commercial" areas along major arterials into attractive, mixed-use corridors served by auto and transit; ■ Promotion of the development of well designed commercial and office developments; and ■ Accommodation of Puget Sound Regional Council growth projections within the proposed land use plan area. � n-� Concentrate new developmeet in the Highway 99/1-5 cotridor. Develop infnstructure to support corridor development Trensfortn retaii core into a new � mixed-use C'ity Center. � Preserve and enhance existing single- family neighborhoods. Create a network of parks and open space corridors. L Diversify employment base by � creating distind employment areas �\ � \ �� Geate new intensive residentiaf communities supported by transi� Provide communitv and rnmmercial services to residential oommunities. ive :\ � Figure ll-1. The Concept Plan CITY ❑� FEDERAL WAY C❑MPREHENSIVE PLAN • L.I GENE�A�IZ�I� EXI�'I'IN� I,AI�T� USE LAND USE ELEMENT LE�END —b—�—�—�—y FEDERAL WAY GITY LIMITS SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL MULTI—FAMILY RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTIQNAL [ �FFICE RETAIL / SERVICE INDUSTRIAL PARKS / RECREATI❑N ❑PEN SPACE VACANT Thfs Map is intended for use as a graphical representatlon on!y The Clty of Federal Wny rrakes no warranty as to its a�curacy �a G �-''=��/•�l � GIS DIVISIt3N SGALE� 1' = 5,Q00' MA� II-1 DATE� DEGEMBER 1995 � � i , � � � , , , , ' i � � ' i ��' � 2.2 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAND USE CHAPTERS Tlie land use concept set forth in this chapter is consistent with all Comprehensive Plan chapters. Internal consistency among the chapters of the Compre- hensive Plan translates into coordinated growth and an efficient use of limited resources. Below is a brief discussion of how the Land Use chapter relates to the other chapters of the Comprehensive Plan. Economic Development Federal Way's economy is disproportionately divided; retail and service industries comprise nearly two-thirds of Federal Way's employment base. Dependence on retail trade stems primarily from the City's evolution into a regional shopping destination for South King County and northeast Pierce Counry. Increased regional competition from other retail areas, such as Tukwila and the Aubum SuperMall, may impact the City's ability to capture future retail dollars. To improve Federal Way's economic outlook, the economic development strategy is to promote a more diverse economy. A diversified economy should achieve a better balance between jobs and housing and supports the City's quality of life. In conjunction with the Economic Development chapter, this Land Use chapter promotes the following: ■ A City Center composed of mid-rise office buildings, mixed-use retail, and housing. ■ Community Business and Business Park development in the South 348th Street azea. ■ Continued development of West Campus. ■ Development of East Campus (Weyerhuaeser Corporate and Office Pazk properties). ■ Redevelopment and development of the SR-99 corridor into an area of quality commercial and mixed use development. ■ Establishment of design standards for commercial areas. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use The land use map designations support development necessary to achieve the above. A complete discussion of economic development is set forth in the Economic Development chapter. Capital Facilities Capital facilities provided by the City include: trans- portation and streets, parks and open space, and surface water management. Infrastructure and Urban Services The amount and availabiliry of urban services and infrastructure influences the location and pace of future growth. The City is responsible for the construction and maintenance of parks and recreation facilities, streets and transportation improvements, and surface water facilities. Providing for future growth while maintaining existing improvements is dependent upon the community's willingness to pay for the construction and fmancing of new facilities and the maintenance of existing facilities. As outlined in the Capital Facilities Plan, new infrastructure and services may be fmanced by voter approved bonds, impact fees, and money from the City's general fund. To capitalize on the City's available resources for urban services and infrastructure, this Land Use chapter recognizes that concentrating growth is far more cost effective than allowing continued urban sprawl. Concentrating growth also supports the enhancement of future transit improvements. Water Availability Water availabiliry is limited by the rate of recharge of the aquifers that underlie the Federal Way area. In recent years, water in the aquifers has been withdrawn at a rate faster than what can be sustained through aquifer recharge. Therefore, the Lakehaven Utiliry District is working on a number of water supply options including securing water from the City of Tacoma's second supply pipeline project which will run through the City. If an adequate supply of water cannot be provided, future development may be restricted if certificates of water availabiliry, as required by State law, can no longer be issued by the District. Concentrating growth, along with conservation measures, should help to conserve water. II-4 Federal Wey Comprehensive Plan - Land Use Water Quality Maintaining a clean source of water is vital to the health and livability of the City. Preserving water quality ensures a clean source of drinking water; and, continued health of the Ciry's streams and lakes. Maintainuig water qualiry is also important for maintaining the health of the aquifers which rely on surface water for rechazge. Contamination of an aquifer, by contaminated surface water, could lead to serious health concerns. To address this concern and impacts of new development, the City prepared a Surface Water Management Plan. The plan specifies actions to ensure water quality including the development of regional detention/ retention facilities to control rate and quality of water runoff. Furthermore, development of a wellhead protection program with the Lakehaven Utility District should provide guidelines to avoid possible contamination. Policies contained in the Natural Environment chapter provide direction for development neaz wellheads and in aquifer recharge areas. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Capital Facilities chapter. Parks & Open Space One of the most important and valued elements of a high qualiry living and working environment is a pazks and open space system. Providing pazks and open spaces contributes to a reduction in environmental impacts such as noise and air pollution; increases the value of adjacent properties; provides areas for passive and active recreation; and helps preserve the natural beaury of the City. To maximize open space opportunities, the City will coordinate with adjacent jurisdictions to create a region-wide open space system as contemplated in the Countywide Planning Policies. The proposed land use map depicts areas where existing and/or proposed pazks and open spaces aze located. This map is consistent with the City's Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan. Potential Annexation Area To facilitate intergovernmental planning and policy coordination, the King County Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP's) require each jurisdiction to, "... designate a potential annexation area." The City's Potential Annexation Area lies within unincorporated King County, generally east of the present City boundary. The boundary has been defined through cooperative agreements between the City and adjacent jurisdictions. No land use designations aze currently proposed by the City for this area. Ciry provided urban services and utilities (to the extent the City controls such services, either directly or by contract) may be provided to this area when an annexation is accepted. In the future, the amount of land and population to be annexed into the Ciry will depend on the number of annexation petitions received by the Ciry and the availability of urban services. The City does not intend to actively seek annexations. A comprehensive plan for the potential annexation azea may be prepazed by the City to assign land use designations and zoning. This plan will provide guidance for all future citizen initiated annexation proposals. A complete discussion regazding the City's potential annexation areas can be found in the Potential Annexation Area chapter. Natural Environment Federal Way's natural beaury is apparent. Lakes, streams, wetlands, and Puget Sound provide a scenic backdrop as well as a source for active and passive recreation. The Land Use chapter seeks to protect Federal Way's unique natural resources through policies that support the preservation of these areas for future generations. For a complete discussion please refer to the Natural Environment chapter. Housing Housing is a basic need and a major factor in the qualiry of life for individuals and families. An adequate supply of affordable, attractive, and functional housing is fundamental to achieving a sense of community. The central issue related to land use is supplying enough land to accommodate projected growth for a range of incomes and households. Presently, housing is provided primarily in single family subdivisions or multiple-unit complexes. This plan devises strategies to increase housing options and housing choices. The Land Use chapter advocates changes to current development codes to increase flexibility in platting land and encowage housing as part of mixed-use developments in commercial areas. The II-5 r � , l� � � ' � , ' ' � � � � ' � latter provides an opportuniry to locate housing closer to employment and shopping, and create affordable housing. The land use map depicts single family and multiple family residential areas as staying generally in the same geographic boundary as the original comprehensive plan map. The proposed land use designations will provide adequate capacity to meet projected growth. See Section 2.8 for further discussion. A complete discussion of housing can be found in the Housing chapter. City Center The proposed land use map depicts two Ciry Center land use designations. The Ciry Center Core and Frame areas will direct the location and extent of growth in the City Center. The creation of an identifiable and vibrant "downtown" is one of the primary goals identified by the community during the CityShape planning process. The policies of the Land Use and City Center chapters envision a concentrated Ciry Center comprised of mixed- use developments, pedestrian-oriented streetscapes, livable and affordable housing, a network of public spaces and parks, and development of superior design and qualiry. The Ciry Center will provide a central gathering place for the community where civic and cultural activities and events take place. A complete discussion of the City Center can be found in the City Center Chapter. 2.3 POLICY BACKGROUND Recent passage of State and Counry land use policies provide a statutory framework for the development of City land use policies. It is important to briefly review State and County level policies to better understand the historical conditions which have shaped the goals and policies in this chapter. GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT The GMA aclrnowledges that, ". .. a lack of common � goals expressing the public's interest in conservation and the wise use of our lands pose a threat to the ' Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use environment, sustainable economic development, and the health, safety and high qualiry of life enjoyed by residents of this state" (RCW 36.70A.010). The Act provides a framework for content and adoption of local comprehensive plans. The Act provides 13 goals to be, ". .. used exclusively for the purpose of guiding development of comprehensive plans and development regulations." A number of the State GMA goals pertain to land use. They are as follows: Urban Growth - Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. Reduce Sprawl - Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. Open Space and Recreation - Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks. Environment - Protect the environment and enhance the State's high quality of life, including air and water quality and the availability of water. Public Facilities and Services - Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. Historic Preservation - Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance. Regional Policies Vision 2020 and the CWPP's, both required by GMA, provide a regional framework to achieve the goals of the GMA. Vision 2020 is the long range growth management, economic, and transportation strategy for the central Puget Sound region encompassing King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. It provides broad direction agreed to by member jurisdictions. Most notable is Vision 2020's direction for Regional Transportation. An important connection between u-s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use Vision 2020 policies and the City's land use policies is development of an urban center, refened to as the City Center in this Comprehensive Plan. Urban centers are to accommodate a significant share of new growth, services, and facilities. The idea is to, "... build an environment in the urban centers that will ariract residents and businesses" by concentrating residences, shopping, and employment in close proximity to each other and regional transit. The Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP) aze a further refinement of policy direction contained in the GMA and Vision 2020 and are a result of a collaborative process between King Counry and the suburban cities within. Policies contained herein have been prepared to implement the CWPP's as they apply to the City. Countywide Planning Policies provide a framework for both the County and its respective cities. Adherence to these policies ensures that plans within the County are consistent with one another. These policies address such issues as the designation of urban growth areas, land use, affordable housing, provision of urban services for future development, transportation, and contiguous and orderly development. Countywide Planning Policies have the most direct impact on land use policies in this chapter. By undertaking the following actions, the Land Use chapter is consistent with CWPP's direction: ■ Promoting phased development for ef�cient use of land and urban services; ■ Creating a City Center (urban center) as an area of concentrated employment and housing, served by high capacity transit, public facilities, parks, and open space; ■ Limiting growth outside the City Center to azeas that are already urbanized; ■ Encouraging infill development; ■ Expanding business and office pazk development to include limited commercial; and ■ Establishing incentives to achieve desired goals. 2.4 PROJECTED GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY Projected Growth In 1995, approximately 74,413 people called Federal Way home. Most of the growth to date occurred during the decades of the 1960's and 1980's in which the City's ' population doubled. Federal Way is now the sixth ' largest city in the State and the third largest in King County. Future population and employment growth has been forecasted through a cooperative effort between the state, counties, and cities. Through the CWPPs, the City's target ranges for household and employment growth over the next 20 years is defined. Federal Way's target household range is 13,425 - 16,556; and, employment target range of 13,300 - 16,400. Chart //-3 Population Projection Central Puget Sound Region � � �3 s � � a a 1 Development Capacity Through the goals and policies of the Comprehensive Plan and the Land Use Map, the City is required to show that it has the capacity to accommodate projected growth target ranges for housing and employment. To determined the City's ability to accommodate forecasted growth (both residential and employment) a capaciry analysis was conducted. The results of this effort is summarized in Tables II-1 thru II-4, and in the Capaciry Analysis section. Methodology Using a methodology consistent with the recommendations of the King County Land Capacity Task Force, the Ciry calculated capacity for all land use u-� ' � � � , � ' ' ' , � � � 1 � ' ' 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use designations. In general, capacity is defined as the number of additional dwelling units or square feet of improved floor space (commercial and industrial uses) that can be accommodated within a comprehensive plan land use designation. Capacity figures for both vacant and redevelopable land were calculated. Once the theo- retical capacity was derived, a series of reductions were applied. The reductions account for land consumed by right-of-ways, building footprint, environmentally sensi- tive azeas, and for public purpose (parks, cemeteries, etc.). The summation of these discounts ranged from 47 to 72 percent depending on the land use designation. Chart //-2 PERCENT GROSS LAND AREA BY COMP PLAN LAND USE DESIGNATION PARKS 8 OPEN SPACE RETAII FAMILY (54.6d%) In addition to the reductions outlined above, a market discount factor was applied to vacant land (10 percent) as well as redevelopable land (17 percent). Application of the market factor (discount) acknowledges that not all potentially developable parcels will be available for development and that some parcels may not be fmancially feasible to develop or redevelop. Finally, a cushion (discount of 25 percent) was applied to cover any inaccuracy in the data sources used and to account for any unforeseen circumstances which may affect the development of a given parcel of land. Employment figures were then derived from the final square footage calculations for commercial and office land use designations using commonly acceptable squaze foot per employee ratios. Capacity Analysis The following tables (Table II-1 thru II-4) illustrate the Ciry's development capaciry. In summary, the employ- ment figure of 69,358 shows that the City has the capacity to easily accommodate projected employment growth (13,300 - 16,400 jobs) over the next 20 years. As shown in Table IV, the City has the capacity to accommodate 16,723-23,994 households, thus surpassing. the CWPPs target range of 13,425-16,556. Table II-1 � Net Commercial and Office Ca aci Proposed Developable Square Footage ' Comprehensive Plan Land Use Employment Designations Vacant Redevelopable Net # jobs Developable � � _� C � ' ' Business Park C ity Center Cor¢ City CenterFrame Community Business Corporate Park Neighbo Business O„QSce MANUFAC. (2.08%) MUITIPLE FAMILY (8.20%) FFICE (7.63%) 3,937,414 1,441,578 733,304 1,660,330 2,203,467 594,200 6,421,102 I TOt81S I 16,991,395 , The capaciry of the city s commercial and offrce areas (Table II-1 J support the shift towar� than remiL � 1,218,531 5,155,946 8,889 1,357,488 2,799,066 6,997 39,685 772,989.00 1,931 1,045,130 2746453 5,492 1,337,536 3,541,003 14,164 127,866 722,066 1,466 1,183,869 7,604,971 30,419 6,310,105 23,342,494 69,358 the job market by providing for future growtH rn employment sectors other II-8 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use Table II-2 Net Ca aci of Residentiai Ezisting Dweiling Vacant/Redev Comp Plan Designation Units (potential units) Total Net Units Single Family 16,681 5,413 -12,684 22,094 - 29,365 Multiple Family 12,826 3,852 16,678 Mobile Homes 1,393 1,393 TotalS 30,900 9,265 -16,536 40,165 - 47,436 New residendal opporturNties (Tablel!-?) will be provided through the contixued bui7d-out of exisdng mulNpk jamily areas and abng with in-fil! and platting of nmaining parcals in singk family anas Tabk II-3 ahows that appra�rimate(y S,7S9 dxvUing units ojnsw mulHpk family housing will be providsd in non-residendal designadons Residendal mrmbsrs do not includs ac�rssory dw�sl(ing uniGx Net Residential Comp Plan Designation City Center Core City Center Frame Neighborhood Business Community Business Totals Table II-3 �pacity of Non-Residential Desig Net Developable Residential Square . Feet 2,290,146 772,990 361,034 1,352,731 4,776,901 ations Potentisl Dwelling Units 3,272 773 361 1,353 5,759 Su Comprehensive Pian Designation Table II-4 of Dwelling Unit Ca� Buildable Square Feet # of Dwelting Units CommerciaUOffice Designations that Allow 11,828,417 5,759 Residential Component Multiple Family 3,851,621 3,852 Single Family N/A 5,413 -12,684 Accessory Dwelling Units 1,700 Total Residential Capacity 16,723 - 23,994 King County Planning Policies Household 13,425 -16,556 Target Range Table II-0 summarizes dwelling �mit capacity. The table cleerly shows �cient capacity to accommodate anticipated growth beyond the year 2012. New household and employment forecasts from PSRC will be evalueted against the preceding tables to ensure that there is �cient capacity to accrnnmodate future gowth. Capacity numbers pertain only w incorporated Federal Way, does not include the City's Pota�tial Annexetion Area. I I-9 � ' � ' , ' � ' ' ' ' , 2.5 URBAN DESIGN AND FORM In addition to guiding development, the Land Use chapter will also guide the qualiry and character of the City's future development pattern through goals and policies related to the form, functioq and appeazance of the built environment. These goals and policies, related to quality development, will serve as a basis from which to develop appropriate implementation measures. Imple- mentation of design standards will be achieved primarily through a series of zoning amendments and design guidelines, to be used as an integral component of the development review process. Commercial guidelines will support comprehensive plan policies by addressing integration and preservation of natural features; location and type of pedestrian amenities and public spaces; pedestrian and vehicle circulation; building setbacks, orientatioq form, and scale; landscaping; and mixed-use design. Residential design guidelines, potentially as a component of sub-area plans, will address neighborhood character, and compatibility between residential and mixed-use/commercial development. Goal LUGl Improve the appearance and funcrion of the built envrronment. Policies LUPl Develop residential design performance standazds to maintain neighborhood chazacter and ensure compatibility with surrounding uses. ' LUP2 Use design and performance standazds to achieve a greater range of housing options in multiple family designations. � ' �J ' � LUP3 Support the establishment of design and performance standards to create attractive and desirable commercial and office developments. 2.6 DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS The Land Use chapter provides the policy foundation for implementing zoning and development regulations. In developing policy concerning future land use Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use regulations, or revisions to existing regulations, every effort was made to instill certainty and efficiency in the development process. Recent State legislation has focused on developing streamlined and timely permit processing. Prior to this legislation, the City conducted Developer Forums to solicit input regarding the Ciry's permit processing system. Comments received during the Forums provided invaluable information to evaluate the City's perinit system. Through the following policies, the Ciry continues to strive to provide an efficient and timely review system. Goal LUG2 Develop an efficient and timely development review process based on a public/private parrnership. Policies LUP4 Maximize efficiency of the development review process. LUPS Assist developers with proposals by continuing to offer pre-application meetings in order to produce projects that will be reviewed efficiently. LUP6 Conduct regular reviews of development regulations to deternune how to improve upon the permit review process. LUP7 Integrate and coordinate construction of public infrastructure with private development to minimize costs wherever possible. LUP8 Increase efficiency in the permit process by responding to State legislation concerning development review processes. 2.7 CITYWIDE POLICIES Citywide policies apply to all Comprehensive Plan designations. These general policies are intended to maintain the quality of the living and working environment and ensure that the interests, economy, and welfare of the community are considered. ' n-i o Federal Way Comprehe�sive Plan - Lend Use Policies LUP9 Designate and zone land to provide for Federal Way's share of regionally-adopted demand forecasts for residential, commercial, and industrial uses for the next 20 yeazs. LUP10 Support a diverse community comprised of neighborhoods which provide a range of housing options; a vibrant City Center; well designed and functioning commercial areas; and distinctive neighborhood retail azeas. LUPl l Support the continuation of a strong residential community. LUP12 Evaluate household and employment forecasts on a periodic basis to ensure that land use policies based on previous assumptions are current. LUP13 Distribute pazk and recreational opportunities equitably throughout the Ciry. 2.8 LAND USE DESIGNATIONS The land use designations in the Comprehensive Plan recognize the relationships between broad patterns of land uses. The designations set forth locational criteria for each specific class of uses consistent with the long term objectives of the Plan. These designations provide the purpose and intent for specific zoning districts. The location of comprehensive plan land use designations are shown on the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map. Residential Areas Single Family Federal Way is lrnown for its quality single family neighborhoods. This section contains goals and policies that will shape future development and protect or improve the character and livability of established neighborhoods. The demand for and development of single family housing is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. Single family development will occur as in-fill development of vacant lots scattered throughout existing neighborhoods and as subdivisions on vacant tracts of land. To address future housing needs, the Land Use chapter encourages new techniques for developing single family subdivisions. Such techniques include clustering, planned unit developments, lot size averaging, and zero lot line development. New to single family neighbor- hoods is the introduction of accessory dwelling units and special needs housing as required by State law and Ciry ordinance. Furthermore, future residential code revisions will address the compatibiliry and design of in-fill development and special needs housing. Single Family Low Density The Single Family Low Densiry designation retains lazger urban lots in order to avoid development pressure on or near environmentally sensitive azeas and to retain azeas that have unique azea-wide circumstance. There aze two notable locations: Spring Valley, located in the southern portion of the City; and along Puget Sound near Dumas Bay in the viciniry of Camp Kilworth and the Palisades Retreat property. The Single Family Low Densiry designation continues the historic application of low density zoning in areas that lack urban services and infrastructure. Moreover, the application of large urban lot zoning is appropriate to avoid excessive development pressures on or near environmentally sensitive areas as well as to serve as a buffer between ad�jacent land use designations of higher densities. The Single Family Low Densiry designation in the Spring Valley and Dumas Bay azeas have numerous environmentally sensitive features including, but not limited to: wetlands, flooding potential, geologically hazazdous azeas, streams (including salmonid habitat), and wildlife habitat, and groundwater infiltration potential. Due to the sensitive nature of this azea, the Draft Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound Plan recommends zoning of one lot per five acres. Single Family Medium Density The Single Family Medium Densiry designation creates urban lots with a density range of 1 to 3 dwelling units per acre to avoid developing on or near environmentally sensitive azeas. The Single Family Medium Density designation can be found along the Puget Sound shoreline and south of South 356th Street, both east and west of SR 99. Lot sizes of 35,000 and 15,000 square u � � ' � , ' , � , ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' � ' � ' � � i , � ' ' � � � � � � � �� 1 � � a � a , .� ,,....... e ! , , '� _ _ ..r:-.�` � !. � � PUGET �OUND � r ; :, : � CITY ❑F F�EDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN C �1VIP�EI��NS�VE PLAN DESIGNA'�I�NS LAND USE ELEMENT �� ��1V � -�-�-�-�-�-�- FEDERAL WAY CITY LIMITS -� - - - - POTENTIAL ANNEXATI�N AREA � City Cente� Gore _ City Center Frame ��``F� s� � orp orate P ark ��* ,-�€ ��� t�ffice Q Business Park _ Neighborhood Business C om.mercial/Recreatian Q Community Business -��-� Parks and Open Space Muiti—Family Single Family - � ��; _.__. �.;�t.: High Density � Medium Densit,y 0 Low Density �� G �D MAP II - � GIS DNISION SCALE� 1." = 5,000' DECEMBER 1995 � Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Le�d Use 1 feet provide for a transition in density between land designated as Single Family High and designated as Single Family Low. Some areas designated as Single , Family Medium still lack urban services and infrastructure. � � i � � � � � � � � � � � � The relatively lazge lot sizes along the Puget Sound shoreline areas are appropriate due to geological features including steep slopes and landslide hazards commonly associated with marine bluffs. As with the Single Family Low designation, the Single Family Medium designations south of South 356th is located in the West Branch Hylebos Creek Sub-Basin. As noted in the Single Family Low Densiry description, this sub-basin contains a number of environmentally sensitive areas. Single Family High Density A majority of the single family residential land in the City is designated as Single Family High Densiry. Urban densities of 9600, 7200 and 5000 squaze feet provide for a range of housing densities. Single Family High Density residential designations aze located within close and convenient proximity to neighborhood business centers, areas of existing or future employment, transit and existing urban infrastructure and services. Future Single Family High Density development should provide good access to collector and arterial streets. Goai LUG3 Preserve and protect Federal Way's single family neighborhoods. Policies LUP14 Maintain and protect the chazacter of existing and future single family neighborhoods through strict enforcement of the City's land use regulations. LUP15 Protect residential areas from impacts of adjacent non-residential uses. LUP16 Revise existing land use regulations to provide for innovation and flexibility in the design of new single family developments and in-fill. LUP17 Encourage the development of transportation routes and facilities to serve single family neighborhoods. Special attention should be given to pedestrian circulation. LUP18 Encourage the development of parks and the dedication of open space in and adjacent to residential areas to preserve the natural setting of Federal Way. LUP19 Consider special development techniques (e.g., � accessory dwelling units, zero lot lines, lot size averaging, and planned unit developments) in single family areas provided they result in residential development consistent with the qualiry and character of existing neighborhoods. LUP20 Preserve site characteristics that enhance residential development (trees, watercourses, vistas, and similaz features) using site planning techniques such as clustering, planned unit developments, and lot size averaging. Multiple Family The multiple family residential land use designation represents an opportuniry to provide a range of housing types to accommodate anticipated residential growth. Increasing population, the decline in average family size, and increasing cost of single family homes have created heavy demand for new housing types. The Land Use chapter encourages the development of new housing types, such as duplexes, townhouses, and condominiums in existing multiple family areas and within mixed-use development in commercial areas. During the 1980's, the Ciry's landscape changed as a number of large apartment complexes were constructed. These apartments, often built without regazd to scale or amenities, created a general dissatisfaction with the appearance of multiple family development. Future code revisions should address issues regazding appeazance, scale, location, and type of dwelling units. Incentives for creating desired development such as duplexes and townhouses should be considered. Multiple Family Multiple Family designations in lazge part are in azeas currently zoned for multiple family development. Densities of 3600, 2400, and 1800 square feet per dwelling unit will continue to be used. Opportunities for II-13 new development will occur through redevelopment and build-out of remaining parcels. To address the design and appearance of multiple family development, residential code revisions aze expected to be developed in the neaz future. The primary goal of these code revisions is to develop multiple family housing that is reflective of the community's character and appeazance. Goal LUG4 Provide a wide range of housing types and densities commensurate with the community's needs and preferences. Policies LUP21 Allow and encourage a variety of multiple family housing types in designated commercial areas, especially in the City Center and City Center Frame azeas. LUP22 Develop design and performance standards for multiple family developments to achieve integration in commercial developments. Performance standards should focus on scale, appeazance, and compatibiliry. LUP23 Support multiple family development with transportation and capital facilities improvements. LUP24 Multiple family residential development should be designed to provide privacy and common open space. Variations in facades and roof lines should be used to add character and interest to multiple family developments. LUP25 Encourage the establishment of street pattems and amenities that encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use. Commercial Designations Existing commercial areas are auto-oriented and chazacterized by one story low intensity development. In the future, these areas will become more intense and pedestrian oriented, and in some designations, accom- modate housing. Transfornvng existing areas into places where people want to live, shop, and work requires changes. Commercial azeas should contain street Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use fumiture, trees, pedestrian shelters, well marked cross- walks, and buildings oriented to and along the street to provide interest and allow easy pedestrian access. � � General Policies for Commercial, Oftice, and ' Business Park The following general policies apply to all commercial, office, and business park designations. Specific goals and policies related to each land use designation follow the discussion of each, except for Corporate Park and Commercial Recreation. These two designations, and the uses allowed in them, are defined by pre-annexation agreements with the City. Policies LUP26 Provide employxnent and business opportunities in Federal Way by allocating adequate land for commercial, office, and business park development. LUP27 Encourage development of regional uses in the Ciry Center. LUP28 Develop regulatory incentives to promote common open space, public art, and plazas in commercial and of�ice developments. LUP29 Provide for a mix of commercial and residential uses in commercial areas, except Business and Office Pazk. LUP30 Ensure compatibiliry between mixed-use developments and residential areas by regulating height, scale, setbacks, and buffers. LUP31 Encourage quality design and pedestrian and vehicle circulation in office, commercial, and business park developments. LUP32 Encourage commercial development to locate along the street edge (where deemed appropriate) to provide pedestrian street access Provide pedestrian access between developments and to transit stations. LUP33 Identify and designate streets where on-street parking can be safely provided without unduly slowing traffic flow or jeopardizing tr�c safety. II-14 � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � L� � � �J � � � �� � � � � � �' � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use LUP34 Provide developer incentives for inclusion of housing in commercial projects. Business Park The Business Park designation is a new designation that substantially encompasses the uses found in the former Manufacturing Park zoning designation where large undeveloped and underdeveloped parcels, having convenient access to Interstate 5 and Highway 18, provide a natural location for business park develop- ment. The advent of the Business Park designation is intended to capture the growing demand for higher quality, mixed-use business pazks which permit a mixture of light manufacturing, wazehouse/ distribution, office, and limited retail uses to serve the immediate needs in the area. Revisions to design and performance standazds will address site development, lot size, setbacks, and modulation. Goal LUGS Develop a quality business park area that supports surrounding commercial areas. Policies LUP35 Encourage quality, mixed development for office, manufacturing, and distribution centers. LUP36 Develop business parks which fit into their surroundings by grouping similar industries in order to reduce or eliminate land use conflicts, allow sharing of public facilities and services, and improve traffic flow and safety. LUP37 Develop a South 348th Street Sub-azea Plan to address development of a street grid, open space, storm drainage, utilities, and building locations. LUP38 Limit retail uses to those that serve the needs of people employed in the area. City Center Core The intent of establishing the City Center Core is to create a higher densiry, mixed-use designation where office, retail, and government uses are concentrated. Other uses such as culturaUcivic facilities, community services, and housing will be highly encouraged. City Center Frame The City Center Frame designation provides a zone of less dense, mixed use development physically surrounding a portion of the Ciry Center Core. The Frame azea will have similar look and feel of the Core, but, the emphasis will on providing residential develop- ment with accessory retail and office uses. Together, they are meant to compliment each other to create a `downtown' area. A more detailed description, along with goals and policies regarding the City Center Core and Frame, can be found in the City Center chapter. Community Business The Community Business designation encompasses two major retail azeas of the Ciry: It covers the "strip" retail areas along SR 99; and, the large "bulk" retail area found near the South 348th Street area, approximately between SR-99 and I-5. Community Business allows a large range of uses and is the City's largest retail designation in terms of area. The Communiry Business designation generally runs along both sides of SR-99 from South 272nd to South 348th. A wide range of development types, appearance, ages, function, and scale can be found along SR 99. Older, single story developments provide excellent opportunities for redevelopment. Due in part to convenient access and available land, the South 348th Street area has become a prefened location for large bulk retailers such as Eagle Hardware, Home Depot, and Costco. Due to the size of these facilities, the challenge will be to develop these uses into well functioning, aesthetically pleasing retail environments. To create retail areas that are aesthetically and functionally attractive, revised development standazds, applied through Community Business zoning, should address design quality, mixed-use, and the integration of auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Site design, modulation, and setback requirements should also addressed. The size and scale of hotels, motels, and institutional uses should be limited in scale so as not to compete with the Ciry Center. Goal LUG6 Transform Community Business areas into vital, attractive, mixed-use areas that appeal to pedestrians and motorists and enhance the community's image. II-15 Federai Way Comprehensive Pian - Land Use � Policies GOaI C__.l LUP39 Encourage the transformation of the Pacific Highway (SR-99) Community Business corridor into a quality mixed-use retail azea. Retail development along the corridor, exclusive of the City Center, should be designed to integrate auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Integration of public amenities and open space into retail and ot�ice development should also be encouraged. LUP40 Encourage auto-oriented large bulk retailers to locate in the South 348th Street Community Business azea. Neighborhood Business. There aze neazly a dozen various sized nodes of Neighborhood Business located throughout the City. These nodes aze areas that have historically provided retail and/or services to adjacent residential areas. This Plan recognizes the importance of firnily fixed boundaries to prevent commercial intrusion into adjacent neighborhoods. An economic analysis done as part of the comprehensive planning process determined that every new resident can support 15 squaze feet of new commercial use. Based on this multiplier and forecasted population growth, existing sites provide sufficient capacity to accommodate existing and future demand for Neighborhood Business space. Neighborhood Business azeas aze intended to provide convenient goods (e.g., groceries and hardware) and services (e.g., dry cleaners, dentist, bank) at a pedestrian and neighborhood scale close to adjacent residential uses. Developments combining residential and commercial uses provide a convenient living environment within these nodes. In the future, attention should be given to design features that enhance their appearance or function of these areas. Improvements may include sidewalks, open space and street trees, and parking either on street or oriented away from the street edge. The function of neighborhood business areas can also be enhanced by safe pedestrian, bicycle, and transit connections to surrounding neighborhoods. The need to address expansion or intensification may occur in the future depending on population gowth. Future neighborhood business locations should be cazefully chosen and sized to meet the needs of adjacent residential azeas. LUG7 Provide neighborhood and community scale retail centers for the City s neighborhoods. Policies LUP41 Integrate retail developments into surrounding neighborhoods through attention to quality design and function. LUP42 Encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to neighborhood shopping and services. LUP43 Encourage neighborhood retail and personal services to locate at appropriate locations where local economic demand and design solutions demonstrate compatibility with the neighborhood. LUP44 Retail and personal services should be encouraged to group together within planned centers to allow for ease of pedestrian movement. LUP45 Neighborhood Business centers should consist of neighborhood scale retail and personal services. LUP46 Encourage mixed residential and commercial development in Neighborhood Business designations where compatibiliry with neazby uses can be demonstrated. LUP47 Neighborhood Business areas should be served by transit. LUP48 The City shall limit new commercial development to existing commercial areas to protect residential areas. Commercial Recreation The Commercial Recreation designation acknowledges the unique recreational opportuniry associated with the Enchanted Park property. Enchanted Park is an indoor/outdoor amusement faciliry most noted for its water park. Annexation of the Park will provide the Ciry with an unique recreational asset. The Pazk is located in the City's potential annexation area in a location where urban services can be adequately provided. The City has u6r:� � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � l_�i ' � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - land Use received and accepted a ten percent petition for annexation. Upon annexation, a concomitant annexation agreement will establish the comprehensive plan designation and zoning (Of�ice Park-4) particulaz to Enchanted Park. Office Designations Federal Way is well known for its quality office parks. Developments within the West Campus area embody good design and are representative of desired future office pazk development. Complementing of�ice park development is the addition, through annexation of Weyerhaeuser Corporate Headquarters property, of land for corporate pazk development. Together, office and corporate pazk development will provide new job opportunities within the community. Office Park The Office Park designation emphasizes high qualiry office development that allows for a mix of office and compatible manufacturing type activities. Changes to the Office Pazk classification will pernut a limited amount of retail support services, along with the current mix of office and light manufacturing uses. Goat LUG8 Create ofjSce and corporate park development � that is known regionally for its design and function. � Policy LUP49 Continue to encourage quality office development in West and East Campus Office and Corporate Pazk designations. � � � Corporate Park The Corporate Pazk designation applies to Weyer- haeuser property generally located east of Interstate Highway 5. The properiy is a unique site, both in terms of its development capacity and natural features. The Corporate Park (CP-1) land use designation applies only to the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Campus. The Corporate Park designation is surrounded by Office Park designations of OP-1,2,& 3. The corresponding Office Pazk zones aze anticipated to develop as corporate headquarters, offices and as ancillary uses. These types of developments are characterized by lazge contiguous sites containing landscaping, open space, and buildings of superior qualiry. The Office Pazk zones are for the development of other corporate headquarters and office parks that serve to compliment Weyerhaeuser Corporate headquarters. Development standards and conditions for these two zones are unique to Weyerhaeuser's property and are outlined in a Concomitant Pre-Annexation Zoning Agreement entered into by the City and Weyerhauser Corporation. 2.9 ESSENTIAL PUBLIC FACILITIES Pursuant to the GMA, no comprehensive plan can preclude the siting of essential public facilities. The City is responsible for defining essential public facilities and providing a land use process for siting them. Essential public facilities include those facilities that are typically difficult to site, such as airports, state or regional transportation systems, correctional facilities, and mental health facilities. The Growth Management Planning Council, or its successor, is responsible for establishing a process by which all jurisdictions shall cooperatively site public facilities of a countywide or statewide nature. Based on these future policies, the City will develop policy and siting criteria to address the siting of public facilities including assurance that essential public facilities will meet existing state laws and regulations requiring specific siting and permitting requirements. Policy LUP50 Amend the City Code to include a list of locally defined essential public facilities and an appropriate land use review process. 2.10 PHASING Phasing focuses growth to those azeas where public investments for services are targeted. By doing so, these areas become more attractive for development. � n-v Consistent with CWPP's, Federal Way proposes to use a tiered system for accommodating future growth. The primary purpose of this technique is to assure a logical sequence of growth outward from developed areas. Future growth will be directed to the City Center and other areas with existing infrastructure and urban services. This will be followed by focusing growth to areas where in-fill potential exists. Lastly, growth will be directed towazd areas of undeveloped land or to the City's potential annexation azea. For those areas of the City that are lacking services, these lands should be retained or reserved until build out has occurred in developed azeas. Based on phased growth concept outlined above, The City should develop criteria for a phasing plan over the next 10 and 20 yeazs. Phased growth will promote efficient use of land by: ■ Reducing taxpayers costs by locating new development nearest to existing urban services; ■ Adding predictability to service and facility planning; ■ Reducing commuter miles and protecting air quality by locating housing and jobs near each other; ■ Encouraging in-fill and redevelopment where environmental impacts have already occurred; and ■ Reserving land for future parks and open space. Policies LUP51 Establish priority areas for public facility and service improvements, especially for transportation. These priority azeas should be located where public facility and service improvements would effectively advance Federal Way's growth vision. Priority areas will shift over time as improvements are installed and an acceptable level of service is attained. LUP52 When and where service deficiencies are identified, the City, along with service providers, will develop capital improvements programs to remedy identified deficiencies in a timely fashion or will phase growth until such programs can be completed. LUP53 Work with King County through the develop- ment of an interlocal agreement to assign phasing to the City's potential annexation area. Federal Way Comprehensive Ptan - Land Use LUP54 The City should limit spending on capital facilities in those areas of the City and potential annexation area that are not designated as prioriry azeas for capital projects. 2.11 INCENTIVES In certain designations, incentives allowing more development than otherwise pemutted should be used to encourage features which provide a public benefit and/or contribute to the mitigation of growth impacts. For example, development in the City Center that provides common open space or affordable housing units, may gain additional floors or a reduction in the number of parking stalls. Incentives can play an important role in the development of the City Center and must be substantial enough to influence market conditions by making them ariractive to use the development community. Policies LUP55 Develop incentives to encourage desired development in commercial areas, especially in the City Center Core and Frame. LUP56 Consider incentives for desired multiple family residential development (townhouses, duplexes, etc.). � � � , � � � � � '"1 � 2.12 HISTORIC RESOURCES � Historic preservation involves the identification, maintenance, renovation, and reuse of buildings and sites important to a community's history. Buildings or sites may be associated with a particulaz style or period in the community's past, or with historic or significant historic events or persons. Historic preservation to date has largely been undertaken by the Historical Society of Federal Way. Historic preservation is listed as the thirteenth goal in the GMA which encourages jurisdictions to "Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance." u-t a � � �, � � � � � � � � � � � r Faderal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use Goal LUG9 Use historic resources as an important element in the overall design of the Ciry. Policies LUP57 Identify vista points and landmazks such as major trees, buildings, and land forms for preservation. LUP58 Develop a process to designate historic landmazk sites and structures. Use developer incentives or other mechanisms to ensure that these sites and structures will continue to be a part of the community. LUP59 Recognize the heritage of the community by naming (or renaming) parks, streets, and other public places after major figures and/or events. LUP60 Zoning should be compatible with and conducive to continued preservation of historic neighborhoods and properties. LUP61 Safeguazd and manifest Federal Way's heritage by preserving those sites, buildings, structures, and objects which reflect significant elements of the City's history. LUP62 Catalog historic sites using the City's geographic information system. LUP63 Undertake an effort to publicly commemorate historic sites. LUP64 The City shall continue to work with the Historical Society of Federal Way towards �, attainment of historic resource policies. ` 2.13 IMPLEMENTATION � � � The following actions aze recommended to implement the policy direction outlined in this chapter. Implementation will occur over time and is dependent on resources available to the City and community. The following items are not listed in order of importance or preference. Amend Shoreline Master Program for Consistency with the Comprehensive Plan Upon incorporation, the City adopted the King County Shorelines Master Program for its own Master Program. Undertaking the preparation of the City's own shoreline master program will enable the Ciry to develop a shoreline master plan that is better integrated with its Comprehensive Plan and associated development regulations. Integration will ensure that unique shoreline resowces aze protected, or in certain instances developed, consistent with the community's land use vision. In addition, recent State law considers shoreline master plans as an element of each jurisdiction's comprehensive plan. As such, it must be consistent with all elements of the plan. Establish Comprehensive Planning and Zoning for Potential Annezation Area Comprehensive planning and the assignment of zoning designations should be completed for the City's potential annexation azea. This will provide the City with needed direction relating to future annexations and growth. Planning for this area pursuant to WAC 365- 195 requires a considerable planning effort and policy development. An interlocal agreement between King County and the City regarding planning actions should be prepazed. Residential Code Revisions for Single and Multiple Family Residential code revisions should be adopted to implement design and infill standazds for single and multiple fainily residential development. Subdivision Code Revisions Amendments to the subdivision code should be adopted to bring the code into compliance with State law and recent State legislation. Revisions to the subdivision code will provide a range of platting options for single family development, such as clustering and planned unit development. Zero lot line and lot size averaging should also be considered as part of these amendments. Area-Wide Rezone Upon adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, a new zoning map should be prepared and adopted to support the comprehensive plan designations. � 11-19 The Land Use Plan and The Zoning Code Implementation of policies and goals of the Land Use chapter is done in large part through the zoning code. Upon adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, the City will consider revisions to the zoning code, consistent with Comprehensive Plan direction. The zoning conversion chart, Table II-S, shows the connection between the various zoning designations and the Comprehensive Plan designations. Phasing Plan A phasing plan shall be prepared to prioritize areas of new growth based on available and proposed infrastructure improvements. Siting of Essential Public Facilities Based on policies generated by the Crrowth Management Planning Council, the Ciry should develop its own criteria for siting public facilities in the community. Project Environmental Impact Statement for City Center To facilitate growth in the City Center and Frame, the City should complete a environmental impact statement Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Land Use (EIS). By doing so, development consistent with the direction outlined in the EIS will not have to go through prolonged environmental review. This can be a powerful incentive for private development in the City Center. Subarea Plans Over the past five years, citizens from various azeas of the City have come forth to testify before the Planning Commission and Ciry Council regazding their neighborhood or business area. Development of subarea plans can lead to area specific visions and policies. This type of specific planning, developed with citizen input and direction, can lead to improved confidence and ownership in the communiry. Areas where subarea planning should be considered include: SR-99 Corridor, South 348th Street area, and Twin Lakes neighborhood. Incentives Develop an incentives program, for both residential and commercial development. Incentives should be substantial enough to attract development and should be used to create affordable and desired types of housing and to encourage development within the Ciry Center. `� Table II-S Land Use Classifications � � � � � � � � � lJ � � � n-2o �" Transportation L-- - _ --�____-----� ��L--- ( -- - _ � __ -- -- � ___ _ _ — _ �_ --- _ _ _ �� i � � �.__ -- _� � , i--- � � ---- -.� C � �� O ��r+ C O .� � � � � O ` �� � � � � � � � � l._; � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation 3.0 INTRODUCTION he Transportation chapter of the Comprehensive Plan establishes the framework for providing a transportation system (facilities and services) and focuses on actions needed to create and manage the transportation infrastructure and services. The GMA, (RCW336.70A.020[3]) "encourages ef�icient multi modal transportation systems that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with county and ciry comprehensive plans." In addition, the act outlines guidelines for the prepazation of the transportation plan, which is a mandatory element of the plan. Spec�cally, these guidelines (RCW 36. 70A.070[6]) include: ■ The land use assumptions used in the plan; ■ Facility and service needs, including: ■ An inventory of existing facilities, ■ Level of service standards for all facilities and services, ■ An action plan for bringing system deficits up to standard, ■ Forecasts of future traf�ic growth, and ■ Identification of system expansion and transportation system management needs. ■ A fmancing plan which includes: ■ A comparison of funding needs vs available resources, ■ A six-year financing strategy, and ■ An assessment of how funding deficits will be managed. ■ Intergovernmental coordination efforts; ■ A demand management strategy; and ■ A concurrence management strategy. This transportation plan is consistent with GMA requirements in terms of the general policy direction and that it includes all components required in a GMA compliant plan. This plan is also consistent with the direction provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Plan as outlined in Vision 2020 and the Land Use chapter in this compre- hensive plan. As discussed in Vision 2020, this plan proposes a more diverse, multi modal transportation system by encouraging viable alternatives to the single occupant vehicle, including car and van pooling, non- motorized vehicles, and improved public transit which allows integration for a possible future High Capacity Transit system. This comprehensive plan also includes a land use chapter which is supportive of this vision and the region's transportation future. It encourages densities and intensities in locations that support a more diverse, multi modal transportation system. Finally, this transportation plan conforms with the Countywide Planning Policies for King County as adopted in 1992 and amended in 1994. These policies include Framework policies FW18-20 and Transportation Polices T1-T23. In essence, these Policies encourage development of a High Capaciry Transit System, Public Transit, High Occupancy Vehicles, Transportation Demand Management and Systems Management options, Non-Motorized Travel, and regional coordination and cooperation. The policies also discuss the importance of level of service standards as they relate to financing and concurrence management strategies. Background The process of providing a transportation system involves numerous agencies at the local, state, and national levels. The cycle of providing a system involves planning, change approval, funding, implementing, operating, monitoring, and administering the elements of the system. Some components are provided by other agencies, such as METRO and WSDOT; the City can only influence their efforts and system components. The Transportation chapter, including the administrative procedures developed from it, guides the provision of facilities. Until recently, the cycle of planning and providing facilities could be summarized as shown in Figure 111-1. Through a combination of national and state legislation, as well as regional planning efforts, the process has been changing in recent years. Physical and economic limitations of continued expansion of the tughway system and other factors such as environmental issues have been key factors in the shift. Figure III-2 reflects the process as it might be viewed today. iu-i HISTORICAL TRANSPORTION INFRASTRUCTURE THE PLANNING - IMPLEMENTATION CYCLE Land Use Plan Transportation Plan Transportation Improvement Program Regional, State 8� Federal Funding Application Process Funding Implementation Process Design ' Rig ht-of-Way Bidding Construction Operation Figure III-1 CURRENT MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION & MANAGEMENT .-�----�---------�------. -------------------��---. ; Land Use vsion Federal Legislation : : Existing Conditions State Legislation � � LOS Standards Regional Policies ; Transportation Plan Facilities Services Region/State Local Transportation Improvement Program Regional Systems, Policies, Agreements, Etc. Transportation System Management Funding IMPLEMENTATION Local Regional .......-�-�� ---------� : Streets 8 Roads Transit System ; ; Transit Amenities ; Highways/HOV System ; : TDM Programs TDM Programs : � Non-Motorized Non-Motorized � OPERATION MONITORING Figure III-2 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � Table Ili-I Trans ortation Plan Cha ter Subsection Section Facility/Service E:smple Activities by City 3.0 Introduction N/A 3.1 Streets and Roadways Provision, maintcnance, and better use of sheets. 3.2 Transportation System Management Geometric and signalization improvements, controls and restric6ons, capacity enhancements. 3.3 Non-Motoriud Transporta6on Sidewalks, bike trails, transit access, ways between/within neighborhoods. 3.4 Transportation Demand Management Altemate modes (carpool, vanpool, transit), parking policies, CTR legislation. 3.5 Local and Regional Transit Buses, provision for stops, etc. in design standards, land uses, corridors, transit centets. 3.6 HOV Facilities HOV lanes, transit signal priority, park 8c ride lots/transit centers. 3.7 Aviation Design guidelines for heliports; Influence regional sirport efforts. 3.8 Freight and Goods Develop local standards and truck routes; SR 167-99 planning. 3.9 Marine Plan and accommodate ancillary needs of Port of Tacoma 3.10 Lnplementation Strategies Financing (improvement districts, impact fees, grants). �nplementation (prioritization and programming). Monitoring (traf�ic counts accident records, plan comparison). Areas of Required Action Existing Conditions The City has direct influence over certain aspects of the The following sections provide a summary of the transportation system and indirect influence over others. ercisting transportation characteristics for Federal Way. Table III-1 provides a structure for understanding these This information was developed during the prepazation areas of responsibility. It also reflects the organization of of the Community Profile report, published in 1993. the remainder of the chapter for the Transportation Plan. The Growth Management Act requires that the Puget Sound Regional Council certify the transportation chapters of local comprehensive plans. Certification will be based upon confornuty with state legislation concerning transportation chapters and consistency of the Ciry's plan with the Metropolitan Transportation Plan, which has become known as Vision 2020. Conformity focuses on five requirements for the Transportation chapter: ■ Consistency with the Land Use chapter. ■ Identification of facility and service needs. ■ A fmancial plan to support the transportation plan. ■ An intergovernmental coordination plan. ■ Development of Transportation Demand Management strategies. Who Travels Where and Why? Travel patterns in the Federal Way planning area are shown on Map Ill-1. ■ About 57 percent of person trips originating each day in Federal Way are completed within the City and the immediate area. ■ One in three trips originating in the Ciry are destined to points along the Seattle/Tacoma high capacity transit corridor. ■ Nearly 75 percent of Federal Way travel is focused on the residence, either as the point of origin or destination. � � � � � � III-4 � MAP II I -1 Federal Way Compreheneive Plan - Trensportation How Do People Travel? ■ As in much of suburban King Counry, the Single Occupant Vehicle (S0� is the dominant mode of long distance travel. Neazly 8 out of 10 work trips occur by this mode. Are There Ezisting Street Deficiencies? ■ Congested intersections aze predominately in the city core area and along Highway 99. East-west routes which experience high levels of demand include South 320th Street and South 348th Street. ■ Between 15 and 20 percent of all work trips are made by HOV's (High Occupancy Vehicles). Of these, less than three percent aze by transit. ■ The average occupancy of vehicles is similaz to the suburban Seattle average at 1.2 people per vehicle. Raising the average occupancy would reduce congestion. ■ Most area employers (68 percent of those responding to a Ciry survey) reported that bus service exists within one block of their workplace. ■ Biking and walking modes aze used for about seven percent of all trips. The value is somewhat lower for work trips. What Role Do Park & Ride Lots Play? ■ Pazk and ride facilities are in high demand in Federal Way, as throughout the region. Of today's three lots, with a total of 1,900 spaces, nearly all are filled on the average weekday. Adding a lot at 21st SW at SW 344th (NE corner) will increase area capacity by about 650 stalls. However, Metro studies have identified the need to double the present supply by 2010. ■ Utilization of the existing park & ride lots (at South 272nd, South 320th, and South 348th) is a mix of regional traffic. Federal Way users range from a low of 44 percent in the South 272nd Street lot to a high of 60 percent in the South 348th Street facility. Are There Areas Needing Increased Transit Service? ■ Areas outside Federal Way which generate or attract ciry trips and which are not heavily serviced by transit include: ■ The Kent Valley (Renton, Kent, Aubum, and Puyallup). ■ Tacoma. ■ Rainier Valley - Duwamish South. ■ Tr�c accidents cost travelers in the city over $14 million per yeaz. Most accidents aze in the viciniry of intersections. Federal Way's Subarea Roles In establishing a future direction for the Ciry's trans- portation system, it is vital not only to understand existing characteristics of travel, but also to understand the nature of land uses which generate travel. Following is a summary of the present characteristics in the subareas of the City. As land use varies across the City, so do transportation requirements. For example, truck delivery capabilities are higher in the vicinity of the City Center, while the presence of trucks in the western residential azeas would likely evoke a negative public response. Subareas of the City aze readily identifiable. They range from mixed use centers along the I-5 corridor to residential areas which developed with widely varied land use patterns. Western Residential Area Three general areas of the Ciry can be defined for comparison of land use as well as transportation patterns. The Western Residential Area consists primarily of suburban type dwelling units. Over half of all residential dwellings in the study area aze in this area. While transit is provided to the azea, the development patterns have been designed to accommodate the auto and not transit. The steady progression of residential development in the westem areas of the City has resulted in a mix of middle and upper income residences. Dwelling unit density is azound three to five units per acre. This density dces not readily support transit service, nor does the existing street pattern (cul-de-sacs and few through roads). For example, the Twin Lakes area was designed with serpentine, discontinuous streets and cul-de-sacs which make it difficult for transit penetration and violates ni-s � l� � � � C� � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation many of the precepts of Neotraditional neighborhood design and the provision of a network of through streets, which are found to best reduce congestion and improve circulation. In general, there aze too few arterial streets; the arterial streets aze used for nearly all traf�ic circulation, and there is a strong need for more easdwest corridors. The present street pattern focuses easdwest trips from the Western Residential Area into the business core. This, combined with the north-south commute pattems, (predominantly to work centers along the I-5 and SR-99 corridors) and business district generated commercial and retail trips, results in high congestion in the business district, especially during the evening commutes. Commercial Core Area The primary commercial areas lie west of I-5 and east of about l lth Avenue South. This includes SeaTac Mall retail, SR 99 corridor, and office uses in the West Campus area. About 11,000 job opportunities attract Federal Way and regional trips to this area. Consumers and clients of core azea businesses also contribute to the travel patterns of the azea. While the Western Residential Area contains the highest concentration of housing, the Core Area witnesses the greatest traffic demand. Today's 77,000 evening peak hour trips to and from the area are expected to increase to nearly 103,000 trips by 2010. Compounding the problems associated with the attractiveness of the area, trips beginning and ending in the Westem Residential Area are funneled through this area by the limited system of east-west arterial streets, principally South 320th and South 348th. It would be beneficial to not have these trips pass through the core area, make the passage through the core area easier, or intercept the trips before they reach the core area by using buses, carpools, and park and ride lots west of SR 99. There is, a need for improved circulation, fewer commute trips to help reduce peak period congestion, improved transit and access to transit, and a means to improve goods and services circulation both internally and to the regional transportation networks. East of I-5 Area The lowest level of development in and about the Ciry falls east of I-5. This presents the possibility of lazge increases in travel demand in the future. As this development occurs, it will be imperative to the success of the overall vision that supportive development and transportation patterns be encouraged. In other words, there is a need for a sufficient grid of more interconnecting streets. Regional Perspective Vision 2020, developed in the early 1990s, is presently being updated by the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) as its Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP). The objective is to assure compliance with federal and state legislation which has been enacted since the original adoption of the metropolitan plan. Key strategies of Vision 2020 include: ■ Creation of a regional system of central places framed by open space. ■ Ir►vestment in a variety of mobility and demand management options to support the central places. ■ Maintaining economic opportunity while managing growth. ■ Conservation of environmental resources. ■ Eazly mitigation of adverse effects of concentrating development. ■ Monitoring and updating of Vision 2020. The Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) is the product of the current planning efforts. It is coordinated and managed by PSRC and: ■ Identifies the transportation system of regional significance. ■ Determines modal performance expectations. ■ Documents needed improvements under Vision 2020, incorporating local level growth management plans, fmancial needs, and a regional congestion management system. ���-� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation A structure for monitoring progress towazds the achievement of the plan and improvement to mobility issues is being designed. The City's role in this process has already been established through the involvement of key staff and elected officials at the regional and state levels. Coordination and planning with PSRC, WSDOT, METRO, King County, and the RTA principally is an on-going local effort. Summary of Major Needs In summary, Federal Way has defined its role through the end of the 20th Century and into the 21st Century as one supporting the regional direction; becoming an urban center and developing the appropriate combination of transportation services and facilities to support the inherent development pattern of the proposed land use plan. Service Providers Key service providers in the region, with which the Ciry maintains contracts through the planning process (and their primary functions), aze presented in Table Ill-2. Pertinent information on the impacts of their programs are noted in the text of the plan. The Ciry needs to capitalize on its close proximity to the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, and the SeaTac airport. This means assuring good access and supporting the viability of these international transportation facilities. The following major needs or improvements are related to transportation in Federal Way: ■ Assure Port and SeaTac Airport access. ■ Take steps to assure free moving intra- and interstate highways. This provides free moving people, freight, and goods to maintain economic viability of the region. ■ Provide a transportation system that supports the City's Land Use Plan. ■ Provide for additional arterial streets and inter- connecting streets in both business and residential azeas to reduce congestion and reliance on the few existing arterials. Table III-2 Ke Service Providers Service Providers Primary Functions The State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Major roadways, Park 8c Ride lots, HOV Ianes METRO Transit, Park & Ride, CTR coordination Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Rail Pierce Transit Transit, Park & Ride, CTR coordination City of Tacoma Roadways & Interconnections Pierce County Roadways 8c Interconnections King County Roads, Interconnec6ons, Signal Msintenance, & Police Services Private U61i6es Puget Power, WA Nstural Gas, US West, and Viacom for U6lities on ROW Lakehaven Utility District U6lities Within Right of Way Fire District Fire Hydrants in Right of Way Neighboring Cities Tacoma, Des Moines, Kent, Aubnrn, Pacific, Algona, Milton, and Fife for Traft'ic and Land Use Change Impacts � � � ,� � � III-8 � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation ■ Provide additional easdwest arterials or other ways to relieve easdwest travel congestion. � ■ Improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities with better access between cul-de-sacs, between neighborhoods, to transit corridors and centers, and within business i� areas. ■ Give priority to transit over automobiles and give improved priority to trucks so as to move more people, goods and serv-ices with less congestion while respecting the qualiry of life. � � ■ Provide altematives to SOV's to reduce their use, relieve congestion on streets (especially in peak hours), and provide more rapid movement of people, goods, and services on streets. This may include helicopter, rail, increased transit, pazk and ride lots, car and van pools, telecommuting, and information highway products. ■ Provide a variety of transportation system options and choices with mobility for all. ■ Provide transportation system management � techniques to improve mobility. This may include impact fees to build better transportation facilities, parking fees to reduce SOV use, subsidies for bus � passes, caz and vanpools use, free business area shuttle buses, and land use regulations that support the transportation system improvements. ■ Provide a transportation system that protects and enhances the environment and qualiry of life. ■ Provide the funding needed to both maintain this existing infrastructure and implement the needed transportation system improvements. ■ Provide cooperative transportation solutions that are interjurisdictionally coordinated to meet local and regional needs. Transportation Goals & Policies Goal !' TGl Maintain mobility for residents and businesses through a balanced, integrated system of � transportation alternatives that: � c. Q a. Meet local and regional needs through interjurisdictionally coordinated and integrated systems. b. Reduce auto dependency, especially single occupancy vehicle (SOV) use. Support the land use vision and plan. Protect and enhance the environment and the qualiry of life. e. Provide acceptable levels ofservice for each alternative that are also commen- surate with their planned levels of funding. Policies TPl Integrate land use and transportation vision and plan decisions to assure integrated transportation systems that support the land use vision and plan. TP2 Implement Federal, State, and Countywide planning policies. TP3 Provide integrated, intemodal multiple travel options to residents and workers, especially those with disabilities, that are also effective altematives to the single-occupant vehicle. TP4 Give priority to transit and supportive needs. TPS Protect neighborhoods from traf�ic impacts. TP6 Give priority to transportation alternatives that improve mobility in terms of people and goods moved for the least-cost. TP7 Establish mobility levels of service appropriate for the alternatives and location. TP8 Provide funding necessary for transportation needs at the appropriate levels of service. 3.1 STREETS AND ROADWAYS In Federal Way, the predominant mode of travel will likely remain the private automobile. It is cleaz that major expansion of the highway system with the intent III-9 of expanding capacity for the single occupant auto will less frequently meet federal, state, and regional policies. Modifications to the transportation system which are likely to receive funding aze those which will promote the increased movement of people and goods as opposed to vehicles. Alternatives which move people rapidly to their destinations must be provided as congestion grows and driving time increases for users of single-occupant vehicles. The future transportation system will be reprioritized to promote high occupancy vehicles, trains, buses, carpools, and vanpools along existing rights-of- way, and to incorporate high capacity transit if it becomes available to Federal Way. Several actions relating to streets and roadways are necessary for the City to adopt its transportation plan. The City must establish and adopt the following standards: ■ Functional Classification of Streets. ■ Access Management Classification. ■ Street Standards. ■ Level of Service (LOS) Standards. ■ Prioritized list of street and roadway improvements that supports the Land Use Plan. ■ Currency Management Plan. Existing Conditions An extensive inventory of the existing roadway system in Federal Way was reported in the Ciry's 1993 Com- munityProfile. The following excerpts on existing conditions aze taken from that document. Street and Highway System Federal Way is served by a network of publicly main- tained streets and highways connecting local com- munities and urban centers in the Puget Sound region, as shown inMap Ill-2. There are two major freeways in the Federal Way planning area: Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation ■ Interstate S(I-S) is four lanes in each direction, with a posted speed limit of 55 mph. This freeway serves as the main north-south freeway for regional travel in western Washington. ■ SR 18 is two to three lanes in each direction, with a posted speed limit of 50 to 55 mph. This freeway acts as a north-south alternative to I-5, connecting to I-90 east of Issaquah and serving the communities of Auburn, eastern Kent, Covington, and Maple Valley. � � � � Primary roadways in the Federal Way planning area � include: ■ Pacific Highway South (SR 99) ■ Military Road ■ South 272nd Street ■ South 320th Street/Peasley Canyon Rd ■ South 348th StreedCampus Drive SW ■ SR 509 (Dash Point Rd) ■ Enchanted Parkway (SR 161) These roadways serve major activity centers within Federal Way, including commercial activities in the South 320th Street corridor between Pacific Highway South (SR 99) and Interstate 5(the City's Central Business District [CBD]), commercial developments along Pacific Highway South, and several smaller commercial centers located within various residential areas. The roadway system also serves concentrations of office uses located within the CBD, West Campus, and the Weyerhauser Headquarters/East Campus area. The roadway system within the ciry connects to the surrounding regional transportation network, which provides access to other major activity centers including Seattle, SeaTac Airport, Tacoma, the Port of Tacoma, Kent, and Auburn. The functional classification of streets is described later in this section. Traffic Signal Locations Map III-3 shows the locations of signalized intersections within the Federal Way planning area. Currently, signals are maintained and operated by WSDOT and the City under a contract with King County. The ability to coordinate signals along congested minor and principal arterials is important to achieve the maximum capacity of a given facility. South 320th Street currently has 13 signalized intersections that are not evenly spaced and, m-�o � ,� � � � � � � � � � � �` � � � � � � � � � � Existing Significant Streets and Highways LEGEND — — — — City Limits � � � � Potential Annexation Area � � � � cmoF G �� m�L Map III-2 Signalized Intersections LEGEND • Signalized Intersection � Fire Department Signal O Signal Planned for 1995 ■ Flasher ♦ Pedestrian Signal cmoF G �� �E�� Map III-3 � � � � � � � � �� ;� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � (� - Average Weekday Traffic (1992) LEGEND 7900 Average Weekday Traffic anoF G �� mEJZAt— Map III-4 in some cases, spaced too close to each other. Coordination of the signal system was implemented in 1993, from I-5 to lst Way South, together with the coordination of signals on SR 99 from South 308th to South 324th Street. In addition, coordination of the signal system along SR 99 from South 336th Street to South 356th 5treet and along South 348th Street from I- 5 to lst Avenue South will be implemented in 1995. Existing Traffic Volumes Existing (1992) average weekday traffic volumes on selected arterials are shown in Map Ill-4. The roadway with the highest daily traffic volume is I-S. This facility carried nearly 158,000 vehicles on an average weekday in 1992 (WSDOT, 1992). Historical growth on I-5 has fluctuated in recent yeazs in the Federal Way vicinity. Between 1985 and 1990, the average daily traffic increased at an average annual rate of 5.3 percent. However, from 1990 to 1992, the average daily traffic decreased at an average annual rate "of four percent. Federal Way's busiest arterial, South 320th Street between I-5 and SR 99, carries approximately 55,000 vehicles per day. On South 320th Street, average weekday traffic has grown at an annual rate of 5.8 percent since 1985. Other arterial roadways with significant daily traffic are portions of Pacific Highway South and South 348th Street, carrying 40,600 and 53,500 vehicles per day, respectively. Forecasts of Future Travel Travel can be described in terms of the purpose of the trip and the trip beginning and end points. Federal Way e�ibits a wide variety of travel purposes. Trips range from children walking to school to adults commuting. Not all of these trips are typically analyzed in trans- portation planning, although emphasis is increasing for non-motorized trips and transportation management systems. To assist in categorizing trips, the area of interest was divided into Transportation Analysis Zones, or TAZ's. This structure allows a link between travel data and land use data. Estimates of households and employees were made for each TAZ. These land use estimates were then translated into traffic demand on major arterials using a computer modeling process. The model was used to Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation estimate existing and future traffic volumes within the Federal Way planning area. The model can be used to estimate demands for various modes of travel, including auto, carpool, and transit. There is a fairly consistent relationship between the number of trips produced each day and the densiry of residential dwelling units. Depending on the density of the azea and other factors, it is possible to forecast the total number of trips produced in an area. In a similaz fashion, employment densities can be used to forecast person-trips attracted to an azea. Each pazcel of land �enerates traf�ic based on its type of use and intensity of development. The evening peak hour is a modeling standazd, since it usually is when the highest demand occurs. Future Travel Demand Once the model was able to simulate existing conditions, it was used to predict the future travel patterns based on land use development forecast information. The com- muniry visioning process explored a series of future (2010) land use intensities and configurations. Concepts of future development which would accomplish regional and City goals were explored. The concepts were then turned into estimates of travel demand and the necessary transportation improvements were identified. Through the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process, a recommended alternative was identified, which includes significant improvements to the existing street system, along with other transportation demand management and transit actions. In general, between 1990 and the 2010 an increase in total person trips of approximately 40 percent is predicted. City Action Areas for Transportation Plan Adoption Functional Classification of Streets Public streets are classified according to their functions related to mobiliry and land access. These functional classifications help facilitate planning for access and circulation, standardization of road designs, and provision of a hierazchy for roadway funding. The classification system is typically shown in a map form which can be used following adoption by planners and developers alike to determine improvements and 111-14 i � � � � � � � � � � � � � L� � � � � � C_� � 1 � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation program needs. The types of functional classifications for Federal Way are described below. Freeway - A multi-lane, high speed, high capacity road- way intended exclusively for motorized traffic with all access controlled by interchanges and road crossings separated by bridges. Principal Arterial - A roadway connecting major community centers and facilities, o8en constructed with partial limitations on access and minimum direct access to abutting land uses. Minor Arterial - A roadway connecting centers and facilities within the community and serving some through traffic while providing greater access to abutting properties. Collector Street - A roadway connecting two or more neighborhoods or commercial areas, while also providing a high degree of properry access within a localized area. Collector Streets have been separated into principal and minor designations according to the degree of travel between areas and the expected traffic volumes. Local Street - All other roadways not otherwise classified, providing direct access to abutting land uses and serving as feeders to facilities with higher functional classifications. Designation of roadway functional class�cation is an integral part of managing street use and land develop- ment. In Washington, as in most states, classification of streets is necessary for receipt of state and federal high- way funds. Inconsistent or misdesignation of functional class (usually in the form of under-classification) can lead to poor relations with residents and the traveling public. Studies have shown that traffic volumes in excess of about 1500 vehicles per day on residential streets produce markedly increased objection on the part of local residents. Misdesignation of a street segment to a lower classification when the amount of expected traf�ic warrants a higher class can also result in under- design of facilities producing long term capacity problems. Table III-3 summarizes the typical characteristics of each functional classification. The lasting functional classifications of roadways in the Federal Way planning area are shown in Map III-S and the proposed functional classification in Map III-6. Table III-4 illustrates typical cross sections for street classifications. The exact cross-sections and standazds for a particulaz street within the community will be established through the Ciry's design process, which is ongoing. Illustrative examples of cross-sections A through K are shown in Figure III-3 to Figure Ill-13 respectively, for the street system within Federal Way. Access Management Classification Access is one of the major factors influencing functional classification. Generally, higher classifications (inter- states or freeways) serve a limited access functioq while lower classifications (local roads, cul-de-sac streets) serve a local access function. The State of Washington approved legislation requiring that access onto state facilities be granted by permit and that such access conform to an Access Management classification system (RCW 47.50). The WSDOT put into place two adminis- trative codes. The first, identifies the administrative process (including permit fees for issuing access permits on state facilities), and second, defines the Access classi- fication system (WAC 468.51 and 468.52, respectively). A summary of the access classifications from WAC 468.52 is provided in Table III-S. The criteria used to define the classification system included functional classification, adjacent land use (existing and proposed), speeds, setting (urban or rural), and traf�ic volumes. The classification system was developed with assistance from the cities by the WSDOT Northwest Region planning office. The authoriry to permit access to state facilities lies with the state in unincorporated areas and with the cities in incorporated azeas. WAC 268.51 requires that cities with permit authoriry adopt a classification system equal to or more restrictive than that proposed by WSDOT. The WSDOT requires the City to establish an appro- priate access classification system by mid 1996. All state routes with the City also need to be classified, with the exception of SR 18 and I-5, which are limited access facilities and not subject to the access classification system. Map Ill-7 indicates the recommended access classifications within the City. 111-15 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Table III-3 Characteristics of Functional Classifications of Streets �nt or way w;ath Number Ezpected Daily Road Classification of Lanes Ezisting Code Recommended Posted Speed Traffic Interstate/Freeways 4+ (varies) Varies Varies 50-SSmph 30,000+ Principal Arterial 4 to 7 80' to 100' 100' to 140' 35�Smph 20,000+ MinorArterial 2 to 5 70'to 80' 60'to 100' 35�Smph 8,000-20,000 Collector Sheet - Principal 2 to 4 60' to 70' 60' to 100' 30mph 2,500-8,000 Collector Strcet - Minor 2 to 3 60' 60' to 90' 30mph 1,200-3,500 Local Street 2 50' S0' to 60' 25mph up to 1,500 VDl44l l.V/M(QIY ■ Limited access, state Jiuisdictlon. ■ Connects su�onal ac[ivity centers and communitia. ■ Provides major movcnrnt capecity, collecting neighborhood and business tra8'ic to higher level arterials. ■ Connectiorm betwem neighborhood or coromercial areas. Desipp consideration for tcudcs. ■ Channels local traffic W principal collectors or arterials. Design fa buses per METRO standards. ■ Primary function ia �s to abuuing residential use. Through haffic can be disco�uaged by use of traffic control devixs. ■ The exact cross-aections and standards for a particulaz atrxt within the community will be eatablished throug}1 the Cit�s design. Table III-4 T ical Cross-Sections for Street Classifications Cross-Sections A through K(Refer to Figures �-9 thrnugh III-19) Functional Ftg Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Fig Classification �-3 III-4 III-5 ID-6 III-7 III-8 III-9 III-10 III-11 III-12 III-13 s I.aoa s t,aoe. s[.ane., sLaoas, bL.w., b btfoe,+ �L,�.+ y L,�,+ +HOV, +HOV, Plwted Zw�p Plaohd Laosst, ParktoQ parWog parWng Plaohd 3 wq Msdlaa IeR turn }Laoes mei�u Blke, w Ow Slds LLaws Yoth dda YW6 ddn Medla4 Isft tura turn medl�o turolaoes laoes Principal Arterials: SR99, S 320th, (99- ✓ ✓ I-5), S 348th St (99- I-5) ✓ ✓ All others Minor Arterials ✓ ✓ ✓ Principal Collector: Streets ✓ ✓ Existing ✓ ✓ ✓ New/Reconstruc6on ✓ ✓ ✓ Business Park d CBD Minor Collector: Streets ✓ ✓ Existing ✓ ✓ ✓ New/Reconstruction ✓ ✓ ✓ Business Park � CBD Local Street ✓ Note: ✓= Applicable Cross-Section Bike Lanes included as Variations III-16 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Functional Classification of Streets. Existing Designations LEGEND � .� �..� � Freeway � Principal Arterial •••••••••••• Minor Arterial Collector arvoF G �� �EJ'Z�L Map III-5 Functional Classification of Streets. Proposed Designations LEGEND sr � �. .� � Freeway � Principal Arterial •••••••••••• Minor Arterial Principal Collector Minor Collector cmoF G �� ��L- Map III-6 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CROSS SECTION A 5 LANES + HOV PLANTED MEDIAN WITH TURN LANES 8' � 6' � 5'� 11' r s�e— F �— Sidewalk Planter Bike HOV + RT Lane O � �2' _ y �o' _L �z' _L �r `�-� Mcd /� r-� 128' Recommendcd ROW 132' Existing Cocle ROW 80'-1�' With On-Street 8ike Lane 12' 118'-126' zecommenAecl �eow i22'-1 ExtaUng CoAe ROW 80'-100' Without On-5treet Bike Lane if' 11' 5' L 6' � � ��—� HOV + RT Bike Planter O Lane 8' { 2' Figure III-3 �i 8'-12' 6' 11' 11' 12' 10' 12' 12' 11' 11' 6' 8'-12' 2' rn Sidewalk Planter HOV + RT Lefti Turn HOV + RT Planter 5idewalk O Mc�d /� r� O 2' 8' �_ 6' _ �_ 5'_ �_ 11' Ain IE'—•'i'F�E 5iclewalk Planter Bike HOV + RT Lane O 2' 8'-12' 6' 11' rlin �--�� SiAewalk Planter HOV + RT d Bike O � � � � �r �` �r �� �2� �! m _ I _ �r � GenterLane 116' Recommended ROW 120' ExisUng Code ROW 80'-100' With On-Street Bike Lane •-�.- t -:� - w �-� � 106'-114' Recommended ROW 110'-118' ExieUng Cock ROW 80'-100' Without On-Street Bike Lane CROSS SECTION B 5 LANES + HOV TWO-WAY LEFT TURN LANE OR MEDIAN 11' � 5� � 6� _ I 8 s�E rfF--s HOV + RT Bike Planter Sidewalk O Lane 11' �6'� 8' HOV + RT Planter SiAewalk O d� Bike Figure III-4 �i �1 � � � i � � � � � � � � � � � � ! � +�r�r �r �.• �• �r � .�r +�rs �r r� �r � ar r +�r� � �• �r � CROSS SECTION C 5 LANES PLANTED MEDIAN WITH TURN LANES �� Sidewalk Planter Bike Lane ,r i �z� 12' to� �2� Left Turn Mcd !� r� Recommended ROW 110 Existing Code ROW 80'-100' With On-5treet Bike Lane 2' 8'-12' 6' Ain Sidewalk Planter 6 Bike � ,2� � ,o_� ,2� �� Left 7urn M�d !� r� 96' Recommended ROW f00'-108' Exfsting Code ROW 80'-f00' Without On-Street 8ike Lane �r _ �_ 5� _ �` 6 � 8 ---��---���—���—� Bike Planter Sidewalk I�ne il' � 6' � 8'-12' E�— E—! Planter 5ldewalk d Bike Figure III-5 2' 8' 6' 5' �fin H 5idewalk Plarrter Bike Lane 2' 8'-12' 6' �lin Sidewalk Planter 6 Bike �r i �r �y 12' �� CenterLane ii' 11' �� 6 � 8 ' Planter Siclewalk Raommended ROW 98' Existtng Code ROW BD'-fOd With On-Street Bike Lane �� �2� � ,o � ,? � 5 lanes with Raised f0' Median � � � � 11' � 11' � �Z' � �p 's Centerlane 84' RecommenAeA ROW B8'-96' Existing Code ROW 80'-100' Without On-5treet Bike Lane 11' 6' 8'-12' Z' in Planter Stdcwalk 3 8lke Figure III-6 �� CROSS SECTION D 5 LANES TWO-WAY LEFT TURN OR MEDIAN � � � � � � � � I� � � i � � � i � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CROSS SECTION E �,�• ,� 6'-8' 6' 5' 11' 5idewalk Planter Bike 12' ;--� CenterLane 11' _ 5' _ � 6' 6'-8' ?,, e--� Bike Planter 5idewalk Lane _ Recommended KOW 72'-76' Existing Code ROW 60'-BO' With On-Street Bike Lane �,� 2' 8'-12' Sidewalk & Bike 6' � 12' � 12' � 12' F-- anter CenterLane 64'-72' Recommended ROW 6B'-76' Existfng Code ROW 6d-80' Without On-5treet 8ike Lane _ 6'_ � 8'-12' 2 F� Planter 5idewalk & Bike 3 LANES, 2-WAY LEFI' TURN CENTER LANE Figure III-7 CROSS SECTION F 2 LANES, PLANTED MEDIAN 0 8' 6' 6' F---� Sidewalk Planter Bike Lane 14' � 8' � —��---�r 2 Lanes w 14' with 8' Medlan 14' 6� _' � 6' � 8' —��--�—�F----� Bike Planter Sidewalk Lane Exfsting Gack ROW 60'-80' With On-5treet 8ike Lane Figure III-8 r � �r � r■ir �r � +rs rs +� �w �s �r �r r � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CROSS�SECTIOI`d G 2 LANES, NO MEDIAIV m� 5' H 81ke Lane Ezisting Gal6 RON/ 6P-� With Curb 12' I 12' 2 Lanes � 12' 56' Raommeru�e R O w6 o' Exiating Coda ROW 60'-BO' No-Curb CaSe 5' �— 8lke Lane C�iQi Figure III-9 CROSS SECTION H 2 LANES, NO MEDIAN, WITH PARKING 6' 6' 8' � H 5idewalk Planter Parked Car 12'-14' 12'-14' --� 2 LaneS @ 12'-14' Recommended ROW 60'-64' Without On-Street Bike Lane 6' 6� ' � 8' E_��.�. Sidewalk Planter Parked Car 11.5' ( 11.5' —��— 2 Lanes � 11.5' Recommencled ROW 64 Exieting CoAe ROW 60'-70' One-5ide Bike Lane Only Figure III-10 6' 6' Planter 5idew; 5' 6' 6' H 8(ke Planter 5idew Lane �r � � � �r � �r a� r � � �r� � � r r � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CROSS SECTION I 2 LANES, NO MEDIAN Figure III-11 Local �cce55 �treet ExiSting Exisuny coae Row so' Local �cce55 5treet New CROSS SECTION J 3 LANES, WITH PARKING �y 12'-18' � 8' �� 12' � 12'� 12' 8' 12'-18' � Ped/Bike i'arking 3 LaneS � 12' Parking Ped/Bike 76'-88' Recommcnded ROW 80'-92' ExisUng Code ROW 60'-70' Without On-Street Bike Lane Figure III-12 �� r� �� rr r a� r �r +�w �rs r� �w rr r ar �� 6rieting Lode ROW 60'-70' With On-Street Bike Lane � �r � �r � r w� �r � � � i■r +� r � r � � � CROSS SECTION K 2 LANES, WITH PARKING Z ! 12'-18' � 12' � 12' � 12' �� 12_� 12'-18' MJn � 5idewalk Parking & 2 LaneS C� 12' Parking & 5idewalk Bike Bike rz�-ea�� Recommencled ROW 76'-B8' ExisUng CoAe ROW 60' � With On-5treet Bike Lane 2� 12'-18' 8' 12' 12' � 8' � I� 12'-18' din � - s�r��E Ped/Bike Parking 2 Lanes C� 12' ' Parking � Ped/Bike 64'-76' Recommended ROW 68'-8CJ' Exigting Code ROW 60' Without On-5treet Bike Lane Figure III-13 � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Street Standards As the transportation system evolves, changes to the subdivision code and street standards will be needed. These provisions convey the vision of the plan in greater detail. Similaz to the classification map, they guide the development process activities. For example, components of the subdivision code can require certain types of street standards (e.g. widths, parking, etc.) to support designated transit compatible development. Street design standards show preferred cross sections for each arterial and street segment in the City. Changes to the code and standards would take place after plan adoption. Level of Service (LOS) Standards Level of Service (LOS) on a street or roadway is a qualitative description of traffic flow conditions during a specific time period. This measure considers travel conditions as perceived by motorists and passengers in terms of travel speed, travel time, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions, delays, comfort, and convenience. Levels of service have traditionally been given letter designations from A through F, with LOS A repre- senting the best operating conditions, and LOS F repre- senting the worst conditions. Level of service is quantified differently for roadway segments as opposed to intersections. For example, on roadway segments the LOS can be defined by the general spacing of cars traveling on the street and their level of interference with one another. At intersections, however, the LOS can be defined by the length of delay a driver experiences in passing through the intersection or waiting to turn into or out of a side street. The definitions for each level of service and methodologies for calculating LOS are contained in Transportation Research Board Special Report 209, Highway CapacityManual (1985, updated 1995). Level of service is used by the Ciry of Federal Way for two primary purposes: (1) to calculate the amount of transportation facilities the Ciry needs in the future, and (2) to measure the adequacy of the public services which serve existing and proposed development. The first use of LOS is addressed in this section, in which alternative improvement scenarios are evaluated against these levels of service. The second use of LOS relates to the "concurrency" requirement of GMA, as described in Section 3.10. The two uses of LOS utilize the same basic standards and methodology, such that consistency is maintained. Table III-S Access Classification S stem Cha ter 468.52 WAC 7-14-94 Minimum Posted Typical Planned Planned Prtvate Speed Medtan Treatment Intersection Connection Class Functional Characteristics (MPI� Spacing" Spacing" 1 High speed/vohane, laig trips aerving: intastate, interregional, SO to SS Restrictive, where multi- 1.0 mi 1320 feet. One per intercity havel. Savice W abutting laod subordic�ete W suvice lane is wartanted parcel of major trafl'ic mwemenu. 2 Medium W high speeds/volumes, medium W long trips ucving: Urban: Restrictive. wherc multi- 0.5 mi. 660 feet One per intertegional, intercity, intracity travet. Service W abutting land 35 W 50 Ime is wurmted. percel subordinate W service of �c mwemmc Rural: 45 to 55 3 Moderau speeds/volumes, shott trips serving: intercity. intra- Urban: Ratrictive where multi- Rival: 0.5 mi 330 fcet city, intercommunity travel. Balance betwem land access and 30 W 40 lane is wacranted Two- Ucban: mobility. Uud where land uu is less than maxim�un bwldout, Rural: way le8-t�an lane may be 0.5 mi/less with signal but development potential is high 4S w 55 utilined progFession analysis. 4 Moderate speeds/volumes, short trips serving: intercity. intra- Urbm: Non-restrictive Rural: 0.5 mi 250 feet city, intercommuniry travel. Balance between land access and 30 W 35 Urban: mobiliry. Used wfiere level of development is morc intensive R�ual: 0.5 mi/leaa with si�al and tnejor land uae change.+ less likdy than class 3. 35 to 45 progression analysis. 5 Low w moderate speeds, moderate W Itigh vol�a, pnrtmnly 25-35 Non-restridive 0.25 125 feet shoct trips in intracity and inVacommunity travel. Seevice of mi/leas with si�al land access dominant function. progrossion analysis Note: Thrs table u for aummary purposes only and is not rncluded in the WAC Sourct (WSD07) •Ses text ojths WAC for RaccepHons � � i � ' � � � ' � C-1 � � � r � C J III-30 � -- �w � a� w�r � � r � w +�r r� �r �w �r � � � � � �� Federal Way Access Management Classifications LEGEND � Limited Access - � - - Class 3 Interstate Facilities aze not subject to access management classification Note: All City-owned arterials will have Class 4 access restrictions except the segment of S. 320th shown, which will be Class 3. arvoF G �� ��L Map III-7 Los Standard - The City's goal is to maintain or itnprove upon a PM peak hour roadway Level of Service so that it is at least as good as conditions e�usting today. The plan expects some change in the present patterns of travel behavior through increased use of modes, such as walking, bicycling, transit, car pooling, and vanpooling. Some worsening of peak period roadway congestion is still likely. Los Methodology - Within urbanized areas, most of the roadway congestion occurs at signalized intersections. However, it is not always practical to measure tr�c flows at every inter-section, and this type of detailed analysis does not provide a full perspective on how well the overall road-way network is performing. Due to the complex nature of traf�c flows and the abiliry of motorists to take altemative routes for similar trips, the City of Federal Way has selected a LOS methodology which is an expansion of the traditional LOS measurements presented in the Highway Capacity Manual. The Ciry uses the following two criteria for measuring LOS. Corridor and Roadway Segment Volume/Capacity (i�/C) Ratio - The traditional volume%apaciry (v/c) ratio directly compazes the volume on a roadway segment with the capacity of that segment to carry tr�c volumes. The ratio, expressed in a range as shown in Table III-6, can then be approximately equated to the A through F LOS indicators described above. The capaciry of the roadway segment reflects the condition of the road (e.g. width of lanes, amount of driveway disturbances, whether there exists a left tuming lane, etc.) and the type of traffic control along its length (e.g. frequent traffic signals reduce capacity). This LOS methodology is used to evaluate individual roadway corridors, intersections, and to set priorities for roadway improvements. The City chooses this methodology to determine development impacts and mitigations. The LOS standazd within the City's corridors and intersection is established not to exceed v/c = 0.9 or E. Table III-6 Level of Service and V/C Ratio Level of Service Volume/Capacity Ratio A-D Less than 0.75 E 0.75 to 0.90 F Over 0.90 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Citywide Congested VehicleMiles ofTravel - In analyzing alternative measures of LOS, the City chose a level of service methodology for planning purposes based on Congested Vehicle Miles of Travel during the evening peak hours as the most appropriate indicator of cirywide traf�ic conditions. Vehicle Miles of Travel (VMT) is the product of the number of vehicles on the road times the distance traveled by the vehicles. Using the City's traffic model, the amount of VMT was calculated for several levels of traffic congestion. In this analysis, congestion was defined by each arterial which had a volume/capacity ratio exceeding 0.90 (refer to Table Ill-�. In 1990 (used as a baseline for existing conditions) approximately 24 percent of the arterial lane miles operated during the PM peak hour at LOS F. CurrentLos Deficiencies -Map III-8 illustrates the current PM peak hour level of service deficiencies on Federal Way's arterials. This figure indicates that South 320th Street, Pacific Highway South (SR 99), Dash Point Road, Enchanted Pazkway, Military Road, South 356th Street, and portions of South 348th Street are among the most congested corridors in Federal Way. These are the primary routes that carry commuters, shoppers, business trips, freight and goods, and other vehicles throughout the day and especially during peak periods. Future Los Deficiencies - Map III-8 also illustrates the expected 2010 PM peak hour level of service deficiencies for the "current trends."Map III-9 depicts congested streets with "recommended plan" improvements. The current trends condition assumes that limited roadway improvements would be made on the existing street system, while the recommended plan includes significant improvements to several major and minor arterial routes. Without improvements, South 320th Street, Pacific Highway South (SR 99), Dash Point Road, Enchanted Pazkway, Military Road, South 356th Street, and portions of South 348th Street would remain the most congested corridors in Federal Way. The recommended plan would improve conditions along SR 99, South 356th, South 320th (west of SR 99), Military Road, and portions of South 348th. L__i �� ' r -, ''I �� � � i � i � L� , C� J ' i � � � ���_32 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Congested Streets If No Improvements LEGEND Existing Deficient Streets - - - - - - - - - Additional Deficient Streets in 2010 With No Further Improvements NOTE: Congestion is V/C>0.90 in PM peak hour anoF G �� �E�zA� Map III-8 Congested Streets With Recommended Plat� Improvements LEGEND 2010 Congested Street Segments * NOTE: Congested V/C > 9 �oF G �� � EJZAL Map III-9 � � � � � � � � � � ! � � � � � � � � � Federat Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation , � Year 1990 , 2010 2010 ' , � � ' � , ' ' � ' Alternative Existing Conditions Current Trends Recommended Plan Table III-7 v Conditions (PM Peak Congested Lane- Miles 31.9 52.3 38.2 System Level of Service Analysis - A brief summary of the Congested VMT levels generated during the analysis are shown in Table Ill-7. With limited roadway improvements in the 2010 Current Trends Alternative, the number of lane-miles of congested arterial roadways in Federal Way will increase from 31.9 to 52.3, an increase of 64 percent from 1990. Also, the total amount of vehicle miles of travel showing congestion will increase significantly during the PM peak hour, while the percent of VMT which is congested rises from 24 to 33 percent. The 2010 Recommended Plan will also show an increase in overall Vehicle Miles of Travel (up 26 percent), but the percentage of overall VMT showing congestion would actually go down, in comparison to existing conditions. This generalized analysis indicates that the Recommended Plan would provide a Level of Service which is comparable to existing conditions, while ac- counting for a significant growth in overall travel demand within the city over the next 15 years. Los on State Facilities - In the 2010 Current Trends Alternative, the entire portion of I-5 in the Federal Way planning area will experience severe peak-direction congestion (v/c>0.90) in the PM peak hour. Most of SR 99 and SR 161, as well as major portions of SR 18 and SR 509, will also be congested. The "Recommended" Alternative shows similar conditions, although traffic congestion along SR 99 and SR 161 would be somewhat reduced. � These state facilities form the backbone of Federal Way's transportation network. Therefore, the City will continue to coordinate with the WSDOT and PSRC ' regarding acceptable LOS standazds and plans for improvements to state facilities. L' � Congested Vehicle Miles I Percent Congested VMT of Travel (VMT) 25,992 � 24% 47,492 � 33% 32,871 � 21% Street and Roadway Improvement Plan Table Ill-8lists major street and roadway projects which are included in the 2010 recommended transportation plan. The locations of these projects are shown inMap III-10. These projects will have the most significant impact on reducing corridor and system congestion within the City. A full listing of recommended street and roadway improvements is provided in the Transportation Improvement Program, described in the "Implemen- tation Strategies" section. The WSDOT has jurisdiction over the state lughways in the city. These include not only I-5 but SR 18, SR 99, SR 161, and SR 509 (Dash Point Road). However, since many residents depend on these and other state facilities in the region, it is important to the City's plan that the Ciry consider the policies and efforts of the DOT. The City is responsible for the maintenance of State routes (except I-5 and SR 18 east of 16th Ave South) within the City limits and for the issue of right-of-way use permits subject to WSDOT review. The State has enacted several policies to relieve the various problems facing travelers. These policies include: ■ Improvement of personal mobility (emphasizuig movement of people and goods, over vehicles). ■ Enhance transportation to support economic opportunities. ■ Coordination of (and with) regional transportation planning and implementation. ■ Improved energy and environmental efficiency. ■ Promotion of public-private and public-public partnerships. ' i�1-35 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Trensportation � Table III-8 Ma'or Street and Roadwa Im rovements # Facility From To DescripNon of Improvements - 1 Military Rd S S 272nd S 288th Widen to five lanes - provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. 2 Military Rd S S 288th 31 st S Widen to three lanes - provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition (incl. S 304th to 28th S). 3 S 356th lst S SR 161 Widen to five lanes - provisions for bicyeles, sidewalks, signal modification, illumination, Iandscaping, property acquisition, coordina6on with rogional storm detention. 4 S 312th 28th S Military Rd S Construct overerossing of I-5, construct new (#) lane roadway, provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. 5 S 312th Military Rd S 51 st S Construct new (#) Iane roadway, provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. 6 SR 99 S 272nd Dash Pt Rd Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 7 SR 99 Dash Pt Rd S 312th Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 8 SR 99 S 312th S 320th Construet Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 9 SR 99 S 320th S 340th Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both direc6ons. 10 Dash Pt Rd SR 99 1 st S Widen to three/four lanes. 11 S 316th W Valley Hwy Extension. 12 I-5 SR 18 SR-161 Construct collector/distributor roads beside I-5 to extend the SR-18 interchange south to SR-161. 13 SR-161 SR 18 Military Widen to five lanes, eurb, gutter, and sidewalk illumination. ■ Improvement of freight and goods mobility. ■ Enhancement of transportation to support tourism. ■ Promotion of land use patterns to improve mobility. ■ Improvement of public transportation. ■ Enhancement of transportation system efficiency (i.e., management). ■ �nproved air quality. The City's plan has been developed in awareness of these policies and the supporting programs. As a result, the City's plan is in compliance with the WSDOT's direction and vision. The transportation plan for Federal Way will rely on the State in the following action areas: ■ HOV system completion on I-5 and other freeways. ■ Implementation of the State System Plan. This plan identifies, in priority order, the need for maintenance, preservation, safery, economic initiatives, environ- mental retrofit, and mobility (capacity) improve- ments. The latter are not likely to be fully funded and may therefore affect the implementation of the following WSDOT projects: ■ HOV access improvements, primarily IS medians. ■ Interchange improvements for I-5 from SR 18 to SR 161. ■ Overpass/underpass improvements for I-5 at South 312th. ■ Arterial HOV and other enhancements on SR 99 north from South 272nd to South 348th. ■ Improvements to SR 509 (Dash Point Road) between SR 99 and 21st SW. ■ SR 509 extension from Burien along the western and southem sections of SeaTac Airport south to I-S with the most southerly alternative connecting at South 272nd Street. III-36 ' ' � ' ' � � � � ' ' � � , � � � , � � � � � � � � � �■ � r � � � � � � � Recommended Major Street Improvements LEGEND �- Street section with Major improvements recommended � Listing # in Table II-6 (Not a Priority ranking) arvoF G �� �EI'zFaL Map III-10 The SR 509 extension north from Tacoma to the new SR 167 connection on I-5 at Fife. This extension will likely occur in the 2010 planning horizon. To have I-5 and 509 coincident along I-5 from Fife to South 272nd would be consistent with this plan. An option which would place added SOV and truck tr�c on SR 99 would not be consistent with this plan. ■ Continued improvements to monitoring, with possible provision of information systems regarding travel conditions. ■ Right-of-way acquisition for rail and the above improvements before construction. ■ The addition of pazk and ride lots and added capaciry for existing ones. This includes the planned lot on 21st SW at SW 344th. ■ SR 18 improvements east of SR 99. ■ Advanced vehicle identification (AVI) on SR 99 to provide transit priority. I-S HOYLanes - As noted in the section on transit and HOV's, the major improvement along I-5 anticipated by the State is completion of the core HOV improvements south to the Pierce County line. These changes are con- sistent with the assumptions included by the City in its analysis efforts, and support the concepts envisioned in the plan. On a more long-range basis, WSDOT has embarked on an effort to plan the next generation of improvements to the HOV system on I-5 (and other regional facilities). This effort will identify ways to improve HOV and transit access to the freeway (predominately along the medians of these highways). Such concepts are, again, consistent with this plan. SR 509 - Two projects will affect this facility; both out- side the City of Federal Way. To the north, there is on- going planning for extension of SR 509 from Burien along the westem and southem sections of SeaTac Air- port to I-5. Four altematives are being investigated through an EIS process. The most southern of these four I-5 connections is at South 272nd at the northern edge of the City. A new interchange with I-5, and improved park and ride options, would be features of this alternative. Overall, it is seen as consistent with the concepts em- bodied in this plan. City staff is involved in review of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Tra�sportation EIS, which is anticipated to be complete in mid-1995 The second modification to SR 509 will be south of Federal Way. SR 167's connection to Tacoma from Puyallup will be improved during the planning horizon. As part of this effort, the connection with SR 509 in Tacoma will be modified. The State has not resolved the issues of modifying this connection. Analyses will look into the best methods to accomplish this connectioq and will likely examine how best to connect to an improved SR 509 to the north (see preceding paragraph). An option to have I-5 and 509 coincident along I-5 would be consistent with this plan. An option which would place added SOV and truck traffic on SR 99 would not be consistent with this plan. Other Action Areas The Regional Transit Authority (RTA) is reviewing a high capacity transit system alternative for a second vote in early 1996. The City plan identifies stations/transit centers on or neaz the SR-99 corridor at South 272nd Street, South 316th Street, South 336th Street, and South 348th Street. If the vote fails, the transit centers would be for bus transit only. The integration of the road system for vehicles and buses with high capacity transit is incorporated into this plan. METRO and Pierce Transit provide bus and park & ride facilities to Federal Way. These are also identified and integrated into the Ciry's plan. King County, Pierce County, Tacoma, Kent, Auburn, Algona, Pacific, Milton, and Des Moines presently border Federal Way. An integrated street system with these adjoining jurisdictions is incorporated into this plan. The RTA's preliminary alternatives include regional bus service to connect transit centers. These could connect Federal Way to the south with Tacoma, Auburn, and Puyallup/ Fort Lewis. , ' ' � i! �___. �� u � � , C� ' L. J ' , � , Transportation Goals & Policies , It is proposed that the City adopt the following goals and policies with respect to transportation facility improve- ments which allow it to maintain options into the future; especially with respect to transit enhancements. This may result in a conservative approach to highway improvements which might slow the rate of progress in the azea of non-SOV mode use. 111-38 � i � i �� � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Goal TG2 Provide a safe, efficient, convenient, and ' economic street system with su,f, j`'icient capacity to move people, goods, and services at an appropriate level of service. , ' ' � ' , ' � , r ' ' ' ' , , The City shall develop and adopt policies for the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, and preservadon ofnew and existing facilydes, such as gravel and substandard streets. Policies Policies which affect streets and roadways aze divided into five categories: General, Functional, Safety, Multi- modal, and Community/Aesthetic. General TP15 Specify an appropriate arterial LOS which balances the economic, ecological, accessibiliry, and livability needs of city residents, consumers, employers, and employees. TP16 Establish a LOS standard based on a planning methodology using VMT congested to measure the LOS citywide, and an operation methodology for development impact, mitigation corridors, and intersections based on LOS E= v/c < 0.9 TP17 Expand arterial capacity by constructing channelization improvements at intersections when they are an alternative to creating new lanes along the entire roadway. TP18 Deternune street classifications by balancing travel needs with changing right-of-way uses and neighborhood character. TP9 Identify and implement changes to the trans- TP19 Limit single-occupant vehicle capacity increases portation system which reduce reliance on the to those required to maintain the existing LOS, single occupant vehicle. Support state, regional, either by providing new streets or by widening and local visions and policies. existing streets. Maintain existing and preserve future street connections vital to system integrity. TP10 Protect existing and acquire future right-of-way consistent with functional classification cross section (transit, rail, bike, and pedestrian) needs. Require developments to dedicate full right-of- way as needed with subdivision development, or with over 50 percent redevelopment. TP20 Take advantage of opportunities to open new road connections to create route altematives, especially in areas with few access choices. TP21 Enhance traf�ic circulation and access with closer spacing of through streets as follows: TPl l Coordinate street and roadway improvement programs with appropriate state, regional, and local agencies. TP12 Maintain the transportation forecasting model for use in impact analysis, capital facilities planning, and monitoring of the plan. TP13 The maintenance and preservation of existing streets, roadways and related infrastructure shall take precedence over major street improvement projects that enhance system capacity. Functional TP14 Provide access between major development areas identified in the recommended alternative, while improving business access and protecting city neighborhoods. a. Arterial streets at least every 1,200 feet in single family zones and every 600 feet in non-single family zones b. Collector streets every 600 feet in single family zones and every 600 feet in non- single family zones. Safety c. For street spacing in the City Center, see the City Center chapter. TP22 Minimize the number of curb cuts on arterials to improve pedestrian and vehicle safety. TP23 Minimize through tr�c on residential streets by maximizing through travel opporiunities on arterial and collector access streets. III-39 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TP24 Consider safety first in the design of intersection improvements. TP25 Allow improvements to traffic flow only where they contribute to traf�'ic and pedestrian safety, high capacity transit and HOV system enhancements, and reduce air pollution. TP33 Acquire rights-of-way for high capacity transit whenever possible in advance of their need, and make accornmodadons for any improvements, _ whether public or private, to provide for future high capaciry transit needs without major redevelopment (e.g., locate structures so they would not need to be altered to accommodate future high capacity transit facilities). TP26 Employ traf�ic calming measures in neighborhoods (where feasible) where traffic Communiry/Aesthetic volumes and speeds on local streets consistently exceed reasonable levels. TP34 Design arterials to fit with the planned character of the area they pass through. TP27 Prohibit parking on arterial and collector streets except on low volume business district streets in TP35 Minimize visual distraction to drivers on City Center when neither safety nor transit arterials. operations would be compromised. TP28 Improve safety on residential streets by: TP36 Make arterial travel a pleasing visual experience. TP37 Keep through tr�c to state routes and arterials. a. Reducing street widths while maintaining on- Discourage the use of local or neighborhood street parking streets for through movements (unless part of an overall process of creating a street grid). b. Increasing separation between sidewalks and streets. Multimodal TP29 Reduce reliance on the single occupant auto by prioritizing and implementing supportive local level transit, HOV, and non-motorized improvements. TP30 Identify and plan for multi modal freeway, arterial, and collector street improvements which ensure more efficient use of existing roads and enhancement of HOV, transit, and related non- motorized operations. TP31 Integrate the traffic circulation network with high capacity transit, HOV, bicycle, and pedestrian networks with consideration to regional system needs, including air and port facilities. TP32 Structure the Ciry's improvement program to strategically place increments of public and private investment that complement the multi modal vision of the plan. This should include "matching" improvements to supplement the efforts by other agencies to provide HOV and transit facilities. TP38 Include sufficient area in rights-of-way for bike trails, sidewalks, and landscaped medians to pro- vide separation from motorized tr�c as funds allow. Use landscaped medians to separate opposing traffic when safety and aesthetic pur- poses dictate the need. 3.2 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (TSM) Transportation Systems Management (TSM) focuses on maximizing use of the existing systems travel capacity. The concept was first originated in the mid-1970s by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Since that time, it has been applied in a host of different ways in cities and metropolitan areas azound the country. More recently, the 1991 Federal Transportation Act (ISTEA) expanded the vision of TSM introducing the term Congestion Management Systems (CMS). The terms CMS and TSM are synonymous in this document. Again, the focus of TSM is to identify ways to manage the transportation system (usually streets and highways, from a local agency perspective) to maximize the carrying capacity of existing facilities. TSM activities III-40 ' ' ' ' , ' � ' ' ' ' ' ' ' , ' , ' ' ' , C J � _J � ' � �' ' � ' L__J L� L__I , ' ' ' � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation can include new construction, but they typically modify an existing faciliry. TSM options can be grouped into the following categories: ■ Geometric Improvements ■ Controls and Restrictions ■ Signalization Improvements ■ Capacity Enhancements Such improvements are under the City's control. While there are national and state level guidelines, the City's adopted design standazds guide the design of these improvements. Sometimes called Spot Improvements, their low cost and net increase in efficiency make them particularly popular. These groupings cover a host of alternative actions. Not all are appropriate for a city to undertake. The more populaz and successful ones are listed in Table III-9, TSMStrategies Applicable to Federal Way. Geometric Improvements The term Geometric Improvements refers to projects intended to "re-shape" the physical layout of roads.. Through reported problems and periodic monitoring (see section on Monitoring which follows), isolated improvements can be defined which will improve the operation of traffic and increase safety. Signalization Improvements Signalization improvements include trat�ic signal installation or removal, and operational strategies. Historically, the Ciry has relied on other agencies to service its tr�c signals. The County has maintained some signals under contract to the City, while the State has operated those on certain state routes. This has produced a fragmented approach to traffic control. Recognizing this, the City recently initiated a program to create a central computer system to control key intersections in the Ciry Center (Core) azea. This program will consolidate all signals under King County- contracted maintenance and operation. Table III-9 TSM Strate ies A licable to Federat Wa Strategy Low or None High Geometric Improvements -Channelization ✓ -Bus Tumouts ✓ -Exclusive Turn Lanes ✓ -Intersection Widening ✓ Signalization Improve»�ents New Signals ✓ -Signal Removal ✓ -Coordination ✓ -Timing/Phasing Optimiza6on ✓ -Monitoring ✓ Controls/Restridions -Tum Prohibitions ✓ Access Management ✓ -Driveway Restrictions/Removal ✓ -Signing ✓ Capacity Enhancements Arterial Frontage Roads ✓ Railroad Over-crossings ✓ -Intcrsection Grade Separation ✓ III-41 Traffic along South 320th Street, South 348th Street, and SR 99 will benefit from coordination and improvement to signal timing and phasing. A decrease in delay of about 25 percent was forecast in an earlier study. The cost of such improvements has been shown to be rapidly recovered by this reduction in delay to drivers. Air quality is also enhanced with fewer unnecessary stops. In additioq transit reliability will increase. Coordinated signal systems require periodic attention to maintain their efficiency because traffic conditions change over time. In contracting its signal operations work, the City recognizes this. While Federal Way is not directly operating the signal systems, it has focused on hiring traffic personnel in the Public Works department who have experience in this area and can manage the contracted work. Monitoring of the system is another activity which the City controls directly. Whether or not the Ciry operates the signals, a monitoring and reporting program should be set up. This would include the gathering of traffic information, its processing, and the reporting of the results in a systematic fashion. Changes in operating conditions should be reported to responsible officials on a regulaz basis and should be used as part of the prioritization process in making local improvements (see section on Implementation Strategies). Controls and Restrictions Traf�ic controls and restriction aze another means to manage traffic flow efficiency. They can be instituted by the City on its facilities. Further, the State Department of Transportation encourages the City to manage access to state routes in the Ciry, often by use of controls and restrictions. (See the Roads and Streets section for access management category designations.) Controls and restrictions are of�en placed where recurrent safety problems have been noted. Signing, which is a form of traffic control, is important to the motoring public. One component often overlooked is directional or informational signing. Another reminds travelers of regulations. Since a number of jurisdictions operate roads in and about Federal Way, a compre- hensive effort to coordinate signing would be useful in placing street improvements. Such a system would route motorists and other travelers to the most appropriate route (see section on Intelligent Traveler Systems). Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Tranaportation Capacity Enhancements Capacity enhancements typically include road widening. They are construction oriented (as opposed to oper- ational), and are often placed to assure an existing road segment operates as ef�iciently as nearby segments. For example, traffic monitoring might indicate a section of freeway carries more local, short trips than long distance, through trips. By adding a parallel frontage road, the freeway might operate more efficiently. Another example might consist of two heavily used streets being grade separated at their intersection point to accommodate flow. Intersections such as South 320th Street at SR 99, South 348th Street at SR 161, and South 348th Street at SR 99 may be considered for such improvements in future planning cycles. Capacity enhancements typically are higher in cost than other TSM strategies. Funding from outside sources is limited. Therefore, such projects must be carefully justified. ' ' ' ' J �, � � , Advanced Technolo and TSM ' 9Y Applications of new technology can also be categorized as TSM measures. Originally called Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems and now known as Intelligent Traveler Systems, they are being rapidly developed for all modes of travel. Key to many of them is improved traveler information. As described further below, their application holds great merit for managing congestion, improving safery, and informing travelers of multiple travel options. An Intelligent Traveler Systems Plan was recently prepazed for the State of Washington. Directed by WSDOT, it established a framework for implementation of a variety of ITS options. Table Ill-1 D lists the main categories of ITS application, their relative applicabiliry in Federal Way, and the degree of impact each might have on the Ciry's vision and plan. TSM Projects � u � , lJ ' � ,_� The following projects have been identified under the , City's TSM program. r m-a2 � ' Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � ' ', 1 ' , ' ' ' �-- � 1 ' � ' 1 L�J � , Table III-10 Intelli ent Traveler S stems TTS A lications Federal Wa Degree of City Impact to Vision IVHS Category Ezample Application Area Control Public Trsnsit Monitoring of Transit Operations s► s► Automatic Fare Payment i� s► Dynamic Ridesharing s► s► ✓ HOV Lanes & Parking �' �' Priority Treatment ✓ HOV-Signal Priority �' �' HOV-Automated Highways s► s► ✓ Employcr-Based TDM itti6atives �► �' Vehicle Guidance & Control +�, }► Road Use Pricing H }► Ferry Management N/A N/A Traveler Information Traveler Information Databases s► �" Trip Planning (Pre-trip) +s� �' Trip Guidance En Route +s� s+ Vehicle Monitoring & Warning Systems +� +y Traftic Management Incident Detection & Management s► :► ✓ Traf�ic Network Monitoring �' �' Communica6on Systems :► :► ✓ Trat�ic Control Systems �' �" Construction Management s► s► Freight & Fleet Management Route Planning & Scheduling +�, }► Vehicle & Cargo Monitoring +� +s� Regul ry Support �' }► Internodal Port Transfers N/A N/A Other Services Emergency Service System Mgt. �" �► Enforcement Services �' s► Traveler Safety/Security ?► H Air Quality Monitoring & Pricing +L i► - High/Positive - Somewhat/Possibly - Low/Quesdonable ✓- Pura�u III-43 Traffic Signal Coordination TSMl Signal Coordination on SR 99 - South 288th to South 356th. Complete signal coordination along major arterial sections. TSM2 Signal Coordination on South 348th - I-S to 1 st South. Complete signal coordination along major arterial sections. Traffic Signalization TSM3 South 312th @ 8th Avenue South. Place traf�'ic signal to manage changing traffic conditions. TSM4 21 st Avenue SW @ SW 325th. Place traffic signal to manage changing tr�c conditions. TSMS SWDash PointRoad @ 4th Avenue South, or 8th Avenue SW. Install left turn lane and traffic signal. TSM6 SW Dash Point Road @ 21 st Avenue SW. Install right turn lane, tr�c signal, illuminate intersection TSM7 SW 340th Street @ 3Sth Avenue SW. Signalization and school crossing illumination. TSM8 South 336th Street Right Turn Lane @ SR 99. 150' Right Turn lane. TSM9 South 356th Street Right Turn Lane @ SR 99. 150' Right Tum lane. Intersection Improvements (Channelization, Geometrics, etc.) TSM10 ContinuingMinor Tra, f,JSc Improvements. Place signal revisions and other traffic controls at various locations to manage the dynamics�f short term changes in traffic conditions. TSMI l SW Campus Drive @ 6th Avenue SW. Install new traffic signal and left turn storage lanes. TSM12 South 320th @ SR 99. Redesign intersection to accommodate changing traffic patterns. TSM13 SW 340th @ Hoyt Road SW. Modify left turn lanes and signalize. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TSM14 South 336th @ 20th Avenue South. Add left turn lanes to accommodate changing traffic demand. TSM15 South 288th @ 20th South. Add left tum lanes to accommodate changing tcaffic demand. Transportation Goals & Policies Goal TG3 Extend the functional life of the existing trans- portation system and increase its safe, e�j`'icient operation through application ofTSM strategies. Policies TP38 The City will continue to implement traffic signal coordination projects as the primary component of its TSM program. As funds permit, monitoring of tr�c operations will be carried out to assure efficient timing of traffic signals. TP39 TheManual of Uniform Tra,fJSc Control Devices, developed at the federal level, will be employed in the design and placement of traffc controls. TP40 Public comments and requests will supplement routine traffic monitoring to identify and conect tr�c control needs, as well as other noted system deficiencies. TP41 Arterial HOV improvements will be constructed along key comdors to improve flow and encourage use of these more efficient modes. TP42 Minor capital projects, placing spot (localized) traffic improvements, will be cazried out to extend the capacity of system components. TP43 Capacity enhancements will be made where other, lower cost improvements will not conect deficiencies. They will be cazefully justified to compete for limited funds. 11I-44 ' � ' , , ' ' ' 1 ' � ' ' � ' , , , ' � � � , � ' ' � � LJ � !� � � ' � � � , Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TP44 Employers will be encouraged to institute complementing TSM actions to those under- taken by the Ciry. This will create consistency and understanding, thereby improving travel conditions. TP45 Intelligent Traveler System options will be monitored by City Traffic Staff, who will periodically recommend additional ITS-TSM options. TP46 Access Management, placing restrictions limiting left turns across major arterial streets, will be used to reduce accidents and extend capaciry of major arterials. TP47 As technology pernuts, and the ciry HOV system is implemented, opporninities will be sought to modify the signal coordination strategies to provide priority to HOV's. 3.3 NON-MOTORIZED MODES The two most popular modes of non-motorized trans- portation are walking and bicycling. Wallcing constitutes the greatest percentage of personal travel. Unfortunately, short trips (under one mile) are usually not counted in urban travel statistics. We make at least as many short trips as longer trips by motorized vehicles. When travel by younger generations is considered, the importance and magnitude of short trips can be better appreciated. As pointed out in a recent State Department of Com- munity, Trade, and Economic Development report, the popularity of bicycling has increased in the U.S. since the 1970s, especially in Washington. A 1991 survey found that 1.67 percent of Americans and 2.9 percent of people in the Western states commuted to work by bike in October 1990. This compares well to Federal Way. The Census Work Trip data for Federal Way reported slightly less than one percent bicycle use and about two percent walking for work trips in 1990.' Table III-11 summarizes the trip purposes reported in 1990 as part of the National Personal Transportation Study. ' Your Community's Tronsportation System, Department of Community Development, State af Washinpton, Olympie, WA, April 1993. Table III-ll Pur oses of Walkin and Bikin Tri s Purpose Walk Bike Work 11% 10% Shopping 18% 10% SchooUChurch 20% 14% SociaURecreational 34% 55% Other 17% 11% It is cleaz from this information that U. S. citizens have not discovered the bicycle as a commute vehicle, and that opportunities for walking to work are limited. It is possible that the location of jobs relative to homes and the lack of connections between major travel points contribute to this dilemma. Can this change? One needs only look to other nations to fmd examples of bicycle use, especially to access other modes of transportation. In Germany, for example 43 percent of arrivals at rail stations aze by bike. A 15 percent figure is common in Japan. Nationally, 54 percent of the population lives within five miles of their work place. There is a tremendous opportwuty for people to walk or bike if we provide safe, direct pedestrian, and bicycle facilities. Safery is another area of concern for pedestrians and cyclists. The WSDOT reports that the vast majority of pedestrians killed or injured aze struck while crossing the roadway, most often at intersections. Intersections aze also a contributing factor in bicycle accidents. Nearly half of all bicycle/automobile accident occur at inter- sections. The state is monitoring pedestrian and bicycle accidents as performance measures of the service objectives. Funding is no less an issue with non-motorized facilides than road and transit services. The ability of the City of Federal Way to provide non•motorized facilities is limited by funding sources and competing program needs. The extent of this constraint becomes apparent when the estimated $300,000 cost to provide needed wheelchair ramps for transportation disadvantaged persons in Federal Way is compared to the recent annual budget amount of $30,000. In summary, walking and biking do not appear to play a major role in satisfying urban travel needs at present. III-45 Federei Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation This will not occur until we provide a safe network of pedestrian and bicycle ways and development patterns that aze oriented towards pedestrians and bicyclists. Wallcing and bicycle ways are a potential means of providing increased accessibility for the full range of citizens; including young, old, and transportation disadvantaged. A safe network of non-motorized facilities will provide the opportuniry for recreational and commuter users to reduce their dependence on automobiles. ■ Identifying performance based strategies; [.�. � ■ Developing criteria for identifying regionally significant projects; , � ■ Establishing funding levels and financially constrained plans; ■ Developing better standards; ' ■ Ensuring consistency in planning among local � jurisdictions; State & Regional Coordination Issues On the federal and state level, coordinatioq planning and implementation of non-motorized facilities has gained significant sup-port as an alternative mode of transportation. The 1990 Internodal Surface Trans- portation Ef�iciency Act (ISTEA) emphasizes the benefits of non-motorized modes of travel and provides a revenue resource for funding planning and implemen- tation activities. The State of Washington has developed service objectives for bicycle and pedestrian trans- portation systems primarily to increase use and improve safety. The State has also defined the non-motorized systems in terms of state-owned and state-interest. The state-owned system refers to state highways, interstates, ferries, and Amtrak. "State-interest facilities are local, regional, or statewide facilities that are vital to the statewide economy and the mobility ofpeople and goods. " On a regional level, the Metropolitan Trans- portation Plan (PSRC 1995, MTP-3), identifies major issues to be addressed by the plan including: ■ Establishing priorities for funding; and, ■ Involving the public involvement and providing coordination. � To provide regional guidance and coordinatioq the MTP calls for a significant increase in facilities that support pedestrian and bicycle travel. The three components of the MTP strategy include development of a regional net- work of non-motorized transportation facilities, develop- ment of local networks for non-motorized travel, and development of a transit network that is fully accessible to pedestrians and bicyclists. These strategies aze consistent with and incorporated into the non-motorized chapter of Federal Way's Comprehensive Plan. To develop a faciliry plan and strategies for non- motorized modes of travel, attention to the perceived needs of regional and local users will help create a viable system. Table Il1-121ists the most common problems encountered and options for improvement. Table III-12 Non-Motorized User Problems and Solutions Problem Solution Alternatives Lack of Facilities, Route -Complete system elements and gaps. DiscontinuiGes -Review and condi6on new development. Trip Too Long -Interconnect developments and cul-de-sacs with trails. -Create closcr opportuni6es (jobs housing balance). Bike Security Add storage facilities at destination and on transit. Clothing/Cleanliness -Add showers, changing areas, and restrooms. Personal Security -Assure lighting, wider facilities, motorist compliance with laws. -Re-time signals. Where appropriate, separate from vehicles. Unaware of System -Designate (sign) routes. -Public education, advertising, provide maps. � � � � � � � � � �� � III-46 � � � � � � L.� � � �� u Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Pedestrian System Background Walking supports many trip purposes. Significant foot traffic occurs in areas with concentrations of children and high population densities, such as downtown and retail centers. Also, as the American population ages, higher numbers of elderly, who no longer can drive or who choose walking for exercise, are using walkways (sidewalks, paths, and trails). Planning for walkways requires an understanding of the pattems of foot tr�c and a decision on which tzips can be appropriately supported through investment by the public sector. For example, a communiry such as Federal Way, much of which has been built with neighborhood streets, may find it can only afford to place sidewallcs along major streets. For fmancial reasons, it may be necessary to accommodate foot and bicycle traffic on residential streets within the neighborhood, but provide pedestrian sepazation from traffic on busier streets through the placement of sidewalks. In 1992, pedestrian facilities were inventoried and are shown inMap Ill-11. This inventory has recently been revised. As noted in the figure, several arterial streets do not have sidewallcs or have sidewalks that are substandard. In 1993, the ciry adopted a policy that makes the city responsible for maintaining sidewallcs. A program to construct missing segments of sidewalk, or to construct sidewallcs only within certain arterial classification, may not be economically feasible. Pedestrian Improvement Options Facilities for pedestrians consist of more than sidewalks. Street lighting, hand/guazdrails, directional signing, wheelchair ramps, and traffic signal crossing indications are some of the amenities which need to accompany system considerations. Many existing facilities in Federal Way do not have these amenities and inhibit safe pedestrian improvement and access to transit. The actual provision of these amenities is usually assured through the adoption of design and construction standards, which aze applied to new or significantly reconstructed facilities, such as streets, subdivisions, public, and commercial buildings. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) calls for designs which provide access for the transportation disadvantaged, and aze required for all facilities affording public access. This act also requires the retrofitting of buildings and their access for the disabled. This applies to the need to place ramps at all crosswalks and intersections on City streets. There are also many older areas of Federal Way that have no sidewalks and pedestrian amenities, the lack of which tend to impair safe pedestrian movement. An assessment of needed pedestrian amenities and the condition of existing sidewalks needs to be camed out so that they can be prioritized, funded, and constructed. As the American public grows older, it will be increasingly necessary to consider their needs. A recent study by the Center for Applied Research reports that 20 to 40 percent of the elderly who do not drive depend upon walking for their travel needs. The report also points to the fact that traffic signals may fail to take the slow walking speed of these individuals into consideration. The Federal Highway Administration is presently considering the study's findings. While there is no immediate action required by the City, it is likely that municipalities such as Federal Way will be prornpted to give more explicit consideration of walking needs of the elderly in the future. A strategic objective for Federal Way's pedestrian system should be as follows: ■ Short Term Strategy. Initial improvements should aim at safety and complementing the transit system, making it more accessible. First, it is necessary to attend to the safety needs of pedestrians, correcting locations having high accident problems, and making ADA required ramp improvements. Then connections to the transit system can be made to provide a missing link in what could be a"seamless" public transit system. In extending the pedestrian system to provide access to the transit system, transit amenities such as bus shelters should also be provided. ■ Mid Term Strategy. Provide extensions to the walkway system. Logical, safe, and convenient connections to parks, schools, neighborhoods, retail areas, transit, and other points of attraction should be considered. The major interim extension of the network should provide connections to and within neighborhood and business centers. This will support the neighborhood area and concepts imbedded in the plan vision. The network of wallc-ways and trails on roadways needs to be integrated with the Pazks Comprehensive Plan and its trail system to provide for the needs of both recreation and the commuter. III-47 Inventory of Sidewalks on Major Streets (1992) LEGEND No Sidewalk •'•"'••••••••••••� Substandard Width Sft. or Greater NOTE: Sidewalk indications refer to both sides of street unless two line types are shown together. «noF � -�� �E1zAL— Map III-11 ! � � � � � � �'� � � � � � !� i � l� � �i Federal Wey Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � � � � � � � � � ' ■ Long Term Strategy. This should focus public and private investment in the core area of the city. At present the pedestrian system does not contribute to the identiry of the downtown. The future system must link comtnercial establishments, public open space, and public buildings with transportation facilities. Pedestrian faciliry development must be supported by zoning regulations and development review to make sure pedestrian access is accounted for and is consistent with this plan. Through a collective vision for the denser core area, this can become an attractive feature for Federal Way. Without it, the resulting pedestrian environment will remain cold and forbidding. BICYCLE SYSTEM Background The Federal Way Bicycle Advisory Committee (FWBAC), Federal Way's citizen advocacy group of bicycling enthusiasts, wishes to see Federal Way become one of the best cities for non-motorized modes of travel. Their goals are to make available to the citizens an interconnected network of bike trails for commute, utilitarian, and recreational users. Attached by this reference to the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan is the "Ciry of Federal Way Bicycle Plan," May 1994, which is intended to act as a guide for policy makers when making or planning for needed bicycle improvements in the greater Federal Way azea. The following summarizes key recommendations and gives some examples of possible programs: ■ ■ Staffing. PSRC's MTP aclrnowledges that com- munities with dedicated bicycle planners are more likely to have extensive programs for pedestrians and bicyclists, a well developed facility plan, and design standards for bicycle facilities. A Bike Planner is recommended to facilitate and implement non-motorized programs. This planner could also implement other components of the transportation plan such at TDM, grants, and the TIP. Education and Training. The public needs to be made aware of alternatives to the single occupancy vehicle (SOV) and that bicycles have equal rights to cazs on the road. Volunteers and FWBAC members could assist with education programs promoting safety. Programs for grade school children would be beneficial. Users could learn from "Bicycle Buddies." Programs such as "Safety Town" and bicycle rodeos teach children tr�c and bicycle safety. ■ Promotion. Bicycles need to be promoted as an altemative means of transportation for commuting and for recreation. Publications could have bike riding tips. Maps of bike routes need to be published. Nationally, 54 percent of all people work within five miles of work, an easy bike ride on safe trails or routes. ■ Enforcement. Cars and bicyclists that disobey the rules of the road make the roads less safe for everyone. Greater enforcement would be beneficial. ■ Plan. The adoption of a Non-Motorized Facilities Plan developed with the Comprehensive Trans- portation Plan will provide a classification of the types and locations of bike trails and routes to provide an interconnected network of trails to meet the needs of Federal Way. ■ Standards. The adoption of design standards for bicycle facilities will ensure that the safety and quality standards of the community are met. This includes trail widths, pavement markings, signs, bike racks, and lighting for both public and private facilities. Safery can be enhanced by identifying how intersections and driveways are designed and what kinds of catch basin lids and pavement markings are to be used. WSDOT and AASHTO have developed design standards for bicycle facilities. ■ Facilities. The TIP provides a prioritized listing of non-motorized improvements. These aze shown in Table Ill-13. A small Capitallmprovements category should be identified for improvements to non- motorized modes of travel, such as replacing catch basin grates that are not bike safe, to construct small improvements such as minor discontinuities of bike trails and to install signs and pavement markings. Major capital improvements for streets should incorporate non-motorized facilities. Additionally, prioritized projects just for bicyclists will also help provide a continuity for the principal bike trails shown on the Non-Motorized Facilities Plan and provide a basis to compete for available funding sources. � III-49 Federel Wey Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � Table III-13 TIP Non-Motorized Im rovements Location Improvement Cost Year BPA Trail Phase II 1 st Ave S to SW Campus Dr Trail Development 50.631 Million 1995 Military Road I-5 North to I-5 South 51.176 Mi(lion 1997 S 320th St Hoyt Road to I-5 50.010 Million 1995 S 312th St Dash Pt Rd to SR 99 50.308 Million 1999 SR 99 S 283rd St to S 373rd St 50.071 Million 1995 Dash Point Road SR99 to 21st Ave SW �3.933 Million 1995 Weyerhauser Wy S 320th St to S 349th St $0.652 Million 2000+ 21st Ave SW Dash Pt Rd to SW 349th St 54.140 Mi1Gon 1995 BPA Trail Phase III SW Campus Dr to SW 356th St Trail Development Unknown 2000+ Building owners and employers need to be encouraged to provide bicycle pazking, bicycle security, showers, and lockers. Transit agencies also need to be encouraged to provide bicycle parking, security, and a means of transporting bicycles so they can be used at trip destinations. ■ Funding. Reliable on-going funding is needed to accommodate the state, regional, and local goals in providing and supporting non-motorized modes of transportation. Grants are one source to pursue. The following is a list of national grant sources which indicates the level of interest in bicycling as transportation. ■ National Highway System ■ Surface Transportation Program (ISTEA) ■ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program ■ Federal Lands ■ Scenic Byways Program ■ National Recreational Trails ■ Federal Transit Title III Bicycle Improvement Options In competing for limited funding sources, it is essential that the bicycle system's chapters, like the pedestrian/ wallcway system, be programmed for implementation in a logical fashion. The following are the criteria proposed for establishing the prioritized order of improvements. They are listed in their recommended order of precedence. 1. Maintenance and operations. Maintenance of trails, signs, etc. Regular sweeping of trails. Safery Improvements: ■ Replace catch basin grates that are not bicycle safe. ■ Remove hazazds and minor discontinuities of trails. ■ Striping and pavement mazkings for bike trail delineation. ■ Signs. 2. Public and private development or redevelopment. Off-road developments. Schools. Parks. Subdivisions. 3. Roadway construction or reconstruction. Include bike trails as a part of all projects. 4. Trail construction projects which provide access to: ■ Transit. ■ Parks. ■ Neighborhood centers. ■ Libraries. ■ Work sites. ■ Churches. ■ Schools. 5. Completion of sections of the regional trail system (when identified by PSRC). � � � � � � ;� LJ L� � ,' III-50 � ,� � � � �� � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation 6. Creation of a commuter biking system. 7. Creation of a recreational biking system. Non-Motorized Facilities Plan To assist the City in identifying important facilities for non-motorized modes of travel, as well as provide guidance for the location of improvements in the non- motorized plan, a facility plan has been developed. Consistency and coordination with regional and other adjacent agency plans and projects will ensure a seamless system of pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Pierce County, Tacoma, and King County have to some degree identified important facilities. The Pierce County and Tacoma plan identify important bicycle connections at SW Hoyt Road, SW Dash Point Road and SW 356th Street. These connections are also continued on the Federal Way Plan. The closest regionally significant non-motorized facility to Federal Way is the Interurban Trail. Access east-west to the Interurban Trail from Federal Way is provided on shazed facilities on South 320th Street, South 288th Street, and South 272nd Street. The Federal Way Non-Motorized Facility Plan is shown inMap III-12. The State, Region (PSRC) and King County have identified improvements to non-motorized facilities to enhance non-motorized transportation. The FWBAC also identified improvements needed to accommodate non-motorized facilities. Improvements identified by FWBAC will be considered for submission to the Federal Way and Regional Transportation Improvement Programs. This plan illustrates the proposed system of designated bicycle facilities for the City. The complete system will be composed of three types of non-motorized facilities, classified as follows: Class 1 facilities aze separate trails, operating in their own rights of way. Class 2 facilities aze signed bike routes which operate jointly with roadways. Class 3 facilities are shazed road facilities. Under this plan, the most common element will be shared road facilities. Where there is sufficient right-of- way, cyclists can be allowed to share the road with motorized vehicles. No signing or striping will be placed on these facilities. The next most common element of the bicycle system will be a network of bike routes and bike lanes. Routes will be established where there is suf'ficient on street width to accommodate cyclists in traffic. To maintain continuity and guide travelers, the system will be signed with distinctive markers, possibly designed in a citywide competition. Where the needs of the cyclist and the demand warrant, Class 2 bike lanes can be installed using approved pavement marking techniques and signing. A limited number of Class 1 bike trails separated from vehicles will be provided through the plan. Key among these facilities will be a cross town trail along the BPA Power Line right-of-way, between l lth Avenue South at South 348th Street and SW 356th Street at about 19th Avenue SW. This facility will provide a non-motorized link between residential neighborhoods, the Aquatics Center, Panther Lake, and commerciaUretail areas that include Seatac Mall. Transportation Goais & Policies Non-motorized transportation facilities will be increasingly important to the City in meeting the travel needs of its residents and workers and to reduce our dependence on automobiles. The pedestrian and bicycle systems can be implemented through a prioritized series of improvements to complement the transit, and HOV systems as well as create a key link to business, cultural, recreational, and residential elements that are a part of the CityShape Vision. Goal TG4 Enhance community livability and trans- portation by providing a connected system of pedestrian and bicycle ways that is also integrated into a coordinated regional network. Policies TP48 Provide sidewalks on both sides of all arterial streets as funding allows. 111-51 Non-Motorized Facilities Plan LEGEND •••••••••• Classl (Separate Trail) Class 2 (Joint Use With Roadway) Note: All other streets in Federal Way, including those not shown, are Class 3. arvoc G �� � E�zAL Map III-12 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � 1 � � � �� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TP49 Incorporate bicycle routes either designated, signed, or marked onto all arterial streets. TP50 Incorporate pedestrian and bicycle features as design elements in the City Center as reflected in the CityShape Vision. TP51 Ensure that City facilities and amenities are ADA compatible. TP52 Work to extend the existing system of sidewalks, bikeways, and equestrian ways in the city to provide safe access to public transit, neighborhood and business centers, pazks, schools, public facilities, and other recreational attractions. TP53 Work with other agencies, particularly relating to regionally significant facilities, to pursue funding for pedestrian and bicycle amenities. TP54 Inform and educate the public on safery and use of non-motorized facilities. TP55 Ensure non-motorized facilities are safe and well maintained. Actions 1. Work with high capacity transit agencies to ensure such non-motorized travel amenities as shelters, benches, bicycle racks, lighting, and information kiosks aze incorporated in the design and improvement of transit facilities. 2. Establish a funding program which prioritizes the most critical non-motorized improvements first, while realizing opportunities for property owners, neighborhoods, or business groups to create portions of the system through public-private partnerships. 3. Establish and operate a system of safe school walking routes. 4. Emphasize the enforcement of laws that reduce pedestrian, cyclist, and vehicle conflict. 5. Improve public awareness of the laws that protect pedestrians and cyclists and of non-motorized facility locations. 6. Include maintenance of non-motorized facilities in the City's on-going transportation services program. 7. Acquire access easements between e�usting developments, cul-de-sacs, public facilities, business areas, and transit followed by trail construction to improve non-motorized circulation. Require the same for all new developments or redevelopments. 3.4 TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM) Several pieces of recent legislation have led the ciry into the realm of Transportation Demand Management (TDM). These include the State GMA, Commute Trip Reduction Act (CTRA), and federal level requirements under both the ISTEA and the Clean Air Act Amendments as reflected in the State Implementation Plan. The GMA cites the need for a variety of "management actions;" including the requirement that the transportation chapter of each plan shall include an identification of system expansion needs and transportation system management (TSIVn needs to meet current and future demands. The act gces on to note: After adoption of the Comprehensive Plan ...local jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a transportation facility to decline below the standards adopted in the transportation element of the comprehensive plan, unless transportation improvements or sfrategies to accommodate the impacts of development are made concurrent with the development. These strategies may include ...demand management and other transportation systems management strategies (emphasis added). The purpose of the following section is to provide recommendations on the appropriate approach to TDM for a suburban city such as Federal Way. 5ince the preponderance of employment is currently outside the Ciry, there can only be limited influence on traffic III-53 congestion within Federal Way by travel management through TDM. Options must be selected accordingly. Table III-14 stratifies various TDM alternatives by their functional grouping and the degree of control the City can exercise over that strategy, and its expected cost effectiveness. Fortunately, several of the more effective options are within the purview of the City. The Puget Sound Regional Council's (PSRC) Vision 2020 identified five basic strategies that overlap with those presented in Table Ill-14. These strategies are: ■ Telecommuting ■ Pazking Pricing and Subsidy Removal ■ Compressed Work Week ■ Employer-Based Management ■ Pazking Supply Strategies The PSRC also recognizes that the following issues must be addressed to support successful TDM implementation in the region: ■ Lack of data on effectiveness. ■ Emerging technological and social shifts. ■ Lack of regional coordination. ■ Need for TDM strategies to address non-commute trips. ■ Lack of funding fleJCibility to finance TDM investments. ■ Lack of alternatives to single occupant vehicle (SOV) travel. ■ Lack of public support. While TDM actions aze aimed at reducing travel demand or, at least, shifting it to more opportune travel times, several focus on consolidating person trips to fewer vehicles. The City views High-Occupancy Vehicle (HO� and transit use as key to reducing travel demand. As discussed in later sections, provision of on-street and off-street HOV facilities and controls will support this strategy. For example, arterial HOV lanes will complement the regional system. Similarly, traffic signal priority and preferential parking, access, and egress for HOV will further bolster the program. Effectiveness of TDM Alternatives Recently, Apogee Research conducted a study of the effectiveness of alternative TDM strategies. This work was camed out for the National Association of Regional Federal Way Comprehensiva Plan - Transportation Councils and provides interesting conclusions. Apogee's efforts looked into both the cost of TDM strategies and the relative reduction in the amount of travel (and air pollution) resulting from the efforts. Interestingly, this work identifies the least and the most effective strategies, wluch are suxnmarized in Table Ill-14. The researchers noted that land use planning and related strategies aze also potentially highly cost-effective but could not be quantified under the study. Commute Trip Reduction Act The Commute Trip Reduction Act was passed by the State Legislature in 1991. It is also a part of the State Clean Air Act. The intention of the law is to improve air quality, reduce traffic congestioq and decease fuel consumption. It focuses attention on larger employers with the intent of reaching concentrations of workers who might use shared-ride and non motorized modes to travel to and from work. Working from 1992 as the base year, employers are encouraged to reduce SOV use and vehicle miles of travel (VMT) by 35 percent in 1999. In 1992 the baseline characteristics were established for South King County (including Federal Way) at an 85 percent share to SOVs and an average trip length of 9.3 miles. In meeting the 1999 goal, SOV use would need to drop to SS percent and average VMT to six miles. In 1993, Federal Way adopted an ordinance consistent with the CTR guidelines. In adopting the ordinance, the City agreed to file an annual report on the program and to accept advice from METRO on altemative strategies which local employers might be encouraged to use in meeting the goals. The Ciry also agreed to conduct a review of its parking requirements as part of the process and to play an active role in the regional process. It is the City's intent to also set an example for other employers through the establishment of CTR programs among its employees. Based on recent (March 1995) surveys of Federal Way Employers, the 1995 SOV goal of 72.25 percent was not met. The actual SOV percent was 87.4 percent. Also, the 1995 Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) goal of 7.91 miles was not met. The average work site trip length was estimated as 12.9 miles and the average zone trip length was 9.07 miles. The overall mode split results from the survey are shown in Table III-1 S. Similar to the issues stated in the MTP; reasons for driving alone included convenience and a lack of alternatives. III-54 � �� � � � � � � �� � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � � � � � � �. � Table III-l4 TDM Strate ies Degree of Control Cos Effectiveness Grnup/Strategy None/Low Medium/High Low High HOV/ALTERNATIVE MODES Employer Trip Reduction ✓ Areawide Ridesharing � ✓ Transit Lnprovements ✓ ✓ Transit Service �/ Subsidies d HOV Lanes/System Enhanccments ✓ ✓ Bicycle & Pedestrian Facili6es �/ ✓ PARIQNNG Preferred Parking (HO� ✓ Reduced Requirements �/ Maximum Limits �/ Shared Parking Options �/ Neighborhood/Area Programs ✓ PRICIlVG Parking Pricing ✓ ✓ Congestion Pricing �/ ✓ Smog/VMT Tax ✓ Purchase of Older Vehicies �/ LAND USE Increased Densities �/ Friendly Design ✓ Incentives ✓ PEAK SPREADING Staggered Work Hours ✓ Flexible Work Hours �/ Compressed Work Weeks ✓ TRIP ELIMINATION Telecommu6ng ✓ III-55 Table III-1 S Federal Wa Mode S lit Surve Results Mode Mode Split SOV (Single Occupant Vehicle) 86% 2+ Carpool 04% 6+ Carpool Ol% Bus/Transit Ol% w� io°io Telecommute Ol% Did Not Work 02% Unknown 03% Recommendations Based upon the above, the following recommendations are made: Encourage voluntary expansion of the CTR Program to employers of less than 100 employees. The encouragement by employers may be as diverse as subsidized bus passes, carpool space prioriry, bike racks, shower facilities, van pools, caz pool information access, telecommuting, variable work hours, etc. 2. Encourage the formation and expansion of area- wide ride-sharing programs. Such programs operate with little direct cost to the City and are highly cost-effective. 3. Facilitate the creation of Park and Ride facilities and transit centers to supplement the regional system, either directly through acquisition of properiy or indirectly through development conditions where employer vans are required to shuttle employees to Pazk and Ride facilities or transit centers. 4. Facilitate enhancements to the HOV System. This may include the acquisition of properiy for HOV lanes, construction of arterial HOV lanes on City arterials and State highways, priority controls for buses at traffic lights, and through traf�ic develop- ment conditions. At the very least, opportunities to support improved access to the State system of HOV lanes should be identified and supported. Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation 5. Increase density of land uses, coupled with appropriate planning of a mix of uses near bus routes, pazk and ride lots, and transit centers through the adoption of the Comprehensive Plan and its supporking zoning. This policy is vital to the creation of a regional bus and rail system and will also be an effective way to reduce traf�c congestion and air pollution. 6. Encourage mini transit centers in the City Center, neighborhood shopping areas, and multifamily nodes, together with enhanced pedestrian and bicycle access and security. Improve pedestrian and bicycle access to bus routes and transit centers. This can be a requirement of subdivision, development, and redevelopment. The City may need to acquire easements and construct trail connections. Development incentives could be granted for providing such amenities that aze pedestrian, bike, and transit friendly. 8. While bicycle, pedestrian and bus transit services and facilities may be desirable for other reasons, they should not be looked on as highly cost-effective strategies to the exclusion of those actions listed above. Transportation Goals & Policies Through Transportation Management options, the City can maximize the effectiveness of the public investment dollar. Many jurisdictions aze fmding non-construction, or management actions, critical to the overall achievement of congestion management and protection of neighborhoods. As such, the Transportation Management goals for Federal Way can be expressed as follows. Goal TGS- a. Employ and promote the application of non- construction, and transit/HOYconstruction actions to preserve and enhance mobility and assist in achievement of the land use vision. b. Develop methods to successfully measure and achieve the following HOV & Transit mode split levels by the year 2010: III-56 � � �� � � , � �, � � � Federal Way Comprahensive Plan - Transportation � 1 S percent of all daily trips over one mile in length; � 30 percent of all work trips; and � � 40 percent of trips between major activity centers. � � c. � e. Assist all qualifying and voluntary employers in the Federal Way planning area achieve the Com- mute Trip Reduction Act travel reduction goals by the January 1, 1999, objective year and encourage other employees to also meet the goals. Ensure that all members of the community, including those with transportation disadvantages, have viable travel options or alternatives to travel. Use transportation management to help achieve an appropriate arterial level of service which balances the economic, ecological, accessibiliry, and livability needs of the City's residents, consumers, employers, and employees. Policies TP56 TP57 � � TP58 � � � � � ■ Support the achievement of Ciry and regional mode split goals through encouragement of local and regional work at home and transportation coordination programs such as ride matching services and van pools. Support "other" transportation management programs that can be shown cost-effective in achieving plan goals, while allowing residents and employers discretion to choose the methods they wish to employ. Develop an arterial street HOV system and related enhancement, which complements the regional freeway HOV system, through the following actions: Place emphasis on the development of HOV and transit prioriry improvements; especially those requiring minimal cost or construction. These improvements should pace the extension of the regional system and minimize the gap between traveler needs and system capacity. Establish an urban traffic control system that gives priority to busses and HOV's. TP59 Provide improved operational ef�ciency to the City's transportation system and support regional monitoring programs through regular, structured reporting, monitoring, and performance evaluation. TP60 Modify the development review process by: ■ Incorporating revised impact analysis pra cedures wluch comply with State GMA Concurrency and other requirements. The revisions need to include revised Level of Service standards. ■ Streamlining it to the extent possible to minimize private development costs. Where developments are consistent with this plan, they should be allowed to proceed by mitigating site impacts; developing appropriate components of the HOV, transit, non-motorized and motorized chapters; and participating in an equitable citywide improvement funding or mitigation payment program. ■ Incorporating requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. ■ Requiruig explicit consideration of pedestrian and bicycle circulatioq as well as parking and general circulation needs. TP61 Adopt a flexible level of service standard wluch employs a measurement factor that accom- modates demand management to help balance likely levels of growth, with opportunities to create a multimodal transportation system. TP62 Encourage non-motorized improvements which minimize the need for residents to use motorized modes by providing: 1) access to activity centers, 2) linkage to transit, pazk & ride lots, and school bus networks, 3) completion of planned pedestrian/ jogging or bicycle trails, 4) designating a network of streets which can safely and efficiently accommodate bicycles. TP63 Enhance a non-motorized system by the following actions: ■ In instances where the citywide system of bike lanes, trails, and sidewallcs crosses or abuts new development or redevelopment, consider requir-ing the developer to mitigate the impact of the development on the City's ill-57 transportation system by constructing bike lanes, trails, and sidewalks that interface with the existing system. ■ Coordinate development of the non-motorized system with surrounding jurisdictions and regional system e�ensions. ■ Incorporate on-street or in right-of-way bike lanes on all new major collector and arterial road projects. ■ Extend the existing system of City sidewalks to all streets. TP64 Recognize that TDM requires coordination, and work with the region and other adjacent communities to develop coordinated TDM strategies. 3.5 LOCAL AND REGIONAL TRANSIT Public transit service is provided to azea residents by a combination of fixed-route, express, dial-a-ride, and subscription bus services. METRO serves the Ciry directly, while Pierce Transit buses serve the Park and Ride lot on I-5 at South 320th. Amenities supporting transit patronage include Park and Ride lots and waiting- azea shelters. The Federal Way School District and King County's Multi-Service Center also provide special, local area bus services. Locally and nationally, public transit services, ranging from local buses to regional rail, are witnessing increased attention. Despite declining transit ridership in the late 1980s and early 90s, these services are being viewed at the regional, state, and federal levels as essential to meet public travel needs. Many people with low incomes or special mobility needs depend on transit. The City of Federal Way supports the provision of viable transit services as a component in a multi-modal transportation system. Coupled with carpooling and vanpooling, improved transit service is viewed by the Ciry of Federal Way as essential to providing area residents with mobiliry options in the future. Unlike road services, however, the City is constrained in its ability to provide these alternatives. Federa� Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation The City's involvement with the provision of transit services is indirect—through such efforts as supportive land use planning (to generate sufficient transit patronage) and roadway design features (to accom- modate transit and other high occupancy vehicles). The Ciry's planning process has focused on development of a transit-supportive environment, including improved pedestrian and bicycle access to transit. Public works projects anticipate enhanced regular route, local bus service, and the possible implementation of a rail system. Expansion of regional transit and HOV systems is critical to the achievement of Vision 2020, which guides the regional Metropolitan Transportation Plan. Federal Way's vision, which includes a City Center with surrounding commercial and residential land uses, is enhanced by both an improved regional bus system and a rail system. Local circulation routes will also be essential. The Federal Way plan has been structured with primary emphasis on locations which can become transit centers. In the interim, transit centers will be focused at Park and Ride lots. Existing Conditions An extensive inventory of existing transit services in and about Federal Way was reported in the City's 1993 Community Profile. The following excerpts on existing conditions are taken from that document. Map III-13 indicates Federal Way's existing regulaz, express, and Dial-A-Ride route locations, as well as its pazk and ride lot locations and planned bus routes. There are 24 regular and express service routes which provide nearly 250 bus trips to, within, and through Federal Way each day. In total, about 3,000 to 3,500 person trips are made by regulaz, express and Dial-A-Ride service each day. About one percent of all daily (and three percent of peak hour) Federal Way trips are made by bransit, which is comparable to other suburban azeas. The majority of service is provided to Park and Ride facilities where more than half of Federal Way's transit riders access transit. Routes into the neighborhoods of the City aze oriented to the higher density areas were there is lower auto ownership and greater reliance on transit. III-58 � � � � � �� � �� �� � � � � ��� � �,. �.� � � � �� � � � � ��' �� � °� � � �� � Existing Transit Service LEGEND Bus Route • Park-and-Ride Lot � Dia1-A-Ride NOTE: * Route 176 Clockwise for Buses Counter-clockwise for Vans �oF G �� � Er�L Map III-13 Under a demonstration project, METRO instituted Dial- A-Ride Transit (DART) service to portions of the City in 1992. Today, DART service follows a semi-fixed routing with service provided to patrons who do not live or work on fixed routes. Is transit service available today? In a 1991 survey by Federal Way, the answer seemed to be a resounding "No." Distributed to approximately 30,000 residents, nearly 2,000 responded, many of whom (87 percent) were auto drivers. When asked for reasons why they did not use transit, the following responses were received: ■ Auto required for work or personal errands - 47%. ■ Buses do not go to destination - 33%. ■ Auto saves time - 30%. ■ Bus schedules are not convenient - 29%. ■ Bus stops too far away - 23%. ■ Pazking is free/low cost at work - 23%. ■ Transfers are inconvenient - 20%. However, in another survey, among 75 employers of varying size, nearly 75 percent indicated that service is available within one block of their establishment. Local Transit Service Development Most transit service to and from Federal Way is oriented toward downtown Seattle. Historic, radial expansion of the system from the downtown is one reason for this. More significant, is that congestion and parking costs have kept transit competitive in the downtown Seattle mazket. It was not prudent for METRO to expand service for the growing suburban market where there was little congestion and parking was abundantly avail- able. However, suburban-to-suburban travel demand and local congestion have increased the need to revaluate and begin planning for cross-town service. The potential for improvement was conoborated by comparing auto and transit travel times. The new METRO Six Year Plan, which is nearing adoption, has accommodated these changes in customer needs by setting policies which would shift layout of the system to multiple Hubs and Spokes focused on transit centers with rapid service between centers. This would provide radial local service to take customers to a city center. Thus citizens would be able to catch express service to such destinations as Auburn, Puyallup, Tacoma, and Seattle. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Other Factors Affecting Transit Use While routes extend into Federal Way neighborhoods, the existing street layout, with its many cul-de-sacs and dead-end streets, is not always conducive to transit use. Buses cannot run along every residential street. They usually operate on collector and arterial streets, thus residents often have to walk several blocks to reach a route. Research has shown that when potential patrons have to wallc over'/. mile, many will refuse to do so. Because of the distance to residential bus stops and frequent express-type service to Park and Ride lots, many transit users travel to the three Federal Way lots. However, these lots are nearly always at capacity. Efforts to expand their capacity by both METRO and WSDOT have been hampered by the relatively high cost of land to provide for expansion. Despite high land costs WSDOT, plans to construct a new 650 space Park and Ride lot at 21st SW at SW 344th Street in 1996 if funds are available. In considering future land use and transportation altematives for the City, a balance must be sought between creating transit compatible land uses and providing system access from park and ride facilities and stations. Dial-a-Ride Transit (DART) As noted above, this service was introduced by METRO in 1992 and is being evaluated for its potential as a component of future transit service in suburban com- munities such as Federal Way. Dial-A-Ride service is demand activated by the users. Users originally phoned in and van service was provided within two hours. Unlike regular route service, only the area being served was defined, not the routes. The service has since been modified to operate with semi-fixed routes. Under the updated METRO Suc Year Plan, DART service could be expanded to provide local level service connections to transit centers. Designated as one of METRO's Community Service Areas, Federal Way would work with METRO in identifying its investment of about seven percent of its total service. Paratransit Service In addition to the service program for general purpose travel, METRO has embazked on a significant program to improve services for persons who cannot use regular ni-so � � � ,� � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation route bus service. This program has been developed to meet the requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. It provides lugh quality public transportation service to eligible customers. Improvements in this program will continue in order to meet the deadlines imposed by the Act by 1997. People with limited resources who aze either 65 or older or who have disabilities may qualify for Pazatransit. Called ACCESS Transportation, the Paratransit services currently provides door-to-door transportation Monday through Friday for 25 cents. Monthly and annual pass stickers aze available as well. Key elements to METRO's Paratransit Plan are the provision of ■ Supplemental service in Western King County within'/, to 1%2 miles on either side of regular route service; ■ Next-day reservations up to 14 days in advance, with trips scheduled seven days a week; ■ Fares held to the same level as one-zone regulaz bus fares; and ■ Scheduled service to be the same as the near-by, regulaz routes. Federal Way will be within a METRO service area from 5 a.rn: to 2 a.m. Regional Transit Improvements The METRO Six Year Plan is consistent with the regional public transportation concepts embodied in the Regional Transit Authority's plan for longer range rail and bus improvements. It provides a first step towazd building an integrated system of expanded services and capital facilities. Should a regional transportation system be approved by voters, Federal Way's land use and transportation plans accommodate its impacts and implications. The City Role Supporting activities by the City, either under the shorter range METRO Plan or the Regional Transit Plan (RTP), would include preferential traffic signal treatment for regional (express) buses, and cooperation with WSDOT in improving access to the state highways in the area. With major employers or business centers, it may be possible to provide exclusive access. None have been identified at this time, however. The Land Use plan will support both the regional and local transit systems through its configuration of land uses and their allowable densities. Historically most of Federal Way was developed at five units to the acre or less. The land use chapter of the Comprehensive Plan includes higher densities in the City Center and along the SR-99 corridor. A threshold in transit planning seeks 15 to 20 dwelling units per acre to support HCT systems. The results of such intensification aze shown in Figure III-14, which depicts the ability of differing development densities to generate higher transit mode splits. The primary area supporting HCT will be concentrated along Highway 99 north and south of South 320th. The City Center will be located northeast of the intersection of these two arterial roadways. Higher density residential areas will be located in the City Center core and frame, increasing in intensity in areas surrounding transit centers or major transfer points such as Park and Ride lots. Improvement Priorities Metro (King Counry Metropolitan Services) has identified transit service improvements in south King County in their draft six-year plan. These improvements aze depicted in Table III-16. To support expanded regional transit, a more extensive feeder bus system will be needed. METRO and Pierce Transit have worked with the City in developing concepts for improved transit service in and about the City in the future to support the CiryShape land use vision. Key features include: Expanded Bus Route Coverage - Potential new bus routes are depicted inMap III-14. Improved Regular Route Bus Service - Buses would run every 15-30 minutes, linking neighborhoods, Green River Community College, Valley employers, and other south county cities. Transfers to Pierce County buses would also be made easier. m-si DAILY RANGE OF TRANSIT USE LOW - HIGH Land Use Intensity vs. Transit Demand �. � N � 4 O � � � N .� v., O � .� � N � � 6% - 3% - 1% - 16% 6% 3% LEGEND * Note: This level of transit use only attainable with High Capacity Transit Station in place arvoF G � E�EIZ� uV AY Figure III-14 � t� � r� a� � � i�` �' A�s .� �� �e �' �iia � � �t � Zone Density � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � �i � � �� � � Table III-16 METRO Im rovement Plan Pro'ects in Federal Wa Target Service Level Category Route/Descrip6on Peak/Midday/Evening Transit Service 174 Local service along Hwy 99, connecting Federal Way, Des Moines, SeaTac, 15/15/30 Duwamish Industrial Area, and Seattle CBD. SaUSun 30/30 176 Neighborhood service between Federal Way Hub and SW Federal Way, 30/30/60 extended into NW Tacoma in cooperation with Pierce Transit. SaUSun 30/60 179 Peak direction express service - Federal Way Hub to Seattle CBD. 36 trips/day 181 East-west local service between the Federal Way, Aubum, and Green River Community College Hubs; continuing through Kent East Hill to Lake Meridian 30l30/60 P&R and Kent Hub. SaUSun 30/60 194 Two way express service connecting Federal Way Hub, SeaTac Hub, and Seattle CBD, includes stops at Star Lake and Kent-Des Moines P&R's. 30/30/30 197 Peak direction express service connec6ng future West Federal Way P&R, South Sabsun 30/30 Federal Way P&R, and Federal Way Hub with Univ of Washington; stops at 14 trips/day Star Lake and Kent-Des Moines P&R's. 905 Flexible Federal Way local serviee. Transit Hub Park Federal Way transit hub with passenger and bus leyover facilities; METRO is contributing to a third Federal Way & Ride PBcR, a 600-stall lot currently in finat design by WSDOT; Expand Star Lake P&R by approximatcly 500 stalls, either on the surface to the north of the existing lot, or by the construction of a parking structuro on the eatisting site. Speed & Currer►t speed and reliability study underway on SR 99 from Boeing Access Road to South Federal Way P&R. Reliability Non-motorized Collaborate with local jurisdictions in the planning and design of bicycle and pedestrian access improvements (e.g., Access bike lanes, curb cuts, gutters, sidewalks, and rail crossing improvements). Dial A Ride Service - This on-call service would be modified as needed to provide a complement to regular route service. New technology would help provide a more flexible set of services, penetrating neighborhoods where regular buses are prohibited. Pazatransit services would also expand door-to-door service for people with disabilities. TransitMain Streets - Selected travel corridors would be designed to combine frequent bus service with neigh- borhoods and City Center shops or services. Comfort, safety, as well as bicycle and pedestrian access would be emphasized along these corridors. TransitPrioriry - As with regional express routes, special lanes and signals could allow local buses, as well as vanpools and carpools, to by-pass congestion. Areas under consideration, through regionally funded studies, include SR 99, South 348th, and South 320th Streets. Diamond lanes for HOV's, including buses, would be completed along SR 99, and South 348th Street. Traveler Information Systems - Through the application of high- tech communications systems, METRO has already begun installing devices to track the location of vehicles and to provide the traveling public with real-time information on system options. These systems will be enhanced under a comprehensive system of transit, HCT, HOV, and freeway monitoring. As described later in the plan, it is anticipated that a vastly improved traveler information system will make both the local and regional transit system more attractive to local residents. These concepts will be further prioritized in working with METRO to implement its Suc Year Plan. The Result of Transit Expansion The net result expected from placement of improved transit locally and in the region is meaningful improvement to mode split (the percentage use of each mode). The predicted (and present) values are as shown in Table III-17. While not lazge in magnitude, with only a 13 percent share of trips by transit and other HOV's in 2010, one must view the impacts during peak periods and along congested travel corridors in assessing the implications. It is possible, after the turn of the century, that: � III-63 Proposed Transit Service LEGEND All-Day Fixed Routes � � � � Peak-Only Fixed Routes 0 Flexible Route Service Area • • • - • • • • • Potential Annexation Area •Park & Ride oTransit Center Note: Routes shown are in addition to existing transit service level. arroF G �� � EIZAL Map III-14 � � � �► �� � � � il�' � �� � � � �► � ��, � i � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � � � Table III-17 Work Tri s and Mode S lit Estimates Current 2010 Federal Way Region Federal Way Region Mode Work Trips Daily Trips Daily Trips Work Trips Daily Trips Daily Trips Drive Alone 79% 86% 72% 70-74% 81-85% 62-68% CsrNan Pool 14% 8% 15% 18-20% 8-10% 16-18% Trsnsit 3% 1% 6% 4-5% 2-3% 8-10% Other 4% 5% 7% 4-5% 5-6% 8-10% ■ One in every four Federal Way Work trips will be � by HOV and transit modes; ■ One in every three Regional Daily trips will be by these modes; and, ■ Over 50 percent of all work trips to urban centers � such as Federal Way will be by HCT and HOV'. Guiding the Process � � To strategically position itself in the regional transit funding process, Federal Way's plan has been prepared to integrate with the Metropolitan Transportation Plan, METRO's Six Year Plan and the RTP. Road improvements which have been identified will focus service to the transit centers or Park and Ride lots and support access to the regional system or provide an increment of capacity which would relieve congestion and air pollution. To foster achievement of the transit vision, a series of supportive actions aze necessary. The land use distributions should take advantage of opportunities to increase densities in a transit friendly fashion. In the core area, street planning would, in many cases, provide exclusive access routes to transit centers as the area increases in density. A staged implementation of service in the City Center � will be required. This can be accomplished by creating incentives for developers and through investment of public dollars to protect options and provide logical � L�J increments of service. The provision of transit corridors, improved traffic cuculation, and improved non- motorized access to transit will also be necessary. Key interim and long term improvements must continue to focus on transit service to transit centers and Park and Ride lots. As the City moves toward 2010, strategically located lots, with bus, bike, and pedestrian access will be necessary. Complementing this, the City can look to the land use development process and the rising interest of employers to provide "self-managed" travel options. The City's development review process will encourage transit-oriented land use patterns, especially along inten- sified corridors. The State's Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) legislation will also guide these efforts. Transit extension into many of the City's neighborhoods will not be possible due to the configuration of the existing street network. However, opportunities do exist to connect neighborhood collector streets, perhaps limiting passage to HCT, buses, and HOV's. Such extensions into neighborhoods will require strengthening of roads or their structural failure will be rapid. Most routes will remain on major streets where tr�c flow improvements can be made to expedite service. Enhancements to transit (HCT and HO� flow will become increasingly populaz as signal pre-emption techniques are perfected. Several of these systems aze being tested at present. The likely sequence of the longer term development and travel events is as follows: III-65 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Increased Development Densities as the City Grows services which maximize accessibility to regional jobs and maintains Federal Way as a regional activity center. Completion of the Regional HOV System (and a Rise in its Popularity) Increased Use of HOV's and Transit Practicaf Availabiliry of Real-Time Inforr on Transit Service & HOV Status Eventual Congestion on the Regional HOV System, Resulting in Retraints on its Use Increased Reliance on (BUS) Transit With Improved Transit Priority on Surtace Streets Continued Growth and Increased Congestia Followed by Extension of the Rail System Transportation Goals & Policies Goal TG6- a. Prepare and provide for an enhanced, high capacity transit system, maintaining area residents' mobility and travel options. b. Foster phased improvements which expand transit services in time to meet the demand for these services. Policies TP65 Promote the creation and use of a regional transit system which provides a cost-effective alternative mode of travel to the single occupant auto, and assists the region in attaining air quality standards. This system should be extended to the City on a timely basis and be preceded by phased implementation of increased levels of local and regional bus and HOV TP66 Identify and promote the development of a local level transit system which complements the regional system while meeting the travel needs of City residents, consumers, employers, and employees. This system should provide convenient connections from city neighborhood activity centers to the regional transportation system. TP67 The target levels of mode split (share) to transit, and HOV's for planning purposes should be: ■ 15 percent of all daily person trips; ■ 30 percent of all daily work trips; and ■ 40 percent of all work trips between major activity centers. TP68 The regional and local transit systems should be designed to meet the requirements of the elderly and disabled (as prescribed by the Americans with Disabilities Act) and should take advantage of technological advances in transportation reflected in Advanced Public Transit Systems (e.g., traveler information, system monitoring, performance monitoring, etc.). TP69 The City will continue to cooperate with regional and local transit providers to develop facilities that make transit a more attractive option (e.g., bus shelters, rapid intermodal connections, frequent all day service, safe and attractive facilities). TP70 The development of attractive transit commuter options (e.g., subscription buses, special commuter services, local shuttles) should be supported by the City. TP71 Through sub-azea planning, with the cooperation of transit service providers, it will be an objective to make transit part of each neighborhood through appropriate design, service types, and public involvement. TP72 Enhance the viability of regional and local transit service by establishing selected transit, pedestrian, and cyclist only streets in the city center. ui-ss � � C� � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TP73 Preserve right-of-way for transit facilities as development proceeds. TP74 Create an incentive program which rewards development planning that establishes densities supportive of the adopted regional transit plan. TP75 Encourage the use of incentives to stimulate transit, caz, and vanpool use. 3.6 HIGH-OCCUPANCY VEHICLE FACILITIES A Regional Freeway High-Occupancy Vehicle (HO� System Plan, or core HOV system, has been designated for all planned freeway HOV lanes. The HOV system includes using the middle lanes of I-5 south from Seattle through Federal Way to Tacoma, including possible direct access to the South 272nd and South 320th Street transit centers beside I-5. HOV facilities are viewed at the regional, state, and federal levels as essential to meet public service needs. Also, HOV facilities may provide vital accessibility to developing urban centers in the Puget Sound Region. This core HOV system is currently under study (WSDOT Puget Sound Region Pre-Design Studies) to identify direct access locations which will enhance the HOV system and improve transit and non-transit HOV travel times. HOV System The legislature has, in the past, committed to completing the WSDOT core freeway HOV lane system. The Puget Sound Regional Council's (PSRC's) vision 2020 (the MetropoYitan Transportation Plan) includes completion of the Core HOV system as the cornerstone to promoting HOV travel in the region. Features will include ramp meters and queue bypass lanes, as well as integration of Intelligent Vehicle and Highway System (IVHS) features such as electronic signing, radio information, and advanced vehicle detection). Emphasis will be placed on providing improved access routes from lazge employers and where congestion exists today. Generally, HOV lanes will be added to existing facilities, but where there is sufficient capacity to allow conversion of general purpose lanes, this will afford a cost effective altemative. At the regional level, the HOV system will be available to differing mixes of vehicles. The occupancy level will be varied to maintain at least an average peak hour operating speed of 45 mph. As demand increases and speed is lowered below this threshold, the level may be varied, for example, from two or more people per vehicle to three or more. Recognizing that the HOV system will play a key role in expanding the transit system, the WSDOT established the Office of Urban Mobility. Among its projects will be the evaluation of alternative HOV treatments to provide the most effective combination of facilities to maximize speeds and reliability of bus service. Regional planning has applied HOV planning on a local scale. The King County Arterial HOV plan, August 1993, identifies I-5, SR 99 (Pacific Highway), South/ SW 320th Street and South 348th Street as potential corridors for implementation of HOV and transit priority treatments. The plan specifically identifies: ■ Proposed (median) HOV lanes on I-5 extended from SR 516 to Pierce County. ■ Freeway Access study on SR 18. ■ HOV Corridor and Access Study at South 272nd Street. ■ HOV lanes on South 348th and access improvements to I-5. ■ HOV Corridor Studies on South/SW 320th Street and SR 99. ■ Intersection Improvements on South/SW 320th at lst Avenue SW and 21st Avenue South. ■ New or improved park and rides and a iransit center within the ciry. WSDOT is studying potential direct access HOV connections at South 272nd Street, South/SW 320th Street and South 348th Street. The most recent study identifies South 272nd Street and South 320th Street as high priority locations. It should be noted that the SR 509 Extension Study being completed by CH2M-HII,L identifies extension of SR 509 to four locations, one of which would be South 272nd Street. The study is examining potential limitations of access to HOV and transit in addition to south access to the airport. The WSDOT also agrees to the need of HOV lanes with automatic vehicle identification (AVn to provide priority to transit vehicles on SR 99 north of South 348th Street and includes them in their system plan. ui-s� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation The. Future HOV System Transportation Goals & Policies HOV enhancements within the Federal Way planning area will consist of signal priority treatments, exclusive lanes, increased park and ride opportunities, and other improvements to be identified as demand increases. These latter improvements can include sepazate (preferential) access lanes or roadways. This means utilizing HOV lanes on highways and arterial streets wherever practical, if transit and carpool movexnents can be enhanced, and considering the use of a higher occupancy (three or more persons) initially with later conversion to two or more persons if travel rates decline. TIP IMPROVEMENTS Improvements in the City's Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) to support the HOV system aze identified in Table Ill-18. Many of these HOV facility needs will need to be provided by outside agencies, including the WSDOT and METRO. Federal Way is working closely with these agencies to implement these improvements over the next several yeazs. Goals TG7- a. Place high priority on development ofHOV and transit priority lanes. b. Develop arterial HOV lanes on bus routes with priority for transit at tra,�Sc lights. c. Work with the transit agencies, A'SDOT and King County, in applying for funding for HOv improvements that complement transit and non- transit HOV facilities and park and rides within Federal Way. d. Work with A'SDOT to complete the Core HOV system on I-S as planned. Table III-18 TIP HOV Im rovements Federal Wa Location Imprnvement Cost Year S 348th I-5 to lst S HOV Signal Coordination 56.9 Million 1995 Regional CIP SR 99/SW 336th Transit Center Unknown 2000+ City Center, S 316th @ 20th S Transit Center 56.1 Million 2000+ SR 99/S Z72nd Transit Center Park & Ride 512.7 Million 2000+ SR 161/S 356th Transit Center Park & Ride 513.1 Million 2000+ 21st and SW 344th Park & Ride 58.8 Million 1996 SR 99, S 272nd to Dash Pt HOV 520.2 Million 1998 SR 99, Dash Pt to 312th HOV 513.9 Ivfillion 1999 SR 99, S 312th to S 320th HOV 57.2 Million 2000+ SR 99, S 320th to S 340th HOV 524.0 Million 2000+ SR 99, S 340th to S 348th HOV 518.6 Million 2000+ S 272nd Direct HOV Access Unknown 2000+ S 320th Direct HOV Access Unknown 2000+ S 348th Direct HOV Access Unknown 2000+ � � L J � � � � � � � II!-68 � � �� � ,.. � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation 3.7 AVIATION Another vital link in the fabric of area transportation is the aviation system. As pointed out in the Community Profile, this extends beyond regional aviation to local issues surrounding flights over portions of the Ciry ("overflights") and local helicopter activity. At the regional level, there has been recurrent debate over the issue of maintaining SeaTac as the regional facility or establishing a new airport. The City recognizes the economic benefits of its proximity to the airport, as well as the liability to Federal Way's qualiry of life which air traffic can produce. The City will continue to insist upon maintaining the quality of life expected by area residents. Local Level Opportunities Federal Way experiences a relatively high level of helicopter overflights today, due in part to its proximity to Boeing Field and also to the routine use of I-5 as a flight corridor in order to minimize noise. Map Ill-1 S shows twelve landing areas in Federal Way currently used by helicopters. The City is the base for 12 helicopter operators. Together, these operators field a combined fleet of 38 rotor craft. This fleet serves the following types of purposes: 1) Business Operations, associated with corporate activity and air taxi services; 2) Emergency Services, including activity associated with St. Francis Hospital, the Federal Way Fire District, and King County Police; 3) Law Enforcement (primarily King County Police); 4) Government Flights, which are primarily military helicopters from Fort Lewis south of Tacoma; and 5) Disaster Mitigation. The planning and siting of helicopter facilities has been divided into emergency and commercial uses and facilities. Potential roles of heliports and a process for selecting prospective sites in Federal Way have been identified. Given potential roles and siting considerations, the discussion of possible courses of action can be pursued within the community. � Potential roles for heliports in Federal Way would add disaster mitigation to business, emergency service, and law enforcement activities. Planning efforts are currently � underway between Seattle and King County to incor- porate helicopters and designated landing facilities into � the region's emergency preparedness planning. Public heliports in Federal Way would be a key link in a regional disaster mitigation system. Potential improve- ments to e�cisting heliport operations were identified in the heliport planning process. They include improved safety, better utilization of emergency response resources, and increased reliability of helicopter operations. Safety can be improved: on the ground (through improved, properly designed surfaces and fencing of the landing area), and in the air (through proper identification and illumination). Reliability would be increased through placement of modem equipment which would improve the safery of poor weather operations. The practice of providing stand-by fire protection support, which now occurs for transfer of St. Francis Hospital patients, could be eliminated. The Heliport Master Plan (HMP) of June 1994, by Ketchum and Company, is used as a guide for goals and policies which decision makers may use in the implementation of heliport facilities in the Ciry of Federal Way's Transportation Comprehensive Plan. This plan identifies key elements which should be considered as part of the next phase and the public discussion on options to pursue. It advocates that the following questions be evaluated in making the decision: Economic - When will the development for emergency and commercial uses of heliports be justified? Environmental - What will the noise ef�ects be and will mitigation measures be sufficient to meet community interests? Operatronal - Does the faciliry work in terms of air operations and routine maintenance? And, does the area accommodate the physical needs of such flights? Finally, in selecting candidate sites, a sequential process of narrowing alternatives would be employed. Fifteen large zones would be evaluated, initially using general criteria. Then, the "short listed" zones would further screened for specific sites capable of supporting a heliport facility. The Heliport Master Plan provides an in depth site selection matrix and is provided for use in this decision making. The results of a preliminary evaluation in the HMP is shown inMap III-16. III-69 Helicopter Landing Areas LEGEND 1. Fly Wright Company Landing Area 2. Fly Wright Company Landing Area 3. 336th St. Medical Transfer Point 4. Fire Station #8 (Emergency) 5. 272nd St. Pazk & Ride (Emergency) 6. Thomas Jefferson High School (Emergency) 7. Twin Lalces Golf Course (Emergency) 8. Federal Way High School (Emergency) 9. Woodmont Elementary School (Emergency) 10. Weyerhauser Corporate Landing Area 11. Green Gables Elementary School (Emergency) 12. Fire Station #3 (Emergency) �oF G �� �E�ZAL Map III-15 � � � � � � � � � � � � � 1� � � �� � � r� � �r t�r � � r �r �e M� �s �■r �r�r r� � r� � !� � Recommended Heliport Siting Areas LEGEND — — — — City Limits � � � � Most Compatible Region With Heliport Development crnoF G �� ��L Map III-16 The Heliport Master Plan recommends the following: ■ The Ciry appoint a representative to the Puget Sound Heliport System Plan (PSHSP) Adyisory Committee, which is investigating a system of heliports. ■ St. Francis Hospital consider an emergency heliport on its properry for a trial period. ■ The Federal Way Fire District eliminate its policy of attending each ambulance/helicopter transfer at Weyerhaeuser. ■ Appropriate agencies establish an EMS-only heliport. ■ Identify primary medical helicopter transfer points by a Global Positioning System (GPS) points and on Airlift Northwest helicopter navigational computers. ■ The Ciry develop a heliport ordinance/code section consistent with the PSMSP and Puget Sound Helicopter Emergency Lifesaver Plan (PS/HELP). ■ The City of Federal Way participate in the PS/HELP. Transportation Goais & Policies Goal TG8- a. Support the area's economy by assuring residents and area employers access to a full range of travel modes, including intercity airport facilities, while matntaining the quality of life reflected in the plan vision. b. Provide guided opportunities for the improvement ofheliportfacilities and services in and around the Ciry. Poticies TP76 Continue to represent the community in matters pertaining to the regional airport(s). Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation TP77 Promote extension of fixed guide way facilities to the regional airport as an ef�ective means of resolving congestion problems that affect City residents and businesses. TP78 Finalize and adopt guidelines for short range, local area rotor craft faciliry installation and use. These will be designed to minimize noise and safery risks and recognizing the jurisdiction of the Federal Aviation Administration. � � � � 3.8 FREIGHT AND GOODS � Transportation related decisions can have a significant impact on freight and goods movement, affecting the economic competitiveness of local and regional businesses. When freight and goods movement was confined mostly to rail on sepazate right-of-way, there was not a great need to include freight and goods in urban planning processes. That situation has changed. Today, even at the local level, our dependence on trucks for deliveries has been heightened. Industry's adoption of "just-in-time" inventory systems and increasingly populaz over-night small pazcel services, as limited examples, have increased demand for limited roadway space. Combined with increased urban (commuter) congestioq trucks are not able to perform their role in the economy as efficiently as they did a decade ago. The general approach to transportation planning has failed to systematically consider freight and goods movement needs. Recent state and national legislation, encouraging such an approach, recognizes that local government has long played a role in managing this component of our transportation system. At the local level, development standards assure the provision of adequate on-site facilities such as loading docks; the width, frequency, and location of driveways; the turning radius at intersections for curbs; and pavement standazds to carry trucks and bus loads. Other government actions include restriction of oversized vehicles on roads and bridges that cannot support their weight or size, and the designation of truck routes. Similar activities can be found at the regional and state levels. 111-72 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation Local Level Needs/Opportunities Federal Way displays a unique set of circumstances with respect to freight and goods movement. An under- standing of its history, as well as current issues and projects, can contribute to adoption of appropriate long term policies and action strategies. While extensive truck and rail oriented development has not taken place in Federal Way, freight and goods movement, primarily by trucks passing through the Ciry, has obviously had its impacts, Situated between the major urban centers of Tacoma and Seattle, the Federal Way planning azea has been influenced by four major arterials. Military Road, the original arterial through the area, still displays the benefits of a design aimed at accommodating heavier freight and goods vehicles. Its concrete road sections no longer carry large numbers of pass-through truck traffic. It now provides local access for truck deliveries to established neighborhoods. Until the national freeway system was developed in the 1960s and 70s, Highway 99 was the next arterial to serve as the truck route through the azea. Today SR 99 provides a distribution function, mostly for delivery purposes, but also affording access to such regional facilities as the US Postal facility just west of Pacific Highway near South 336th. Along its southem sections, crossing into Pierce County, truck drivers fmd an alternate route to a congested I•5. Today, the major roadways for freight and goods movement into and through the area are provided by I-5 and, to a lesser extent, SR 18. As the regional economy has grown, the volume of truck traffic along these arterials has increased. Today, the highest concentration of regional truck traffic passes through Federal Way's section of the I-5 corridor. As pointed out in the following sections, the volume of this traffic influences congestion as well as economic competitiveness. Map III-17 depicts the City's truck route plan, including existing and proposed truck routes. Regionai Activities Trucking centers in Federal Way include the Evergreen Center which has SR 99, SR 18, and SR 161 on three of its sides and Ernie's Center on SR 99 at South 330th. These facilities cater to this important segment of our economy, the movement of freight and goods. Looking toward the future, several regional road projects may affect freight and goods movement through the area. Improvements along I-5, which will make truck traffic more efficient, include truck climbing lanes in the South Center area. At present, there are major points of delay for peak hour traffic. Trucks arriving on I-5 and on SR 18 just east of I-S from I-405 have problems, since they are not able to approach the hill climb at posted speed and delay other travelers, many of whom are headed to Federal Way. Perhaps one of the most significant improvements proposed in the region's Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP), is the improved connection of SR 167 with I-S at Fife and into the Port of Tacoma. The current industrial development in the area of the Port masks the growing importance of the Green River Valley, both as a transportation corridor and as a generator of freight and goods movement. Increasing accessibility to the SR 167 corridor will provide an alternate route for truck based freight and goods movement. Hill climbs from the valley floor, either along I-5 or SR 18, might be avoided, relieving capacity problems along these facilities. It is unfortunate that complemented improvements at the north end of SR 167 at its interchange with I-405 are not anticipated at this time. SR 509 is being studied for consideration of an extension, possibly tying back to I-5 at South 272nd Street. This route will open an alternate route to the Port of Seattle's international freight facilities, as well as to provide access to the airport industrial complex. To the extent that this new route's design considers impacts to I-5, SR 99, and local street system in Federal Way, it provides great benefit to Federal Way. Other long range actions which will af�ect freight and goods movement in this north-south corridor include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS}—with improved (truck) vehicle identification, and commuter rail service in the Crreen River Valley. ITS features (described in greater detail under Demand Management) will be incorporated into the "high tech," I-5 corridor being designed under the state DOT's Venture Program. Advanced communication systems will allow better detection of slow-downs, accidents, and even hazardous vehicles moving through Federal Way, which certainly affect the City's local residents traveling these regional facilities. To the extent that Commuter Rail service in the Valley can avoid impacting freight and goods movement, it is viewed as a positive step in the direction of providing III-73 Through T� Route Plan LEGEND E�usting Truck Route � Proposed Additional Truck Route cmoF G �� �Elz� Map III-17 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation high capaciry transit to the south end of the region. Care must be taken to avoid forcing a shift in cargo carrying capacity from rail to truck in the south county corridor. Highway commuter needs warrant keeping this "traffic" on rails. Consistent with the requirements set at the federal level, PSRC and WSDOT are focusing increased efforts towards understanding freight and goods movement and identifying solutions to problems faced by local, regional, state, and international shippers. Using studies by the Port of Seattle and WSDOT, PSRC and the Economic Development Council have established a Freight Mobility Roundtable. The Roundtable will convene key carriers, producers, and consumers, as well as nationally recognized consultants on the topic. This effort is seen as setting the pace for other areas azound the country. The Roundtable efforts will be linked with a series of other efforts by the Regional Council, including: ■ Building a commodities flow database; ■ Identifying current and future problem azeas that inhibit or restrict the effective movement of freight and goods; ■ Recommending road, intermodal, and other system � improvements to address these problems, while meeting federal and state Clean Air Act strictures; and � � � � ■ Developing planning guidelines for use at the local level. The benefits of supporting these regional activities will be maintenance of accessibility for City residents and businesses. Local Needs Within the City, continued growth of local truck traffic can be anticipated. Densification of the urban core, along SR 99 and South 320th, as well as the South 348th corridor, will lead to increased numbers of trucks along primary arterials. Street design standards and road classifications adopted under this plan will assure that new and rehabilitated facilities aze built to appropriate standards. Where pavement, bridge, and neighborhood traffic management systems, or planned land uses indicate that roadways cannot handle truck traffic, designated truck routes will be adopted to protect eausting investments and assure continued quality of life. With the enhancement of neighborhood centers, truck deliveries may increase as consumer activiry shifts to these azeas. While localized neighborhood intrusion is unlikely, isolated cases can be managed using traaf�c calmixig techniques. To accomplish effecdve planning and management of freight and goods movement in the area, trat�c monitoring (volume counts) will include vehicle classification, allowing the patterns of use to be better understood. Another technique which can be employed to assure adequate consideration of truck needs is the involvement of those industries and businesses generating the traffic in roundtable discussions, such as the regional activities described above. Goals and Objectives Freight and goods movement is recognized as a vital link in the chain of local and regional economies. Yet, the characteristics of larger vehicles (trucks in the case of Federal Way) can produce significant impacts to area mobiliry, livability, and infrastructure. With these factors in mind, the Ciry adopts the following goals and strategies. Goal TG9 To improve movement offreight and goods throughout the region and within the City, while maintaining qualiry oflife, realizing the vision of our comprehensive plan, and minimizing undue impacts to City infrastructure. Objectives and Strategies ■ Cooperate with state and regional agencies in identifying freight and goods movement needs of azea employers. � ill-75 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � ■ Provide or encourage improvements which enhance the movement of goods and services to businesses in the greater Federal Way area. ■ Encourage interests to view Federal Way as a viable resource area for ancillary freight and goods activity, drawing upon its excellent location along the I-S Comdor, other State Routes, and proximity to air and port facilities. ■ Establish revised code requirements and a designated truck route system that accommodates the needs of both the private sector and residents. ■ Discourage the use of road facilities by vehicles carrying Hazardous Materials and those with weight, size, or other characteristics that would be injurious to people and property in the City. ■ Adopt revised code provisions which aclrnowledge the characteristics of modern trucks and provide a balance between movement needs and quality of life. ■ Support regional transportation projects which are appropriately designed and will preserve the capacity of I-5 and State Routes. ■ Involve major generators of area &eight and goods movement in discussions to identify their needs and priorities as part of improvement programming. Objectives ■ Encourage the planning and construction of improved regional highway, rail, and marine facilities in the azea of the Port of Tacoma. ■ Coordinate with local business organizations, and provide feedback on intemational and regional transportation issues and on transport needs and opportunities related to all modes of transportation. � � 3.9 MARINE The City of Federal Way has no marine facilities to be addressed in the plan. However, its proximity to the Port of Tacoma and the support role it can provide to its facilities is recognized and the following goals and objectives are proposed. Goais and Objectives Goal TG10 To foster the development of the local economy for Federal Way residents and employers as may be possible through access to regional marine facrlities. ■ Encourage international relationships, such as our sister-ciry relationship with Hatchinohe, to foster marine related trade. 3.10 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES Provision of transportation facilities and services requires the timing of new projects to meet the needs of the community. At the same time, e�sting facilities must be maintained and the public's investment protected, maximizing the life of the infrastructure. The purpose of this section is to describe various strategies available to the City to implement the preferred transportation and land use plan . The Preferred Plan proposes a balanced investment among modes of travel, increasing the commitment to travel by transit, ridesharing, bicyclists, and pedestrians. This strategy may create somewhat higher levels of roadway congestion near transit centers, but will provide more travel options for those who choose to use other modes of travel. Growth management requires an implementation program which earmarks suf�cient financial resources, while putting into place a Concurrency Management System to regulate the pace and scale of new growth within the communiry. The implementation plan for Federal Way focusses on the next six-year time period within which to forecast needs and to identify reliable options for transportation funding. In reality, the City's implementation program began in 1990 at incorporation. During the past five years, several major transportation improvements have been completed or will soon be operational. While these improvements have occurred, the actual City growth rate has been lower than projected, thus creating fewer im- pacts on the transportation system. Since the City also m-�s �� L' � LJ � � � � �� � � � L_� � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Pla� - Transportation has modest growth expectations over the next six years, the proposed transportation improvement program for 1996-2001 is expected to maintain reasonable levels of service on the arterial highway system. At present, the Ciry's system is provided by a variety of agencies. The Ciry operates, improves, and maintains most of the streets and roadways, although the State operates the freeway (I-5) and selected State arterials within City limits. Private development may construct various local street improvements, which then become the properly of the public and must be maintained by the City. The City is also responsible for the management of the transportation system, which includes the setting of standards for design, maintenance and operations, and review and approval of modifications. Transportation Improvement Program The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) counts on strong coordination with other agencies to help fmance needed improvements on the state highway system, facilities in adjacent jurisdictions, along with expanded transit services provided by Metro. Map III-18 shows, and Table III-191ists, the Ciry's TIP for 1996 to 2010, as of June 1995. Most of the projects listed in the table have been identified throughout the planning process and reflect differing degrees of evaluation. They provide a usable estimate of trans- portation needs for matching broad estimates of forecast revenues. For programming purposes, these projects have been prioritized using the methodology below. Project Prioritization Prioritization is part of the process associated with implementing projects in the order most needed. It is a tactical effort to detemune the sequence of events to meet strategic goals, as summarized in the Trans- portation Improvement Plan (TIP). To determine the sequence of improvements in the City's TIP, several factors had to be balanced. These included consideration as to when improvements would be needed, the City's ability to compete for funds, as well as providing improvements across motorized and non-motorized projects. Nine factors used to rank projects are shown as follows. Factors Used in Prioritization of Improvements Transportation Effectiveness 1. Citywide reduction in congested VMT. 2. Corridor Congestion relief (volume%apacity). 3. Enhanced Safery. Alternative Modes 4. Transit HOV Supportive. 5. Non-Motorized Supportive. Environmental 6. Air quality improvement. Implementation 7. Cost Effectiveness. 8. Ease of Implementation. 9. Community Supportive. A project was given a rating for each factor on a scale of 0 to 4. The ratings were then summed across all of the factors to produce a total "score" for each project. Projects were prioritized in order of highest to lowest score. Plan Highlights The projects and programs listed in Table III-19 represent a broad range of multi-modal transportation improvements. Key system investment features include the following: ■ Transportation System Management improvements along key arterials, including installation of new traffic signals at needed locations. ■ Several miles of roadway improvements. ■ New arterial extensions on new alignments. ■ Regional HOV lanes along I-5 and SR 99. ■ Transit centers at the Ciry Center (South 316th and 205th), and on SR-99 at South 336th, South 272nd, and South 356th Street. ■ Expansion of local transit service, according to Metro's six-year plan. ■ Non-motorized investments for pedestrians and bicycles along major corridors. ■ Substantial funding for ongoing road maintenance and annual programs, including overlays, bridge replacements, minor capital improvements, and neighborhood safety. w-n -- �:� �. � ,- ,���� - . � , , , � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ' TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN (TIP) - 1996 TO 2010 STREETlfRAFFIC COMPONENT . . . . . * � * * . .. I August 30,1995 (TIP952.WQ1) S 316th & 20th S- SR 99 to S 320th - Widen to 5 lanes "" 14th Ave S- S 312th St to S 316th St Rin R- Access for S 372th St - 23rd Ave S to 28th Ave S- Widen to 3 lanes SW 320th St at 47th Ave SW - Si nalize 1st Ave S- S 348th St to S 356th St - Widen to 5 lanes S 288th St at 20th Ave S- Left tum lane S 336th St at We erhauser Wa S- Safe /Re-ali n intersecl 1st Ave S Extension to SR 99 - Road Extension '" S 308th Street Connection - 8th Ave S to Sth PI S S 312th St at 8th Ave S- Si nalization S 336th St at 20th Ave S- Left tum lane S 312th St - 28th Ave S to Milita Road I-5 ove ass SW 340th St at Hovt Rd SW - Left tum lanes. sianalize NON-MOTORIZED CIP PRIORITY PROJECT LIST *" BPA Trail Phase II - 1st Ave S to SW Cam us Dr '" BPA Treil Phase III - SW Cam us Dr to SW 356th St Milita Rd S I-5 N to I-5 S C' Limits S 312th St - Dash Pt Rd to SR 99 SR 99 - S 283rd St to S 373rd St Weyerhauser Way S- S 320th St to S 349th St 361,770 1,164 417,698 71 743,729 7,659,015 7, 1.253.063 1, 1 1 3,185,871 i6 8,910,177 2 13,935,099 9 14,780,188 4 17,847,595 8 18,321,453 9 19,065,182 5 26,724,197 3 27,977,260 8 28,197,718 0 28,451,118 2 42,142,320 0 42,649,120 5 0 0 umulative Tota 0 594,000 0 2.507.000 0 TOTAL CITY EXPENDITURES 7,485,892 6,560,108 10,656,471 8,111,726 ' 11,108,203 13,342,573 7,460,779 137,421,136 202,146,888 0 REGIONAL CIP PRIORITY PROJECT LIST 0 umulative Tota SR 99 HOV - S 272nd St to S Dash Point Rd - Construct HO 4,016,330 4,750,745 11,432,074 20,199,149 20,199,149 SR 99 HOV - S Dash Pt Rd to S 312th St - Construct HOV la 2,375,372 3,196,063 8,397,043 13,968,478 34,167,627 SR 99 HOV - S 312th St to S 320th St - Construct HOV lane 1,352,180 1,908,418 3,950,427 7,211,025 41,378,652 SR 99 Hov - S 320th St to S 340th St - Construct HOV lane 4,580,200 18,226,000 22,806,200 64,184,852 SR 99 HOV - S 340th St to S 348th St -Construd HOV lane 17,104,500 17,104,500 81,289,352 SR161-interchan e I-5 with Collect. Dist. for SR18 & wide 3,105,000 10,712,250 26,609,229 40,426,479 121,715,831 "" Trensit Center - C' Center SR 99-5 316th 5,068,000 5,068,000 126,783,831 *' SW 336th Transit Center SW 336thSR 99 3,801,000 3,801,000 130,584,831 "" Park 8 Ride - 21st Ave SW at SW 344th St 2,475,770 6,350,221 8,825,991 139,410,822 "' Park & Ride and Trensit Center - SR 99 vicin S 272nd St 10,136,000 10,136,000 149,546,822 "" Park & Ride and Transk Center - SR 161 vicin' S 356th St 10,136,000 10,136,000 159,682,822 SR 18 Westbound Truck Climb Lane 0 0 159,682,822 Dash Pt Rd - SR 99 to 1st Ave S- Widen to 3/5 lanes • 2,534,000 2,534,000 162,216,822 S 316th St Extension to West Valle H 635,500 635,500 t62,852,322 S 321 St at Peasle Can on - Add left tum lane 3,167,500 3,167,500 166,019,822 Dash Pt Rd -1st Ave S to 21st Ave S- Widen to 3 lanes 2,534,000 2,534,000 168,553,822 S 272nd St at Star Lake Road - Left tum lane 1,013,600 1,013,600 169,567,422 S 320th St at We erhauser Wa - Add IeR tum lane 946,449 946,449 170,513,871 Milka Rd S- S 320th St thru Peasle Can on Wa - Widen 3,167,500 3,167,500 173,681,371 S 320th St at Milita Rd S- Add tum lanes 743,729 743,729 174,425,100 S 312th St - Milka Road to 51st Ave S- Bikelanes, Sidewal 3,167,500 3,167,500 177,592,600 Milka Rd S- 31st Ave S thru S 320th St - Widen to 3 lanes • 3,167,500 3,167,500 180,760,100 S Peasle Can on Rd at Peasle Can on Wa S- Safe 341,460 341,460 181,101,560 A�0.19�2.V� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � r � � � � � � SW Dash Point Rd at 47th Ave SW - Signalize 508.067 508.067 181.609.627 0 =GIONAL NON-MOTORIZED PRIORITY PROJECT LIST 0 umul Ifta Rd - S 260th St to I-5 481,460 481,460 lita Rd - 31 st Ave S to SR 161 3,674,OU0 3,674,000 4 320th St - I-5 to West Vallev HwY 190.000 190.000 4 GRAND TOTAL ="`"•`•":'• 17,272,358 39,741,470 18,478,277 18,234,320 29,322,890 22,346,440 232,115,328 " Note: Projects identfied in the 1995 Bond Issue. These projects were selected to address safety and congestion in various areas of the City for a total of $7.5 million. "` Delete hom the TIP to derive Arterial Street improvement Plan (ASIP) Note: 1) Projects which are pianned to be compieted between 2002 to 2010 and beyond are estimated in 2002 dollars. 2) Annual programs are inflated at 3% per year. 0 I August 30,1995 (TIP952.WQ1) Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation � Maintenance and Operations Funa�ng strategy � Planned expenditures of $7,710,407 for the proposed transportation inveshnent program will be for maintenance, operations, and annual programs within the Ciry. Maintenance of the existing system is critical to the success of the Comprehensive Plan and the abiliry of the Ciry to accommodate increases in jobs and housing. The maintenance of the existing network, along with low-cost traffic management actions, will improve the system's ability to move people and goods without making significant changes to the overall travel patterns or physical dimension of the streets. While several roadway capacity expansions aze being proposed, most of the Ciry's future street network is already in place. It will carry much higher volumes of traffic, which will contribute to increasing maintenance requirements, which are included in the above total maintenance and operation costs. Financing The purpose of a transportation fmancing strategy is to develop an adequate and equitable funding program to implement transportation improvements in a timely manner. Without adequate funding the transportation plan cannot be implemented in an efficient and cost- effective manner. Furthermore, the inability to fund transportation projects could result in unacceptable levels of congestion. The fmancing program recognizes various user groups, including tr�c from existing and future Ciry of Federal Way development, and regional or sub-regional traffic. Funding sources are not fixed and require annual review and re-programming. Where non-city funds are sought, the City's projects may be competing for limited funds. Without attention to financing requirements, the operation, maintenance, and expansion of the trans- portation system will not occur in a timely fashion. Funding Needs Given that the City has only been incorporated since 1990, there is not a long history of fmancial expenditure which can be reviewed. The needs forecast through the planning process call for $319,262,923 in total funding needs, as listed in Table III-19. Already implemented in Federal Way is a portion of its funding of long term transportation improvements under this Comprehensive Transportation Plan. The following improvements, begun in 1990, have been or will be completed by/in 1996: ■ South 348th Street, SR 161 to SR 99. ■ SR 161, South 348th to I-5 Overpass. ■ 16th Avenue South, SR 99 to South 348th Street. ■ South 356th Street, 21st Avenue SW to lst Avenue South. ■ South 320th Street Corridor Signal Interconnect, I- 5 to lst Avenue. ■ SR 99 Comdor Signal Interconnect, 272nd to 356th. ■ South 348th Corridor Signal Interconnect, SR 18 to lst Avenue South. ■ BPA Trail Phase 1& 2, South l lth Street to Campus Drive South. ■ Numerous traffic signal installations and upgrades. In addition the Ciry just passed a$7.5 Street/Tr�c Bond to improve 10 major projects (see TIP list, Table III-20, for projects). These projects, when combined with the Ciry's commitments over the next six yeazs, will help maintain an acceptable level of transportation mobiliry for residents and businesses. Table III-20 summarizes the Ciry's current fmancial plan through the Yeaz 2010. Annual revenues and expenditures aze estimated for each of the first s� years of the plan, while the latter ten years are aggregated. Since the City's existing resources aze limited, there will be a significant reliance upon new City resources, grants, and other agency grants to balance the transportation program needs over the planning period. Funding Sources Funding sources for operation and expansion of the City's transportation system fall into several categories. Some sources consist of reliable annual funds, others are periodic, such as grants, and some are available options. The use, availabiliry, and applicability of these various sources is not always at the discretion of the City. Most sources have limitations imposed by either the enabling legislation or City policy. m � � � � �� � � � � � � � June 23, 1995 (tiprev.wql) Table III-20 �'� � � � � � � ��YV��1r1�vcIV��LN �r�- ���v � � � � � PUBLIC WORKS STREET/TRAFFIC COMPONENT REVENUE/EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 1995 1998 1997 1998 t999 2000 2001 20002-2010 Total GRAND TOTAL 10,778,213 17,322,541 �,354,240 18,885,507 18,234,320 28,322,890 22,348,440 234,935,870 �0,358,821 II � � � The following two categories of funds are available to fund TIP: 1. ExistingAnnual Sources_ The Ciry has control over the establishment and programming of a variety of funding sources which have been enabled by State legislation. Currently the Ciry utilizes the following options: City General Funds: The general fund was � established to provide services typically offered by local governments, and derives its funding primarily from local tax sources. The general � fund provided $960,814 to the street fund in 1995. � State Motor Fuel Tax: The Street Fund was established to account for the receipt and disbursement of state levied un-restricted motor � vehicle fuel taxes which must be accounted for in a sepazate fund: $1,114,805 was budgeted in 1995. � �� i � � � � Restricted State Fuel Tax: The Arterial Street Fund was established by state law to account for the use of state shared fuel tax revenues dedicated for this purpose: $536,550 was budged in 1995. Motor Vehicle Excise Tax (MVETI: Motor vehicle excise tax is collected on motor vehicles at the time owners purchase their vehicles licenses. Cities are allocated 8.83 percent of the total amount collected by the State, which is distributed on a per capita basis. The 1995 budgeted amount was $1,309,035. Vehicle Registration Fee: A vehicle registration fee was approved in 1993 by the State Legislature to address transportation needs within growing communities. The 1995 budgeted amount was $611,906. Transportation Development Charges (SEPA Miti ation : The City is assessing traffic impact mitigations for new development as a part of SEPA review. The mitigation amount is based upon the percentage of traffic, directly attributable to the new development, that uses the facility which is the subject of each needed City improvement project. That percentage is then multiplied by the cost of that improvement Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation project. The resulting amount is the portion of the cost of each improvement that is to be paid by the owner of the new development. Over the last four years, the City has averaged $19,000 per year. Other Minor Services: These include Committee Trip Reduction (CTR), revenues, and street use pernut fees. 2. OtherPeriodic orAvailable Sources: Additional funding will be generated through other sources. Some are currently utilized, others may be used in the future. Funding also is derived from outside sources (State, Federal, County, Metro) and often requires application. Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiencv Act STEA : This is a federal program designed to improve transportation system that helps air qualiry and relief congestion. The City has averaged about $400,000 per year over the last four years. State Transportation Im�rovement Board (TIB) Fund: Another State wide transportation fund available to local agencies for roadway improvements. Over the past four yeazs the City has averaged about $650,000 per year Street Utility Tax: The City may levy a street utility to fund up to 50 percent of the City's budget for street maintenance, operation and preservation. These charts aze based on the number of households and employment (FTES) within Federal Way. The maximum rate that can be charted an owner or occupant of a residential household is two dollazs per month. This is expected to generate over $1.3 million dollars in 1996 if approved. Bond Issue: A written promise to pay a specified sum of money at a specified future date. Bonds are typically used for long term debts and to pay for specific capital expenditures. Traffic Impact Fees: A traffic impact fee ordinance can be established to provide regulatory mitigation. The fee could take into account such elements as the benefits or impacts of developments in various sub-areas of the City, impacts at key locations, changes in congested VMT in sub-azeas, projects that promote alternative transportation, buses, car, � Ill-84 Federel Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation and van pools, etc., and development incentives for increased public facilities investments, especially in azeas such as the City Center. Traffic impact fees would be based upon actual direct impact of new development on the transportation system. acceptable transportation system performance conditions, and the community's long vision for land use and transportation. The City has identified probable financial capabilities, anticipated system performance conditions (level-of-service), and has proposed a roster of transportation investments and programs that implement the Comprehensive Plan. Concurrency The transportation chapter of the Growth Management Act (RCW 36.70A) requires each city and county planning under GMA requirements to incorporate a Concurrency Management System (CMS) into their comprehensive plan. A CMS is a policy to determine whether adequate public facilities are available to serve new developments. In this manner, concurrency balances the transportation investment program with land use changes envisioned by the City over the next several years. Legislative Requirement The transportation element section of the Washington State GMA reads: `Zocal jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a transportation facility to decline below standards adopted in the transportation element of the compre- hensive plan, unless transportadon improvements or strategies to accommodate the impacts of development are made concurrent with development (RCW 36 70A.070). " The phrase "concurrent with development" means that public infrastructure improvements and strategies required to service land development be in place, or fmancially planned for, within six-years of development. In Washington State, the transportation CMS's must include all arterials and transit routes; but may include other transportation services and facilities. Concurrency Management The Plan presents an allocation of estimated available transportation resources matched to planned improvements which are scheduled over the planning period. With the general estimates of costs, revenues, and timing for construction, as required by the Growth Management Act, the Plan predicts the acceptance of development permits that are consistent with its policies. The GMA requires that a contingency plan be outlined in case the City should fail to obtain the resources anticipated to make the necessary transportation improvements to maintain the adopted LOS standards. This analysis is sometimes termed "plan-level concurrency." Strategies for maintaining or rectifying adopted LOS standards in the event of a budget shortfall include the following: � � t� � ■ Increase the level of funding commitments in � subsequent years; ■ Review and adjust the City's overall land use � vision to lower the overall transportation demand; ■ Reprioritize improvements to address system � capacity needs as the highest priority; and ■ Modify (i.e., lower) the LOS standard to match available resources. � Regulaz updating of the Comprehensive Plan and Transportation chapter will afford opportunities for the City to modify the LOS standard or to secure other funding sources necessary to implement the capital improvements needed to maintain the adopted level of service standazd. Concurrency Testing The application of concurrency for transportation «„ assures that improvements and programs for accom- state law requires that a concunency test be applied to modating planned growkh are provided as development all development proposals as a condition of granting a development permit. A concurrency test compares a permits aze issued. The concurrency strategy balances proposed development's need for public facilities and three primary factors: available fmancial resources, III-85 � � � � � � � � � � �� � � i � � � ' � � � � services to the "capacity" of the facilities and services that aze available to meet demand. Other questions that need to be addressed are at what point in the development process does concurrency apply, what types of development pemuts are subject to the concurrency test, and if fees should be chazged for concurrency testing to cover staff and administrative costs associated with the testing. Federal Way's approach is to implement transportation improvements and programs that it can afford to fmance. These improvements and programs are based upon the Comprehensive Plan, which includes a level-of-service standard for the transportation system. The primary purpose of the Concurrency Management Program is to allocate available resources based on the timing and location of development, and to assess mitigation fees based upon each new development's share of the improvements that aze planned in the sub-area within which it is located. Level-of-service measures the out- come of and progress toward the planned growth rate. Concurrency Management and SEPA While Concurrency requirements are similar in many ways to the requirements of the State Environmental Protection Act (SEPA), there are some important differences, as follows: ■ Concurrency requirements are more demanding; if con-currency is not met, denial of the project is mandated. ■ Concurrency is based on a Level-of Service (LOS) standard; SEPA has no specific standazd as its basis. ■ Concurrency requirements only apply to capacity issues; SEPA requirements apply to all envuonmental impacts of a project. ■ Concurrency has timing rights related to development; SEPA does not. Therefore, concurrency does not replace SEPA, but rather becomes an integral part of a comprehensive program that relates private and public commitments to improving the entire transportation system. SEPA will focus primarily on site impacts that could result in additional transportation requirements in specific Federal Way Comprehensive P�an - Transportation instances (particularly access to the site or impacts in the immediate vicinity that could not have been anticipated in the overall transportation investment strategy for the system). Concurrency conclusions in this Comprehensive Plan do not excuse projects from SEPA review. However, they do address major system infrastructure issues that must be properly administered under both SEPA and the Growth Management Act. Monitoring The cycle of managing transportation facilities and services has recently been expanded. Emphasis is now being placed on monitoring the transportation system to assure that the communiry's vision, as reflected in the Comprehensive Plan, is being met. In addition, all projects that are complex in nature or involve significant capital expenditures have a value engineering study performed in order to select the most cost effect altemative. As a part of the project implementation phase, all projects are required to be reviews and approved by the City Council at the 30 percent, 85 percent, and 100 percent design phases. In the past, transportation planning merely forecasted expected growth in demand and sought ways to provide the needed capacity. Today, Federal and State level legislation place requirements (and authority) on the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) to monitor aspects of the transportation land use process. For example, Federal congestion management systems require a regional performance monitoring system. The PSRC is currently developing such a monitoring system which is expected to provide key information on the achievement of plan goals and objectives. Within this context, Federal Way may be called upon to monitor local actions including: ■ Project Implementation (versus planned improvement program). ■ Program Status and Implementation (e.g., CTR programs). ■ Policy Adoption (versus those called for in the plan). ■ Motorized and Non-motorized Traffic Volumes and Vehicle Occupancy on local facilities (versus that forecast by the Ciry plan). m-ss Faderal Way Comprehensive P�an - Transportation ■ Land Use Development Approvals or Density Pattems (vs. plan-anticipated growth). ■ Parking data such as pricing, policies, and management. Concurrency management requires the City to monitor the progress of transportation improvements against the impacts of growth occurring within the community. This test will be crucial in measuring the ongoing perfor- mance of the Comprehensive Plan over the coming years. Summary of Implementation Goals and Policies for Transportation Cazeful management is recognized as the key to fruition of the Comprehensive Plan's vision. The transportation system has multiple users and multiple funding sources. The implementation plan for Federal Way focusses on the next six yeazs within which to forecast needs and to identify reliable options for transportation funding. The actions needed during this period take into account transportation investments the City has undertaken since incorporation, combined with realistic expectations of growth. The City currently conducts value engineering on large construction projects and should continue to do so. All construction projects will be presented before the City Council at increments of 30 percent, 85 percent, and 100 percent for review and approval. In emphasizing multiple modes of travel, it is recognized that resources will have to be spread and balanced among modes. In achieving this goal, the City should undertake various strategies to implement its transportation plan by 2010. The near term efforts should focus on projects to: 1) mitigate safety problems; 2) preserve and protect the existing infrastructure; 3) expand multiple modes of travel and assure access for the transportation disadvantaged; 4) mitigate localized traffic congestion problems; and 5) expand the system for new growth. These actions are expected to maintain reasonable levels of service on the arterial highway system during this period. All major projects will be presented before Ciry Council at increments of 30 percent, 85 percent, and 100 percent for review and approval. Investment Focus ■ Emphasize eazly investment in lower cost Transportation Systems Management actions aimed at improving the performance of the existing street system. Actions will include intersection spot improvements, new and coordinated traffic signals, and neighborhood traffic management. ■ Identify and preserve necessary rights-of-way at the earliest opportuniry. ■ Work with transit providers to promote expanded local and regional bus services and to encourage a transit supported land use pattern. ■ Expand current park and ride facilities and develop support programs to encourage use by Federal Way residents. ■ Create a core street network in the Ciry Center with a by-pass circulation route for through traffic and express transit. ■ Develop and apply cleaz development standards to obtain necessary infrastructure changes as property develops. ■ Improve the pedestrian environment Citywide, with special focus along SR 99 and the Ciry Center. Focus on safe and efficient pedestrian facilities and improve the abiliry of pedestrians to safely travel throughout the community. Implementation Process ■ Work closely with adjacent local agencies and preferably, prepare interlocal agreements (especially WSDOT and Metro) to formally establish commitments for coordinated transportation planning and implementation. ■ Develop a comprehensive Transportation Investment Strategy using a two-stage approach. The first stage should be an updated six-year Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the second stage being a long-range comparison of transportation needs and revenues through 2010 and beyond. m-s� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � L _J � �� � � ■ Work towards obtainu�g new funding sources that: have the greatest local control for utilization on the most pressing local transportation needs; have the least strings attached; minimizes staff time for obtaining and reporting on the use of the funds; are received on a regulaz (such as monthly) basis; are predictable; inflation adjusted; and can be counted on for long term fmancial project planning. ■ Formally establish a process for prioritizing, designing, financing, and monitoring the completion of transportation system projects and programs. Identify clear departmental roles and responsibilities. ■ Monitor the status of the transportation system so � that progress towards the Plan's vision can be assured and improvements are in place in time to meet forecast demands. � � � � � � � � ■ Develop a Concurrency Management Strategy for the City that facilitates the full integration of the programming and administration of transportation improvements, services, and programs with the Comprehensive Plan. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Transportation ■ Assure that transportation system improvements are programmed to be available for use within six years of development pennit approval if level of service is forecast to be excceded within the subazea of the permi� ■ Monitor and make adjustments as needed to transportation level-of-service standards� and approach based on growth rates, comprehensive plan amendments, and fmancing for projects. ■ Integrate a transportation impact program within the development mitigation structure. ■ Work with the regional bus providers to promote a transit-supported land use pattem. ■ Program projects to: 1) mitigate safety problems; 2) preserve and protect the existing infrastructure; 3) expand multiple modes of travel and assure access for the transportation disadvantaged; 4) mitigate localized tr�c congestion problems; and 5) expand the system for new growth. � iu-sa Economic oeveiopmern � . __ __ _��_ - - _ _ �i __ _� � —L----- ,_ _ _ _ - - - ---- � ,�_l_ - — -- � i --- . i ! � ��-- _ —_ _ _ J _ % � i---- ��-- - � ) ---- - C ta .r. 1�. O �r C O .�. � � �� � O � v� � � L� � � ' � � � � ,� � � LJ � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Ptan - Economic Development 4.0 INTRODUCTION he Growth Management Act (GMA) includes economic development as one of its basic goals and it is a theme that runs throughout the Act. It considers the need to stimulate economic development throughout the State, but requires that these activities be balanced with the need to protect the physical environment. It encourages the efficient use of land, the availability of urban services, and the fmancing strategies necessary to pay for infrastructure. Finally, the Act mandates that communities do their planning and then provide the zoning and regulatory environment so that appropriate development can occur. It recognizes that while the public sector can shape and influence development, it is the private sector that generates community growth. The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC), has also adopted region-wide goals and objectives to guide multiyurisdictional transportation and land use policies that will be implemented through local comprehensive plans. Economic development is implicit in many of the goals and objectives of VISION 2020. The VISION 2020 strategy emphasizes that continued economic stability and diversity is dependent upon public and private sector collaboration to identify needs, such as infrastructure and land, and to invest in services that will promote economic activity. VISION 2020 also emphasizes that the stability of the regional economy increases when it develops and diversifies through the retention and strengthening of existing businesses and the creation of new business. King Counry, through its growth management planning policies and process, re-emphasizes the economic development implications of growth management. The Countywide Planning Policies promote the creation of a healthy and diverse economic climate. The Policies describe the need to strengthen, expand, and diversify the economy. They encourage protection of our natural resources and enhancement of our human resources through education and job training. The Countywide policies also speak to the need to make an adequate supply of land available for economic development by providing necessary infrastructure and a reasonable permitting process. Within this policy framework, Federal Way has outlined a vision of its economic development future. Its vision is to transform itself from a suburb of Seattle into a diversified and self contained city (Map IV 1). However, in doing so, it is important to realize that Federal Way is part of the larger Puget Sound economy, and therefore this transformadon will depend on the market forces at work within the larger region. To achieve ttus vision, the City must diversify its employment base by adding professional and managerial jobs, and by improving the balance between jobs and households in the City. The potential is there. Federal Way's unique location between the two regional centers of Seattle and Tacoma, both with large concentrations of population and large, successful ports, and its relationship within the Central Puget Sound region represent significant opporiunities. The City is also home to Weyerhaeuser's Corporate Headquarters and West Campus Office Park, one of the premier office park azeas in the region. The City's economic development vision is based on: 1) economic and demographic analysis completed as part of the comprehensive planning process; 2) market analysis of long-term real estate development in Federal Way; 3) interviews with realtors and properiy owners; 4) synthesis of real estate and development trends in the Central Puget Sound area; and 5) review and comment from the Planning Corrunission. 4.1 THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT VISION FOR FEDERAL WAY The vision for economic development in Federal Way is a focused economic development strategy intended to build a diverse economy and to achieve a better jobs and housing balance. The strategy encourages or speeds up the trends and transformations that aze already occurring in this community. The major objectives of the strategy include the following: ■ Provide a better balance between housing and jobs. ■ Diversify the economic base by encouraging higher paying white collar and technical jobs while preserving and enhancing the strong retail base. ■ Create horizontal mixed use employment sector growth in the South 348th Street area in the near term (1990-2000). iv-i Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development ■ Create Corporate and Office Park employment sector growth in East and West Campus in the mid-term (1995-2010). ■ Redevelop and improve the quality of the mixed use development along Pacific Highway South from South 272nd Street to South 356th Street (1995- 2010). ■ Add more businesses relative to the number of new housing units. ■ Take advantage of its location with respect to the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, as well as the SeaTac Intemational Airport. ■ Public and private sectors in the Federal Way area act cooperatively and aggressively to attract firms. ■ Create mid-rise, mixed use employment sector growth in the City Center in the long term (2005- 2020). ■ Encourage qualiry development throughout the City to attract desirable economic development in Federal Way. ■ Maintain and improve the qualiry and character of the existing residential neighborhoods. ■ Promote high quality, higher density residential neighborhoods in the Highway 99 corridor in close proximity to jobs and good public transportation. Future Regional Role for Federal Way ■ Encourage economic development diversity by aggressive pursuit of regional economic activity ■ Maintain its share of local resident-serving retail and services, and increase its shaze of regional, national, and international oriented business firms. ■ Increase its capture of region-serving office development. ■ Emphasize redevelopment and land assembly through the I-5/SR-99 corridor, especially in the City Center, as well as the 348th and 336th areas. ■ Transform the City Center into the focal point for commercial and community activities, as well as a major transit hub. ■ Diversify the local economy to provide quality office and business park space. ■ Generate more demand for hotel room-nights through growth in business park and office space. ■ Actively pursue relationships with cities in other parts of the Pacific Rim region for trade, commerce, and cultural advantage. Retail Areas ■ SeaTac Mall and other regional retailers within the City expand to meet the demand and become more competitive with other regional retailers. ■ High-cube, high•volume retail in Federal Way increases faster than population. Costco, Home Depot, and Eagle Hardware are typical examples of this recent retail trend. ■ Growth in resident-serving retail occurs in existing commercial nodes and in redevelopment areas along SR-99. ■ Neighborhood scale retail development keeps pace with population growth. ■ Pedestrian-oriented retail development emerges gradually in the redeveloped City Center. ■ Small amounts of retail use occurs on the ground floor of offices and residential buildings, as well as in business parks. ■ Neighborhood scale retail development emerges in response to growth in multi-family concentrations in the I-5/SR-99 corridor and new single family development on the east side of I-5. ■ Old, outdated strip centers along the SR-99 corridor redevelop as a mix of retail, office, and dense residential uses. iv-2 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY AND N�RTH PIERCE COUNTY SUB-REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT LEGEND FEDERAL WAY C]TY LIM]TS P❑LITICAL/STATE BOUNDARY STATE HIGHWAY � �� i�� m � a �� m < N Thts nap +s �ntended for use ns a graphical representatton only. The City of Federal G/ay makes no warranty as to its accuracy. pN� �� GI5 DIVISION MAP IV -1 SCALE� l" = 30,000' DATE� DECEMBER 1995 � � LJ I� L�.� � � � � � �� I L ' , � � � , � � ' Office Development ■ West Campus area builds out by 50 percent from current levels. ■ Offices of regional, national, and/or international fuYns locate in West Campus, and East Campus ad- jacent to the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Headquarters. ■ Ciry Center becomes an aclrnowledged oflice area. ■ Garden, high-rise and mid-rise office space, and modem industrial buildings increase rapidly in areas with land assembled for business parks and in redeveloped retail azeas. ■ Office development is integrated with retail, residential, and business pazks. ■ Federal Way attracts corporate headquarters. ■ Scattered, old offices are replaced with newer uses. Business Parks ■ High-amenity, high quality business parks accelerate capture of the Southwest King County real estate market as an altemative to the Green River Valley. ■ West Campus builds out 33 percent more business pazk space. ■ Business park land is assembled and able to capture and redevelop a net 75 percent increase in space, primarily in the SR-99/I-5 corridor around 344th and SR 18/SR-99 to 356th. ■ Business pazks contain a mix of uses in and among buildings as dictated by the market for high quality space. ■ One-owner, integrated, campus-like high amenity areas aze encouraged for corporate headquarters and modem research/development of high technology uses east of I-5. ■ The City of Federal Way works with other agencies to provide services for education and training, as well as social services and other remedial programs for the underemployed and the unemployed. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic �evelopment ■ Development of technical and research space increases in East Campus. Residential Areas ■ High quality residential areas are important for attracting and retaining businesses. ■ Federal Way will evolve by increasing local employment relative to residential units. ■ A range of housing types, densities, and prices allow the broad spectrum of employees to live near their work and recreation. ■ The City of Federal Way encourages integration of high- density housing with retail and other uses, especially along SR-99 and in the City Center. 4.2 SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND TRENDS Income Federal Way's demographic characteristics are typical of new suburban communities. However, compazed with other communities in South King County, Federal Way's residents are more affluent, with higher than average incomes and education achievement. In 1990, for example, Federal Way's median family income ($38,311) was neazly 20 percent higher than any other Southwest King County community. Thirty-two percent of all families in Federal Way earned more than $50,000 annually. In other Southwest King County communities, this figure ranged from 18 to 26 percent. Conversely, only about 25 percent of all families in Federal Way eamed less than $25,000 per year. In other South County communities, this figure can be 33 percent or more. Economic Base Federal Way functions as an established and expanding "snb-regional center" for both housing and economic activities. Its current economic base is composed of retail trade, which is 34 percent of total employment, i►.Q� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development and service industries, which are 31.8 percent of total employment. The remaining 34 percent of employment is from manufacturing industries. This contrasts with the Southwest King County region in which 43 percent of employment is in manufacturing, most of which is with or related to operations of the Boeing Company or is in wazehouse/distribution. Federal Way is primarily a bedroom community. It has more households than jobs and as a result, provides more workers to the region than it attracts. The City's employment base grew rapidly during the 1980's, increasing by 61 percent. During that same period, its residential population gew by 94 percent. Federal Way's retail base is diverse and attracts customers from outside the City limits. Its market share, however, is relatively low compazed to other Southwest King County communities. Although SeaTac Mall captures a good deal of the Southwest King Counry region's general merchandise trade, a high percentage of the local populace goes elsewhere to shop for automobiles, building materials, and furniture. The ratio of retail sales to the City's population and income is relatively low, but it still attracts more in retail sales than goes to other areas. Federal Way's shaze of Southwest King County service business (2.9 percent) is well below any of its neighboring cities, except Des Moines. Housing One of Federal Way's strengths is the range and quality of its housing stock. The qualiry, quantity, and range of options for housing are major factors in business siting decisions. In the 1990 census, Federal Way's housing was valued slightly higher than other Southwest King Counry communities, but lower than the average of all King County housing. Median value of owner- occupied homes in Federal Way was $118,800 in 1990. This contrasts with median values in neighboring Southwest King County cities of $91,500 to $107,100 and $140,100 for all King County. Compared with the cost of owner occupied housing, rental housing is somewhat more expensive. While single family houses remain Federal Way's dominant housing type, the majoriry of housing starts in the late 1980's were multi Multi units as a percentage of all housing units increased from less than 10 percent in 1970 to nearly 40 percent in 1990. During the late 1980's, there were twice as many multi-family housing units constructed in Federal Way than single family housing units. From 1990 to 1992, pernutting of multi-family construction stopped, and single-family construction slowed to about one-third of late 1980 levels. As a result, rental housing costs are higher in Federal Way than both the Southwest King Counry and the Countywide average. The 1990 median monthly rental rate for Federal Way was $476, while the median monthly rental rate for King County communities varied between $398 and $458. Federal Way's Regional Role Federal Way's position in a regional context includes several contradictory characteristics. On the one hand, Federal Way is an emerging sub-regional center; on the other, it still has some chazacteristics associated with an outlying suburban or even rural azea. Federal Way is characterized by: ■ High-quality single and multi-family residential azeas. ■ A range of housing that includes very modest tract homes, manufactured dwellings, and large luxury water&ont homes. ■ Auto-oriented, suburban scale regional, and community shopping centers and strip centers. ■ Corporate headquarters. ■ A single high-quality business and office park—West Campus. ■ Little developed space for quality business, flex-tech, and of�ce pazks. ■ Semi-rural areas, wildlife areas, truck stops, recreation- amusement pazks, areas without utilities, and much vacant open space. ■ A waterfront primarily occupied by high-quality homes, but not particularly accessible to the public. ■ Many marginal commercial areas with redevelopment potential along SR-99 which aze vestiges of a prior era. The non-residential areas of Federal Way reflect a community that has the ability to absorb higher density (more compact) uses and greater development as growth in the Central Puget Sound region continues. And even though Federal Way is a new City in a suburban azea, much of its future will be tied to redevelopment and transformation. iv-s � � � , � � � � � � , ' � � � , � � ' r � � ' � I �� � ' � � ' LJ ' � � � i , � ' Industrial and business park space available to rent in Federal Way is a minuscule shaze of the Southend-Green River-Seattle market area (0.5 percent). The South King County industrial area (including industrial pazks, business parks, and flex-tech hybrid business/office pazks) is currently the strongest real estate market in Westem Washington. According to several major real estate research publications, the industrial areas of Seattle, Crreen River Valley, Eastside, Everett and Fife/Tacoma comprise one of the strongest and fastest growing azeas in the U.S. The Ciry of Federal Way is in a major strategic position to capitalize on this trend. Federal Way is located at the intersection of I-5 and SR-18 with easy access to the Port of Tacoma, Port of Seattle, and SeaTac Intemational Airport. In addition, issues in the Green River Valley (the existence of wetlands, lack of developable land, rising land prices, poor access to I-5, and contaminated sites in older industrial areas) are to Federal Way's advantage. Federal Way should be able to attract a broader mix of land uses and economic activity to its redevelopment areas, especially those neaz the intersection of I-5, SR-99 and SR-18. West Campus - This development sets a standard in the region and is one of the best examples of a true mixed-use master-planned community in the Pacific Northwest. The qualiry of development in this area is decidedly different than elsewhere in Federal Way and Southwest King County. Office Development - The relatively small amounts of qualiry office space available for rent in Federal Way comprises 11.2 percent of that available in the South King County market area. The South King County office market has been dominated by Boeing's space needs. That feature is slowly changing. Only a small amount of the South King County of�ice mazket is in buildings that would be classed as mid-rise buildings, most of which are located in SeaTac, Renton, and Tukwila. The Rest - The remaining industrial, commercial, and retail space in Federal Way is typically a jumble of isolated and lower to average quality development scattered along Highway 99. Such development masks the quality of West Campus and the Weyerhaeuser headquarters complex and could also slow the transformation of Federal Way from a suburb into a major sub-regional city. Federal Way Comprehensive Plen - Economic Development In sununary, Federal Way's position in both Central Puget Sound and Southwest King County is the result of its past and its strong current retail and residential role. Much of the pre- and post- World War II highway- related space that developed in the 1970's and 80's in response to rapid population growth is now ready for redevelopment. The West Campus and East Campus areas will serve as a model for the quality of modern commercial, off'ice, and business pazk space Federal Way will need in order to attract its share of future regional growth. Urban design and infrastructure in other areas of Federal Way must be brought up to these standards. In addition, the existence of lazge parcels of land ownership in the 344/356th area and 312/324th azea of the core corridor will give Federal Way a development advantage. Federal Way's Competitive Position in Southwest King County Subregion While many of the development pattems are set in the Southwest King County sub-region, six cities are poised for significant change. These six cities aze Auburn, Federal Way, Kent, Renton, SeaTac, and Tukwila. There aze several sources of uncertainty for each of these cities related to strength of current major developments, available vacant and redevelopable land, routing of regional transit facilities, as well as community and political support. Table IY-1 summarizes the major cur- rent positions and pattems of challenge and opportunity. In addition to these siac cities in Southwest King County, Tacoma is an important competitor to Federal Way. Tacoma is an older city that has been trying to improve its downtown and image for more than a quarter century. It has continually devoted its own funds, as well as State and Federal grants, to stimulate economic development. Tacoma has a strategic location on the highway system and a strong port with much unrealized potendal. In additioq both the City and suburbs have vacant and redevelopable land, as well as relatively cheap accessible land for residential development. The Tacoma area faces challenges similaz to those confronting the six cities of Southwest King County. In addition to its port and relationship to international commerce, Tacoma has the largest concentration of office space south of Seattle and is second only to Bellevue for office space outside of Seattle in Washington State. iv-s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development Table IV-1 Summa of Develo ment Potential in Southwest Kin Coun Cities Curreot Niche -Induttrial area4 Regionai mall -Industrial land -Businaa parks -Airport niated Regional retail -Vacant land -Weat Campus -Boeiog -Mid-rix offia -Redevelopable land -Boeiog Regi�al mall -Haat Campua -Business parks -Mid-rise offix -Redevelopable lig6t -WryerhaeuurHdq. -Vacantland industrial -Vacant land � red- •Mid-riae offix evelopeble land Opportuoitka Pre�eooe ofBoeing -Weyuhseuser Bxiag facilitiea -Boeing & -Adjaxnt W SeaTac -Strnng retail ideMify -Commuter nil -Wed Campus -Commuter rail PACCAR's mfg. & Airpac � cancm4ation _Bs�blishea offia, Essc campus Es,.blishea offia. offia �mp�ex. I,.�JC ar►amcrty. xedev�i�c business padcs & -Large oonoeotratioa busiMas parks � -Mid-riu buildingn -Major HCT'. Stetian pota�tial. industrial aroas. of rdail industrial areas. Potential planned -Frxavay acceas -Crou-va11eY highw'aY -Land assembled for -CYaas-vallry hwy. redevel�t areas. -0ne large strategic location at vas-ioads C�ned� planned redevelopmenc Cormector planned paroel assembled I1i05Q-5. -Sub-crnhal location -fuuae hwy. Cross- -Boeing officdmfg between Pats of roads (I-S & SR509) complexes. Tacoma & Seattle. from Seattle will open -Proximity W SesTac -I-S/SR I8 crosuoads. acros f� office and Airport � w Port of -HC'T stations businas parks. Seatile. -Caarunuta rail imenticipNed. -Urb�n «nhr ia anticipated W be � Hig�t Capacity Transit line.• -Prnnit procas reco�ized fa apeed of dunaco�md. Challeoga -Distance from I-5 & Distance to Pat of -L�nhial image. -Limited retail -Adjacent to SeaTac -Licnited vscant land maj� aonomic Seaule -No prosped for HCT atVadi�s. Aiepo�t. f� b�uiness & office concentiatians. -dispased -OH'-crnur ►ocatiai -Limited land for -Mauive parlcs. -Low-scale developtnent paGem on SR 167 businas � office redevelopment Freeway eccma not development -Not on mmmukr -Small land holdings puks• required. easy or obvious. -0ffcmta location. rail. in CBD. -Senall land holdings -I.and assembly -Limited vacant land -Wetlanda -Little market-quality -Wetlands in CBD. required. -No obviau centa w busin�ss office parlc -Not mticipsted to be -Not on commuter focal point within apaa outaide of West m High-Capaciry rail. Tu�wila Campus. Tcansit line. -Off-centec croas- roads (I�305 & SR 16� 'NOTE: Ths Ciry ofTukwila has notyst besn designated to be on the High Capacity Transit lrne as eurrenUy npnssnted in t1�s ngronal transportatlon plan In summary, any program of economic development for Federal Way must monitor conditions and trends in Tacoma and Southwest King County, and act decisively and aggressively to increase the City's strategic position. 4.3 FORECAST OF ECONOMIC GROWTH IN FEDERAL WAY The growth forecasts used in the other chapters of this plan are based on the PSRC regional forecasting model. The PSRC uses an economic model to project regional growth and then downloads growth projections to the jurisdictions in the region. By contrast, the economic forecasts prepared for this chapter used specific market segments for retail, office, and business park develop- ment to extrapolate future land and redevelopment space needs. The process used for Federal Way was based on an analysis of economic and real estate trends in the region. In addition, the Federal Way forecasts were based on assumptions consistent with the Vision for Federal Way which is the basic concept for the plan. The forecasts that evolved out of the technical analysis of existing land use and economic conditions combine both extrapolations of the future and assumptions about Federal Way's vision. The forecast indicated moderate growth in retail space consistent with Federal Way and Southwest King County's population growth in the face of more competition in the sub-region. Office and business pazk space is expected to grow relative to the region and sub-region. Federal Way is expected to increase its capture of office space as well as tenants of business pazk space. This forecast also assumes aggressive planning and investment in infrastructure in order to transform the communiry at an accelerated rate. iv � � � � i , � � � ' , , � � r i ' � ' � � � II � � ' � , Like all forecasts, these should be periodically monitored relative to the real estate market conditions in South King County and Central Puget Sound, and economic conditions in Federal Way. In addition, the economic development policies and underlying assumptions related to local and regional decisions concerning infrastructure, transportation systems, and land use regulation should be carefully monitored. Federal Way's forecast to the year 2015 is based on several key assumptions which should be reanalyzed at least every five years, along with trends and conditions in local economic and real estate activity. The key assumptions are: ■ Regional trends in population and employment are at least as robust as the Puget Sound Regional Council current estimates which are derived from State and national long-term forecasts. ■ The Regional Transit Authority implements some type of High Capacity Transit Plan including: � ■ Improved bus service. ■ Traffic control measures. ■ Highway improvements. � ' ' �J � � � � � ■ The Aubum Mall is moderately successful. ■ Local public and private sectors jointly fmance adequate infrastructure. ■ The City adopts plans and policies that provide appropriate development incentives and reasonable processes to guide implementation of this vision by the private sector. ■ The business and residential community supports the vision with indirect political support for necessary and timely infrastructure. 4.4 IMPLEMENTATION Attributes of Successful Economic Development Programs Successful economic development programs typically have the following attributes. First, they receive material support and leadership from the mayor, City Council and senior City staff. Second, the municipal leadership is Faderal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Devalopment willing to work creatively and cooperatively with private sector leaders and businesses to accomplish economic development goals. They have the ability and find the resources to target infrastructure projects and programs to encourage development or redevelopment of spec�c areas. To do this, they work aggressively to secure State and Federal funds for local public and private assistance. Likewise, City staff are empathetic toward economic development goals and Irnowledgeable about working within City legal constraints, budget constraints, and community tolerances to assist businesses and the real estate development process. The staff also have the ability to react and make decisions quickly and consistently to provide assistance for private sector dealings with the public planning and regulatory processes. The staff's abiliry to link several programs, team up with other departments, and leverage limited funds allow them to take meaningful and effective action. In addition, innovative techniques such as Transfer of Development Rights, Planned Unit Developments, and Concomitant Agreements to attract and retain businesses, and streamlined permittixig processes should be utilized to help improve economic development. The City's Role in the Economic Life of a Community In the State of Washington, the direct actions that cities can take to impact economic development are severely limited by the State Constitution and its interpretation. Direct fmancial assistance through loans, grants, and tax rebates aze severely limited or forbidden. Courts have consistently ruled that the use of public funds and actions to assist specific businesses, individuals, and developments is unconstitutional in the State of Washington. In addition, voters have reinforced this position when they have had the opportuniry to authorize tax increment financing. Occasionally, communities have used this constitutional conservation to stunt creativity with respect to local community economic improvement. Despite these constraints, there are a number of things a ciry government can do with respect to economic development activities. One of the most significant direct actions a city can take is provide the necessary infrastructure. This includes: 1) developing long term facilities expansion plans; 2) designing the specific ' iv-e Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development systems and projects; 3) raising or borrowing local funds to finance the projects or act as a conduit for state, federal, and intergovernmental funds; and, 4) fornung public-private partnerships to jointly construct projects. Second, a ciry can deliver high qualiry and cost effective urban services. These necessary services include police and fue protection, pazks, recreation and cultural services, social services and job training, and a well run land use planning and regulatory process. In addition, a ciry can actively participate in public/private groups designed to help businesses and the development communiry as they work their way through the state and federal regulatory processes. Third, a city can directly impact economic development by doing market research or by being a land owner and developer. For example, a city could develop, maintain, and disseminate data and analysis on local development conditions and trends, as well as monitor important trends and assumptions upon which plans, programs, and strategies aze based. In additioq a city can buy land, aggregate parcels, and make necessary improvement so that it is ready for new development or redevelopment. This also allows a city to joint venture with a private sector partner if that is appropriate. In terms of indirect roles, a city can act as a facilitator to convene public and private entities to work on issues of local importance and reach consensus. Prepazation of a comprehensive plan is an example of this important indirect action. A city can act as a representative of local residents and businesses interests in resolving regional and Countywide problems such as traffic congestion, housing, and human service issues. A city can also mobilize local community support for important projects and problem-solving; and work to improve the overall image of the community and in doing so, make the community more attractive for economic development General Approaches to an Economic Development Strategy There are basically three local economic development strategies which impact the level of private business growth in a community. expansion and retention of businesses that are already located in the communiry. A city's role in this strategy is to help businesses resolve problems so that they can expand locally rather than move to another community. Problem resolution includes helping a business find a lazger more suitable site, work through a land use or zoning regulation problem, or access necessary infrastructure. This strategy typically has low to moderate cost implicarions and a high probability of success. ■ Second, the relocation of firms from other parts of the country or new plant locations are rare and do not account for a significant share of local employment growth relative to overall employment growth in the United States. Typically, local govern- ment attracts new business to their community with direct fmancial incentives. This strategy has high risk for the number of successes and has a high cost. ■ Third, new businesses that are the result of new business start-ups, spin-offs from existing local firms, and new business ideas and technologies are another effective way that communides increase employment and businesses withixi a local area. Local government encourages new business formation usually through indirect methods. This strategy has moderate-to-high costs depending on actions and low-to-moderate degree of success. Federal Way is an important communiry within the region. Its economic importance has historically been associated with the size of its population and strategic location. Federal Way has the same package of economic assets and liabilities that attracts firms to the Pacific Northwest. Most "footloose" firms searching for a new location will select a region or state, then select a specific location. Federal Way can most affect this site selection and community growth process through its influence on the supply of real estate. The "supply side" approach is consistent with State law, traditional community tolerance for assisting business in Washington State, and the range of fmancial demands on most local jurisdictions. Human Resource Programs ■ First, studies of employment growth experience in � addition to the economic development strategies local communities in the United States show that the �scussed in the previous section, human resource lazge majority, of new jobs are generated by programs are another general way whereby cities can be iv-s � , i � � , � ' � � ' ' � , ' � � ' ' , L_J ' �� �J ' , ' , � L_ J , � � ' ' ' ' u ' effective at economic development. These programs are often not included as part of an economic development program because they focus on assisting people rather than businesses. However, improving and remediating human resources is an important long run approach. The previous three general approaches to economic development strategies try to raise revenues, reduce costs, or reduce risks for business location, facility investment decisions, and operating decisions of businesses. Human resource programs make a community attractive to new and existing businesses by improving the local labor force. Components of a human resources program include: 1) providing temporary support for underemployed workers, unemployed workers, and their families; 2) providing job trairung and retrauung to improve an individual's abiliry to enter or remain in the work force; 3) creating refenal and other programs that allow labor resources to become more mobile and to respond to information about job openings; and, 4) by providing social service programs that meet the needs of community residents who are temporarily not able to participate in the economy. Federal Way could use its existing Human Services program working with local social service agencies and educational institutions to deliver these programs, with a focus on helping residents who aze underemployed and unemployed. Economic Development Strategy For Federal Way As with many cities, Federal Way will have limited funds with which to pursue its economic development goals. The City will have to use its resources in a focused and prioritized manner to have a positive impact on the local economic base. Table IY-2 summarizes how Federal Way will implement an appropriate economic development strategy. Since it is difficult for a local community with limited fmancial resources to stimulate "demand-side" factors for its land and locatioq the actions required to implement the recommended policies use "supply-side" oriented methods to stimulate industrial and commercial development. Implementation of a supply side strategy should increase the City's opportunities to capture a larger shaze of regional real estate market activity, resulting in a stronger, more diverse economy, tax base, and quality of life in Federal Way. There aze several Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development "supply side" tools that local govemments control. They can use these tools to prepare the supply of available developable land and infrastructure for economic growth. These actions include: ■ Assembling land for redevelopment. ■ Reducing or balancing the supply of land by enacting zoning that reduces the supply of marginal or ill-located lands. ■ Enacting favorable land use regulations. ■ Minimizing uncertainty in local regulatory processes. ■ Offering assistance in state and federal permitting. ■ Streamlining the pennitting process. ■ Mobilizing community support by working with the private sector to actively encourage the retention and expansion of existing businesses as well as bringing in new development, businesses and jobs to the communiry. ■ Seeking opportunities to promote the community by working with the private sector to build consensus on community opportunities and goals. ■ Funding the City portion of public/private groups to allow them to do an effective job in marketing the community. ■ Providing leadership to motivate and convene local human and financial resources. ■ Using the local tax base and debt capacity to finance public infrastructure that could accommodate or stimulate private development. ■ Sponsoring projects, and acting as responsible party to receive any available funds that may be provided by State and Federal agencies. The economic development strategy for Federal Way will use these "supply-side" oriented methods to stimulate industrial and commercial development. Most studies of economic development have shown that 60 to 80 percent of new employment growth in a communiry is derived from businesses that are already operating in the community. These studies also attribute a significant amount of local employment growth to the formation of new businesses that are spin-offs from existing lazger firms. These new fums may be started by employees who have new ideas, new processes, or technologies that are not appropriate for or valued by the parent firm. iv-�o Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - Economic Development Table IY-Z Economic Development Areas and Actions Sub Area of Who Initlates Whst Land Uses Are How Are They Federal Way Action Encouraged Encoura=ed Reasons Ti�nin= PRIMARY ECONOMIC AREAS City Center Public w/ Mid/high-rise office. RTA Station. To increase caphue of Emphasis 5-10 private wppoit MF residential. In-fill infi�astructure. rogional gowfh. (20) yeara. Civic%ultural. Urban design regulations & Pedestrisn-orirnted retail. incentives. Public atnenities. 344tkt to Public w/ Mix of low rise office 8c light 356t1�/SR99 private support. industry. ••Big boa�' retail. Regulalions that encourage high-quatity design. Aggessive in&asWdure investrnent Sub-area EIS 8c CIP. Captun the current Emphasis 0-S markd strength in bu- (10) Years• siness 8c indus4iat psrk uses in Southwest King �Y• Wat Campus Cutrent land Buildout & maintain quality. Facilitate buildout. Wat Campus, one ofthe Ongoiog in owners. Assist maintenance of highest quslity master responae W . public areas. planned developments in market the Pacific NoithwesL ' � � ' ' , u East Campus Weyerhaeuser High�uality coiporate & office Cooperative city planning Large land owim with In response to Cotp. parks. & in6as4udure policies. visioq resources, & track roarket & ' rawrd. cwiporate actions. Grneratc demand for CBD & business parks. 336th linkage: Public w/ High density MF. four primary private supporL Low rise office. economic dvpt Supportive retail. areas. Public amenities. Old Hwy 99 Pub6c w/ High capacity 8c business related. outside of main private suppo�t. High de�uity MF residential. economic areas. Low rise office. Auto-oriented retail. Neighborhood commercial. Economic Development Goals The Ciry of Federal Way will not wait for mazket forces to create the future, but will act to shape and accelerate the evolving mazket trends in the direction of its vision. The City will pursue the following goals to implement economic development. Goals EDGl The City will emphasize redevelopment which transforms the City from a suburban to an urban area. EDG2 The Ciry will encourage concentration of non- residential development into four primary areas: I.and use & capital improvemrnts for gadual redevelopmenUin-fil l. Traffic development Land use 8c capital improvements fa gadual redevelopment & in-fill. Development &om traffic. Provide a range of ho- using 8c support services dt retail for a;onomic & residential areas. Mixed-use development in the azea around 348th and SR-99 High-quality business pazk development, including corporate headquarters, continued in and around West Campus. �Iigh-quality corporate headquarters in a pazk-like campus setfing east of I-5. EDG3 The City will help facilitate redevelopment of existing neighborhood commercial centers in the SR-99 corridor and the 336th area between West and East Campus. Economic Development Policies Provide housing & su- ppod services for eoonomic areas. As appropriate � for market As appropnate � for market ' ■ Mixed-use development in the City Center (312th and 320th, SR-99 to I-5). Transfomvng the City Center and business park areas will require the implementation of the following policies: iv-i i � ' � , , ' , ' C� � � � � � �] EDPS The City will complete designs for public ' infrastructure to be jointly funded by the City and private land owners. � EDP6 The City will work actively to formulate ways for joint public-private funding of infrastructure. EDPl The City Center and business park areas will receive special attention in the Comprehensive Plan. EDP2 The Ciry will initiate a process to master-plan these sub-azeas jointly funded by public and private entities. EDP3 The Ciry will initiate a process to develop high-quality urban design and infrastructure standards for these areas. EDP4 The Ciry will complete environmental impact statements for these two sub-areas so that EDP15 The City will develop an aggressive public specific projects that aze consistent with the safery program designed to protect residents and sub-area plan may only require an businesses. environmental checklist. Federal Way Comprehensive Pla� - Economic Development EDP12 The City will fund its portion of the public/private groups to allow them to do an effective job in marketing the community. EDP13 The City will adopt design guidelines to enhance the urban environment to retain and attract businesses and residents. EDP14 The City will adopt streamlined pernutting processes consistent with State and Federal regulations to reduce the up-front costs of locating businesses in the City. EDP16 The City will encourage strong public and private leadership to solicit community support for internal and external funding assistance. EDP17 The City will periodically monitor local and regional trends to be able to adjust plans, policies, and programs. � EDP18 The City will actively work with representative EDP7 The City will develop zoning and fmancing graups of business and property owners, incentives that encourage prioritized including the Chamber and other local business ' development consistent with comprehensive and associations, to enhance citywide and sub-area sub-area plans and orderly, phased growth. improvements and planning. ' EDP8 The Ciry will utilize innovative planning techniques such as Transfer of Development Rights, Planned Unit Developments, and Concomitant Agreements. EDP19 The City in conjunction with the local business communiry will actively pursue ties to Pacific Rim nations. �J I � J EDP9 The City will utilize innovative financing techniques such as Local Improvement Districts, and Industrial Revenue Bonds. EDP10 The City will mobilize communiry support by � working with the private sector to actively encourage the retention and expansion of existing businesses as well as bringing in new , development, businesses and jobs to the communiry. � ' EDPl l The City will promote the communiry by working with the private sector to build consensus on community opportunities and goals. EDP20 The City will work with appropriate local and regional human resource and social service agencies to provide programs for underemployed and unemployed persons in the community. EDP21 The City recognizes the importance of cultural and recreational activity to its economy and through the Arts Commission and Parks Department will pursue joint ventures with private groups and individuals in developing cultural and recreational opportunities. EDP22 The City will encourage the expansion of existing and development of new multi-purpose facilities to host cultural and recreational activities. , iv-i s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development The foregoing policies will assist the City of Federal Way to pursue an accelerated transformation toward the community's vision of its future. Table IY-3 describes the four major employment, economic activiry azeas of the Ciry that will receive the bulk of future commercial and industrial development. The table summarizes the chazacteristics, location, and planning process required as well as the major transformation required. The major public and private actions required for each area are listed. The Land Use and City Center chapters of the Comprehensive Plan describe these four azeas in more detail. Table IV-3 describes the current ownership pattern and major activities where the City will act affirmatively to transform these areas so that an increased share of regional growth will be attracted to the Ciry. In the azeas of multiple ownership, control and implementation of the community's vision will require more explicit ef�ort and resources from the Ciry government. Both West and East Campus have, or will develop, their own high standards for qualiry of the new development. The type of development expected to occur in each of the four major economic zones important to Federal Way's vision is related in Table IY-4. Also related in the table aze who the main competitors will be for each of these four areas. The land use policies and regulations for each area should accommodate and encourage these activities. These policies and regulations are discussed in the Land Use, City Center, and Transportation chapters of the Comprehensive Plan. � Table IY-3 Develo ment Zones: Descri tion Vertical Mized City Master-Planned Master Planned Horizontal Mized- Area 312th/320th West Campus East of I-5 344thl356th Ownership Divecse Diverse Single Diverse Planning Joint Public/Private Private cmphasis Private Emphasis Joint Public/Privatc Major Transformation Retail to office emphasis & Infill and continuc Vacant to high quality Scattered industrial Activity includes hotels. Vend since 1974. corporate headquarters & retail to quality high tech. mixed used. Major Public Actions , Comprehensive Plans C C C C Subarea Plans C Private Private C Design Standards C Privatc Private C Environmental Impact Analysis C C C C Infrastructure Planning C C C C Infrastructure Design C Private Private C Financing Joint Private Private Joint Eaamples Seattle CBD West Campus Redmond Willows Road High Tech Corridor Denny Regrade High Tech Corridor Harbor Pointe Renton Bumaby BC Tukwila Bellewe Kent Tacoma Aubum Portland L wood c=City initiates and leads aceion ' � I � � � '� � � , � � ' , ' ' L� i , ' IV-13 , Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Economic Development Table IV-4 Develo ment Zones and Land Use Market CY�rrent Vertical Master- Master- Horizontal Se�ment Characteristics Competitive M1zed Planned Planned Mi=ed-Uee E:amples City Mued Corporate Basinas Center Campas Parlc Parlcs RET'AIL High Cube Freeway access Moderate amenities 348th & SR18 V High Volume Cheap Iand/space Festival High density population & employment Pike Place V Regional draw Market Retail & rastaurants Bellewe Square Mall stores Westlake Center Edmonds LaComer Employment & High suto or pedestrian Uaffic Southcenter V V V V Resident Tacoma Mall Supporting Aubum Mall Rapidly growing population Southcenter V Mall-like Freeway access Tacoma Mall Hotel Serves employment centers SeaTac Only at Provides meeting space Tukwila &eeway Tacoma i�section OFF7CE Garden •Heavy landscaping Older Bellewe V V •Low pedestrian levels Redmond •Low/mode[ate in/out V�c •Small business/professional & business Renton & se�vices, FIRES Tukwila along •Serves local & mgional business aRerials •Auto oriented •Residetrtial ateas close Mid-rise •Larger tenants, sub-regional8c regionat Bellewe V V V Occasionally if •Moderate landscape Tukwila park of Masfer •Moderate in & out Renton Plan •SmalUmedium business services, Lynnwood mediaUdental FIRES Queen Anne •Branch offices Lake Union •Surface parking or on deck Elliott Way •Some Vansit Factoria Freeway interchanges High •Pedestiian Vaffic •High amenities Seattle V V Rise/Higher •Public transit •Larga businesses Bellewe •Moderate traffic •Professional services SeaTac •Headquarters, branch officxs RenWn •Regional serving F.I.RE.S. •Underground or deck parking BUSINESSPARKS •Auto/truck oriented •Warehouse/retail High Tech V V •Cheap land •Govemmerrt offices Corridor •Employment density Eastside •Manufacturing assembly Renton •Office IocaUregional Tukwila •Professional & business service Krnt •Distribution & service L wood IPQiC! � �\ II I i �� \ - I I � I � � �' � / �- i I I I � T �_ �� � l I I I I I ' 1 I i ; ��.�' i ' I From Vi�io� �o Pian _ a _ � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing 5.0 INTRODUCTION his chapter was prepared in conjunction with the Land Use chapter of this Comprehensive Plan. Together they provide a holistic view of how housing stock may be expanded and improved to meet the City's housing needs over the next 20 years. The emphasis of tlus chapter is on preserving the high quality of e7cisting residential neighborhoods while improving housing opportunities for low income families and persons with special housing needs. These housing needs were identified in a Housing Needs Assessment which the Ciry completed in the Fall of 1993, and are summarized in this chapter. The Growth Management Act (GMA) requires that housing issues be addressed in both the Land Use and Housing chapters. To gain a full picture of how new housing will be provided in Federal Way, both chapters should be read. As a general rule, the Land Use chapter describes what densities will be pernutted in the various neighborhoods of the Ciry and makes recommendations for how new residential neighborhoods should be designed so that they aze a positive addition to the community. The Housing chapter focuses on the demand for new housing, the availability of a range of housing types and sryles, and on the housing needs of low and moderate income families, special needs populations, and the homeless. 5.1 LEGAL CONTEXT Washington State Growth Management Act In preparing its comprehensive plan, GMA requires cities to, "...encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population and to promote a variety of residential densities and housing types." It also encourages "preservation of existing housing stock." The Act discourages conversion of undeveloped land, "...into sprawling, low-density developments." (RCW 36.70A.020, 1990 Supp.) GMA requires that the Housing chapter include: ■ An inventory and analysis of existing and projected housing needs. ■ A statement of goals and policies for housing preservation, improvement, and development. ■ Identification of sufficient land area for the number of needed housing units, including government assisted housing, housing for low income families, mobile/manufactured housing, multifamily housing, and special needs housing. This defines the amount of land that the City must designate for housing in the Land Use chapter. ■ A strategy and policy for meeting the housing needs of all economic segments of the community. ■ Encouragement for innovative land use management techniques to enhance affordable housing opportunities, including densiry bonuses, cluster housing, planned unit developments, and transfer of development rights. Affordable Housing Inventory A 19931egislative amendment requires that all cities and public agencies develop an inventory of public properties no longer needed for use and which may be available for affordable housing. The inventory is to identify individual properiy locations, size, and current zoning category. Public agencies include all school districts and the State departments of Natural Resources, Transportation, Social and Health Services, Corrections, and General Administration. The inventory is provided to the Washington Department of Community, Trade and Economic Development (CTED) and is to be updated annually by November 1. The inventory is available from CTED upon written request (RCW 35.21.687). Accessory Dwelling Units The City is required by the State Housing Act of 1993 to include provisions for accessory housing. To allow local flexibility, the provisions are subject to such regulations, conditions and limitations as determined by the City Council (RCW A.63.230). Consistent with the adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, the City prepared and adopted accessory dwelling unit provisions consistent with the State's mandate. v-i Multi-County Policies In response to GMA, the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) adopted regional housing policies. These policies promote fair housing access to all persons regazdless of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, family status, source of income, or disability. Policies seek to strengthen interjurisdictional efforts for fair distribution of low and moderate income and special needs housing. PSRC policies seek to provide a diversiry of housing types to meet needs of all economic segments of the population. Jurisdictions should promote cooperative efforts to ensure that an adequate supply of housing is available throughout the region. Each jurisdiction should work at preserving existing affordable housing stock and providing access to public transit for the residents in such housing. Policies promote development of institutional and fmancial mechanisms to provide housing neaz communiry centers. They also encourage consideration of the economic impact of regulations and development of regulations which do not burden the cost of housing development and maintenance. Countywide Policies In 1994, King County adopted Counrywide Policies for affordable housing that promote a"rational and equitable" distribution of affordable housing. The policies establish numerical housing targets which each city should accommodate and specific targets for housing affordable to households earning less than 80 percent of the County's median family income. Local actions to encourage development of affordable housing may include, but are not limited to, providing suf�icient land zoned for higher housing densities, revision of development standards and permitting procedures, reviewing codes for redundancies and inconsistencies, and providing opportunities for a range of housing types. Additionally, all jurisdictions should participate in a cooperative, Countywide effort to address current low income housing needs. Initially, this effort will include identifying a Counrywide funding source and Countywide programs to address housing needs that cross jurisdictional boundaries and benefit from Countywide application. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing Other Countywide housing policies require jurisdictions to evaluate existing subsidized and low cost housing resources, and identify such housing that may be lost due to redevelopment, deteriorating housing conditions, or public policies or actions. Jurisdictions should develop strategies to preserve existing low income housing and provide relocation assistance to households that may be displaced due to public action. For jurisdictions such as Federal Way, which have elected to have an urban center, the Countywide planning policies provide that the center be planned to accommodate a minimum of 15 dwelling units per acre. All jurisdictions should monitor and report on various aspects of residential development within their communities. They should define annual targets for housing development and preservation, and track progress in achieving Countywide and local goals for housing all economic segments of the population. The County's Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC) is charged with determining whether development of housing for all economic segments of the population is satisfying housing needs. If new housing falls short of ineeting the Countywide need for housing, and particularly affordable housing, the GMPC may recommend additional actions. � � � � � � O � � Implications for the Housing Chapter � In summary, based upon the foregoing laws and policies, Federal Way's Housing chapter should include an inventory of existing housing stock; identify housing needs and set minimum housing tazgets for each economic segment of the population; provide for sufficient, appropriately zoned land to meet these needs; and identify appropriate goals, policies, and strategies for achieving these housing targets. Tools for achieving these goals may include amendments to the zoning code to encourage a more diversified housing stock, promote imaginative design, and encourage development of affordable housing. Strategies may also include provisions for interjurisdictional efforts to provide and fmance affordable housing. The primary objective should be to create residential neighborhoods which are of high quality, provide social and community support and meet the needs of all segments of society. v-2 � � LJ L, � � � �' � Federel Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing 5.2 HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT � Existing Conditions � Introduction .� Federal Way has grown rapidly over the last 13 years. The area doubled in population during the 1960's and again in the 1980's. Since its incorporation in 1990, the � Ciry has grown by seven percent. Based on PSRC forecasts, moderate growth will continue through the tum of the century when the inventory of vacant land is � consumed and will then slow down considerably. By the yeaz 2020, Federal Way's population is predicted to be approximately 50 percent greater than it is today. � Households are more affluent in Federal Way than in nearby communities. This is reflected in higher home prices. Both home prices and rents have increased faster � than income over the past 20 years. By 1990, Federal Way had the highest housing costs among Southwest King County communities for both owner occupied � houses and rental units. The down side was that 18 percent of homeowners and 31 percent of renters in the City were paying more than 30 percent of their household � income for housing. Home ownership has become more affordable in recent yeazs due to declining interest rates. Rents are currently rising faster in Federal Way than in � nearby communities, probably due to the lack of new apartment construction in Federal Way over the past three yeazs. � Population � The population of Federal Way is currently younger than � other South King County communities, creating a demand for family housing, recreational facilities, and support services. However, by the tum of the century, � Federal Way's population will contain a much higher proportion of senior citizens. Senior citizens require such services as in-home caze, congregate and nursing care � facilities, and transportation. Figure V-1 describes the current distribution of Federal Way's population. Household Income Figrre V-1 Fedsial May Age Disbibutioa by Pop�lation ix 1990 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 so�.�.: �990 �.�:�. Very Low Income: 0 to 30% of county median income. Low Income: 31-50% of county median income. Moderate Income: 51-80% of county median income. Middle Income: 81-120% of county median income. Upper Income: 121% or more of county median income. King Counry's 1990 median income for all households was $36,179. A breakdown of Federal Way's income groups are shown in Figure Y-2. Figu�e i� 2 Federal Way's Income Groups Incane 46.4% Very Low kwome 5.6% �\�2�S�:�t�2'=�� Mode�ate Incane 14.9% Understanding the distribution of Federal Way's � household income is also critical in planning for future housing needs. GMA defines income groups as follows: s°°^`°: �990 ce„a�a � V-3 Under 1 B 19-29 30-54 55-64 65-74 Over 75 Federa� Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing More specifically, the 1993 Housing and Urban Development (HLJD) guidelines for King County's various income groups are shown by household size in Table Y-1. While Federal Way households are generally more af�luent than elsewhere in the County, appro�umately 30 percent of the population in the City is part of a household that earns less than 80 percent of the King Counry median family income. About 1,000 households in the City of Federal Way aze currently receiving housing assistance from King County Housing Authority or living in subsidized private housing. 3 �43,200 534,550 521,600 S 14,400 Annual incomes and affordable housing costs have been Employment computed for the average pay rates in each job. The annual income column demonstrates that these jobs may During the 1980's, Federal Way's employment base grew provide an inadequate income to support a family. faster than any other suburban azea of King County. This Similazly, the affordable rent and home price columns growth was primarily in retail and service jobs and by show a gap between these pay scales and current housing 1994, more than'h of Federal Way's employment base costs if this is the sole income for a family. The average was in retail sales, followed closely by service Federal Way home (approximately $152,000 in 1995) Table Y-1 Annual Household Income bv Household Size Median Moderste 80% Low 50% Very Low 30% Source: HUD, S/18/93 1 a33,600 526,900 S 16,800 510,100 2 538,400 530,700 S 19,200 $11,500 Affordable employment. These industries typically pay low wages and as a result, these workers have difficulty finding housing they can afford despite working full time jobs. Accordingly, there may be an imbalance between jobs available in Federal Way and the eamings needed to afford local housing. Ironically, this may result in employees working in the Ciry commuting from other communities where cheaper housing is available and higher wage earners who live in Federal Way commuting to other cities for higher paying jobs. To illustrate some of these points, Table V-2 provides four representative jobs from small retail or service firms. 4 548,000 538,400 525,900 515,550 5 551,850 541,450 525,900 S 15,550 Table V-2 for Retail and Service Em 6 555,700 544,550 527,850 516,700 7 559,500 547,600 529,750 517,850 8 563,350 550,700 �31,700 519,000 Average Average Annual Monthly Mortgage Mortgage Hourly Hours/Week Income Rent & Payment� Principal Pay Utilities Waiter S4.97 28 S7,236 S181 S181 Cashier S6.56 33 S11,257 5281 5281 Sales Clerk 57.94 36 514,864 5371 5371 Truck Driver 59.19 40 S19,115 5478 5478 'Bonowo is qualified at 30!G ojgrosr inrnme jor housing to income ratio. '30-year rnortgage payab4 at 7. S!G fixed interaT rate with 18� ojmonthly payment jor taxes, inntrance, and maintenance 'Home price based on S:G down payment Sourca• Washington State Employment Searity; 1996 Arta A'age Survey jor Xing Q� Snohomisk Counfies, Decembw 199a. Home Price' S19,Z61 S20,275 S32,490 534,200 540,366 542,491 S52,076 554,817 V-4 � � � � � � � � I� � _� l� � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing remains generally unaf�ordable to employees in retail and service jobs. In the more extreme cases, the individuals and families may need some type of government subsidy to access even rental housing. If these employment trends continue, the City may be under increased pressure to provide housing assistance to those employed locally in low wage jobs. Housing Inventory For the most part, the housing stock in Federal Way is in good condition. A majoriry of existing housing was built after 1960 and over 70 percent after 1970. The City has very little concentration of substandard housing typically found in older urban azeas. Houses in poor condition do exist in isolated cases around the Ciry and in small pockets. These include Westway; (located north of 308th and west of lst Avenue) and an azea south of 356th and east of 21st Avenue Southwest. As depicted in Figure V-3, 58 percent of Federal Way's housing stock is constructed as single family homes. The remaining supply is comprised of 37 percent multiple family units, five percent mobile homes, and approaumately %z percent of other types of housing. In 1993, there was an inventory of 714 assisted housing units located within Federal Way. Of these, 428 units, or 60 percent, are owned by King County Housing Authority and the remaining are privately owned and receiving some kind of subsidy. In addition to these assisted housing units, the Housing Authority reports that 342 families living in Federal Way postal zip codes are receiving HUD Section 8 housing assistance certificates and vouchers. In total, approximately 1,000 households within Federal Way currently receive housing assistance. There are presently seven organizations that offer emergency shelter and transitional housing to residents of Federal Way. Altogether, they provide appro�mately 250 emergency shelter beds and 46 transitional housing units in South King County. None of these organizations, by themselves, have the capacity to adequately meet the demand for service. Even with close cooperation and coordination, they have had difficulry meeting the demand for services and providing case management for clients. Another important way to provide affordable housing is to prevent the existing affordable housing stock from being redeveloped or deteriorating to the point that it is Figure V-3 Soures 1990 Caiars no longer useable. Although the City can generate maps of properiy with high redevelopment potential, there is no data which specifically describes how much property is actually redeveloped and how many affordable housing units aze actually lost. To address these situations, the Countywide policies promote development of strategies to preserve existing low income housing. Toward that end, Federal Way currently allocates approximately $200,000 per year in CDBG funds to housing rehabilitation programs subject to funds availability. These services are provided by contract with the King County Housing Authority. Future Housing Needs The GMPC adopted PSRC housing projections which estimate that there may be between 13,425 and 16,566 new households in Federal Way by the year 2012. Figure v 4 depicts the historic growth rate of the total number of housing units constructed within Federal Way by decade, in relationship to the number of new households projected within Federal Way by the end of this planning period. The distinction is that housing units are actual constructed habitable structures, whereas households reflect occupied housing units. The number of housing units always exceeds the number of households, and is dependent on vacancy rates. V-5 Federal Way's Housing Stock Figure V-4 Projected Households vs Historic Housing Unit Growth 5uuu 4000 � 0 :3000 � � _ ;2000 a z 1000 -�- Actual Housing Units � Projected Households Source: 1. 1992 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy. 2. 1995 Office of Financial Management Housing Unit Estimate. 3. King County Countywide Planning Policy Household Target, t 994 to 2012. These forecasts also attempt to predict the demand for housing by income groups. Specifically, the Countywide planning policies suggest that Federal Way plan for an additiona13,222 to 3,976 units that are affordable to low and very low income families (24 percent of projected net household growth) and 2,282 to 2,816 housing units that are affordable to moderate income families (17 percent of projected net growth) by the year 2010. The remauung 7,921 to 9,774 units should be affordable to middle income families (22 percent of projected net household growth) and upper income families (37 percent of projected new household growth). Housing is considered affordable when a family is spending not more than 30 percent of their monthly income, or two and a half times their annual income, for housing. For a three person very low income family in Federal Way (see Table V-1), it means that the monthly rent plus utilities must be less than $360, or if they are buying a home, it must cost less than $36,000 at 1993 prices. Cleazly, it will require some creativity to provide mazket rate two bedroom rental units for less than $360 per month. To build homes that aze available for $36,000 would require some significant public subsidy. Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - Housi�g PSRC housing forecasts also indicate that the Ciry may add appro7cimately 3,500 new multiple family units by the tum of the century, and 10,000 multiple family units by the year 2020. Multiple family housing might rise from 37 percent of Federal Way's total housing stock at present, to 40 percent in 2000 and 45 percent by 2020. These numbers represent forecasted growth of particulaz housing types, but are not considered mandatory requirements for the Ciry. However, the Comprehensive Plan does contain sufficient capaciry to meet forecasted multiple family growth in the event it occurs. To ensure that these projected new housing units, if built, are a positive addition to the community, the Ciry will need to review and revise its multiple family residential code to encourage more variety in the types of units available, more innovative and aesthetically pleasing design, and require more aggressive management of buildings and facilities. Requests for help by Federal Way residents for homeless shelters, transitional housing, and special needs housing exceed supply. Highlights of a recent review of supportive housing for residents of Federal Way with special needs indicates that: ■ The number of individuals and families turned away from each shelter ranges from none to six times the number admitted. ■ The domestic abuse shelter turned away nearly five times as mairy as it served in 1993. ■ There is a need for more supported living units (apartments and shared single-family homes) for the mentally ill. ■ There are between approximately 150 and 175 homeless children in kindergarten through sixth grade in the Federal Way School District. ■ There may be a need for 96 units of housing for persons with AIDS in southwest King County by the year 2000. Federal Way may wish to cooperate with the King County Consortium and neighboring cities to adopt effective housing goals and policies to meet future housing needs. A comprehensive strategy will ensure that safe and suitable housing is available to residents of all income levels and special needs, as required by GMA. v-s r� � II u � �� �� � � � � 1� 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 � � � C� � �� � ,� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing Housing Capacity As is described in the Land Use chapter, this Comprehensive Plan provides more than enough capacity to accommodate a range from 13,425 to 16,566 new housing units, which are forecast for Federal Way by the year 2012. The land use plan will accommodate between approximately 16,723 and 23,994 new residential units, including between 5,413 and 12,684 detached single family homes, approximately 1,700 accessory dwelling units, and up to 9,610 multiple family units. In general terms, the primary component of the Ciry's housing strategy is to promote in-fill while protecting the character and quality of its existing single family residential neighborhoods. New detached units will be constructed on vacant lots in existing neighborhoods but they will be compatible with the existing homes. Planned Unit Developments and other special development techniques may be added to the zoning code to encourage compatible development on difficult sites and near environmentally sensitive areas. However, in-fill development will not be permitted at the expense of the quality of life in existing neighborhoods. A secondary component of the housing strategy is to encourage higher density residential uses in the I- 5/Highway 99 corridor, including the City Center. Row houses, townhouses, condominiums, and mid-rise apartment buildings may be appropriate in this area subject to the availability of utilities and other infrastructure, access to public transportation, jobs, shopping, entertainment, and social and human services. This plan anticipates that during the next 20 years, the Ciry Center and the Highway 99 corridor will redevelop and accommodate the majority of the new housing units, particulazly multi-family housing units, added to the City's inventory. The azea will gradually become a more dense, mixed use, pedestrian friendly, high amenity, high quality, vital part of Federal Way. The third part of the strategy is to ensure that there is sufficient land available for other housing needs such as government assisted housing, manufactured housing, group homes, and foster care facilities. The Land Use chapter and zoning code provide support for this type of housing. The City may also wish to eliminate barriers to siting special needs housing within residential zones to ensure the opportunity for adequate provision of these services. � � Together, the Housing chapter and the associated development regulations provide sufficient capaciry to accommodate projected housing growth for all economic segments of the population. It is important that the City implement a housing program that will assist private developers and private non-profit organizations in meeting the identified housing needs. Such action is not only required by GMA, but it is also prudent public policy and will ensure a safe and supportive housing environment for future generations. 5.3 KEY HOUSING ISSUES Preserving Neighborhood Character As the population of the azea in and azound Federal Way doubled during the 1980's, residents feared that existing neighborhood character and values were threatened. Approximately 7,000 new multifamily units were built in Federal Way between 1980 and 1990. Many of these units were not well designed and were haphazardly sited across the entire Ciry. This resulted in substantial changes to the character of neighborhoods, or created whole new neighborhoods along major arterial streets. Preservation of existing neighborhoods has been cited as an important community value in Federal Way. This value played a large role in the communiry's decision to incorporate. This Comprehensive Plan recognizes that neighborhoods aze special places and aze valuable and important to the quality of life for many citizens. New development in established neighborhoods must be sensitively designed and constructed. New development within existing single family neighborhoods should be limited to small scale, well designed in•fill and accessory housing. Likewise, new multiple family or mixed use development located along arterials running through or adjacent to existing residential neighborhoods should be designed to minimize adverse impacts and with sufficient buffers. Development Review There are several actions the Ciry may take to make housing more affordable. Time is money to a housing developer. Thus, whatever the City can do to reduce permit processing time will make housing more affordable. Accordingly, one of the first priorities for the v-� City should be to revise the zoning code so that more land use decisions are administrative decisions thereby avoiding time consuming public hearings. Second, the Ciry should consult with the developer at an early stage in the review process to ensure that the applicant understands the meaning of City development regulations. Such early meetings allow the City and housing developer to agree on the best method to achieve a code compliant and mutually beneficial site plan prior to having spent significant sums on costly design and engineering work. A significant portion of the cost of building housing is the cost of providing the necessary infrastructure. If the City is interested in providing housing that is affordable to very low income citizens, it could, to the extent economically practicable, provide the necessary infrastructure, or possibly subsidize the cost of providing public facilities such as streets, parks, utilities, transit facilities, public amenities, and social services. CDBG funds and other grants are available for this purpose and should be used where appropriate. Citizen Participation Citizens of the community should be actively involved in the preparation of this Comprehensive Plan, zoning regulations, and review of proposed development projects. The resuit of this participation should be policies and regulations which are clear, precise, and easy to implement, and new development that is an asset to the community. Moderate scale housing development that is consistent with City policy and regulations should be reviewed and approved through a prescribed, efficient, and consistent administrative process which minimizes review time and the subsequent increases in project costs. Larger scale development plans, or those which will have significant impacts on surrounding neighborhoods, should have full public review as defined in the Federal Way City Code. The public and the developer should have a clear understanding of process, the types of issues which are open to discussion, and the time frame for completion of the review process. Housing Design and Innovation The City's e�cisting Comprehensive Plan and zoning code do not encourage new and diverse housing forms. The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing challenge in this new plan and subsequent code revision work is to be fle�cible when presented with creative and high quality design proposals. Of course, this flexibility must be balanced with the need to provide a degree of certainty to the developer and to give clear guidance to policy makers, staff, and public. The following paragraphs describe several regulatory mechaxusms which the City could include in its zoning code that would encourage superior design, a greater variety of housing types, and reduce costs. Incentives For Good Practice - Many jurisdictions include incentives in their zoning code which encourage developers to build projects in a way that produces some identified public benefits. The public benefits might include creative designs that aze sensitive to community and neighborhood values, dedication of land or right-of- way for public use, and construction of urban amenities, community facilities, and other public spaces. The incentives might include density bonuses, extra development potential, or expedited pemut processing. Inclusionary Zoning - In certain zones, development might be required to meet certain Ciry goals, such as providing affordable housing, as set out in the zoning code. It is becoming more commonplace for jurisdictions to require major developers to provide a portion of low income housing in developments over a certain scale. Planned Unit Development - A Planned Unit Development (PUD) ordinance allows developers fle�bility to achieve design, layout, or density that is suited to a specific site. As an example, a PUD allows clustering of housing density in more developable portions of a site while protecting important open space and environmentally sensitive areas. A PUD ordinance gives the City and the development communiry flexibiliry to provide a variety of housing types and costs in new residential areas or smaller, older, mixed use neighborhoods. Transfer ofDevelopmentRights - This technique allows a developer to transfer permitted density from one part of a site to another, or from one site to another. It is a useful technique for protecting parts of sites that are environmentally sensitive without loss of land value. It also allows for more dense forms of housing development, thereby reducing housing costs. v-s � � � � �� � � �� � � � L.� ' � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing Diversifying Housing Choice The majority of the housing available in Federal Way today is fairly homogenous. Housing primarily consists of single family detached units, constructed in the sixties and eighties, laid out in isolated subdivisions discon- nected from the urban fabric. There are some mobile home parks and a few duplexes located in the City. The rest of the housing stock tends to be low density, two and three story apartment buildings. This provides only a narrow range of choices and does not fully reflect the range of housing options that could be built. It creates a situation where an increasing number of families find it difficult to obtain suitable housing in the communiry. This includes senior citizens who have owned and lived in their homes for many years and either cannot afford, or are no longer able to maintain, their homes. It affects empty nesters and couples who have raised their families who, for lifestyle reasons, no longer need or want a lazge single family house and the associated maintenance. Young adults, students, young married couples, and low income workers would like to live in the community where they grew up or currently work, but cannot find a house that fits their housing needs or cannot afford the available housing. New housing should be more diverse, contributing to communiry character and relating better to the neighborhood environment. It should reassure residents that they will be able to afford to live close to their jobs, friends, and families. It will also help preserve and maintain neighborhoods that include a healthy mix of ages and incomes. Housing Affordability and Special Needs Housing Federal Way has one of the highest housing costs (for both owned and rental housing) among Southwest King Counry communities. The population of Federal Way also tends to be younger than other communities, creating a strong demand for moderately priced housing. There are approximately 8,000 low income households currently in Federal Way which aze in need of housing assistance in order to afford housing. Some of these are part of a growing number of senior citizens who are likely to need both housing assistance and related services within the next decade. PSRC also projects a strong demand for affordable multiple family units through the year 2000 to serve low and moderate income families who work in Federal Way. GMA and the Countywide Planning Policies require that municipal jurisdictions adopt strategies for providing a "fair share" of identified regional housing needs. The Countywide policies set a target of 5,500 to 6,790 new affordable housing units in the City by the yeaz 2020. Of that number, 3,200 to 3,900 must be affordable to low and very low income citizens. These are ambitious goals for a young City still trying to establish itself and its vision for the future. The need for homeless shelters, transitional housing, and special needs housing exceeds the available supply. County policies as well as GMA require provisions for special needs housing. Special needs housing, also called `supportive housing,' brings together housing and support services for community residents who need special services in order to live independently or with minimum assistance. This includes community wide services for those who live in their own homes, as well as services in housing operated by public and private agencies. Although the proportion of elderly is smaller in Federal Way than in neighboring South County cides, the City's seniors (65 and over) were sti116.2 percent of the population in 1990, with another 6.5 percent between the ages of 55 and 64. Average life expectancy continues to climb, and we should expect an increasing percentage of Federal Way's population will be 65 and over in the neart 10 to 20 years. Because women tend to live longer than men, this population will be predominantly female. Elderly people, are often reluctant to give up the comfort and security provided by their own homes. With this in mind, federal and state policy has shifted from one of providing institutionalized care for seniors to a more home based or "aging in place" policy. Many seniors, and most of those over 75, need some in home services. As elderly people become more frail, their supportive service needs increase. They may be better served in congregate care facilities, or eventually, nursing homes. Federal Way should begin planning for a continuum of care that minimizes family stress and public costs. In home services should be available Citywide, wlule congregate care facilities and nursing homes should be located near to community services and shopping areas, and away from busy traffic corridors. V-9 The 1994 King Counry Comprehensive Housing Affordability 5tudy, estimates that there are 7,500 chronically mentally ill and 67,000 seriously disturbed persons living in King Counry. Safe and affordable housing, a key element in a long-term therapy program for these people, is not available for a majority of the low-income mentally ill in King County or Federal Way. Northwest Mental Health manages housing and services in Federal Way and believes that there is a need for 121 more units of supported apartments and shared single- family homes in South King County. A number of these may be located in Federal Way. Federal Way is currently served by two programs for victims of domestic violence. ,The Domestic Abuse Women's Network (DAVVN) in Kent provides 10 shelter beds, as well as crisis intervention and support services. Statistics show that DAWN turns away nearly five times as many as they are able to shelter during each year. The South King County Branch of the YWCA also serves Federal Way azea residents. They recently opened 14 units of transitional housing for victims of domestic abuse in South King County. There is clearly a large unmet need for emergency housing in South King Counry for victims of domestic abuse. King County jurisdictions receive Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS rental assistance funding from HUD. Federal Way participates in the oversight of this program with Seattle acting as the lead authority. A recent Five Year AIDS Housing Plan estimates a need for 852 units of AIDS housing in King Counry by the year 2000. Of these, 96 will be needed in Southwest King Counry based on the historic proportion of persons living in this azea at the time of their diagnosis. Several organizations in South King County offer emergency shelter and transitional housing to residents of the City of Federal Way. Existing data concludes that current facilities are inadequate when compared to requests for help. The number of individuals and families turned away from shelters ranges up to six times the number admitted. There aze many reasons that people and families end up homeless. Families and individuals sought shelter in King County during 1991 for the following reasons: employment and income related problems (19 percent of those seeking shelter); eviction and displacement (18 percent); domestic violence (16 percent); family crisis (16 percent); mental illness, alcohol, and substance abuse (7 percent); and other, including runaways, new arrivals, Federal Way Comprehensive Plen - Housing and medical problems (23 percent). According to established service providers, suburban homelessness is also increasing. Data from the South King Counry Multi Service Center indicates that the proportion of women, children, and families seeking shelter is growing rapidly in this community. It is dif�icult to estimate the number of homeless children there actually are in Federal Way, but the Federal Way School District reports that in their District alone, there are between 150 and 175 homeless children in kindergarten through sixth grade. Federal Way Youth and Family Services reports that many homeless children come from abusive homes or suffer from emotional neglect. Homelessness and domestic instability may cause deep emotional scars which impacts a child's ability to focus his or her full attention on education. There is also a need for transitional housing for homeless individuals and families. State and Federal rules restrict the length of stay in emergency shelters to 60 days. So, after many families have exhausted their time in an emergency shelter, they need access to longer term transitional housing, where they can live for one or two years, obtain necessary support services, and stabilize their lives. Data is scarce so it is very difficult to estimate the number of beds that aze needed to house the special needs population. However, there is unmet need in this service area. The City is committed to fostering programs and supporting service providers to assist in meeting this need subject to economic limitations, Ciry revenues, and the need to balance housing against all other public needs. Policy Coordination and Regional Participation The GMA and good planning practice require that each chapter of the Comprehensive Plan be coordinated and consistent with goals and policies set forth in the other Plan chapters. This is especially true of the Housing chapter, particularly as it relates to the Land Use and Transportation chapters. The GMA also requires that City policies for affordable housing be consistent with Countywide Planning Policies. PSRC, King Counry, and Federal Way have jointly adopted regional planning goals that estimate fair share v-i o � � � � � � ,� � � � � � � � � � � � Federel Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing housing tazgets, including low and moderate income housing targets which promote an equitable distribution of low income housing. This type of housing is most appropriate in urban centers which contain jobs and good public transit access. Consistent with these requirements, the City's Land Use chapter proposes multiple family housing and mixed use development in the Ciry Center, along the SR 99 and I-5 corridor, and to a limited extend in the neighborhood retail centers. All of these locations aze or will be well served by public transit. The Ciry has also determined that housing, and in particular, multiple family housing, will be designed so that it provides a quality place to live and is an asset to the community. In additioq the City is committed to fair housing access to all persons without discrimination. This Housing chapter must also be coordinated and consistent with the Counry's and the Ciry's funding programs for housing. This is particularly true for programs such as the Communiry Development Block Crrant, Home, and other Countywide funding initiatives as recommended by the GMPC's Housing Finance Task Force. The City also recognizes that most of the housing issues found in Federal Way aze common to the County, Seattle, and the other suburban jurisdictions. In order to insure quality in the City's provision of housing services, and to help eliminate duplications of effort, the City should coordinate with the King County Consortium and other South King County cities when designing and implementing housing and housing related services. 5.4 HOUSING CHAPTER GOALS AND POLICIES The following section provides goals and policies for providing, preserving, and improving housing conditions in Federal Way. These goals and policies provide a framework from which to develop implementing strategies and work programs for the community. The purpose of these goals and policies is to provide housing opportunities to all segments of the population. Consistent with GMA, these goals and policies should promote a variety of densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of the Ciry's existing housing stock. Overall Goal Preserve and proted Federal Way's existing high quality residential neighborhoods and promote a variety of opportunities to meet housing needs of all residents oJthe community and region. Preserving Neighborhood Character Goal HGl Preserve and protect the quality of existing residential neighborhoods and require new development to be of a scale and design that is compadble with existing neighborhood character. Policies HPl High density housing projects will not be permitted in existing single family residential neighborhoods. HP2 Design guidelines should be adopted potentially in subazea plans that will specify in detail neigh- borhood character and require that new housing be consistent with these design guidelines. HP3 Amend development regulations to accommodate a diverse range of housing forms that are compatible with neighborhood character and create an effective transition between the Ciry Center, business areas, and residential neighborhoods. HP4 Allow accessory housing units within single family neighborhoods that protect residential character, ensure proper access, maintain specific design standazds, and comply with all applicable laws. HPS Maintain a strong code enforcement program to protect residential areas from illegal land use activities. HP6 Conduct periodic surveys of housing conditions and create programs, including housing rehabili- tation, to ensure that older neighborhoods are not allowed to deteriorate, subject to availability of funding for such surveys and programs. HP7 If allowed by applicable law, development inside and outside the City should be required to provide their fair share of onsite and offsite improvements. v-i i Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing Community Involvement And Development Review Goal housing development and maintenance, and diversify the range ofhousing types available in the City. Policies HG2 Involve the community in the development of HP13 new housing to a degree that is consistent with the scale of impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. Policies HP8 Encourage public input into development of planning and regulatory documents through a formal public process characterized by broad, HP14 thorough, and timely public notice of pending action.. HP9 Consider the economic impact of all development regulations on the cost of housing. HP10 Maximize efficiency in the Ciry's development review process and ensure that unnecessary time delays and expenses aze eliminated. Provide streamlined pemutting processes for development that is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and Federal Way City Code and that has no adverse impacts. HPll Encourage community input, where appropriate, into the development permit process by providing thorough and timely information to the public. HP12 Assist developers with housing proposals at the eazliest possible opportunity, including preapplication meetings to produce projects that can be reviewed quickly and maximize their ability to receive pemuts. Diversifying Housing Choice And Design Goal HG3 Develop a Comprehensive Plan and zoning code that provide�lexibiliry to produce innovative housing solutions, do not burden the cost of The Ciry's development regulations and Land Use chapter of the Comprehensive Plan will be coordinated to allow low income and special needs housing azound the City Center and other areas providing proximity to low wage employment, safe and convenient access to transportation and human services, and adequate infrashucture to support housing development. Amend development regulations to encourage superior design and greater diversiry of housing types and costs through such techniques as incentives, inclusionary zoning, planned unit developments, density bonuses and transfer of development rights. HP15 Consider zero lot line standards within planned unit developments to create higher density single family neighborhoods with large open space areas. HP16 Consider reducing minimum lot sizes to allow construction of smaller, detached single family houses on smaller lots. HP17 Continue to permit mixed use residentiaUcommercial development in designated commercial azeas throughout the City. Include developer incentives and design standazds. HP18 Establish administrative procedures to permit innovative housing designs, provided they are of high standard and consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. HP19 Establish incentives, such as densiry bonuses, for providing a portion of affordable housing in new developments. HP20 Periodically review and update development regulations to incorporate opporlunities for new housing types. 1�J � � � �.� � v-� 2 � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing Housing Affordability HP28 Explore Federal, State, and local resources to assist in fmancing affordable housing. Encourage expansion of home ownership options through such means as first time home buyer programs, housing cooperatives, lease-purchase ownership, and other housing models. Goal HG4 Develop a range of affordable housing opportunities for low income groups consistent with Countywide Planning Policies and the needs of the community. HP29 Policies HP21 Promote fair housing access to all persons without discrimination. HP22 As estimated by Countywide Planning Policies, maintain suf�cient land supply within the Ciry to accommodate 17 percent of the City's projected net household growth for those making 50 to 80 percent of King Counry's median income and 24 percent making less than 50 percent of inedian income. HP23 Require a portion of new housing on sites of significant size to be affordable to low income households. Ensure that affordable housing is not concentrated in particulaz neighborhoods by setting a percentage limit to the number of affordable housing units that can be included in new housing developments. HP24 Ensure that any new affordable housing remains affordable. Consider delaying, deferring, or exempting affordable housing from development fees, concurrency requirements, payment of impact fees, offsite mitigation, and other development expenses that do not compromise environmental protection or public health, safety, and welfare or constitute a nuisance. HP30 Support tax law amendments that provide relief to affordable and special needs housing. HP31 Identify low income housing resources that may be lost due to redevelopment or deteriorating housing conditions. Develop strategies that seek to preserve existing low income housing, and that seek.to provide relocation assistance to households that are displaced as a result of such activities. HP32 Annually monitor residential development to determine the total number of new and redeveloped units receiving permits and units constructed, housing types, developed densities, and remaining capacity for residential growth for all income levels and needs. HP25 Allow and encourage use of manufactured HP33 Integrate and coordinate construction of public housing in residential zones, provided it conforms �'astructure with private development to to all applicable Federal, State, and local ��� housing costs wherever possible or requirements and is compatible with the character practicable. of the surrounding neighborhood. IiP26 In order to maintain earisting affordable housing, the City should continue to allow manufactured home parks in existing locations. However, new manufactured home parks will not be permitted, nor will expansion of e�cisting parks be allowed. HP27 Encourage new residential development to achieve maximum allowable densiry based on net building area. Special Needs Housing Goal HG5 Develop a range of housing opportunities that meet the requirements ofpeople with special housing needs, including the elderly, mentally ill, victims of domestic abuse and persons with debilitative conditions, or injuries. � V-13 Federal Way Comprehensiva Plan - Housing � Policies Regional Participation � HP34 Remove existing regulatory bamers to siting special needs housing to avoid concentration and to ensure uniform distribution throughout all residential and mixed use zones, subject to performance standards that protect residential amenity, ensure proper access, and maintain design standazds. HP35 Review permit applications for special needs housing in close coordination with service providers and the City's Human Services program. HP36 Assist local service organizations and self help groups to obtain funding and support. HP37 Ensure that access to special needs housing is provided without discrimination. Goal HG6 Develop emergency shelter and transitional housing facilities for the homeless. Policies HP38 Foster and support services that are not concentrated in particular neighborhoods by setting a percentage limit to the number of affordable housing units that can be included in new housing developments. HP39 Coordinate City actions related to homelessness with the City's Human Services Program and other shelter providers. HP40 Continue to pernut emergency and transitional homeless facilities within the City. HP41 Emergency shelters and transitional housing should be regulated to avoid concentration of facilities, mitigate impact on surrounding uses, ensure that such housing is properly managed, and avoid significant impacts on existing residential neighborhoods. Goal HG8 Coordinate and integrate the City's program with other area housing and service providers. Policies HP42 Policies and regulations related to af�ordable housing should be consistent with Countywide and multi-counry policies. HP43 Establish effective links with King County and other azea cities to assess need and create housing opportunities for low income and special needs households, and develop a housing program that addresses issues common throughout the entire region. HP44 Subject to availabiliry of funds, participate in the production and periodic update of a housing needs assessment for the City and region to ensure that policy is based upon a rational evaluation of housing needs and priorities. HP45 Ensure equitable and rational distribution of low income and affordable housing throughout the region that is compatible with land use, transportation, and employment locations. 5.5 IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS Implementation of policies contained in the chapter will occur over a number of yeazs and is dependent on resources available to the Ciry and the community. The following implementation strategy lists actions that the City may take in the next five yeazs. Develop an inventory of public properties no longer needed for use and which may be available for affordable housing. Evaluate use of such property for affordable housing against all other competing public uses. V-14 � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Housing 2. Inventory and report on the estimated number of ■ Diversify housing forms and encourage superior units for each income segment following adoption of design through techniques such as incentives, the Comprehensive Plan, for purposes of Countywide planned unit developments, density bonuses, and monitoring of capacity for housing development. transfer of development rights. 3. Annually monitor residential development and determine the total number of new and redeveloped units receiving pernuts, units constructed, housing types, developed densities, and remaining capacity for residential growth based on income categories. 4. Conduct periodic surveys of housing conditions to direct the housing rehabilitation programs. ■ Create effective transitions between the City Center, businesses, and residential areas. ■ Maximize efficiency of development processes. ■ Sizeamline processes for development consistent with the Comprehensive Plan, zoning code, and having no significant adverse impacts. 5. Develop strategies for protecting low income housing that may be lost due to redevelopment or deteriorating housing conditions. 6. Develop guidelines, potentially as subarea plans, that � require consistency with specified neighborhood character and design requirements. � 7. Assign a Ciry representative to participate with other agencies to create a comprehensive housing program that addresses issues common throughout the entire � region, and to seek and develop funding opportunities and strategies. Prepare and periodically update a housing needs assessment. � �� � � 9. The following is a menu of potential development regulation amendments which should be considered: ■ Encourage low income and special needs housing around the City Center. ■ Zero lot line standazds. ■ Reducing minimum residential lot sizes. ■ Establish administrative procedures for innovative design. ■ Establish maximum and minimum requirements for low income housing on sites of significant size. ■ Eliminate barriers to unifonnly siting special needs housing throughout all residential areas. ■ Preclude concentration of homeless facilities. '� V-15 Capital Facilities � _ _ �_ _ __ ___� ��L _ ,_______ _____ �,,... __ _____ _ _ ___ �___ ; __ __ , __ � _ __ 1 .� _ , r ____�_ ' � � - --- � C � � � a � � 0 � � � � � � `� `�� _ __ . _ � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Cepital Facilities Plan 6.0 INTRODUCTION he City of Federal Way is expected to grow between 13,425 and 16,566 housing units and 13,300 and 16,400 jobs over the next 20 yeazs. This growth will stimulate the local economy and maintain a diverse and vibrant communiry. Unfortunately, it will also generate a corresponding demand for new public services and facilities, such as schools, parks, and streets. These new facilities, and the financial implications they will have for Federal Way and its citizens, are the subject of this chapter. The Growth Management Act The GMA refers to capital facilities planning in two of the 13 statewide planning goals. The two relevant goals aze: � 1. Urban growth. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. � � 12. Public facilities and services. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support . development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. More specifically, the GMA mandates that the City � prepaze a capital facilities plan which contains the following components: � � � � ■ An inventory of existing facilities owned by public entities, showing the locations and capacities of the facilities. ■ A forecast of the future needs for such facilities. ■ The proposed locations and capacities of expanded or new facilities. ■ At least a six-yeaz fmancing plan that will fmance such facilities and clearly identify sources of public money for such purposes. ■ A requirement to reassess the Land Use chapter if probable funding falls short. In the pages that follow, this chapter complies with the GMA requirements for a capital facilities plan. Level of Service To prepare a Capital Facilities chapter, one of the first decisions a jurisdiction must make involves the level of service (LOS) standard. The level of service standard refers to the amount and quality of services and facilities that a community wants for itself. For example, the LOS for a parks system is usually described in terms of the number of acres of park land per 1,000 population. If a community has a strong desire for a good pazks system, it will establish a high LOS standard for itself maybe something on the order of 20 acres of pazk per 1,000 residents. On the other hand, 20 acres of developed pazk land is expensive to acquire, develop, operate, and maintain. As a result, the community may be forced, for financial reasons, to accept a lower LOS standard along the order of five acres per 1,000 population. In any event, the City must adopt LOS standards for all the services and facilities it provides so that it can: 1) evaluate how well it is serving its existing residents, and 2) determine how many new facilities will have to be constructed to service new growth and development. The significance of this decision, and the associated cost implications, will become obvious in the following discussion. Concurrence In addition to mandating that a Capital Facilities chapter be included in the Comprehensive Plan, the GMA also introduced the concept of concurrence. In general terms, concurrence describes the situation where adequate and necessary public services and facilities are available "concurrent" with the impacts of new development, or within a specified time thereafter. Concurrence has two levels of applicability. The first is at the planning level and refers to all services and facilities, over the long term, and at the citywide scale. Planning level concurrence is what this chapter is all about. It inventories all existing facilities and services, establishes a LOS standard for each, estimates new faciliry require to accommodate projected growth, vi-� and develops a fmancing plan which identifies the revenues necessary to pay for the all the new facilities. If the necessary revenues aze not available, then the jurisdiction fails the planning level concurrence test and must take appropriate action. Those actions include lowering the LOS standard, raising taxes, restricting growth, or a combination of these actions. This chapter satisfies the planning level concurrence requirement as outlined in the GMA. The second level of concurrence analysis is project specific and only required for transportation facilities. Specifically, the GMA (RCW 36.70A. 070[6e]) states "...local jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a- transportation facility to decline below the standazds adopted in the transportation element of the compre- hensive plan, unless transportation improvements or strategies to accommodate the impacts of develop- ment are made concurrent with the development." That same section gces on say that "concurrent with the development" shall mean that improvements or strategies are in place at the time of development, or that a fmancial commitment is in place to complete the improvements or strategies within six years. To satisfy the project level concurrence requirement, the last section of the Transportation chapter, chapter three, contains a concurrency management discussion. As mentioned previously, project level concurrence is only required for transportation system facilities. However, the procedural criteria for adopting comprehensive plans (WAC 365-195-060[3]) states that, "...concurrence should be sought with respect to public facilities in addition to transportation facilities. The list of such additional facilities should be locally defined." This section goes on to say that the City could enact ordinances that require a project level concurrence test for other services and facilities if it chooses to. At this point, the City of Federal Way is not proposing any additional concurrence requirements. It is, however, a goal the City may want to consider in the future. Impact Fees The GMA allows local jurisdictions to assess impact fees for parks, transportation, and schools. It was clearly Federal Way Comprehensiva Plan - Cepital Facilities Plan the intent of the legislature to have new growth pay its shaze of the impact on public facilities. Impact fees must be based on an adopted capital facilities plan. In addition, the collected fees must be used for projects that benefit the development paying the fees. The fees must also be used within five years of the date they were collected or returned to the pay�. Furthermore, impact fees can only be used to mitigate the impact of new development. They cannot be used to make-up existing system deficiencies as is the case when a jurisdiction is actually providing a lower LOS than its adopted LOS standazd. To impose an impact fee program, the City must have a plan in place to make-up any e�cisting system deficiencies. Countywide Planning Policies The Countywide planning goals originally adopted in 1992 and amended in 1994 contain a number of goals and policies regazding capital facilities and the provision of urban services. Those relevant Countywide policies aze the following: COl Jurisdictions shall identify the full range of urban services and how they plan to provide them. CO2 Jurisdictions and other urban service providers shall provide services and manage natural resowces ef�iciently, through regional coordination, conjunctive use of resources, and sharing of facilities. Interjurisdictional planning efforts shall evaluate approaches to shaze and conserve resources. CO3 Service provision shall be coordinated to ensure the protection and preservation of resowces in both nual areas and in azeas that are developing, while addressing service needs within areas currendy identified for growth. C04 All jurisdictions acknowledge the need to develop a regional surface water management system which crosses jurisdictional boundaries and identifies and prioritizes program elements and capital improvements necessary to accommodate growth and protect the natural and build environment. The GMPC shall develop and recommend a fmancing and implementation strategy to meet this need. vi-2 � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan � COS Water supply shall be regionally coordinated to provide a reliable economic source of water and to provide mutual aid to and between all agencies � and purveyors. The region should work toward a mechanism to address long-term regional water demand needs of agencies and water purveyors. �J � � � � � � � � LJ C07 Water reuse and reclamation shall be encouraged, especially for lazge commercial and residential developments and for high water users such as parks, schools, golf courses, and locks. CO10 In the urban azea identified for growth within the next ten yeazs, urban water and sewer systems are preferred for new construction on existing lots and shall be required for new subdivisions. However, earisting septic systems, private wells, and/or small water systems may continue to serve the developments so long as densities and physical conditions are appropriate, the systems are allowed by the relevant jurisdictions, and management keeps the systems operating properly and safely. C013 Urban sewer system extensions in unincorporated King County shall be permitted consistent with the provisions of the King Counry Sewerage General Plan, Countywide Planning Policies, and the policies of the jurisdiction in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. FW13 Cities are the appropriate provider of local urban services to urban areas, either directly or by contract. Counties are the appropriate provider of most countywide services. Urban services shall not be extended through the use of special purpose districts without approval of the city in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. Within the urban azea, as time and conditions warrant, cities should assume local urban services provided by special purpose districts. FW32 Public capital facilities of a Counrywide or Statewide nature shall be sited to support the Countywide land use pattern, support economic activities, mitigate environmental impacts, provide amenities or incentives, and minimize public costs. Amenities or incentives shall be provided to neighborhoods/jurisdictions in which facilities are sited. Facilities must be prioritized, coordinated, planned, and sited through an interjurisdictional process established by the GMPC, or its successor. LU29 All jurisdictions shall develop growth phasing plans consistent with applicable capital facilities plans to maintain an urban area served with adequate public facilities and services to maintain an urban area to meet at least the six yeaz intemiediate household and employment target ranges consistent with LU67 and LU68. These growth phasing plans shall be based on locally adopted defuutions, service levels, and financing commitments, consistent with State GMA requirements. The phasing for cities shall not extend beyond their potential annexation areas. Interlocal agreements shall be developed that specify the applicable minimum zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation for the potential annexation areas. LU30 Where urban services cannot be provided within the next 10 years, jurisdictions should develop policies and regulations to: ■ Phase and limit development such that planning, siting, densities, and infrastructure decisions will support future urban development when urban services become available. ■ Establish a process for converting land to urban densities and uses once services are available. Funding/Financing Typically, cities and the residents they service would like to have higher LOS standazds than they can afford. Federal Way has worked hard to provide the highest LOS possible without raising taxes. It is a difficult balance to maintain and the Ciry is currently at a point where it may have to consider raising additional revenues to pay for capital facilities and the associated maintenance and operations costs. If the City decides to generate additional revenues, there aze several sources available. Some of these revenues are "on-going" in the sense that the Ciry levies the tax and � VI-3 the revenues are added to the Ciry's general fund on an annual basis. On-going revenues include property taxes, sales taxes, utility taxes, impact fees, and business and occupation taxes. The other category of funds aze called "one time" funds because the City cannot count on having these funds available on an annual basis. These funds include bond sales and grants such as ISTEA, IAC, and Urban Arterial Fund money. On-going funds can be used for either capital facilities or maintenance and operations. However, it is prudent fmancial management and adopted City policy that one time funds be used only for capital improvements. As is discussed later in this chapter, the Ciry proposed two bond issues to finance capital facilities in the Fall of 1995. As part of that bond issue, voters were asked to approve a permanent utility tax to pay for the maintenance and operations costs associated with the new capital facilities. 6.1 PARKS AND RECREATION Inventory of Existing Facilities The City of Federal Way adopted the Comprehensive Park, Recreation, and Open Space Plan in December of 1991. The City updated the Plan in 1995 (which is adopted by reference in this plan). The Parks Plan cover not only the City of Federal Way proper, but also includes the area east of Interstate 5. The original 1991 Parks Plan identified 39 pazks and open spaces in the planning area which covers some 998 acres. The 1995 Plan updated the inventory to include of CITY PARK/RECREATION AREAS COUNTY PARK/RECREATION AREAS STATE PARK/RECREATION AREAS SCHOOL DISTRICT AREAS PRIVATE PARKS/RECREATION AREAS TOTAL PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Federei Way Comprehensive Pian - Capital Facilities Plan new parks added to the Gity's system. The Plan also lists school district facilities, State, and County facilities as well as private recreation facilities. Map VI-1 describes the location of major pazks and open space withixi the Federal Way planning azea. Table YI-1 summarizes this inventory. When the City incorporated in 1990, there were appro�nately eight acres of park land available per 1,000 residents in Federal Way. Since that time, the City has purchased additional properiy and developed new facilities. These include the Lake Klahanee Community Senior Center, Visitation Retreat Center, Celebration Park, and Steel Lake Annex facilides. These facilities aze described in greater detail in the Ciry's Pazk Compre-hensive Plan. The result is that the City is now providing 10.9 acres of pazks per 1,000 residents. This represents a fairly dramatic increase in the LOS being provided to local residents. In addition to acquiring and developing new facilities, the Ciry has taken administrative actions to take advantage of other available public recreational facilities. The City enacted interlocal agreements with the School District to jointly operate and maintain school recreational facilities. As a result, the City now jointly operates and maintains a major community park in conjunction with Saghalie Junior High School. Also, the City has agreements to provide recreational programs and schedule play fields at several elementary schools. These facilities are now formally available nights and weekends, year around for use by local residents. When one considers all of the pazks and recreation facilities which are now available through interlocal agreements, City residents now have access to approximately 17 acres of parks and open space per Table VI-1 ting Parks and 799.11 23.65 295 134.68 184.13 1436.57 � � � � � � � � � 45 4 � 2 21 � 10 82 � VI-4 � MAJOR PARKS AND OPEN SPACE � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � L�' � Federal Wey Comprehensiva Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 1,000 residents. This inventory includes all City, County, State, and School District facilities. This is a substantial increase in the LOS over the past five years. However, for the purposes of pazks planning, the LOS standard adopted in the City's Parks Plan and this Capital Facilities chapter is 10.9 acres of park land per 1,000 population. This LOS standard is consistent with the LOS that the Ciry is presently providing. Forecast of Future Needs Based on population estimates included in this Plan, and the adopted LOS standazd for parks and open space, the City estimates that it will need to acquire and develop 104 acres of new parks and an additional 177 acres of open space between now and the year 2010 in the Plan. These estimates aze summarized in Table YI-2. In addition, the City completed a cultural arts survey in 1994. The surv e y evaluated several alternatives for a performing arts center and concluded that at some time in the near future, the City would need'such a faciliry with a capacity of about 800 seats. Locations & Capacities of Future Facilities Map VI-2 indicates the location of the parks, recreation facilities, and open space subazeas the City will need to maintain the adopted LOS. The Pazks Plan breaks the planning azea into subareas and addresses future facilities at the subazea level. For more details about the type, size, and cost of these new facilities, please refer to the 1995 Pazks and Recreation Plan. Finance Plan Table VI-3 describes the proposed parks projects that will be needed between now and the year 2010, together with cost estimates programed by year. It identifies approximately $38.8 million in projects. Table VI-3 also identifies the revenues that will be available during the next six years to fmance these new facilities. The only revenue sources identified aze those that have be�n secwed for fiscal yeaz 1995 and a$7.5 million bond issue turned down by the voters in November, 1995. If the bond issue had been approved, the City would complete Phase I unprovements to Celebration Park. These improvements would add six play fields and four baseball fields to the City's inventory of facilities and help to maintain the LOS for parks over the next six years. Given the bond issue was not approved, pazk's LOS will most likely decline given the prospect of new growth and development over the next six years. The City may place the Parks bond issue on a ballot in 1996 for reconsideration by the voters. The City annually updates its Pazks & Recreation capital improvements program. These updates reflect new project priorities, eliminate projects that have been completed, and add new projects to the program. Table VI-Z Parkc & Recreation Needs - Year 2010 A 24.0 80.0 B 45.0 0 C 25.0 25.0 D 3.0 0 E 5.0 42.0 F (OUTSIDE CTTl� N/A N/A G(50% OUTSIDE CTTI� 2.5 30.0 H (OUTSIDE CTT� N/A N/A VI-6 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan Table VI-3 � � � � � � � � � � � � �_� vi-� � PARKS PLAN PLANNING AREAS u �J � � � l_J � � �� � � � � i � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 6.2 SURFACE WATER Inventory of Existing Facilities Natural Systems The Federal Way area consists of two major drainage basins, the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound. The Hylebos Creek Basin consists of the West Branch Hylebos Creek, East Branch Hylebos Creek, and the Lower Hylebos Creek Sub-Basins. The Lower Puget Sound Basin consists of the North Lower, Central Lower, and South Lower Puget Sound Sub-Basins. Map VI-3 describes the planning area boundary, basin, and sub-basin boundaries. Map VI-4 shows the major features of the natural system. The natural systems have been reviewed on a sub-basin level. This sub-basin information is contained in the Ciry's Comprehensive Surface Water Faciliry Plan. Man-Made System As part of its 1994 Surface Water Facilities Plan, the Ciry completed an inventory of the storm water drainage trunk system. There are ten major trunk lines in the system, and one can find more details about their capacity and location in the Surface Water Plan. The Ciry has made a significant number of improve- ments to the man-made system since incorporation in 1990. One of the more significant of these projects is the Panther Lake retention/detention system. The Panther Lake project will accommodate storm water flows from the 100 year storm, includes an aquifer recharge component, and provides a recreational trail around the facility. Most of the projects completed to date corrected existing localized flooding problems. As a result of resolving these "spot" problems, the Ciry and its surface water utility have significantly improved the LOS on a system-wide basis. System Capacity As another part of the Surface Water Facilities Plan, the City developed a model of its surface water facilities including the natural part of the system, the various lakes, streams, and wetlands. This model uses the following design or LOS standards: ■ 10 yr storm conveyance capacity on lateral systems; ■ 25 yr storm conveyance capacity on major trunk systems; ■ 25 yr storm storage capaciry in local retention/detention facilities; and ■ 100 yr storm storage capabiliry in regional retention/ detention facilities. Based on these LOS standards and the data on existing facilities, the model helps utility engineers identify deficiencies in the existing system and the most cost effective way to resolve them. The model also allows engineers to describe the new facilities that will be needed in the future to accommodate new growth and development as outlined in the Land Use chapter. Forecast of Future Needs Based on model results, utility engineers prepared a detailed 20 year capital facilities plan. The plan identifies projects, priorities them, estimates the cost, and re-examines the utility rate structure to ensure that there is sufficient funding available over the next 20 yeazs to construct these projects. Locations and Capacities of Future Facilities Table VI-4 includes the surface water facilities project list. For a more complete discussion of this list, and maps describing project locations, please refer to Chapter N of the City's Comprehensive Surface Water Plan. As noted eazlier, these projects address existing system deficiencies as well as the new facilities that will be needed in the future to accommodate projected growth. Finance Plan The City has created a surface water utility to manage storm water drainage, prevent flooding, and improve water qualiry. The City chazges each household business for each employee, an annual surface water fee. These fees, along with any outside grant monies and low interest loans, provide the revenues that pay for capital facilities projects and operate and maintain the surface water system. vi-s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan TABLE VI-4 SURFACE WATER MANAGEMENT - CIP WM SOURCES arry Forward 53,377,155 ;;:;;:;;���`�;1$:� ser Fees (w/growth) 52,736,264 52,772,920 52,809,576 �2,846,232 52,882,888 52,919,544 52,956,367 528,258,158 :::;�:`::�;;::;����$�;;��. terest Eamings 538,034 538,544 539,053 539,563 �40,072 �40,582 541,094 5392,788 ::::�;:;:;:::��":`:;:::;�.�.!�;;��: ransfer-In (streets) 5205,794 5207,852 5209,931 5212,030 5214,150 �216,292 5218,455 �1,985,751 :::`:': ;;:;:;;:����E�C#�� WTF - Loan S 1,322,214 ::::;':::::::;�;�':;�.��:; ::::���`���'�33�':;s:�3 ::>`::::;;:':�::�:�.:>'''�`''''.`''::::::::<:>::`::»::::::::::::::::::::.>:::'•``�::>;::;::<:::>:::::::.;:::;:..»:::.;:.;::;:::;«:::�.?..;...:..::�:::�.<::>.::::.:;::::;:<;:> :: :. ............................................ ................................ ............................. ..... :::.>::::>;:<::;::>::><:<::::>::::>::;<;::>::>:::>:>::::::::>;::::::::<:::::�::::>::::::;: ::>::::>::;::>::::�»::>::::;:>:<::::>:::«:;::: <>::::::;;::>::::>::::>::><::;'>:::::<:::::>: ::::»> '�,�:�:�:�:f��`:::::::;<':::>�:>:: <>::':><:?'::::�?�� `:�': ��:: <::::<?:>::�":3'#����..'�� .��i ::::::::;..�: : . . .... .. . . .? . ..... � ��?' � �.�! .�� �'����8 .......�� .�� t� .......:.��"3�lS €9� .:;:.... �5�`+� .......................................................:..... ............... �.... �..... ............ �.......�..... ............>.......,�.�'...... ...............e....... ...,�"d�.'.... ............ t...... �....... ....................>........ ..:...........�.....�.... :............... �........e........ ........:...........��:�. wM usEs apital Project List 36th/Kits Regional Detention acility �2,276,000 ':``':;�;:;:���'1�:'• •::� •: ross Road Culvert Upgrade 5315,675 :::::`:::::;��:��:: 56th Detention Facility 51,274,233 51,200,690 :::;;:;:::;:����')`.$;�._ ea-Tac Mall Detention �497,835 5910,541 51,705,208 51,032,770 5288,607 ::::::::::::�`#t?�i��:.. 36th Detention Facility 516,068 5133,046 ;:;:;:�':��:�4�;:�;�; 56th Drainage Study �623,535 ::::::;':::$��'�� Hylebos Channel Stabitization 5314,736 �429,000 ;:�•.`•.::�<;���;?�.. 40th Detention Facility �261,129 5476,558 5395,042 :;::;:::;;;:;:::::;��:x���"���. reystone Apts Detention Pond 5111,960 ::„::#:��;�:�;;'4�..: kota Creek Channel 5351,149 ::<:;:::.:�5�'•.;���.. tabilization ::::;::>::>::;;: psize Trunk �292,624 st Way Culvert 5304,074 �';;;:��;��;,#��'; VI-10 r � � �r � � r�i� � �r +�r� � �r a�i �► a�r s�r � � �r � � � � � � � � � '� � � �� � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan R 99 36" Stromdrain Activation S 12,420 ��:::>::>:::::�.����:.�..: psize Trunk S91,058 5753,779 ':z::::::�:::::;'::;':>�:�`��sa{;�; 20th Trunk Crossing eplacement 5417,428 �::;':'':::::;;�;::;:::::;��#�'i;�l�; 72nd Trunk up-size 5819,556 ::::::;:::::;;:::;;;;;;;���;�:�.:: Lakota Creek Stabilization 52,001,550 :;:::::::::�:;;'::;::$�;�tQ�;S� rifice Replacement, Channel ehab S 154,066 <:::s�`:::`::;>'":`:�:::<�:� ��..:;;..: 20th Trunk Replacement 5107,978 :::::�:::::::::::;::::::::::�:��3:�y��. torm Drain Up-size 5397,675 ::::'::::;::��;:::>�:::�:;:��`#�67 tar Lk Rd Trunk Replacement 5765,065 �?:::':::<r:':::�::>:'�:�7�i5;;�' ... .. ........ . ................................ ............................... nchanted Pkwy Trunk Upsize 5279,163 :::>:::::::::;:::':::>::::::��;:1:�i: ................................ ................................ ............ ................ .. nchanted Pkwy Pipe eplacement 575,057 :::::>::::::::::`::'••::::r<:`.::'.;�...���. �:`• ::::>::'.:;<>:;r>::>::::>�::>::>::::;::::»::»: olf Course Flood Wall 5302,865 `:`:::;:'r:::":::::":: ;����'. ,;;: ake .Jeane Outlet Control tructure 5933,616 <:::::::::::<:>:��«::::�.'.$..9 .ake Lorene Out(et Control tructure 5217,273 >:<:::: ::::::::::::::::::��:�:'•.���:.:::.>:< 60th St Regional Detention �1,250,968 :::::::::::::::;:;>;�;�';��;�.. derbrook Detendon nlargement 569,790 :: '•;{:�::::r:;::'``•:'•::.'...��..'.�;i?�:�,:.' red Meyers Detention Purchase 5409,527 < <�:3;�` 25th Culvert/Tronk Replacemen S 154,172 :: ►9Qiil Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan VI-12 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � PUGET SOUND BASINS SURFACE WATER TRUNK SYSTEMS ' � � � � � � L� � � � � �J � � I LJ � CJ Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan As outlined in Table YI-4, projects are scheduled based on anticipated revenues. The capital facilities spread- sheet indicates project scheduling based on available funding and priority ranking. The Ciry annually updates the capital facilities plan for surface water. The Compre- hensive Surface Water Plan, which includes the capital facilities plan, is adopted by reference in this plan, including changes made during the Ciry's annual update. 6.3 TRANSPORTATION The GMA requires that local jurisdictions prepare a transportation chapter as part of the Comprehensive Plan. The GMA also authorizes jurisdictions to assess impact fees for transportation system improvements that aze necessary to accommodate the tr�c created by the new development. In order to assess impact fees, the capital facilities plan must include the list of transportation improvements and associated costs that necessitate the impact fees. The Transportation chapter contains the City's Trans- portation Improvement Plan (TIP). Table III-19 contains the TIP for Federal Way covering the years 1995 - 2010. Inventory of Existing Facilities Chapter three of this document is the City's transportation plan and it describes the complete inventory of the City's transportation facilities. Map VI- S indicates the City's street arterial classifications. One of the motivations for incorporation in 1990 was that the City had grown significantly over the past decade without benefit of necessary transportation system improvements. In short, residents were dissatisfied with the declining LOS in transportation. In response, the City acted quickly to make road improvements. The City added capacity to the system by widening and improving South 356th Street, 16th Avenue South, and 348th Street. It also coordinated the traffic signals along South 320th Street to improve traffic flows and lobbied for the Dial-A-Ride Transit service in Federal Way. The result is that the LOS for transportation services in the City has been stabilized and improved. With this in mind, the City Council has adopted the 1995 LOS as the standard for service delivery into the future. Forecast of Future Needs Based on the adopted LOS standard for transportation, the City used the EMME2 computer transportation modeling program to evaluate future transportation system needs. Please review chapter three for details associated with this analysis. The conclusion is the Ciry will have to construct the projects identified in the 1995 transportation improvement program (refer to the Transportation chapter) in order to maintain the existing LOS betwcen now and the year 2010. Locations and Capacities of Future Facilities The Transportation Improvement Program is a prioritized list of capital projects that have been identified for the period 1995 through 2010. The projects have been identified by location, with the project costs indicated by anticipated year of expenditure (for multi-yeaz projects). The transportation project list includes the 10 proposed projects, a map of the project location, and estimated cost of the projects to be funded by the 1995 bond issue. For the most part, these ten projects will not add capaciry to the transportation system. Rather, they will permit the system to function more ef�iciently as discussed in the Transportation Systems Management section of the transportation plan. Specific project information is also included in the plan. Financing Plan The transportation projects proposed in the City's TIP are based on funding available through a$7.5 million dollar bond issue passed by the voters in the fall of 1995. All projects shown aze dependent on this bond measure. All other identified projects are scheduled to take place beyond the initial six year time frame of this plan. The Transportation chapter describes the Ciry's 1995 TIP, including the revenue sources and project costs. VI-15 6.4 POLICE SERVICES Since incorporation in 1990, the City has contracted with King County to provide police services. The City uses a"Patrol Unit Cost" model to determine annual cost of police services from the County. This rate covers the direct cost of the officer plus a pro-rata shaze of the cost of administrative and support personnel and special services such as SWAT, Major Crime Investigation, VICE, Dive team, helicopter, K-9, and special emphasis traffic unit. In 1992, the cost per unit of service was $117,030 and the total cost for 53 patrol officers was $6,326,511. In 1993, the unit cost increased by 14.34 percent and in 1994 it increased an additional 12.94 percent. The 1994 cost for police service was over $82 million. Due in lazge part to these cost increases, which were significantly higher than local cost of living increases, the City started discussing the possibility of starting its own police department. These discussions also identified a local interest in a"communiiy based" policing model for Federal Way. Based on this history and these discussions, the City Council voted unanimously in May of 1995 to terminate the police contract with King County effective December 1996, and form its own City police department. At tlus time, the City is just in the beginning stages of setting up a police department and most of the major decisions associated with this new direction have not yet been made. However, the City has decided that it wants to maintain the existing LOS for police services. This means that the City will be hiring approximately 11 CAPACITY Elementary School Capacity Junior High Capacity Senior High Capacity I� Total Capac •NOTE: These capacities are 1994 Actual � 10,527 5,001 4,206 19,734 lo not include ooi Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 2 new employees to staffthe new department. The existing City Hall is at capacity and cannot accommodate the new department. As a result, the City anticipates that it will have to buy or lease a building to house the new department. This decision will have obvious long term capital facility impacts which will be described in the 1996 version of this Capital Facilities chapter. 6.5 SCHOOL FACILITIES This section summarizes information in the Federal Way School District No. 210, 1994/95 Capital Facilities Plan (School Plan) and adopts the School Plan by reference. This Plan covers the entire Federal Way School District which includes the City of Federal Way and unincorporated azeas to the east of Interstate 5. The District provides educational programs to all students who live in the School District service area, whether they live in Federal Way, Kent, or unincorporated King County. A school outside the Federal Way City limits may provide service to students who live within the City limits and vice versa. Inventory of Existing Facilities Map VI-6 shows the location of every school in the District. Table VI-S summarizes the District's student capacity. At this time, the District has sufficient capacity in the existing schools to house all of the students in the District. Table VI-5 of Ezisting Facilities 1995 1996 11,034 11,034 5,001 5,001 1997 1998 11,034 11,034 5,001 5,001 1999 � 11,034 5,001 2000 � 11,034 5,001 4,206 4,206 4,206 4,206 4,206 4,206 20,241 20,241 20,241 20,241 20,24 ] srooms. These capacities aze based on the ma�amum use of the buildin¢s. VI-16 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ARTERIAL CLASSIFICATIONS FEDERAL WAY SCHOOL DISTRICT Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Pla� Program Capacity The School District has established a LOS for itself which it calls "program capacity." The District's program capacity is based on: 1) the number of students per classroom, 2) the number of classrooms per school, 3) the number of classes that can be held in each classroom per day, and 4) other operational conditions. "Program Capaciry" assumes that the average class will serve the following numbers of students: Grades 1- 3 24 Students per classroom Grades 4-12 27 Students per classroom GATE 25 Students per classroom Special Education 12 Students per classroom Portables 25 Students per classroom The School District uses portables at many school sites as an interim measure to house new students until permanent facilities can be built. There are other administrative measures that the School District could use to increase school capaciry. These measures include double shifting, modified school calendar, and yeaz-round schooling. These measures have been used in the District on an experimental basis, but not District wide. ENROLLMENT Elementary Junior High Senior High TOTAL Forecast of Future Needs - Student Forecasts The School District has a relatively sophisticated methodology for forecasting student population increases. The methodology has historically projected student population increases with a 98 percent rate of accuracy based on the following variables: ■ Number of housing units in the District. ■ Students moving from one grade to another. ■ Students transferring in from other schools. ■ Students remaining in their current grade. Table YI-6 describes increased enrollment through the yeaz 2000. It shows that the School District's student population will grow steadily every year with the highest growth in elementary schools. The District has compared their e�cisting school capaciry with their growth forecasts and concluded that they will be operating at a deficit at all school levels by the year 2001. The District will need to use portables to accommodate the anticipated "unhoused" student population. The District may also be required to build new schools as well. Table VI-6 Federal Way School District Student Forecast ACI'UAL 10,505 10,553 10,637 10,799 10,955 11,077 � 11,224 4,677 � 4,713 � 4,813 � 4,818 � 4,842 � 4,878 � 4,975 4,032 4,022 4,025 4,135 4,183 4,255 4,393 19,214 19288 19,475 19,752 19,980 20,210 20,59: VI-19 Federat Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan Location and Capacity of New and Improved Schooi Facilities No new schools, and only a few school expansions, are planned for the District over the next six years. These limited school facilities improvements are listed below, along with their addresses and program capacities. Of the schools listed below, only Meredith Hill Elementary is still under construction and is scheduled to open in September of 1995. Because of its opening date, Meredith Hill is listed as eacisting capaciry in 1995. The budget listed for the other schools is to fuush schools that aze akeady open and operating. ■ Green Gables Elementary (Elementary #21) 32607 - 47th Avenue Southwest ■ Enterprise Elementary (Elementary #22) 35101- Sth Avenue Southwest ■ Meredith Hill Elementary (Elementary #23) 5830 South 300th Street accompanying six year finance plan will be updated annually by the School District. This will bring the plan into full compliance with GMA requirements. 6.7 WATER SYSTEMS This section summarizes the Lakehaven Utility District's Comprehensive Water System Plan. Map VI-7 shows the District's water service area boundary. Other purveyors provide water to portions of the District. The City of Tacoma, for example, serves an area on the west side of the District. Highline Water District serves a small portion of the District on the north side. The Town of Milton serves a small area on the south side of the District that is within the Town of Milton limits. Areas on the east side of I-5 within the City limits of Auburn and Pacific receive water from the District by agreement with the cities. These areas are at a higher elevation than the valley cities can cost effectively serve. ■ Saghalie Jr. High (Jr. High #6) 33914 - 19th Avenue Southwest ■ Mark Twain Elementary 2450 South Star Lake Road ■ Kilo Jr. High 4400 South 308th Street These schools aze all identified inMap VI-6 which shows both ercisting and proposed new schools. Finance Plan Table VI-7 describes the School District's six yeaz fmance plan to support the school construction. The table identifies $26,215,517 available from secure funding sources and an additional $38,999,265 anticipated from other funding sources between 1995 and 2000. These funds will more than cover $26,215,517 in planned project costs to the year 2000. Inventory of Existing Facilities The District's wells, storage, and major components of the distribution system are located onMap VI-8. Other facilities are described in the following sections. Interties Interties connect Lakehaven's system with adjouung water districts. Interties allow the District to buy or sell water with adjoining districts and are an essential back-up which provide enhanced system reliability. Interties have been installed at six different locations with three of the adj acent water purveyors. The water mains for the other purveyors on the east and south are located a significant distance away from the District's mains. In addition, there is a large difference in elevation which makes it possible to flow only in the direction away from the District, and would require installation of control valves to control the pressure. Not all interties allow two-way flow. Details of these interties aze shoum below: The School Plan states that State matching funds and ■��tertie is installed on Southwest 325th Street impact mitigation fees, if realized, will be used to near 35th Avenue Southwest between the District decrease the need for future bonds or used on additional and the City of Tacoma system and serves as an capital fund projects. The School Plan currently covers emergency supply to Tacoma. the years 1995-2000. The School Plan and vi-2o ' , � ' � � � � � � � � � � � � � � , � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan �J � � � l___1 C� � , � ' � � i � , � LJ � Table YI-7 School Fundin Plan SECURED FiTNDING 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 TOTAL 1991 Bond & Intetest 56,512,179 S6 Impact Fees (1) 524,000 524,000 City L►tcrlocal Funds 5929,338 5929,338 Lend Sale Funds (2) 5250,000 � 150,000 5400,000 State Match Funds (3) 59,775,000 a8,575,000 518,350,000 TOTAL $17,490,517 $8,725,000 526,215,517 UNSECURED FUNDING SOURCES State Match Funds (6) 52,822,019 52,822,019 Bond or I.evy Funds (4) �31,000,000 531,000,000 Mitigation Fees (5) �1,065,984 51,065,984 TOTAL 534,888,003 534,888,003 Green Gables (Etementary #21) 5209,689 5209,689 Enterprise (Elementary #22) 5818,693 �818,693 Meredith Hill (Elementary #23) 55,213,134 $5,213,134 Saghalie (Jr. High #6) $929,338 �929,338 MODERNIZATION5 Mark Twain Elementary 550,523 550,523 Kilo Jr. High �229 5229 TEMPORARY FACILITIES Portables 5178,415 5178,415 OTHER Sports Fields - Lakota/Memorial �1,265,496 51,265,496 ReserveFacilityImprovements 58,575,000 $8,575,000 517,150,000 Facilities Department $250,000 5150,000 5400,000 TOTAL 517,490,517 �8,725,000 526,215,517 Notes: 1) Thae fees have been collected in calrndar vear 1995 W date. 2) These funds come from vario�u sales of land and are aet atide for atimated expenditures. 3) Guaranteed State match nimb�usements. 4) These funds, if secured, will be used for modemi�tion of schools. 5) Calculations on impect fee estunates are coMaurod m the 1994/ I9v5 scnoo� autr►a p�an. 6) These funds aro tentatively allotted state matching funds. l9�'�i ■ ■ An intertie has been installed on Southwest 349th Street near 30th Avenue Southwest between the District and the City of Tacoma system. This intertie was enhanced in 1991 by the construction of a control valve station to allow full-time supply by Tacoma to a one squaze mile segment of the District's system, including Tank No. 3 in the southwest comer of the District. A third intertie with the City of Tacoma is being added at 15th Avenue SW and SW 356th Street to provide a redundant source to the one square mile area served fiill time by Tacoma. This intertie will also allow for possible expansion of the area now served by Tacoma water. ■ One intertie, located on Pacific Highway South at South 276th Street extended, has been installed between Lakehaven and Highline Water District. This intertie can provide emergency water to the Highline District. ■ An intertie between Highline Water District and the Lakehaven system is installed at Pacific Highway South at about South 274th Street. This intertie could operate in either direction since the systems on both sides of the intertie operate at a 490 foot system head. ■ An intertie is installed on Marine View Drive near the boundary between Highline Water District and the Lakehaven system. This intertie can serve in both directions since both systems operate at or near a 334 foot system head. ■ An intertie has also been constructed with the Town of Milton's water system, but due to the significant differences in head between the two systems (450 feet, LUD vs. 330 feet, Milton), water is only provided to Milton on an emergency basis. Forecast of Future Needs The Water System Plan estimates future need by analyzing existing water consumption pattems on a daily, seasonal, and yeazly basis. The District converts gross water consumption numbers into per capita consumption in gallons per day. Average per capita water consumption in the District is appro�cimately 114 gallons per day. This figure multiplied times projected Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Fecilities Plan population growth, provides a rough estimate of the future demand for water. Recently, these numbers have been reduced slightly to account for the reduction in water consumption associated with the District's water conservation program. In additioq the growth rate in the District has slowed significantly. In 1990, the District was assuming a three percent annual growth rate through 1995 and a two percent rate through 2000. In 1994, the District experienced a 1.64 percent increase in the number of water meters installed. Despite their relatively successful conservation program and lower than anticipated growth, the Lakehaven Utiliry District has a t►igher demand for water than it has in available supply. Each year, the District pumps more water out of its aquifers than is replenished by natural aquifer recharge. As a consequence, the water levels in some of the District's aquifers aze going down. If the District is unable to secure additional water resources in the near future, it may be forced to stop issuing certificates of water availability. That action would have significant impacts on the local economy and economic development efforts. Location of Expanded And Improved Facilities The District has programmed a number of system improvements to eliminate existing system deficiencies, conserve water, develop water sources, drill wells, add storage, and expand distribution. These improvements are summarized below. Second Supply Pipeline The District is currently involved in developing other sources of water. The most significant effort is the Second Supply Pipeline (formerly called Pipeline 5). This project is absolutely critical to the long term water needs in Federal Way and to stabilize the water level in the aquifers. Based on the 1994 pipeline construction schedule, the District would access the pipeline at two locations. One connection facility is proposed in vicinity of Military Road and the Bonneville Administration Power Line. This facility would add from 4.62 or 5.87 million gallons per day (mgd) to the District, depending on the fmal contracted allocation. The second connection facility would be located at the Well No. 19 site. These facilities would add from 4.62 to 5.87 mgd to the ►���xa ' ' ! ' � � � � i � � � � i � � � � , LAKEHAVEN SERVICE AREA MAP EXISTING WATER FACILITIES ' Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capitel Facilities Plen ' District's supply depending on the final contracted allocation. It should be noted however, water available from the Second Supply Pipeline is conditioned upon � adequate in stream flows and may not be appropriate as a primary water source. ' i � ' , ' ' i , ' 0 ' � � The City should cazefully monitor progress on all of these projects, and particularly on the second supply pipeline project, to ensure that the City has water available to meet future needs. Wells The District currently has sufficient well capacity to accommodate future growth. For example, the District has Well No. 26 at the Tank No. 3 site which has not yet been developed, but is available for future development. This well has the potential capaciry of about 600 G.P.M. The aquifer has not been positively identified. This well would not actually add any more supply to the water system due to limited aquifer capacity, but could be used for replacement of another well in the event that one of the existing wells should fail. The answer to future water demand is not merely through drilling more wells. Additional wells are needed to meet summer peak demands. It is well documented, however, that the existing wells have the pumping capacity to produce more water than is available from local aquifers. Therefore, the District is planning several projects to increase supplies from outside the District, thereby allowing local aquifers to rechazge and increase recovery during the peak summer season. The problem is declining levels in the aquifer and the current inability for the aquifer to keep pace with the demand for water. Source Treatment The Water System Plan identifies a potential need for a water treatment plant in the near future. The decision to build the treatment plant will depend to some extent on legal interpretation of Federal and State drinking water laws. A more important concern relates to adding chlorine to the drinking water. The addition of chlorine to the existing well water will precipitate iron/manganese from the water and cause staining of fixtures and clothes if the iron/manganese concentration is not reduced before chlorination. Storage Improvements According to the District, storage is adequate at this time. Calculations show that the 538 pressure zone will likely require additional storage in the ne�rt few yeazs to meet future demand. The District's updated water systems plan will deternune when and where this new storage should be located. Water Conservation Measures The District is committed to implementing aggressive water conservation measures to reduce per capita water consumption. These include programs such as public information campaigns, rate adjustments to reduce summer and peak day consumption, and every third-day lawn watering calendars. At present, the conservation program is voluntary, but it may become mandatory in the future if conditions warrant such measures. The District will also work with the Ciry to introduce water conservation measures by amending the zoning and building codes. These measures could include a requirement for low flow showerheads and toilets, landscaping with reduced irrigation needs, and use of reclaimed water for irrigation. Finance Plan The District has identified several si�cant capital improvement projects in its water systems plan. The general description and scheduling of these projects is included in the Lakehaven Utility District's Capital Improvement Program for the years 1995-2004 (Table YI-8). The schedule and project costs will be updated annually through the District's budget and capital improvement program process. 6.8 SEWER SYSTEMS The existing Sewer Comprehensive Plan was originally adopted in 1983. Since being adopted, the Plan has been updated on numerous occasions. The last amendment was approved by King County early in 1988. The Lake- haven Utility District has indicated that the compre- hensive plan will go through a major update in Fall 1995, and into 1996. That Plan, and any future amend- ments, are incorporated into this Plan by reference. ' VI-25 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan Table VI-8 Lakehaven Utility District 1995-2004 Ca ital Im rovements Pro'ects Summa — Water De artment 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 TotalProject Project Title We1129/29A Production Drilling 21 S 215 Phase II RepaidRehab Reserve 300 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 10,700 Pipeline 5 Connection 260 800 1060 Aubum Intertie 100 100 10 600 1870 Well 18 Electrica( Upgrade 145 145 Well 29/29A Site Development Phase 300 550 850 � Oversizing Payments 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 500 WD 56 tJLID 3 Replacement 705 80 785 S 348th St. Relocation 20 20 S 356th St. Relocation - Phase II 45 465 510 S 312th St. Relocation 50 235 285 SW 336th St. Rclocation 60 400 460 Redondo Beach Road Relocation 20 130 150 SR161/348th to 360th Relocation 50 350 400 Office Site Improvements ('/:) 5 20 50 75 Enhanced Natural Aquifer Recharge 50 300 200 200 200 200 1150 334th & 18th Tie 30 30 SeaTac Mall Tie 85 85 295th/12th SW Water Main Replace 90 90 35th & 334th Tie/Replacement 75 75 VI-26 � � � � � � � � _ � � � � � � � � � � � � � w� � � � �r �■r � � � �w r■� r � � � r Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 TotalProject Project Title Redondo WWTP WaterMain 40 40 Replace S 344th/345th St. Replacement 320 320 18th PI. S Replacement 80 80 1995 Distribution Lnprovements 90 345 435 Welt 15/1 SA Electrical Upgrade 245 245 WaterReuse 100 1,000 2,000 500 500 500 500 500 5600 16th SW/SW 304th Transmission Ext 220 22� Pump Station/Well Upgrades 300 100 200 125 150 350 500 300 250 2275 Future LUD Complan Updates 155 100 120 120 495 23rd Avenue S Relocation 40 200 240 Campus Drive Relocation 400 400 S 304th Street Relocation 100 1� Future Relocations/Roads 200 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 900 6000 Disfibution Improvements 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 9200 7.0 MG Storage Tank 185 2,500 2625 5310 Coaosion Control Feasibility Study 155 155 Arti6ciat A uifer Rechar e(S 200 800 1000 VI-27 The Lakehaven Utility District serves an area that includes the unincorporated areas east and north of the existing City limits of Federal Way. Map VI-9 describes the District's sewer service area as well as the local service areas within the District. Inventory of Existing Facilities The sanitary sewer system is comprised of three major components. The trunk collection system, the pump station system, and the treatment plants. The trunk system collects sewage from the local service areas and conveys it to the treatment plant using gravity flow. In areas where using gravity flow is not possible, pump stations and force mains are used to pump the sewage to a location where graviry flow can be used. Map VI-10 describes the location of these components of the sanitary sewer system. The District currently has the capaciry in all the major components of the system to accommodate the existing demand for service. Forecast of Future Needs The District estimates that during the non-urigation months (typically November through March), domestic sewage flows are normally equal to about 90 percent of the domestic water demand. On a household basis, the unit rate has been estimated at 225 gallons per day. It is estimated that commercial land use generates approximately 700 gallons per day per acre of land. When these sewer system use rates are applied to estimates of future commercial land and household counts, the District can calculate the size and location of additions and expansions to the sewer system. Wastewater generation or flow is directly related to ultimate land use. The District dces not anticipate any enlargement of the eausting treatment plants until well after the yeaz 2001. This assumption is based on the built-out nature of the azea served by the Redondo plant and the fact that the Lakota plant is currently operating at less than 40 percent of its designed capacity. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan Location and Capacities of Future FBCI�It1@S The District develops a capital improvement projects (CIP) summary as a part of the annual district budget process. This CIP lists individual capital projects for the succeeding 10 year time frame. The CIP prioritizes the projects according to the system needs. Also included in this list of projects aze the ones that are continued from previous years. A list of these capital projects can be found in the District's Capital Improvement Program 1995-2004 (Table YI-9). Finance Plan The District updates its capital improvement program annually as part of the District's budget process. For specific information on the Finance Plan, please refer to the District's most recent capital improvements program for revenue and cost information related to the District's proposed capital projects 6.9 FIRE FACILITIES This section summarizes the King County Fire Protection District No. 39, Long Range Plan (The Fire Plan). The Fire District provides service to the entire City and surrounding unincorporated area. Services include fire suppression, fire prevention (building inspection and public information), emergency medical, and communications center for 911 emergency calls. The Fire Plan identifies and programs improvements that are necessary to maintain existing service standards and to meet the needs of future residents and businesses. The District's Fire Plan, and future updates, are adopted by reference in this Plan. The Fire District provides fire suppression service to the entire City. In order to do this, the District has adopted the following LOS standards: ■ An average emergency response time of five minutes. vi � ' ' , i � � , � ' i i ' ' , � � , � LAKEHAVEN SERVICE AREA AND BASINS MAP SEWER SYSTEM COMPONENTS � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan Table VI-9 Lakehaven Utility District 1995-2004 Ca ital Im rovements Pro'ects Summa — Sewer De artment 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Z001 2002 2003 2004 TotalPrnject Project Title Pierce/Tacoma Capacity Agreement 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 300 Pump Station Fuel Tank Replacement 140 140 RepaidRehab Reserve 250 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 10,650 Oversizing Payments 200 200 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 800 iTLID 59 (SW 312th/8th Avenue SV� 1,340 1,340 iJLID 60 (S 306thY52nd Avenue S) 1,020 1,020 ULID 61 (West Lake Kil(amey) ? � Sewer Station 31 Upgrade 200 200 Auburn/Redondo Siphon Inlet Upgrade 35 35 Grinder Pump Installation 15 15 15 15 15 75 Redondo Beach Road Relocation 20 30 50 Meredith 1 Siphon Upgrade 50 50 Of�ice Site Improvements ('h) 5 20 50 75 UI Rehabilitation 10 50 50 50 160 SW District Sewage Transfer 100 650 750 BiosolidsManagemenUComposting 500 2,000 1,500 100 ]00 100 4,300 Lakota WWTP Difiuser 200 300 S00 Sewet Station 6 Upgrade 500 500 Pump Station upgrades (General) 400 500 500 200 200 300 300 400 2,800 S 363rd Strcet Replacement 80 80 Lakota Creek Observation Platform 30 30 VI-31 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 TotalProject Project Title Redondo WWTP Outfall Repair 400 400 Siphon Upgrades 450 365 470 200 1,485 Future ULID's 500 500 500 500 2000 Lakota WWTP Outfall 500 500 1,000 2000 Lakota WWTPAdvanced Treatment 200 2,500 3,200 10,000 15,900 Lakota WWTP Expansion 1,000 5,000 10,000 16,000 Earthquake Improvements 100 300 100 500 Future LUD Com Plan U ates 150 150 VI-32 � � � _ � _ � � � _ � � � � _ � � _ � ' Federel Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plen ' ■ Each emergency response should include a minimum of one fire fighting vehicle and three fully-equipped and fully- trained crew members. � ' � ' � � � 1 � L�' 1 � � � ' L�1 ' ■ The Fire District provides a full building inspection service for fire code compliance. The District is currently providing service which is generally consistent with its adopted LOS standards. The Fire District also depends on having adequate water pressure available in fire hydrants to extinguish fires. The District works with the Lakehaven Utility District to ensure that adequate fire flow is always available. The Water System Plan� analyzes "fire flow" and programs improvements to the water system to ensure that sufficient water is available for fire suppres�ion. Inventory and Capacity of Existing Facilities The District has two major types of capital facilities. One is fire stations and the other is capital investment in equipment and, in particulaz, fire engines. The District's fire stations are shown onMap VI-11. Forecast of Future Needs From 1986 through 1991, emergency responses increased at an average of over nine percent. In 1990, public education efforts included 911 use/abuse training. The increases in call volume during 1992-1994 leveled off, although it is unknown how much, if any, effect the 911 public education effort had on actual call volumes. Fire related incidents decreased during the 1990's, while calls for emergency medical services have increased. The challenge for the Fire Disbrict will be to manage fixed- cost investments, such as new stations, and to be flexible in its ability to meet fluctuating call volumes. � Location and Capacity of Expanded or New Facilities During 1994 and 1995, Fire District #39 participated in a study to consider the feasibility of consolidating with the four fire districts to the north, toward SeaTac and Burien. Based on the results of that study, District #39 and the two districts in the viciniry of Burien and SeaTac decided to begin working on a consolidation program that would have them merge administratively in the near term and operationally over the ne�rt few years. This consolidation effort is significant for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is the location of the District's fire stations. Based on how the consolidation proceeds, the District may decide to maintain the existing north end stations. Alternatively, they may decide its best to decommission one or both of them in favor of a more central location in the District. Second, the District may have need for an additional station in the south end of the City in the vicinity of 356th and Pacific Highway. If this area continues to experience significant commercial growth, the District anticipates that the calls for service will also continue to grow. In this eventuality, an additional station may be needed to maintain acceptable response times. The District is acquiring property in this area to assure future availability of a station site. Any new station should be able to accommodate an on- duty crew of three fire fighters, with appropriate living and sleeping quarters. In addition, the structure should be able to house two engines and an aid car, with room for growth dictated by LOS demands. The cost of these facilities is appro�mately $1,000,000, plus land costs. Equipment would be in the range of $500,000. Funding Plan The Fire District has established a capital reserve fund for the systematic replacement of all capital equipment. These reserves are funded from the annual revenues of the District. The District also has established a goal of a minimum of three paid fire fighters on each fire appazatus. Additional staff that aze hired in support of that goal will be funded from new construction levies. The District has not established any funds for purchase of new stations or associated equipment. These purchases would require voter approved bonds. In the District's annually adopted budget, capital projects are identified. This capital projects list is updated based on completed projects and changing priorities. This plan adopts by reference the District's Fire Master Plan as well as the annual capital improvements program update. ' VI-33 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan 6.10 GOALS AND POLICIES CFP6 Protect investments in existing facilities through an appropriate level of maintenance and operation funding. The goals and policies in this section implement the State's Growth Management Act requirements and the King County Countywide Planning Policies. The Ciry of Federal Way takes responsibility for implementing only those goals and policies for services provided by the City. Special service districts, such as the school, utility , and fire districts, must implement goals and policies which are consistent with their respective plans. The City dces intend, however, to closely coordinate the City's plan with these service districts so that the citizens of Federal Way receive the highest level of service possible. Goal CFGl Annually update the Capital Facilities Plan to implement the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan by coordinating urban services, land use decisions, level of service standards, and financial resources with a fully funded schedule of capital improvements. CFP7 Maximize the use of existing public facilities and promote orderly compact urban growth. Goal CFG2 To meet current needs for capital facilities in Federal Way, correct deficiencies in existing systems, and replace or improve obsolete facilities. Balancing existing capital facilities needs with the need to provide additional facilities to serve growth is a major challenge�'or Federal Way. It is important to maintain our prior investments as well as serve new growth. Clearly, tough priority decisions are facing Federal Way policy-makers. Policies CFPS Give priority consideration to projects mandated by law, and those by State and Federal agencies. Policies CFP9 Give priority consideration to subsequent CFPl Provide needed public facilities and services to Phases of phased projects when phase one is implement the City's Comprehensive Plan. fiilly funded and under construction. CFP2 Support and encourage joint development and �10 Give prioriry consideration to projects that use of communiry facilities with other govern- renovate existing facilities and preserve the mental or community organizations in areas of community's prior investment or reduce mutual concern and benefit. maintenance and operating costs. CFP3 Emphasize capital improvement projects which �11 Give priority consideration to projects that promote the conservation, preservation, correct existing capital facilities deficiencies, redevelopment, or revitalization of commercial, encourage full utilization of existing facilities, industrial, and residential azeas in Federal Way. or replace worn out or obsolete facilities. CFP4 Adopt by reference all facilities plans and future amendments prepazed by other special districts which provide services within the City. These plans must be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. CFP12 Give priority to projects where leveraged monies such as grants and low interest loans can be used. Goal CFPS Adopt by reference the annual update of the �P Provide capital facilities to serve and direct Federal Way Capital Improvement Program for ,future growth within Federal Way and its pazks/recreation, surface water management, Potential Annezation Area as these areas and the Transportation Improvement Program. urbanize. VI-34 ' ' � ' � ' � ' ' � � ' � � � ' � , ' KING COUNTY FIRE SYSTEM � � � � � � � � � � � � � , �J � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan It is crucial to identify, in advance of development, sites for schools, parks, fire and police stations, major storm water facilities, greenbelts, open space, and road connections. Acquisition of sites for these facilities must occur in a timely manner and as eazly as possible in the overall development of the azea. Otherwise, acquisition opporiunities will be missed, with long term functional or financial implications. Policies The GMA requires that the Land Use chapter be reassessed if funding for capital facilities falls short of needs. The intent is to ensure that necessary capital facilities are available prior to, or concurrently with new growth and development. Capital facilities plans must show a balance between costs and revenues. There are essentially five options available for balancing the capital facilities budget: increase revenues, decrease level of service standazds, decrease the cost of the facilities, decrease the demand for the public service, and reduce the rate of growth and new development. CFP13 Provide the capital facilities needed to serve the future growth anticipated by the Compre- Policies hensive Plan. CFP14 Give priority consideration to projects needed to meet concurrence requirements for growth management. CFP15 Plan and coordinate the location of public facilities and utilities in advance of need. CFP16 Implement a concurrence management system for transportation which permits project approval only after a finding is made that there is capacity available in the transportation system sufficient to maintain the adopted level of service standard. CFP17 The provision of urban services shall be coordinated to ensure that areas identified for urban expansion are accompanied with the maximum possible use of existing facilities and cost effective service provisions and extensions while ensuring the protection and preservation of resources. CFP18 Coordinate future economic activity with planning for public facilities and services. CFP20 Manage the City of Federal Way's fiscal resources to support providing needed capital improvements. Enswe a balanced approach to allocating fmancial resources between: (1) major maintenance of etcisting facilities; (2) eliminating existing capital facility deficiencies; and (3) providing new or expanding existing facilities to serve new growth. CFP21 Use the Capital Facilities Plan to integrate all of the community's capital project resources including grants, bonds, general funds, donations, impact fees, and any other available funding. CFP22 Ensure that long term capital fmancing strategies and policies are consistent all the other Comprehensive Plan elements. CFP23 Pursue funding strategies that require new growth and development to pay its fair shaze of the cost of facilities that are required to maintain adopted level of service standards. One such strategy that should be implemented in the near term is an impact fee program for parks, transportation, and schools. CFP19 Purchase property in the Potential Annexation Area and keep it in reserve for future City parks CFP24 Promote a more efficient of all public facilities and surface water facilities. by enacting interlocal agreements which facilitate joint maintenance and operations of Goal those facilities. CFPG4 Provide adequate funding for capital facilities CFP25 Use the following available contingency in Federal Way to ensure the Comprehensive strategies should the City be faced with capital Plan vision and goals are implemented. facility funding shortfalls: VI-36 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Capital Facilities Plan ■ Increase revenues by selling general obligation bonds, enacting utility taxes, imposing impact fees, and raising property tax levy rates. ■ Decrease level of service standazds to a level that is more affordable. ■ Decrease the cost of the facility by changing or modifying the scope of the project. Poticies CFP28 Monitor the progress of the Capital Facilities Plan on an ongoing basis, including the completion of major maintenance projects, the expansion of existing facilides, and the addition of new facilities. Evaluate this progress with respect to trends in the rate and disiribution of growth, impacts upon service quality, and Comprehensive Plan direction. ■ Decrease the demand for the service or CFP29 Review, update, and amend the Capital facilities by establishing a moratorium on Facilities Plan annually. Respond to changes in development, focus development into areas the rates of growth, new development trends, where facility capacity is available, or and changing City priorities, budget, and changing project timing and/or phasing. financial considerations. CFP26 Aggressively pursue grants or private funds when available to fmance capital faciliry projects. CFP27 Maximize the usefulness of bond funds by using these monies to the greatest extent possible as matching funds for grants. Goal CFPGS Ensure that the Federal Way Capital Facilities Plan is current and responsive to the community vision and goals. Make provisions to reassess the Comprehensive Plan periodically in light of the evolving Capital Facilities Plan. Take appropriate action to ensure internal consistency of the chapters in the plan. CFP30 Continue to coordinate with other capital facility and service providers to ensure that all necessary services and facilities are provided prior to or concurrent with new growth and development. � The role of monitoring and evaluation is vital to the effectiveness of any planning program and particularly for the Capital Facilities chapter. The City's revenues and expenditures are subject to economic fluctuations and aze used to predict fiscal trends in order to maintain the City's adopted level of service for public facilities. This Capital Facilities Plan will be annually reviewed and amended to verify that fiscal resources are available to provide public facilities needed to support adopted LOS standards. VI-37 � �� � � � � � � � �J � � � � f_� � �� City Ce�ter l�_-- - _ --� =-L- -- : -- - : - __ _ __ �_�� _ ------ _ - -- �_ _- _�- _ __ -�, �L__ _ _) - � , �-- ,--- �� ) C !� C`. O ��Ir+ C O � � .� "'.s "" O ` La.. � �' � � !J � � � �� � � �� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center 7.0 INTRODUCTION ederal Way's Ciry Center Plan presents concepts and strategies for creating a defmable and vibrant "City Center" for Federal Way and an"urban center" for Southwest King County. The plan integrates the community's vision for a Ciry Center with the Puget Sound Regional Council's (PSRC) adopted VISION 2020 plan, and King County's countywide strategy for developing a network of centers. In this Plan, the term "urban center" is used consistent with the VISION 2020/King County definition, or to refer to the general characteristics of a sub-regional center. The term "Ciry Center" applies spec�cally to Federal Way's proposed center which includes a City Center core area. The City Center core area is intended to meet the requirements of an urban center. Purposes The principle purposes of the Federal Way Ciry Center Plan are to: " ■ Create an ident�able downtown that is the social and economic focus of the City; ■ Strengthen the City as a whole by providing for long-term growth in employment and housing; ■ Promote housing opportunities close to employment; ■ Support development of an extensive regional transportation system; ■ Reduce dependency on automobiles; ■ Consume less land with urban development; ■ Maximize the benefit of public investment in infrastructure and services; ■ Reduce costs of, and time required for permitting; ■ Provide a central gathering place for the community; and ■ Improve the qualiry of urban design for all developments. Background The VISION 2020 Plan (1995 update), Regional Goal 1 states: "Locate development in urban growth areas to conserve natural resources and enable efficient provision of services and facilities. Within urban growth areas, focus growth in compact communities and centers in a manner that uses land efficiently, provides parks and recreation azeas, is pedestrian-oriented, and helps strengthen communities. Connect and serve urban communities with an efficient, transit oriented, multi- modal transportation system." Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP) support this goal by encouraging: ■ Establishment of an urban center that is a vibrant, unique, and attractive place to live and work; ■ Efficient public services including transit; and ■ Responding to local needs and mazkets for jobs and housing. The CWPP define urban centers as concentrated, mixed- use azeas, a maximum size of 1'/Z square miles (960 acres), and oriented around a high capacity lransit station. At buildout, the policies envision that the center would contain a minimum of 15,000 jobs within'/s mile of the transit center, or 50 employees per gross acre, and an average of 15 households per acre. The urban center policies also call for: ■ Adopting regulations which encourage transit use and discourage the use of single-occupant vehicles; ■ Emphasizing the pedestrian features and promoting superior urban design; ■ Providing sufficient public open spaces and recreational opportunities; and ■ Uses that provide daytime and nighttime activities. CWPP recognize that with this growth will come an increased need for infrastructure. The policies, therefore, indicate that priority will be given to ensure the development of additional transportation and other infrastructure improvements necessary to support new, concentrated growth in urban centers. During a series of community workshops, which aze described in chapter one, participants helped to develop a"vision" for Federal Way's future. This vision includes the creation of a City Center. With the support of the residential and business community, Federal Way nominated itself to contain an urban center. Nominations were reviewed by the Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC), which confirmed the Federal Way Ciry Center core area as an urban center in 1994. The urban center designation will help Federal Way gain access to County funds needed to provide infrastructure as the Ciry Center grows. vu-i Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center � The Role of the City Center in 7.1 VISION STATEMENT � Federai Way's Future There are several reasons why a definable, vital Ciry Center is an important part of Federal Way's future. These include: Communiry Support - The Federal Way communiry has made the City Center a significant part of its vision. Participants in communiry workshops helped to develop a"vision" for Federal Way's future. A keystone of that plan is an attractive, multi-faceted City Center providing the setting for civic features and commercial activities. Economic Development - Federal Way's economic development strategy relies on a strong urban center. As discussed in the Economic Development chapter, Federal V�ay has the opportunity to transform itself from an essentially residential and retail based economy to an emerging, sub-regional economic center with an expanded, more diversified employment base. In the year 2010, the Federal Way Ciry Center has evolved into the cultural, social, and economic center of the Ciry and has fulfilled its role as one of Puget Sound's regional network of urban centers. Tlus role is reinforced by pedestrian-oriented streetscapes; an efficient multi- modal transportation system; liveable and affordable housing; increased retail, service, and office development in a compact azea; a network of public spaces and parks; superior urban design; and a safe, essential, and vibrant street life. The Ciry Center is responsive to the needs of its residents. In addition to general services which draw people from outside the region, such as retail, office, and hotel uses, the City Center is the primary commercial area providing local goods and services to the surrounding neighborhoods, and to residents and employees within the center area. � L� � Natural Evolution - The development of a more intensive, multi-use urban center is a natural step in Federal Way's evolution. Most new centers start out as bedroom communities. Retail businesses develop fust; office and industrial activities next begin to locate at key transportation crossroads, adding jobs and strengthening the employment base. Federal Way has experienced all evolutionary phases, with the exception of one. The final step is achieving a sufficient critical mass in the City Center to produce lively street activity; support specialty business, culturaV entertainment facilities and a high quality hotel; justify the investment for public pazks, amenities, and improved transportation systems; and create the interactive "synergy" of a true urban center. Federal Way's economic development strategy will add this fmal essential step in this evolution. Growth Management - Developing a City Center is part of a regional strategy to address western Washington's growth management problems. Public policy makers have focused increased attention on issues affecting our quality of life, including urban sprawl and the accompanying reduction of open space, declining housing affordability, and increasing traf�'ic congestion. As stated previously, concentrating future growth within the four county region into a number of centers (rather than a continued pattern of dispersion), linked by an efficient high capacity transit system, is one of the principle goals to manage this growth. Private development and City initiated actions have resulted in a balanced transportation network which accommodates automobiles, public transportation, high occupancy vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, and integrated parking. Pedestrian and bicycle circulation is emphasized along with other travel modes. The downtown urban fabric includes smaller blocks, lending itself to efficient and pleasant travel. Concentrated development allows a significant number of jobs and residences to be located within close proximiry to transit and a High Capaciry Transit Station (HCT), thus, reducing dependency on the automobile and improving pedestrian mobiliry. Direct access to a regional transit system links the City Center to Seattle, Everett, Tacoma, Bellewe, Sea-Tac International Airport, and other regional and local destinations. The diversity of housing opportunities has also increased and now includes townhomes, condominiums, and medium-high rise apartment buildings which help to meet a significant portion of the community's housing needs. Residents walk or take transit to shop, work, and recreate. Community facilities and services, public spaces, pazks, and trails compliment the variery of housing and provide places for residents to come together as a community. vn-2 � �� � � r � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center � A central gathering place for the community, the City Center is where the whole communiry can congregate and celebrate. Civic and cultural facilities, in addition to � a pazk and open-space system, meet the needs of residents, employees, and visitors. These amenities connect to the Cirywide and regional system of open � spaces, parks, and trails. Public and private projects contain such design elements as fountains, sculptures, and unique landscaping. �� L_J � � � The quality of urban design for all developments, including streets, buildings, and landscaping, is high and contributes to an improved quality of life. Public buildings and spaces also set a high standazd for design and compatibility with adjoining uses. Goals for the City Center Plan The goals and policies of the City Center Plan are derived from those of the Citywide Comprehensive Plan. The Comprehensive Plan addresses in greater detail the framework of regional plans and legislation which direct planning in Federal Way. It also discusses the basic policies addressing housing, parks, recreatioq and commercial development. This plan builds on these policies, and provides specific recommendations and actions necessary to facilitate the development of the City Center. The following goals provide overall direction to policy makers and community members when making choices about �owth and development within Federal Way's Ciry Center. Additional goals and policies aze located throughout this chapter, providing specific direction on other matters discussed. No set of goals or policies can address all potential issues that may arise in the course of implementing this Plan. Therefore, while these are fundamental to the Plan, they aze not sacred and may need to be revised as situations warrant. Goals CCGl Create an identifiable City Center that serves as the social and economic focus of the City. Define a Ciry Center with distinct boundaries, unique building types, and special features. base, and establishes Federal Way s Ciry Center as an economic leader in the South King County region. CCG3 Connect the Ciry Center to a convenient regional transit system. Provide service between centers and nearby areas by an ef'ficient, transit-oriented, and multi-modal transportation system. CCG4 Create distinct districts withrn the City Center, defining the roles and characteristics of each such district. CCGS Encourage a mix of compatible uses to maintain a lively, attractive, and safe place to live, work, and visit. CCG6 Focus on improving the existing character and image of the City Center. CCG7 Encourage housing opportunities in mixed residential/commercial settings. Promote housing opportunities close to employment. CCG8 Develop land use patterns which will encourage less dependency on the single occupant automobile. CCG9 Create an environment oriented to pedestrians and bicyclists. CCG10 Create an environment that attracts high quality housing, commercial, and office uses. Develop requirements for buildings, streetscape, and srte design. CCGll Create policies and regulations to reduce the amount ofparking that is required. CCG12 Protect and enhance natural features of the area. 7.2 EXISTING CONDITIONS City Center Planning Area CCG2 Attract a regional market for high quality The Ciry Center planning area is approximately 414 office and retail uses which increases employ- acres in size and is bounded by South 312th Street, ment opportunities, adds to the Ciry's tax South 324th Street, Interstate 5, and l lth Place and 13th VII-3 � Fedaral Way Comprehensive Plsn - City Center � Avenue South, seeMaps Yll-1 and YII-2. The Ciry Center Core and Frame areas are 209 and 205 acres, respectively. General Image The Ciry Center is not currently an identifiable downtown or urban center. The existing commercial developmart within the study area is typical of suburban strip retail and mall development. The dominance of mass retailing has largely shaped the commercial core. The SeaTac Mall and spinoffretail centers are a regional destination and generate tremendous amounts of physical and economic activity. However, as is the case with most older suburban mall areas, the existing City Center area could be anyplace. It is similar to hundreds of other commercial centers across the country. The businesses do not connect to each other, nor to public and private spaces, residential neighborhoods, or civic uses, except by automobile. Developments essentially reflect one pattem: a single story of "light" constructioq surrounded by an apron of asphalt. Buildings feature concrete, or concrete block walls, creating austere and "generic" images. Another prevalent image of the area is the vast amount of surface parking. The availability of parking is essential to the cwrent type of retail found in Federal Way. City Center businesses serve regional as well as local mazkets, and are heavily oriented to access by automobile. Actual building footprints relative to total parcel azeas are quite small; the majority of most pazcels are used to provide surface parking. This parking is often underutilized, e�ccept during the peak holiday season. The current network of collectors and arterials, and the disjointed over-sized block grids within the existing commercial area, contributes to significant traf�ic congestion. The character of the street environment is also unfriendly to pedestrians. Signs proliferate the South 320th Street and State Route 99 (SR-99/Pacific Highway South) comdors. Some signs are as prominent as the buildings they purport to call attention to. The number and size of signs produce a negative effect on the visual image of the City. The City Center does not contain a significant residential population. A pocket of residential housing exists between South 312th and 316th Streets, and SR-99 and 23rd Avenue South. Figure VII-1 depicts an aerial view of the City Center azea looking south from the northwest comer of the City Center boundaries. Current Physical Conditions Land Use Most of the study area is currently developed and consequently, most new development in this area will displace existing low intensiry uses. Buildings are dispersed throughout the area and lack pedestrian con- nections to each other and public rights-of-way. Current land use patterns favor auto-oriented commercial activity. The primary use in the City Center area is retail, followed by office, manufacturing, then residential. Sea- Tac Mall is the `signature' development in the area. VII-4 � � � � � � � �� Map VII-I Vicinity Map � � � � � � � �` ��� � � � � '� � � � �' � /J 4 ��. �� � � � � � � < N (��' /(, � }� ' o � p �J Ua"o� 04 � � 1 � �/a 'Q �� "� �❑ �� H p 0�'qq��.0 `�j0o.at �'�'t�Q �70Oo b �w 5'on -� �� �____ °° � °B {�Q �i �Q � ���n o � � �� � � �a � ��""° � ° . 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S� � ' - f �} [� aso o tlL3 �) in � L� O o(`��uro R i [ �� r .r-, t �,� � 'S '3I�Y 4igZ ^ ���t U`�� ��� g��i:� � �Y.� � `�cbo c J �u"� c:u `\� ,�� �' ` • �� �F'�-�I _ � � r -- \._` ' y �'I�, i z C �� Z6 \ I `� �`� � ���- �I I " �9°J �_ j I • � �= � o e��u l-- � gYE, t._-----J _ � � � �_ l -- --- _ s-- � � ._:.� _ oe � � � �� �lJ C� J � :!. 7' ��; `�.__`'` a ��� _-, i� � �,.� � �_., \�\ a �� Ntf S * �--_`�-�` -' -_..-- � _ �d 0 t"+ r� a � H "q! � �s � � � � � � � � T O a m m m < n 0 c ' � 0 � m � m � n W � 4 Figure VII-1 Aeriat View of Citv Center Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - City Center — ---�-�_�"�„--��„ ------ �_�; -` ���-- . - — ---- -- � -- --�--- � � ' ��� r"l^r"l,�`^^41" .,ti,rt ,� i --�'1,1.� �.�� :,��J 't+14� . � ,,,, �.,a✓t,rly,1 .., �, r h � ..�..�.,�..�-� .�,,,� ��� � �.c — �ti _ r� , � . _ z�..� _•+.-.r;: - — � . '� , ,. �� �� � � � a� � �� � � %�� '�" � � L 6 � O-�� � a . oe /� � � , e�—�-- pC � .� Table VII-1 Egisting Land Use Development AREA RetaiUOlTice (1,000 Manu. Civic Single Family Multi-Family sq. ft) (1,000 sq. ft) (1,000 sq. [t) (# Units) (# Units) City Center 3,152 0 14 0 352 VII-6 / � � � � � �� LJ � � �' �- � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Table Vll-1 lists the amourit of current land use development within the Ciry Center planning area. Public and civic uses are scazce, with only four publicly owned non-park sites (the bus barn site north of 1 lth Place South and South 320th Street; Truman High School, northwest of South 317 Street and 28th Avenue South; King County Library, 848 South 320th Street; and Federal Way School District Administrative Offices, 31405 Pacific Highway South). Parks, Open Space, and Natural Systems There aze no public spaces within the City Center. Private green spaces, plazas and meeting spaces are few. Steel Lake Park to the northeast and the proposed Celebration Park to the southwest are on the perimeter of the Ciry Center. Even though these parks are within wallcing distance of the City Center, they also serve, or will serve, as regional facilities in addition to serving local needs. The only other open space areas where natural systems are evident include the wooded edge of Interstate 5 on the eastern edge of the City Center. Civic Buildings and Municipal Facilities The City Center contains one civic or municipal faciliry i.e., the Public Library. The next closest facility is the City of Federal Way Pazks Department Steel Lake Annex and Maintenance Facility neaz South 312th Street and 28th Avenue South. Klahanee Senior/Community Center and City Hall are located a few miles southwest of the City Center at 33901 9th Avenue South and 33530 lst Way South, respectively. Circulation Roadways - A key element defining mobility within the Ciry Center planning area is the enormous size of its blocks. Most U.S. downtowns have blocks ranging from 250 to 500 feet on a side; block lengths in Federal Way are several times that. Because of the "superblock" configuration, motorists drive between and within parking areas serving Ciry Center developments to avoid congestion along City streets. Access to the area is provided by two principle arterial routes: South 320th Street (which runs east/west and connects to I-5), and SR 99 (which runs north/south). An inefficient hierazchy of streets feed these arterial roadways. The area lacks a system of minor arterial and smaller connector streets which could diffuse traffic efficiently away from these two principle arterials. The irregular spacing of traffic signals also adds to congestion. As such, the accessibiliry provided by the juncture of these routes, initially attractive to area residents, has been lost due to growth in traffic. Transit Service - A minimum of ten transit and dial-a- ride routes radiate from the City Center. However, service to the entire Ciry Center is not the primary focus, especially during the peak periods of the day. A regional pazk and ride lot, located southwest of I-5 and South 320th Street, generates most of the azea's transit ridership during peak periods of the day. Both METRO and Pierce Transit serve this site. Congestion on I-5, South 320th Street, and SR-99 demonstrates the need for an enhanced transit system. However, the existing low intensiry and dispersed land use patterns will not support significant increases in transit service. The area also lacks transit facilities such as bus pullouts and waiting areas, and a pedestrian network to safe and direct access from transit stops. Pedestrian Environment and Bicycle Facilities - A 1992 inventory of existing sidewalks within the City (see page V-22 of the Community Profile, Feb, 1993) revealed a deficiency of pedestrian facilities Citywide. The central core was highlighted as one of the areas which lacks an adequate pedestrian network. For example, most of SR 99 and portions of South 312th and 324th Streets and 23rd Avenue South lack sidewalks. A majoriry of walking that does take place in the study area occurs within malls and along storefronts of shopping center strips. Sidewalks connecting storefronts to public walkways are lacking. The few sidewalks that do exist aze narrow, devoid of trees, and interrupted by numerous curb cuts. Crossing wide, busy streets such as South 320th Street and SR-99 can also be intimidating to some people. There are few places to sit and enjoy pleasant weather, meet friends or have lunch outside. The current pedestrian environment is unfriendly and unappealing. The division which exists between pedestrians and auto areas is not conducive to establishing the active street life desired in a Ciry Center. Bicyclists have even fewer facilities to choose from. Ciry streets lack striping or signage for bike riders who must share the road with heavy volumes of traffic. Once bicyclists reach the area, they become frustrated by the lack of safe storage facilities for their vehicles. l9lbl Residential The City Center contains approximately 352 units of housing, located primarily in the azea east of SR-99, south of South 312th Street, north of South 316th Street, and west of 28th Avenue South. Other residential neighborhoods surround the City Center area. West and south of South 320th Street and South l lth Place are pockets of multi-family housing. There are also single family neighborhoods west of Highway 99 and north of the South 312th Street corridor. While these neighborhoods are not located immediately within the proposed City Center, they aze located conveniently within wallcing, bicycling, or vehiculaz distance. They differ greatly in character and type. Infrastructure Most of the existing facilities and infrastructure were inherited from King County. Since the incorporation in 1990, the City has not yet been able to significantly improve infrastructure or increase the number of facilities in the City Center. However, as the City grows and implements the policies contained in its Capital Facility Plan, it will be able to direct investment to meet its growth objectives. 7.3 THE LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONCEPT FOR THE CITY CENTER The Concept Pian The concept is to redevelop the City Center and create a compact urban community and vibrant center of activiry. The crux of the strategy is to promote a compact urban center with connections between where we live, work, and recreate, and create an urban environment that is amenable to walking, bicycling, and transit. The concept, a result of the citizen participation process called CityShape, implements the communiry's goals outlined in Section 7.1. In summary, the concept is to: ■ Establish a City Center to support high capacity transit (HCT) by locating residents and workers within convenient walking distance of HCT. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center ■ Make efficient use of existing capital improvements by concentrating higher intensity land uses in the City Center. ■ Encourage a mix of compatible uses where housing ccexists adjacent to, above, or near commercial developments. ■ Create a dense residential community within walking and bicycling distance of the core. ■ Improve auto circulation in the City Center by completing the street grid, creating smaller blocks and directing through traffic around the core, thus minimizing the impact of future growth on Citywide traffic patterns and congestion. ■ Reduce the impact of parking by encouraging structured parking, reducing pazking requirements, and implementing guidelines that enhance its appeazance. ■ Create pedestrian and bicycle connections throughout the City Center and to surrounding neighborhoods. Provide a safe and inviting environment for pedestrians and bicyclists with direct connections between activities and transit facilities. Develop and/or reconstruct streets to include sidewalks, street trees, benches, garbage receptacles, screening of pazking areas, etc. ■ Create a high amenity pedestrian boulevard through the core, linked to a transit center and providing an attractive civic focus to SeaTac Mall. ■ Provide a civic focus to create a sense of identity for all residents. Develop municipal and cultural facilities within the City Center core area. ■ Develop public spaces in the City Center, particulazly the core azea. Enhance the Ciry Center with a network of public spaces and parks connected to the Citywide and regional system of open spaces, parks, and trails. Encourage gathering spaces in private development. Map Vll-3 applies the principles described above. The Plan depicts the City Center core area between SR-99 and I-5 and South 316th/317th and South 320th and 324th Streets. The City Center core azea contains a concentration of higher-densiry, mixed-use development. The Ciry Center frame area surrounds the core along the vn-$ � I� � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan • City Center � � I � Map VII The Concept Plan Hia+ na+sm �a �rsnuu�r rs�►n RESIDENTIA� V/ACCESSORT �� �� � RETAII i�FICE ��STRIIW LINKAGE PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES �� ���ITY HIGH CAPACITY BETVEEN FICT STATIdd TRANSIT SYSTEM � �pTp� �� �ACT MI%ED-USE y U� � I ? I ' I_-1 _ � I ! n r+.+�.r�.�. I. L .' a 1_ � 1 � �� �I I : 1 � ���� ' � �U o � � ~����� '�' = ii ;� . � C]0 � ��4�� i I�r� ��, i �' , �ii `L' �°� � �� � � r .`Al!i �� � � `.�M1��. � O�� �1 . i a _� l ' h �. I, �o �' i �- . � lJ p � , I ` I � rr���~ � TMan'A:ti� Ln �I;� n ,� � }'' � � � �'� _ ' � - i �� - � nCl °C�PQa�pc= p � . �� ..,...... ... ��. �.r� _ � � � F �,. � n .Yy. .�i�� f j � .''• � °C'�: . i� ' � 0 �� r� �!-�, �C� . - a � I.�.�.."'�'r�� :} Ls �.�.� ����� C�� ': � U, cS���Q r , � ,. 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High capacity transit nu�s through the middle of the City Center, and pedestrian pathways connect the HCT station with residential areas, future civic spaces, and the SeaTac Mall. Proposed Land Use Designations This section expands on the land use concepts described previously. The City Center plan proposes two different land use designations, each with its own distinctive characteristics, to guide evolution of the City Center, see Map Vll-4. The City Center core and frame area designations give form to the concepts summarized in section 7.3. These land use designations direct the location and extent of growth, will reshape the nature of development, and transform the area into a compact, vibrant City Center. City Center Core Area For the last 20 yeazs or so, lower density shopping mall areas at the edge of the nation's larger cities have gradually been redeveloped and transformed into more dense urban centers, emulating the development patterns and sense of place of more traditional downtowns. This transformation, to an azea with a unique character and improved image, is proposed for the core area. The intent of the core area land use designation is to create a higher-density mixed use "center" for Federal Way, and become an urban center as envisioned in VISION 2020 and the King Countywide Policies. The CiryShape vision calls for concentrating growth requiring a higher demand for infrastructure in an azea where sufficient infrastructure capaciry exists, or where such capaciry can be provided efficiently. The infrastructure within the City Center, specifically the core azea, is designed to handle the highest levels of demand within Federal Way. By orienting new growth azound this investment, the existing capacity can be utilized to its fullest extent. The core area designation also encourages the concentration of new development to help reduce development pressure in other areas of Federal Way. Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - City Center The core azea land use designation encourages a greater diversity of uses within mixed-use types of development. Traditional City Centers are places where diverse office, retail, and government uses are concentrated, as well as cultural and civic facilities, communiry services, and housing. Many cities are advocating mixed-use development for a number of reasons. These include: ■ Providing new housing and cutting down on automobile dependency by bringing workplaces and residences into close proximiry; ■ Providing retail and service needs in close proximity to residential and employment areas; and ■ Improving the feasibility of a development project. The proximity of urban services makes housing projects more desirable and a nearby source of consumers help make a commercial project more profitable. Concentrating growth in a specific area also supports future investment in transit, including a regional HCT system. Existing low density development does not generate sufficient levels of demand to justify HCT service. Promoting higher densiry uses within walking distance of transit facilities will improve the viability of this infrastructure. Additionally, concentrating the highest density of development in the core, where a significant number of jobs and residences will be within walking distance of a transit station, helps reduce dependency on the automobile and improve pedestrian mobiliry. The core area emphasizes pedestrian, bicycle, and transit mobility. The core azea will be less auto-oriented than the frame area, but it will not be unfriendly to the use of automobiles. The City Center core azea will also be the central gathering place for the community—a place where the whole community can congregate and celebrate. Accordingly, the core should include an outdoor square, pazk, or commons, with public amenities such as fountains, sculptures, and unique landscaping. Other civic amenities or buildings, including a Ciry Hall and/or a performing arts center, could be grouped azound this City Center squaze. VII-10 � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Figure Vli-4 Center Land Use Designations � ��°� �oo.. lt o � � ,�3 �o �� TM�� � i� ��a o c a th S� q � f�r9 �` �� Goals & Policies Which Promote the Concentration of New Development in the City Center Core Area Goal CCG13 Focus new growth with higher demands for infrastructure and transportation in the City Center, specifically the core area. Allow for higher intensity uses for e,�j"icient use of land. Policies CCPl Support the concentration of uses within the core area to create a fmancial, retail, and business hub of Federal Way. CCP2 Develop an attractive Ciry Center which will ariract qualiry development. CCP3 Revise land use regulations, as necessary, to • allow the higher intensity development expected over the nea-t 15 to 30 years. vu-> > CCP4 Create a City Center that is the primary commercial area providing local goods and services to the surrounding neighborhoods, and to residents and employees withixi the center. CCPS Provide streamlined permit review in the Ciry Center to accelerate changes to the core area. CCP6 Work with urban service providers to ensure suf�icient capacity is available for development. CCP7 Allow for a variety of uses and mixed use development within buildings, or complexes. Ensure that mixed-use d�velopment complements and enhances the character of the surrounding residential and commercial areas. CCP8 Establish guidelines that list compatible uses. CCP9 Provide incentives to encourage residential development in City Center, core/frame azeas. City Center Frame Area Residents choose to live in higher density housing for a variety of reasons. First, higher density is frequently less expensive than single family housing. Second, the convenience and proximity to work, needed services, and cultural activities is very desirable for many people. Finally, many people fmd that they do not need a large, single family detached house. Given their lifestyle, they appreciate the low maintenance and security of higher density living. There is a mutually supportive relationship between higher density residential uses and commercial activities. Establishing a City Center frame area provides a zone for dense mixed-use development that surrounds and supports the core. It also provides a transition between high-activiry areas in the core area and less dense neighborhoods outside of the frame. The presence of housing also activates downtown streets, day and night. The frame area allows uses that are similar to those in the core azea, but aze of lower density and intensity. While the emphasis of the core area is to develop commercial and office uses with accessory residential, the emphasis of the frame area is residential development with accessory retail and office use. Together, the core and frame areas are complementary. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Canter Figure VII-Z Potentiat Core Area De Encouraging multi-unit housing mixed with business and commercial use will help Federal Way meet regional land use goals. This is accomplished by encouraging the development of housing close to employment and transportation centers. To help transform the character of this land use designation, density bonuses should be allowed in exchange for amenities which contribute to a more pedestrian oriented environment. Goals & Policies Encouraging The Location of Higher Density Residential Uses Around Core Area Goal CCG14 Increase housing opportunities and diversiry ofhousing types within the City Center, specifically the Frame area. Policies CCP10 Revise land use regulations to allow the frame area to accommodate higher density residential uses accompanied by residentially oriented retail and service uses. vu 2 � � � � � ,� � � ,� � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center CCPl l Provide amenities such as communiry services, parks, and public spaces to meet residential needs. CCP12 Develop guidelines that ensure effective transitions between different land uses and higher and lower densities. Figure Yli-3 Circulation Federal Way's City Center plan is designed in accordance with VISION 2020 and CWPP related to mobiliry. Although regional travel trends continue to show more cazs on the road, more trips per person, and increases in the number of people driving alone, the emphasis of this Plan is to promote a variery of travel options. The City will focus both on transportation improvements as well as influencing individual travel choices by increasing the attractiveness of alternatives to the automobile. Encouraging growth in a compact, well defined Ciry Center will help promote bicycling, walking, and transit use. The City Center will be connected to other regional urban centers and areas of the City by a multi-modal transportation system, including a fast and convenient regional transit system. In order to function efficiently, mobility in the City Center must be enhanced by adding transportation improvements. The City should focus transportation investments in the City Center to support transit and pedestrian-oriented land use patterns. These improvements should include: a smaller street grid, bicycle routes, public sidewalks and pedestrian pathways, and cleaz and identifiable transit routes. These transportation improvements will also help meet Ciry Center mobility needs in the event a High Capacity Transit (HCT) system is not developed. Goal to Improve Overall Circulation Goal CCG15 Provide a balanced transportation network which accommodates public transportation, high occupancy vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, automobiles, and integrated parking. Automobile Circulation The current network of collector roads and arterials, the disjointed grid, and large block sizes contribute to significant traffic congestion within the City Center. The solution is not to construct wider roads. Streets become less efficient as the numbers of lanes increases. Building new streets with fewer lanes versus widening existing streets is more cost effective, yields greater capaciry, and will have less impact on the City Center. Automobiles are likely to continue as a dominant mode of transportation. A comprehensive network of collector arterials and other streets must be developed to distribute this tr�c and create more driving choices. To the extent feasible, the Ciry should connect streets to form a tighter grid within the City Center, especially in the core, by negotiating new public rights-of-way and building new streets. This "interconnectivity" serves to shorten and disperse trips, and consequently reduce travel on existing congested arterials. Map Vll-S indicates the proposed street network changes. Additionally, alternatives to auto travel such as van and car pools, transit, pedestrian comdors, and bicycle paths should also be emphasized. VII-13 Potential Frame Area Develoament Federal Way Comprehensivs Plen - City Center � Map VII-S Enhanced Street Network VII-14 oasrn+c wtr�atn�s — � — � — � — � — �nnar r�was � ■ ��� �n str�rs 0 s�P�wcw�"cu� � � � � � � � � J � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Goals and Policies to Improve Automobile Circulation and Reduce Usage Goal CCG16 Improve the flow ofvehicular traffic through the City Center and minimize increases in congestion. Policies CCP14 Improve traffic flow azound and through the City Center by extending the street network, creating smaller block,s and completing the ring road along the west edge of the City Center. CCP15 Reduce congestion by supporting the Commute Trip Reduction Act. Develop commuting alternatives to single occupancy vehicles, including transit, walking, and bicycling. CCP16 Establish lower LOS tazgets in the City Center than are typical in other areas of the City to prevent roads from being over-designed and incompatible with pedestrian circulation. CCP17 Discourage cul-de-sacs within the City Center. Pedestrian/Bicycle Connections Pedestrian and bicycle mobility is a vital part of the future City Center circulation system. Improvements for pedestrians and bicyclists should support increases in transit services and promote the development of the City Center. This Plan addresses the lack of pedestrian amenities and pathways by recommending changes to the development pattems and transforming the character of the streetscape. As the street system is redeveloped to better accommodate the needs of pedestrians and bicyclists, a network of facilities for people on foot and bikes will be established such as already exists for people in cars. Reducing the size of the street grid, as proposed to improve auto circulation, and creating pedestrian easements and paths through larger parcels is critical to establishing walking patterns which reduce dependency on the automobile. As individual sites are designed and developed to be more pedestrian friendly, and as the City provides improved pedestrian linkages, the pedestrian system will handle an increasing share of trips. As such, all streets should include some pedestrian amenities, such as public sidewalks, street trees, benches, adequate lighting, dedicated bicycle paths, trash receptacles, and improved signage. Streets and pedestrian/bicycle accessways must be developed to provide for easy, safe, and fast pedestrian/bicycle access. In addition to adding public sidewallcs and creating mid- block easements and pathways, Map Vll-6 depicts three principle pedestrian connections to improve pedestrian circulation. The first is developing connections between the High Capacity Transit station, adjoining bus transfer facilities and other uses. The pedestrian and bicycle system is essential to other travel modes, particularly transit. Virtually all transit trips begin and end as pedestrian trips on public rights-of-way. All buildings within proximity to these areas should be required to facilitate pedestrian and bicycle movement. The second is to establish pedestrian and bicycle connections to SeaTac Mall, the region's lazgest generator of vehiculaz and pedestrian traffia Linkages between the proposed transit station and the SeaTac Mall are important. Unfortunately, South 320th Street is wide, congested, and presents a significant barrier to this connection. Providing an at-grade pedestrian and bicycle crossing could increase congestion and vehiculaz and pedestrian/bicycle conflicts. To facilitate this connection, and encourage redevelopment of existing parking areas, this Plan proposes a pedesirian bridge spanning South 320th Street. This connection would be enhanced by the presence of an elevated rail structure and a two-story addition extending from SeaTac Mall toward South 320th Street. The pedestrian overpass would create a major connection between two areas in the City Center which have a high potential for new development and redevelopment. The third is to connect the City Center to nearby neighborhoods and parks. Residential neighborhoods of varying densities surround the City Center. Steel Lake and the proposed Celebration Park aze located to the northeast and southwest of the City Center, respectively. Both pedestrian and bicycle trails should extend to these residential neighborhoods and pazks. Roads extending to these areas should emphasize the pedestrian connection by including additional pedestrian amenities. VII-15 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center � Map VII-6 iple Pedestrian and Bicvcle Connections VII-16 � I � E7QSTING ARTERIALS � �� 1�1 PR�OSED STREETS � POTENTIAL PEDESTRIAN � POTENTIAL •/SIDEVALKS C��ECT1diS t HICYCLE ROUTES CROSSVALICS � POTENTUIL LOCATI�IS O�ILY NOTE� SIDEVALKS ARE ALSO PROPO.TED FOR EXISTING STREETS �ACKING SIDEVALKS � � � � � � � � � � � � � � i � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Policies to Improve Pedestrian Connections Goal CCG17 Promote and facilitate the effective use of non-motorized transportation. Create a safe, efficient and enjoyable pedestrian and bicycle system. Policies CCP18 Emphasize pedestrian and bicycle circulation to the same extent as other travel modes in all aspects of developing the City Center transportation system. Include public sidewalks, street trees, and other pedestrian amenities for streets. CCP19 Revise local zoning codes, site planning requirements, and street design standards, as necessary, to establish a more pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment. CCP20 Encourage new development to include active ground floor uses such as shops, communiry services, office, and housing units. Connect adjacent buildings where possible to provide for streetscape continuity. CCP21 Develop clear and safe pedestrian paths through lazge parcels to enhance the pedestrian network. CCP22 Site and screen pazking lots to muumize impact on the pedestrian environment. CCP23 Connect the main entry of buildings to public sidewalks by a cleaz, identifiable walkway. CCP24 Encourage transit use by improving pedestrian and bicycle linkages to the existing and future transit system, and by improving the security and utility of park-and-ride lots and bus stops. CCP25 Establish cleaz and well mazked pedestrian crossings to reach transit facilities and other uses at a maximum spacing of 600 feet. Signals at intersections and other crossings may be timed to allow pedestrians to cross. CCP26 Connect Celebration Pazk and Steel Lake Park, via a pedestrian/bicycle pathway, bisecting the City Center: orient buildings, urban open spaces, plazas, etc., to the pathway where feasible. CCP27 Develop special development standards to improve the appearance of, and pedestrian/bicycle circulation along, South 320th Street and Pacific Highway South. Transit Efficient, convenient, and reliable transit is important to this Plan's emphasis to reduce auto dependency tluough the creation of viable travel options. Transit will play an important role in the development of the City Center and the region as a whole. A multi-modal system which includes transit will bring commuters and shoppers to and from other areas of Federal Way and adjacent communities. A high capaciry transit system with a principle stop in the core area will distribute people regionally and connect to other bus based transit systems. Transit stops throughout the center will help shoppers, employees, and residents to circulate around the Ciry Center without the need to get into their cazs. Encouraging a mix of land uses and densities at major transit access points will help meet passenger needs and reduce vehicle trips. High Capacity Transit The Regional Transit Authority is working with Puget Sound citizens and Ciry representatives to develop a HCT network linking Everett, Tacoma, Seattle, Bellewe, and communities between them. Four HCT stations are proposed in Federal Way, including one in the City Center core area. Map YII-7 depicts the proposed approximate HCT alignment and location of the City Center station. The system will generally run north/south along SR-99, jogging east to connect to the transit station before heading south again along SR-99. The actual site for the station has not been determined, but, a station located between South 316th and 320th Streets will be critical for development of the core. A number of vacant or underutilized pazcels exist along this alignment that will allow for developing facilities and public spaces required vu-� � Fede�al Way Comprehensivs Plan - City Center � Map VII-7 Potential Transit Alignments and � � � 00 q IT� � o � ■ �/��-� 8 � POSSIBLE SITES FQt E%AMPLE OF TRANSIT ■ 1� I� I N FICT C�tRIDQt �����+ TRANSIT RWTES FICT � BUS STATIQ�IS � ST� SPACING � FRA�IE � CQ2E � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center for this type of development. This Plan does not depend on the development of a HCT system. The proposed system is one of several transportation options. While HCT will help regional and local transportation needs, other modes will continue to play a vital role. Many of the characteristics that are desired withir► the City Center, and support HCT, also support other modes such as van/car pooling, bussing, bicycling, and walking. To encourage transit use, the high capacity transit station should provide an inviting environment with comfortable pedestrian facilities, including shelter for waiting areas, convenient passenger drop-of�zones, safe lighting, and street fiuniture. Conveniences like telephones, automatic teller machines, secure bicycle storage areas, and outdoor seating areas are also important elements of the station design. Provisions for vendors, small cafes, and carts will make outdoor spaces more lively. Stores adjoining the station can take advantage of the concentrations of people by specializing in goods and services needed by commuters such as dry cleaning, videos, news kiosks, and day care. Federal Way's City Center station will be oriented principally to pedestrians and those arriving by other forms of transit. Providing or pedestrian/bicycle accessibiliry between surrounding properties, street network, general vicinity, park & ride lots, and the HCT is essential. Policies to Guide Transit Planning and Establish a High Capacity Transit Station Goal CCG18 Work with the transit providers to develop a detailed transit plan for the City Center. Identify facilities, services, and implementation measures needed to make transit a viable and attracrive travel mode. Tailor the plan to meet local needs, through rapid transit, express buses, community service, and/or demand-responsive service. Policies CCP28 Focus transportation investments to support � transit and pedestrian/bicycle-oriented land use patterns, specifically in the core area. � � CCP29 Participate actively in regional efforts to develop a high capaciry transit system to serve the City Center. Identify and preserve necessary right-of-way for high capacity transit alignments and station locations at every opportunity. "Land banlc" parcels which will be used for the HCT system in the future, including land for the ROW and the station. CCP30 Create a compact zone around the HCT station for the highest intensities of land use. CCP31 Establish the most intensive levels of transit service to the City Center area. CCP32 Integrate any elevated transit system with new road right-of-way. Design the elevated structure to be compatible with new development in the area. CCP33 Develop a bus transfer facility, on or off the street, which will connect the City Center with other communities in the City. The HCT and bus transfer stations will set a high standard for design and compatibiliry with adjoining uses. CCP34 Integrate the high capacity transit system with other transportation modes serving Federal Way and the region. CCP35 Integrate bicycle and pedestrian facilities with and connect to high capacity transit facilities during right-of-way acquisition, facility design, and optional phases. Civic Buildings and Open Spaces Public buildings including communiry centers, libraries, Ciry Hall, perfornung arts theaters, conference centers, and schools provide places for the communiry to meet, exchange ideas, and socialize. The City should take advantage of every opportuniry to locate a variety of civic buildings in and around the City Center. This will occur over time, but it is necessary to establish a clear direction through public policy. A network of outdoor spaces for recreation, strolling, gathering, and dining will make the Ciry Center a lively and attractive place to live, shop, and conduct business. Each type of space should serve a range of users and ►�it6�:� activities. Outdoor spaces should range from a major urban park which is the focal point for downtown, to pocket urban plazas for lunch time gathering by residents, visitors, and workers. Some spaces will be publicly built and maintained, others will be constructed along with private development. Privately developed gathering space is a major component of all City Centers: small parks and plazas are opportunities to enhance the urbanscape and image of the Ciry Center. Cowtyazds, mews, and forecourts are ways to efficiently integrate open space to enhance a project. Visitors, shoppers, and employees often perceive these private spaces as public. The City should commit to assist in or provide incentives for, the development of plazas and pazks that aze open to the public. Map Vll-8 proposes a central outdoor gathering place withixi the core area, such as a park, plaza, or square, which will become the focus of community activities in the core. Uses around the edges of this plaza, such as transit facilities and cafes, should be sited to generate activiry throughout the day. The edges of the plaza should be well defined and landscaped to soften the hazd surfaces of adjacent buildings and streets. This space should be physically and visually linked to the central pedestrian spine and transit center. Policies to Promote the Development of Civic Buildings and Urban Spaces Goal CCG19 Develop civic and cultural facilities in addition to a public space and park system within the Ciry Center to meet the needs of residents, employees, and visitors. These facilities and spaces should connect to the Citywide and regional system ofpublic spaces, parks, and trails. Policies CCP36 Promote a diversily of public and privately funded recreational and cultural facilities throughout the Ciry Center. Promote partnerships between the City and other agencies, private organizations, and individuals to develop and meet the needs of City Center and the general community for these types of facilities. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center CCP37 Emphasize locating civic and cultural facilities within the core. Planned public facilities could include a City Hall, library, or performing arts complex. CCP38 Acquire land necessary to provide a broad range of recreational opportunities throughout the City Center. "Land bank" pazcels in the core area for future municipal facilities. CCP39 Public buildings shall set a high standazd for design and compatibility with adjoining uses. In the core, parking for municipal uses should be structured. CCP40 Development of public spaces within the Ciry Center will focus on linking these to existing recreational components of the Citywide parks system. Parking The continued use of expansive surface pazking conflicts with the goal of redeveloping the City Center as a higher density mixed use azea which supports the use of public transportation. In order to promote higher intensity land uses, which is pedestrian friendly and supportive of HCT, it is necessary to reduce the need for pazking and encourage the provision of structured pazking within these azeas. Moreover, pazking lots have high redevelopment potential. There are numerous examples of communities similaz to Federal Way where former pazking lots now contain multi-story developments. Parking will be needed for many yeazs to come. However, as development pressures and land values increase, surface parking becomes expensive and property owners will be able to afford the conversion from surface parking to structured pazking. In the interim, the City should encourage site layouts which facilitate future redevelopment of pazking areas. Private and public partnerships should examine the feasibility of constructing a parking structure in the dowtown commercial core azea. Figure VII-4 is a conceptual illustration of the redevelopment of surface pazking azound a mall. vu-2o J � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center � - Potential ( � i Map Vli-8 Space and Bicycle Routes � i� • ♦ ♦ l � � C. ��- . � r .. .� . � i --� a .. � � . � w - � ' � t + � � i � ��iFf r --�� �� �� �'4' � � 1 . 1 � � ' � � rt •■ ■. . i � � _ � -- 3 1 • ��: - "' ■ ' - -� -- — _— �� ',' i ■ ^ �, � T � � • r -• ' �r� i � •i `' - -- ' i-��- �'� • �_�� ��,, �' _� : R �� - - �'����� ' ���� �� � � �. i �i r ' _ i � ,: • • f � � • - ♦ . �, , a � j i �,` � � • r � � - a � � �� � w �� � � ♦ � • .� r � M � T �j. I r � ��' � �. � f • �• a � � i r i • J • � � 1 x�� r � •� � .} � � ■ { • t . � � • 1 M )� �l i L { � • ■ } ■ � ■ � �I��I� , r ' , ; � . . � .. . �, .. , � Y; � ~ I //.�/�%//►� � ; , �.-�, ;,E �' ;! � ' /�� ����o . ; ��- '-- _l � .�; ' ; •� ,.'. �.:►ri� • � �/// ` � ` iiiii���� C / , j ��, ���.r.���r� M ■ - //I ��i, �►� ,�,1 ' CC ' '� L � • ae� i ��' _ , i / �_/i��/ . � i�� •�� , �'� .�� a � % I �/ . ,. ♦a r�_ ...M_. . � I I �� ' ` ' -' ■ , ���'//� / % , . f... -�> , � - � ,��,� � . ,/, � .� �'I � �.. !/ ��� I �� �// � � - � �� i � ' � �1, ,� � • -f �i � � + � �� j��`�� ' ' � , � '; , � �� ■ ' .: ��• � � � /� f� ���'%�% f/� � � �... � � � • L � '�iiiii/ii/iiiiiiii � � �' T� " � r � ,/ ��/ * • e T • , . , � _ _ /� � . . • � �— � �i i�.,_r � �. � � � � � ■ i � „{ � � �, � , . � -� r , � � �`��^ ♦ : ., � F � � 'Y: • �� � I \` J .. .. ., .. .. •• •• ., .. .. � , ,+. �,�'; '` � - �� . �+IlIIII/i/1.111/�/f1���1�.\���i� "% �• 1 ` �"'�1"1,. �� � r ii ( � � •`�.�1�1\1t��'�\1' f"II�11�� t ! al ■ � � �', ; � .� _'„�a � � '� ..r��i��s.. � :�, ;: '�`�'�` � � ., ' ` %. ' �, " `�: � I tt � ! i ,.,. II __ 1 �II �♦ : � ,'�' 1����� +trw ; 1� � I IlIIIIr J 1 1: "_. ' ; ' ' �.:.:'�. "` ' � ' ` � - �� -�.,• ..,, _ , � „ , �. -.. .. � �, -., � i. , - M �' M V��'2� Federal Way Comprehensivs Plan - City Center Potential Figure VII-4 pment of Surface Parking Areas � ��� � � �� , � �� � �� � � ���� � / � � � � � � � � � � ��,� �;�. \ �,. �`. J .r�•� �: �•.• � \ r , / � � _� Or�cr ti»u, parking garnges, loa�rr parking �equi�ements and sha�ed pa�king can aAow jnr more intensivr d�uelopment of land. Goals and Policies to Develop Alternatives to Eaisting Parking Development Goal CCG20 Reduce demand for parking in the City Center. � Policies CCP41 Reduce requirements for the number of parking stalls required for City Center development in comparison to other areas of the City to encourage more intensive development and reflect the improvements in local and regionallransit service. Increases above the required number of pazking stalls may be allowed, on a case by case basis, when structured or underground parking is provided. CCP42 Encourage public and private pazking structures (below or above ground) in the core azea. Consider a public private partnership to develop structured pazking in the dowtown commercial core area. vn-zs � � � � � � � � � � � L� � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center CCP43 The City will encourage the provision of structured parking through the use of bonuses and incentives. CCP44 Buffer parking azeas to increase compatibility between surrounding uses. For larger lots, provide substantial landscaping, special lighting, and pedestrian walkways. CCP45 Site and orient buildings and parking to allow redevelopment of surface parking. CCP46 Allow on-street parking to create a buffer between pedestrians and traffic depending on street characteristics and role within the City Center. On-street parking should be viewed as a component of the pazking supply for the area. CCP47 Encourage shared pazking between uses to � maximize the use of available parking within the Ciry Center. � � � � � �� � � �J { i L_J Streetscape To improve livabiliry within the City Center area, the City must complete the street network and change its street standards. The street grid must be well interconnected to make travel from one place to another as efficient as possible. The key to achieving this is to redefine streets as a network that will serve pedestrians, bicycles, and transit, in addition to automobiles. In azeas where increased density is proposed, e�sting streets must be retrofitted with sidewalks, street trees, street furniture, and other amenities. Allowing on-street parking also creates a buffer between pedestrians and vehicles. It also allows shoppers and visitors to park easily for short amounts of time. On street parking should be permitted on City Center streets (where feasible) except during the moming and evening commuting hours when the extra lanes are needed to accommodate the extra high volumes of traffic. Figure Vll-5 highlights two street standards developed specifically for the City Center area. These streets will connect to other proposed and e�cisting streets to complete a street grid. Street standards for other existing and proposed streets within the City Center can be found in the second section of the Transportation chapter. Policies to Improve the Street Network and Streetscape Character Goal CCG21 Create street designations which reinforce the unique characteristics of the City Center. Policies CCP48 Acquire right-of-way, to complete and enhance the street network. CCP49 Design streets as public spaces, with appropriate pedestrian amenities, trees, sidewalks, bicycle paths, transit services, street furniture, and trash receptacles. CCP50 Construct streetscape improvements as an integral component of any roadway improvement. CCP51 Encourage buildings to front public rights-of- way, providing clear paths from the sidewalk to all entries. CCP52 Only SR-99 and South 320th Street shall be wider than five lanes. 7.4 IMPLEMENTATION Developing a City Center will require collaboration between government entities, citizens, and developers. Phasing and development of certain elements, such as high capacity transit, are outside the Ciry's control. Therefore, an implementation program must be fletcible. It must also be tied to general goals, policies, and strategies rather than a detailed, step-by-step list of actions. The implementation section consists of: ■ A set of strategies to guide implementing actions; ■ An illustration of how these strategies can be realized over time; ■ A 15 yeaz action plan. VII-23 Fsderel Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Figure VII-S Street Cross Sections for Completing the Center Road Network . CROSS SECTlON K � p, 2 �.rwES. rf W1TH PARI�IG �r � tr � ir � rr � rr � rr -.-��:—►r f--�Ts.— 5idewalk Parking � 2 Lanes L� 12' Paridng 6 5Wewafk Btke — - -• Blke �th On-Street Bike Lane �r-�e� � e� � �z � �� rr � e� �� _ ir-�e� Ped/BUre Psrking 2 Ln � 12' Fhrldng � PuUBJkc �thout On-5treet Bike Lane �L !�7 � �~ � � �J61 �r-�e• � ir � � rr s � �r � �r ,� �z , � ir-�e� Sidewa(k P1�rking b 3 Lanes � 12' Parking c� Sidewslk Sike �,�, Bike r.e..rrraavea•a� � �r... �th On-5treet Bike Lane Fgiue III-13 CROSS SECTION J 3 LAI�FS, WIITi PARKIIdG F�� �-ia VII-24 Without On-5treet Bike Lane � � � � � � � �' � , J � � � �J � �� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Impiementation Strategies Specific strategies must be pursued in order to coor- dinate various elements and actions that are dependent upon one another. For example, private development depends upon adequate infrastructure and amenities. Effective transit service depends upon supporting land use development to provide sufficient ridership. Residential communities require adequate transportation and services, a pedestrian friendly environment, open spaces, and jobs to foster a sense of communiry. In addition, much of the City Center's development is dependent upon mazket demands and development that is not projected until about 2005. A regional high capacity transit corridor may not be implemented before 2015. However, regulatory and infrastructure actions must be taken in the interim to prepaze for these developments. The following strategies form the basis to achieve desired City Center development. ■ Establish regulations to shape and influence new development (0-1 years). Discourage low intensiry auto oriented development in the core. Provide regulations and incentives to achieve a high intensity, mixed-use, pedestrian friendly development. Encourage mixed density residential development in the City Center frame area. Allow short term investment in the frame area that will support long term core development. ■ Develop specific plans to construct needed street and infrastructure improvements (1-5 yeazs). Develop plans to acquire street rights-of-way for completing the street grid and constructing transit facilities: Construct arterial improvements with associated landscaping and pedestrian amenities (timing set by capital facilities program). Prepare a pedestrian and bicycle plan and construct sidewalks, pedestrian paths, mid-block connectors, and bicycle connections to all areas of the City Center and particulazly to a transit center (ongoing effort). ■ Develop and manage structured parking facilities as needed to support more intensive development and gradually convert the core into less auto dependent area. ■ Develop parking standards for the City Center Area. ■ Improve both local and regional transit service. Begin new transit service configuration by adding a center bus stop and route busses to it (begin immediately). Upgrade central bus stop to a transit center/station and enhance regional and local transit services to it (2-7 yeazs). Develop a regional HCT station at transit center (15-20 years). ■ Construct civic features, public spaces, parks, and other urban elements to create a true urban center and promote civic identity (5-15 years). Develop major civic facilities in the Ciry Center such as, a Ciry Hall, performing arts center, and recreation center, to generate social and economic activity (5-15 years). Add amenities to residential areas to build new neighborhoods @egin immediately as an incremental program). Include landscaping and pedestrian improvements in all street construction (incremental program tied to actual improvements). Phasing Transfornung the existing dowtown commercial core area into the proposed City Center is an ambitious task. It requires a significant transformation from a low density, automobile oriented, lazgely retail azea to a higher intensity, more pedestrian oriented mixed use area. It requires a change in housing patterns, lifestyle preferences, and transportation modes. The Ciry Center plan acknowledges that the core will take some time to develop. The Ciry can facilitate these changes if a series of small steps are taken over time. This is especially true if the steps are consistent with the emerging economic, social, and demographic trends. As is the intent of this plan, the phasing scenario presented here accounts for the timing of mazket projections and future actions. As noted above, the implementation strategy is keyed to projected trends and regional planning goals. Its form and character, as envisioned in the Plan, are dramatically different from anything that now eacists in the center. It will take some time for the development community to VII-25 redirect its energy and investments to produce buildings that respond to the direction of the Plan. The demand for more intense development opportunities in the City Center is not projected for neazly a decade. In the meantime, there may be some deferred maintenance, short-term, high-turnover tenancies, and even vacancies, as the development community begins to assemble property for future'redevelopment. The City should not encourage continued low-scale investment in this area, since it will need to be amortized over a decade or two and will delay accomplishment of preferred development. As regulations aze applied to modest renovations, it should be possible to secure some basic improvements. However, the Ciry should not expect full implementation of the vision for the City Center until owners are ready to install long-term, major development projects. Figures YII-6 through Vll-9 and Maps Vll-9 through Vll-11 illustrate key steps in the evolution of Federal Way's City Center from 1995 through 2025, in ten year increments. The illustrations are taken from a viewpoint just north of South 316th Street between 20th Avenue South and SR-99. The drawings do not necessarily indicate recommendations for specific sites. The locations of the elements and the time frames may well vary. For example, the high-capacity transit line may follow a slightly different alignment and the City Hall could be located on a different site. The drawings do illustrate how a viable City Center can evolve through several coordinated, incremental steps taken over time. The approximate dates are based on current market demand and funding projections. However, new trends, funding priorities, and development opportunities may emerge, changing the timing. An illustration of 1995 conditions is included for reference. 1995 - 2005 Actions ■ Institute zoning and design guidelines for the core area that encourages a high intensiry pedestrian- oriented mixed-use City Center. ■ Institute zoning and design guidelines for the frame area that encourage higher density residential with accessory commercial uses to support the core. ■ Develop a pedestrian/bicycle plan that outlines a connected, safety-oriented system of routes and facilities. This Plan shall be used in programming capital projects, reviewing development proposals, and encouraging other agencies to integrate bicycle Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center improvements and linkages into Federal Way projects. The plan should emphasize linkages between transportation facilities, Celebration and Steel Lake pazks, SeaTac Mall, and surrounding communities. ■ Work with the transit providers to develop a detailed transit plan for the City Center. Identify facilities, services, acquisition strategies, and implementation measures needed to make transit a viable and attractive travel mode. Tailor the plan to meet local needs, through rapid transit, express buses, community service, and/or demand-responsive service. ■ Develop a parks and public spaces plan for the City Center. Begin negotiations for acquisition of land for a City Center park, plaza, or squaze. ■ Improve the South 320th streetscape. ■ Widen 312th and improve the streetscape. ■ Improve SR-99 and establish mid-block crossings. ■ Complete the Ring Road (14th Avenue). ■ Complete the BPA bike trail. ■ Negotiate and acquire rights-of-way to augment the City Center street grid. During permit review, ensure that new development is compatible with street grid. ■ Reroute transit through the City Center and provide a centralized transfer point. ■ Prepare an economic development program to assist with financing and construction of projects which support City Center development. i �J � � � � � LJ � � � � i ■ Begin negotiations to form a public private partnership to provide structured pazking neaz � SeaTac Mall. Construct the parking structure. ■ Construct street grid enhancements. � ■ Negotiate for the HCT corridor properties. ■ Construct the pedestrian overpass across 320th and build phase one of the City Center pedestrian mall. vn � � � Fedaral Way Comprehensiva Plan - City Center ■ Begin negotiations and acquire properiy for a Ciry Hall and a City Center pazk. ■ Hold competition to design City Hall. Construct City Hall. 2005 - 2015 Actions ■ Construct City Center park. ■ Continue building public-private parking gazages. ■ Develop a transit center and consider replacing the park-and-ride lot. Focus transit activities in the City Center core. ■ Improve community-wide transit service and implement a "spokes-of-a-wheel" service delivery pattern with City Center as the hub. ■ Continue constructing streetscape and pedestrian improvements. ■ Enhance educational and recreational opporhxnities in City Center. - __ _. ■ Construct a performing arts center. ■ Establish ribbons of green parks along the City Center pedestrian mall. 2015 - 2025 Actions ■ Construct the HCT line. ■ Construct roads under the transit facility. � vu-2� Fedsral Way Comprehsnsive Plan - City Center Figure Vli-6 Illustration of City Center, 1995 Conditions • • • • • • S. 320th Street • • • • • • 20th Avenue S. Pacific Highway S. � • • • • : vu-2s . • : . . .. .. . Executel � • • • • • • • S. 316thStreet ° ° -a q o u " ao Q 8 q P p 4 g ° a ... ' a� 6c�a n � � ���� � �� � � 0 0 N � O� O� O� r1 ti � � O � R� C �U 0 � 0 U � U c � d > .� c 0 L O a E 0 U > 0 3 4 r 9 O O LL 0o dDp (��(j� d �� U dd � 0 � � ��� � � �m�� � d � �� � � � � � � � � n �� �] n � o� N � i � � � � .! � i� � � � � � � i i r► w � Fedsrsl Way Comprehensive Plan - City Center Figure Vll-7 Dlustration of City Center Evolution, 2005 S. 320th Street Improvements • • • • • • Highway 99 Improvements • • • • • • VII-30 = • • • • • Executel Expansion � • • Rerouted Transit Service : . .. . Acquisition of Land for Cross Streets with New Transit Centers and Transit Center 0 U n Q � . Q � � ri O N � O � N ti � � � d t� �U a � m U � U c a a 0 > .� c 0 t m � a E 0 U > a 3 4 . 0 -� 0 LL � V .,,.�, _ _ C "_"^r.... . ��......-.� �r.,, l � � ��\ \ C � M � �r a� r � �r a� � � rr �r � � �r � a�r r +rr w � F�deral Way Comprohensive Plan - City Csnter Figure VII-8 Dlustration of City Center Evolution, 2015 •••••• Phase I Expansion of Sea-Tac Mall ;••••• Pedestrian Bridge over S. 320th VII-32 •��• • Alignment of Pedestrian Spine •••• Phase I Residential � •••• New Bus Transit Center Development � • • • • Phase I Commercial Development � r a■� � � r� �► �r r � � � +■� r� � � �r �r � �r - ��— � —�--'�... 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I��.��«�� �. � . �r �,`�..��ri._�.�.r�1��c; /' ' ti � *;� '��:l�fi � e - = - ���� � � --,���:;��,-:��� . _ , � _. ! 1=1 �►�� .�. i�_ - • iinr�.+�'�-� T �.'�; �� � - , — � -�-_ �_� '�.�, �I - ,,t,� I ,—.;.r- ,/% - .;_�-�� �:. � � � � _ � 1� J I � - �'.' � ;-�� uJi i �! p�a.�_� � / 2' i��� ,,. ��ue� _ �8 ��. ! � � Ir 1 '�/c� —1 � : �_��iJl - = _ . = � II ` ,, - - _ � '!1I = 1- ':` _ : _ _ __ / /-�. � ��� �... �_ -i � -°'% I r _�_���! ,: �'�- � � - f i, �::+� i� �j ll t �..� ___+�_;, -- _�il �a�� !��[�►rl�:�:�i-,��� l : - �.1�1 Potential Annexation Areas L- --- ----� _�_ _ -__ . _ � � L __ _ _ _ _�_-- - � _ _. _. ------ ---i---- -- -- �- �----___.._._ � � � �_. --�--. . . _ / � �---- � � �%--- � / C � � O �r C � r� � �� � � � � � ' , �J ' � , � , � CJ ' ' , ' � �J � ' � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas 8.0 INTRODUCTION he Growth Management Act (RCW 36.70A.110) (GMA) requires each city to identify an Urban Growth Area (UGA) for itself. A city's UGA is, within certain counties, the unincorporated azea surrounding it which is characterized by wban development and can accommodate additional urban growth with services being provided by the subject city. In King County, the Countywide Planning Policies refer to a ciry's UGA as a Potential Annexation Area (PAA) so that it will not be confused with the Countywide UGA. This chapter includes state, regional and local planning policies that relate to PAA's, summarizes the process and reasoning associated with designating of Federal Way's PAA, and provides policy guidance for future actions within the City's PAA in the future. The City's proposed PAA includes an island of unincorporated King Counry situated between several south King County cities. While this area is not needed to accommodate Federal Way's anticipated 10 to 20 yeazs of growth, it is an area characterized by urban type growth and is located in an azea where urban services (including water, sewer, police, fire, general govemment, transportation, pazks & recreation, etc.), can be most efficiently provided by the City of Federal Way or other special service districts. 8.1 STATEWIDE PLANNING GOALS Three of the 13 Statewide planning goals contained in the GMA relate directly to urban growth areas and PAA's. The three relevant goals are: ■ Urban growth. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist, or can be provided in an efficient manner. ■ Reduce sprawl. Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-densiry development. ■ Public facilities and services. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support develop- ment shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standazds. 8.2 COUNTYWIDE PLANNING POLICIES In King County, the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP's) that were enacted pursuant to the GMA also provide guidance with regard to multi jurisdictional joint planning, annexation, and the phasing of urban development. The most applicable policies aze: LU28 Within the Urban Crrowth Area, growth should be directed as follows: a) first, to centers and urbanized areas with existing infrastructure capacity; b) second, to areas which are already urbanized such that infrastructure improvements can be easily extended; and c) last, to areas requiring major infrastructure improvements. LU29 All jurisdictions shall develop growth phasing plans consistent with applicable capital facilities plans to maintain an urban area served with adequate public facilities and services to maintain an urban area to meet at least the six year intermediate household and employment target ranges consistent with LU67 and LU68. These growth phasing plans shall be based on locally adopted definitions, service levels, and fmancing - commitments, consistent with State GMA requirements. The phasing for cities shall not extend beyond their Potential Annexation Areas. Interlocal agreements shall be developed that specify the applicable minnnum zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation for the Potential Annexation Areas. LU30 Where urban services cannot be provided within the next 10 years, jurisdictions should develop policies and regulations to: ■ Phase and limit development such that planning, siting, densities, and infrastructure decisions will support future urban development when urban services become available. vw-i ■ Establish a process for converting land to urban densities and uses once services are available. FW13 Cities are the appropriate provider of local urban services to urban areas, either directly or by contract. Counties are the appropriate provider of most countywide services. Urban services shall not be extended through the use of special purpose districts without the approval of the ciry in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. Within wban azea, as time and con- ditions warrant, cities should assume local urban services provided by special purpose districts. LU31 In collaboration with adjacent counties, cities, and King Counry, and in consultation with residential groups in affected areas, each ciry shall designate a Potential Annexation Area. Each Potentiai Annexation Area shall be specific to each city. Potential Annexation areas shall not overlap. Within the Potential Annexation Area, the city shall adopt criteria for annexation, including conformance with Countywide Planning Policies, and a schedule for providing urban services and facilities within the potential annexation area. This process shall ensure that unincorporated urban islands of King County are not created between cities and strive to eliminate existing islands between cities. LU32 A city may annex temtory only within its desig- nated potential annexation area. All cities shall phase annexations to coincide with the ability for the city to coordinate the provision of a full range of urban services to areas to be annexed. LU33 Land within a city's potential annexation area shall be developed according to that city's and King County's growth phasing plans. Undeveloped lands adjacent to that city should be annexed at the time development is proposed to receive a full range of urban services. Subsequent to establishing a potential annexation area, infill lands within the potential annexation area which aze not adjacent, or not practical to annex, shall be developed pursuant to interlocal agreements between the County and the affected city. The interlocal agreement shall establish the type of development allowed in the potential annexation area and standards for that development so that the area is developed in a manner consistent with Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas its future annexation potential. The interlocal agreement shall specify, at a minimum, the applicable zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation within the potential annexation area. LU34 Several unincorporated areas are currently considering local govemance options. Unincor- porated urban azeas that are already urbanized and are within a city's potential annexation area are encouraged to annex to that city in order to receive wban services. Where annexation is inappropriate, incorporation may be considered. As is demonstrated in the remaining sections of this chapter, the process Federal Way used in developing its PAA and the product itself, is consistent with the applicable Statewide and Countywide Planning Policies. 8.3 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ANALYSIS Federal Way began its formal evaluation of a PAA with the publication of an issue paper dated July 1991. This paper examined the requirements of GMA as they relate to UGA's, and included a discussion of how urban services were being provided. The paper also described special purpose district boundaries, the transportation system, pazks and recreation facilities, and physical fea- tures that potentially affect urban service delivery. This information is summarized in the following paragraphs. As noted eazlier in this chapter, the GMA requires that urban growth be planned to occur only in azeas that have adequate public services and urban government services to accommodate development. The GMA defines such services as fire, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, sanitary and storm sewers, and domestic water supplies. With this in mind, this section reviews how and where urban services are provided in the unincorporated area surrounding Federal Way. Fire Protection King County Fire Protection District #39 provides service to the City of Federal Way and most of the surrounding unincorporated area. The District was formed in 1980 vin ' � � , ' ' � ' 1 ' , , ' ' � ' � , � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas from a series of inergers which united several smaller fire districts in the area, some of which had been in existence since 1946. The resulting boundary encompasses some 36.6 squaze miles and has an estimated population of over 100,000. As of this writing, the consolidation trend continues. District #39 is part of an administrative merge with the District that serves Sea Tac and the North Highline District to form a larger more cost effective organization. This latest effort should allow District #39 to continue providing high quality fire protection to the Ciry and its PAA into the foreseeable future. The City has worked closely with District #39 in reviewing a recently completed Fire District Master Plan which complies with the GMA. Fire District #39 currently has three stations within the City limits and four facilities in unincorporated King County (refer to Map Vlll-1 for locations). The District's Master Plan identifies the new facilities the District will need to continue providing service as its service azea grows. The City included the District's new facilities requirements and cost and revenue estimates in the Ciry's Capital Facilities chapter. This should help to ensure that the District has access to the most up to date information about population and employment growth, and is doing its long range facilities planning consistent with the City's Land Use and Economic Development plans. Law Enforcement At the time of incorporation, the City began contracting with the King County Sheriff's Department for police services. There is a King County Sherif�s precinct office located in the Ciry, out of which the City's contract police officers provide service. The office also houses non- contract deputies who provide police protection to the unincorporated area surrounding the City. This arrangement suggests that the City is a logical location for police services that would serve the lazger Federal Way community planning area. In Spring 1995, the City decided to ternunate its contract relationship with King County and form its own police departrnent. The agreement with the County states that the City will begin providing service on or before January 1997. Federal Way's police deparlment could be expanded at some time in the future so that it could effectively provide services to the PAA. Education Probably more than any other special district, a school district provides an area with a sense of community. The Federal Way School District #210 (as outlined onMap Vlll-2), extends from the county line south to South 252nd west of I-5 and South 232nd Street, east of I-S to the north, and for the most part along the edge of the plateau to the east. A school district provides a common thread, be it through school activities such as organized sports, or through voting during school bond elections. City staff ineet regularly with School District adminis- trators to discuss growth management and school development issues. The District administration has indicated in these meetings that they would prefer to work with one jurisdiction as the District attempts to anticipate growth and develop plans for new school facilities. Parks and Recreation The City of Federal Way Pazks & Recreation Department has developed a Comprehensive Parks & Recreation Plan for the City. The plan is based on the boundary of the Federal Way School District (Map i�lll-2). The plan divides the area into subareas (Map Vlll-3) for purposes of long range planning. Areas within the existing City limits are contained within subareas A through D, and azeas in unincorporated King Counry are in E through H. The City has already committed funds to developing pazk lands outside the City limits. For example, Federal Way has purchased approximately 14.9 acres of properly adjacent to King County's 14 acre Camelot Park. This is to remain a passive open space pazk with development being limited to parking and trail development within the park. The acquisition also provides much needed public access to the area that is virtually nonexistent for those that do not live next to the existing park. In addition, the City has begun to offer recreation and leisure programs at a variery of school sites, some of which are on the east side of Interstate 5, in the proposed UGA. Interest in these programs is high and they are attracting large numbers of citizens from both within and outside the existing City limits. In August of 1993, the City opened a new Community/Senior Center that serves the greater Federal Way area. The center offers programs to residents of the Ciry and those in the surrounding unincorporated areas. VIII-3 Water and Sewer The Lakehaven Utility District provides water and sewer service to properties within the Ciry and to most of the unincorporated azea surrounding the City. As indicated onMap Vlll-4, the current District boundary is bordered on the south by the Pierce/King County line, on the east by the Green River Valley, and on the west by Puget Sound. The northern boundary of the District is about South 280th Street with a narrow strip extending along Puget Sound to South 252nd Street. The water service area boundary differs from the District boundary most noticeably on the west, where the boundary is along 30th & 35th Avenue SW, and does not include the area in Milton along the King County line to the south. The entire boundary of the District is contig- uous with other neighboring water systems. Maps con- tained in the District's water system comprehensive plan describe an extensive system of wells, storage tanks, and distribution mains. The water distribution infrastructure is sufficient to provide water to virtually all the District. Sewer service is available in several areas outside the City limits including the CamelodStar Lake area, north of Lake Dolloff, Redondo, Woodmont, a small area east of I-5 and south of Kitts Corner Road, and Portions of the Weyerhaeuser Corporate campus east of I-S. The sewer collection system is a combination of gravity flow lines and foree mains. Map I�lll-S indicates the sewer service area and drainage basin boundaries. This boundary was modified in 1987 to extend a small portion of the service area further north adjacent to Puget Sound, and to include azeas south to Pierce County. The map from the sewer comprehensive plan is used for illustrative purposes. Lakehaven Utility District has the treatment system capacity to extend sewer service to the majority of the City's PAA. Surface Water The City of Federal Way operates a surface water management utility which provides service to properties within the City. The majority of the land area within the Ciry is contained within the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound Drainage Basins. Map VIII-6 describes the boundaries of the major drainage basins and sub-basins in this azea. East of I-5, surface water generally flows east into the Green River Valley basin. King County Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas currently provides surface water management services to the unincorporated azea. If and when annexations to Federal Way occur, the Ciry's surface water utiliry could be expanded to provide service. However, because the majority of the PAA is in different drainage basins, it may make more sense and be more cost effective to con- tract with the Counry utility or the valley cities to provide surface water facilities to the properties in the PAA. Transportation In terms of a street system, the azea east of Interstate 5 is well connected to the City. There are no less than six major arterials and three minor arterials that provide access across I-5. These arterials include: 1) SR 161, 2) SR 18 at South 348th Street, 3) South 320th Street, 4) Military Road at two locations, 5) South 272nd Street, 6) South 336th Street, 7) South 288th Street, and 8) South 375th Street. This degree of arterial access allows quick response times for emergency service vehicles such as police, fire, and aid units. Due in large part to the steep slopes along the eastern edge of the plateau, the access east to communities in the Green River Valley is not parkiculazly good. Map Vlll-7 describes the street classifications for the Federal Way Community Planning azea developed by King Counry. The only easdwest links from the plateau to the valley in the southern half of the planning area aze: 1) State Route 18, a limited access roadway; or 2) the Peasley Canyon Road, a narrow, winding road that eventually turns into 320th Street on the plateau. In the northem portion of the planning area, the major easdwest connection from the plateau to the valley is 272nd Street, which is a four-lane roadway that can be hazardous during the winter months. The north/south transportation system along the plateau, between the Ciry of Federal Way and Kent and Des Moines to the north, is more developed. Pacific Highway (99) and Military Road provide the major north/south arterial links, with I-5 pro- viding regional linkages north and south from the area. The high level of accessibility from Federal Way to the east plateau promotes urban service delivery and underscores the sensibility of including the entire plateau in the City's UGA. The lack of easdwest transportation comdors would appear to impede the ability of cities on the floor of the Green River Valley to provide adequate levels of urban services to the azea on the plateau. VIII-4 ' , ' ' ' ' ' ' ' � ' , ' ' ' ' , � ' KING COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT FEDERAL WAY SCHOOL DISTRICT 210 PARKS PLAN PLANNING AREAS � N �Y E s c PUGET SOUND � ,�� �� i� � s �� ..� ii i � S" �- _ j � ��- �, � � �SW 312 Q � � w Q � � 5 3 6fH ST �_ ST � �,� r�' \ -� q � Z � n �� D Z _ F _ / T�?� , �✓� c� % v � \ �2 Q� S 373 .�' L' ,� 0 v� >- � � _ E3 _ i � �S S 29 I `� , � � , f 7 � � � ��, � � I r w J J Q > CITY �F FEDERAL WAY C�MPREHENSIVE PLAN LAI�EI�AVEN UTILITY �ISTRICT P�TENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT LE GEND — • — • — • — FEDERAL WAY CITY LIMITS — — P❑TENTIAL ANNEXATI�N AREA LAKEHAVEN WATER/SEWER DISTRICT Source� Lakehaven Utility District i This map �s intended for use as a graphicat representation only. I '! The C�ty oF Federnt 4/ny roakes no warranty as to �ts accuracy. I � °^ °r G '�'� D'� N MAP VII I- 4 SCALE; 1" = 5,000' DATE: DECEMBER 1995 LEGEND LEGEND ARTERIAL CLASSIFICATIONS ' � L' � ' ' � � � � � � � � � � � � l_� � Topography A final point addressed in the 1991 issue paper concerns buffers and open space. The GMA (RCW 36.70A.160) requires that cities, "... shall identify open space corridors within and between UGA's." The City and the surrounding unincorporated azea sits on a plateau which has an average elevation of 300 to 400 feet above sea level (Map VIII-8). At the east edge of the plateau, steep slopes drop off to the Green River Valley below. These slopes aze heavily forested, and because of the 40 percent slope, are generally undevelopable. These slopes provide natural separation or open space corridors between the Ciry's UGAs and those of the Ciry of Auburn, as required under the GMA. 8.4 UNINCORPORATED SW KING COUNTY CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEE Concurrent with the Ciry of Federal Way's PAA evaluation process, King County initiated an information gathering process in the unincorporated areas surrounding the City. The King County Council formed a citizen's advisory committee (CAC) from the unincorporated areas surrounding the City to look at the PAA issue. The group was officially known as the Unincorporated Southwest King County Citizen Advisory Committee. Their mission was to advise the County Council where the PAA boundaries ought to be drawn in areas of the County. The CAC identified neighborhoods in the unincorporated area and the committee included residents from each of these geographic areas of the planning area. The CAC, working with King Counry planning staff, developed a public outreach program to inform the citizens in the unincorporated areas of the work being done by the CAC. They commissioned a random sample telephone survey and a mailed questionnaire to gather information from areas residents about annexation, urban service delivery, and their affuuty toward the surrounding cities. Survey results were presented on a sub-area or neighborhood breakdown to assist the CAC in making PAA boundary decisions. Based on these results, the CAC forwarded recommendations to the King County Council as described onMap Vlll-9. Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas 8.5 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ADOPTION PROCESS As discussed earlier in this chapter, the analysis that was included in the 1991 issue paper provided the basis for a proposed PAA area for the City. Staff presented the issue paper and proposed Urban Growth Boundary to the Federal Way Planning Commission. The Com- mission reviewed the proposal and held a public hearing. Most of the testimony received by the Commission was supportive of the proposed urban growth boundary. The Commission recommended that the City Council adopt the proposed PAA boundary. The Ciry Council accepted the recommendation, but did not adopt it. Rather, the Council directed staff to begin negotiations with the neighboring cities of Auburn, Milton, Algona, Pacific, Des Moines, and Kent, all of whom had developed urban growth boundaries that overlapped with Federal Way's proposal. The Ciry negotiated with each of its municipal neighbors for the better part of a year. By the Fall of 1993, staff presented a revised PAA boundary to the Ciry Council. The Council reviewed the proposal and adopted the PAA boundary on December 21, 1993. That boundary was amended in 1994. The City is currently enacting interlocal agreements based on the boundary described on Map VIII-10. 8.6 POLICY/IMPLEMENTATION Implementation of the PAA element of the Compre- hensive Plan will involve surrounding cities and King County. Policy direction for PAA's has been established by the CWPP's. The following aze the City's goals, policies, and action items that relate to PAA's and establish a framework for reviewing future requests. Goal PAAGl Establish a Potential Annexation Area Boundary for the City ofFederal Way. Policies PAAPI Using technical information provided, infor- mation from neighboring jurisdictions, and affected citizens, define and implement a PAA. vm-i 2 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Potential Annexation Areas PAAP2 Create and execute interlocal agreements on mutually agreeable PAA boundaries with the PAAPI l Where appropriate, the City should allow following King County cities: Des Moines, concomitant agreements in the PAA's. Kent, Auburn, Algona, Pacific, and Milton. PAAP3 Enter into an interlocal agreement with King County establishing the PAA for the Ciry of Federal Way. PAAP4 Establish land use control, development plan review, and impact mitigation in the PAA through an interlocal agreement with King County. Goal PAAG2 Provide a framework for processing annexation requests. Policies PAAPS Process annexations of appropriate size. Appropriate size means an azea that warrants the staff time and expense involved in processing annexation requests and complies with the goals of the GMA and the CWPP's. PAAP6 Annexations generally should not have or create abnormally irregular boundaries. PAAP7 The annexation must, to the greatest extent possible, preserve natural neighborhoods and communities. PAAP8 The annexation, where appropriate, should adjust any impractical or irregular boundaries created in the past. PAAP9 Proposed annexations should use the 60 percent petition method whenever possible. PAAP10 Simultaneous adoption of proposed zoning regulations should be required of all annexations. PAAP12 The Ciry will require owners of land annexing into Federal Way to assume their proportion of existing City bonded indebtedness. PAAP13 The City will make a reasonable ef�ort to ensure a smooth transition from King County to Ciry of Federal Way administration. PAAP14 The City should establish departmental service needs prior to major annexations through a fiscal impact analysis. As revenues from each annexation azea are collected, increase Ciry services to maintain current Citywide levels of service. PAAP15 Provide newly-annexed azeas with the same level of service enjoyed by areas inside Federal Way, while at the same time maintaining current Citywide service levels. Goal PAAG3 Develop a Comprehensive Plan map and proposed zoning for the unincorporated areas of the Federal Way Potential Annexation Area. Policies PAAP16 Identify land uses in the Comprehensive Plan for the unincorporated areas and include proposed zoning for these areas. PAAP17 Include policy direction in the Comprehensive Plan for the areas within the PAA boundary relating to land use, transportatioq capital facilities, housing, and utilities. `� VIII-13 � ' 1 ' � � � � ' � � � � � � ' � � � MAP FOOT CONTOURS ADVISORY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION POTENTIAL ANNEXATION , � n �� , � �J ' � , , � �J I � � L'� I �� '� ; � ��'� �I � � ' � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment 9.0 INTRODUCTION aintaining and improving the quality of the natural environment in Federal Way is central to the City's vision of the future. The qualiry of the City's hydrologic features, forested azeas, and scenic vistas is one of the primary reasons that many families have chosen to live in Federal Way. Business people also make locational decisions based, in some measure, on qualiry of life factors and one might argue that the quality of the natural environment is important to the economic vitaliry of the Ciry. Finally, maintaining the viability of the natural environment is prudent and cost effective public policy. If, for example, the Ciry maintains or improves, the natural drainage system and how it functions, it will save tax dollars by not having to build and maintain costly storm drainage facilities. The intent of this chapter, and the goals and policies it contains, is to guide future actions such that the quality of the natural environment is maintained or improved. The State Growth Management Act And Countywide Planning Policies The Growth Management Act (GMA) defines critical areas as wetlands, aquifer rechazge azeas, fish and wildlife habitat, frequently flooded azeas, and geologically hazazdous areas. Pursuant to the GMA (RCW 36.70A.060), the City amended its critical azea regulations in 1993 to regulate development in environmentally sensitive areas. These amended regulations aze contained in Article XIV, of the Federal Way Ciry Code, titled Environmentally Sensitive Areas. The City refers to "critical azeas" as "sensitive azeas" in its ordinances and the two terms are used interchangeably in the Comprehensive Plan. GMA also requires the protection of resource lands. Resource lands are defined as land related to resource- based industries, including productive timber, agriculture, fisheries, and mineral extraction. Since Federal Way does not have land used by resource-based industries, policies regazding these types of lands are intentionally absent from this chapter. Development of this chapter is based on the same premise adopted in the King County Countywide Planning Policies (CWPP) pertaining to the Natural Environment. Countywide Planning Policy FW-4 states in part, "Land use and development shall be regulated in a manner which respects fish and wildlife habitat in conjunction with natural features and� f'unctions, including air and water quality. Natural resources and the built environment shall be managed to protect, improve and sustain environmental quality while minimizing public and private costs. " 9.1 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT GOALS AND POLICIES Environmental Stewardship Federal Way recognizes that the natural environment is an intrinsic part of the urban fabric for the following important reasons: ■ It provides opportunities for recreation; ■ It provides habitat for wildlife and plant life; ■ It is part of the City's surface water management system and water supply; ■ It creates a positive visual image and open space; ■ It supports economic development goals; and ■ It is cost effective public policy. The merits and costs of environmental actions must be weighed and balanced against other important demands, such as public safety and recreation, housing, public infrastructure, and economic development. Goal NEGI To preserve the City's natural systems in order to protect public health, safety, and welfare, and to maintain the integrity of the natural environment. Policies The City's natural environment is composed of a wide variety of land forms, soils, water courses, and vege- tation. The City's tenain ranges from steep hills and ridge lines to plateaus and lakes. Soil types vary from loam in the lowlands to sand, gravel, and till in the uplands. Land use and development practices need to be compatible with this variety of environmental condi- tions. As a general rule, the Ciry intends to protect the natural environment rather than try to overcome its limitations for development. ix-i NEPl Protect and restore environmental quality through land use plans, surface water management plans and programs, compre- hensive park plans, and development review. NEP2 Preserve and restore ecological functions, and enhance natural beaury, by encouraging communiry development patterns and site planning that maintains and complements natural land fonns. NEP3 To the maximum extent practical, the City's future actions will be consistent with the goals and policies of this chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. NEP4 The City should work in concert with state and regional agencies, as well as with neighboring jurisdictions and tribes, to protect sensitive areas and the City's natural environment. NEPS To assist in evaluating eaUSting and proposed environmental policy, the City should prepare inventories for each type of sensitive area to augment data received from other information sources. NEP6 The City encourages private donations of land or conservation easements for sensitive areas and their associated but�ers. NEP7 The City may continue to require completion of environmental studies by qualified professionals to assess the impact of proposed development on sensitive azeas. 9.2 WATER RESOURCES Water resources include: streams, lakes, frequently flooded areas, wetlands, aquifer recharge azeas, and shorelines. The aquifers and aquifer recharge azeas aze the primary source for the community's drinking water The streams and wetlands are an essential part of the Ciry's storm water drainage system that provide necessary flood and erosion control. The lakes and shorelines provide fish and wildlife habitat and valued places for recreation. Federal Way Comprehansive Plan - Natural Environment To protect the value and function of each individual part, water resources must be managed as an integrated system. Use and modification of water resources and the surrounding terrestrial environment affects how the hydrologic cycle functions. The inappropriate alteration of water resources can cause detrimental impacts such as flooding, erosion, degradation of water quality, reduction in groundwater, and habitat loss. In order to minimize adverse impacts to water resources and to ensure their continued viability, the City promotes responsible land and water resource planning and use. The City will permit development in a manner that protects water quality and ensures continued ecological and hydrologic functioning of water resources. Protection should include maintenance of stream base flows, allowance of natural water level fluctuations in wetlands, aquifer rechazge, and stream corridor habitat preservation. Due to the limited capacity of the underlying aquifers and increased water demand, the City also encourages groundwater conservation measures. Aquifer Recharge Areas (Groundwater) Federal Way is dependent on groundwater as a primary source of drinking water. Although the Lakehaven Utility District dces procure water from other purveyors, its main source is from the Redondo-Milton Channel aquifer that underlies the City. At present, the City has a general map of the aquifer recharge areas within the City. However, the District notes that the precise extent of aquifer recharge azeas is uncertain, and these maps are being continually updated as studies are completed and new information is made available. Typical activities associated with land development, such as clearing and grading, affects the natural hydrologic cycle. Historically, stormwater was managed in a way that conveyed it to natural water bodies as expediently as possible. All of these activities decrease the land's ability to absorb and retain water and increases the possibility of contamination. In addition to affecting aquifer recharge potential, increased runof� rate and volume has a deleterious effect on stream channels, water quality, and in-stream habitat. The following CWPP's address aquifer rechazge areas and are consistent with the City's policies. ix-2 ' � � ' ' � � ' ' � ' � ' , ' � � , � , ' ' , ' � � � � ' ' , � ' ' ' ' ' � Fede►al Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment Countywide Planning Policies NEP8 All jurisdictions shall adopt policies to protect the quality and quantity of groundwater. NEP9 Land use actions shall take into account impacts on aquifers detemvned to serve as water supplies. The depletion and degradation of aquifers needed for potable water supplies should be avoided or mitigated. Map IX-I, Areas Susceptible to Ground Water Contamination, is a map produced by the King County Department of Development and Environmental Services and Seattle-King County Health Department as a result of the study entitle Mapping Aquifer Suscepti- bility to Contamination in King County. This study looked at three criteria, soils, surface geology, and depth to groundwater. Based on these criteria, azeas were mapped as low, medium, or high susceptibiliry to contamination from activities occurring in the area. This information is the best available at this time and will be used along with other information on streams, wetlands, and wildlife habitat to determine appropriate zoning. Goal NEG2 To protect aquifer recharge areas. Policies NEP10 The Ciry, in cooperation with Lakehaven Utility District, should continue to identify and map aquifer recharge azeas within the City and its annexation azea. Such areas shall be subject to regulations to protect the integrity of identified aquifer recharge areas. NEPl l The Ciry should encourage the retention of surface water runoff in wetlands in regional retention facilities, and in detention ponds, or use other similar storm water management techniques to promote aquifer recharge. NEP12 The City should establish land use and building controls to use stormwater infiltration wherever feasible, and to minimize the amount of impervious surface created by development. NEP13 The City recognizes that septic tank and drain field systems have a potentially adverse impact on groundwater aquifers. If adequate engineering solutions are available, the City may require con- nection to sanitary sewer service where poor soil conditions persist and/or sewer service is available. Wellhead Protection Areas Because the City relies on groundwater for its drinking water, it must take preventative measures to avoid con- tamination in areas surrounding well sites. In addition, the Ciry and Lakehaven Urility District should work cooperatively to implement the State's Wellhead Protection Program and Section 1428 of the 1986 Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, which generally requires mapping wellhead protection zones and establishing an interagency wellhead protection plan. The following Countywide Planning Policies and City policies will address wellhead protection. Countywide Planning Policies CAS(c)(2) Develop a process by which land use jurisdictions will 'implement, as appra priate, purveyor Wellhead Protection Programs required by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act'. CAS(c)(3) Detemune which portions of mapped rechazge areas and Wellhead Protection Areas should be designated as critical. Goal NEG3 Implement a local wellhead protection program to ensure a safe source of drinking water and to avoid the large financial impact of contaminated wells. Poticies NEP14 The City will work in conjunction with local water purveyors to delineate Wellhead Protection Areas for each well and wellfield as required and outlined by the State's Wellhead Protection program. NEP15 The City will work with water purveyors to model and map Wellhead Protection Areas, as funds are budgeted for such modeling and mappmg. IX-3 NEP16 The City will work with water purveyors to conduct an inventory of all potential sources of ground water contamination within the Wellhead Protection Areas and assess the potential for contamination. NEP17 The City should establish an interagency Wellhead Protection Committee to coordinate and implement a Wellhead Protection Plan. NEP18 The Ciry will work with water purveyors to develop a contingency plan for the provisions of altemate drinking water supplies in the event of well or wellfield contarnixiatioq as funds are budgeted for such purpose. NEP19 The City should establish buffer zones of sufficient size to protect wellhead areas. Streams And Lakes (Surface Water) The City of Federal Way is located within the Hylebos Creek, Lower Puget Sound and Mill Creek drainage basins. These basins contain an integrated system of lakes and streams that provide a natural drainage system for over 36 squaze miles of southwest King County and northeast Pierce County. Due to rapid urbanization, this natural system has been altered and in many azeas no longer provides its original function or habitat. The primary focus of the policies below aze to restore the natural functions that the City's lakes and streams once provided. Moreover, the CWPP's and the City's policies below aclrnowledge that it is more cost effective to restore the natural system than it is to construct a man-made equivalent. Countywide Planning Policy CA15 All jurisdictions shall implement the Puget Sound Water Quality Management Plan to restore and protect the biological health and diversiry of the Puget Sound Basin. Goal NEG4 Protect, restore, and enhance the City s lakes and streams. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Naturel Environment Policies NEP20 The City will seek to work cooperatively with King and Pierce County Surface Water Manage- ment Divisions, the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority, Washington Department of Ecology, and other affected jurisdictions and tribes to implement water qualiry management strategies and to comply withMunicipal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System regulations to address non-point pollution. NEP21 Surface water management facilities which use natural streams and lakes for storage should ensure that those natural features are not adversely impacted by their inclusion in the surface water system. NEP22 The City may regulate private development and public actions to protect water quality and to ensure adequate in-stream flow to protect fisheries, wildlife habitat, and recreation resources. NEP23 The Ciry will seek to retain native vegetation within riparian corridors. New planting of vegetation with the approval from the City may be required where such revegetation will enhance the corridor's function. Consideration should be given to the removal of non-native invasive species. NEP24 Lakes should be protected and enhanced by proper management of watersheds and shorelines, by improvements in water quality, by removal of invasive plant species, and by restoration of fish and wildlife habitat. NEP25 The City should adopt stream defuutions that are reflective of stream function and habitat. The definitions should make a distinction between manmade conveyance systems and natural streams. NEP26 The City should continue to restrict stream relocation projects, the placing of streams in culverts, and the crossing of streams for both public and private projects. Where applicable in stream corridors, the Ciry should give consid- eration to structures which are designed to promote fish migration and the propagation of wildlife habitat. IX-4 ' ' � ' ' ' ' ' � ' ' � ' , ' � , , � CITY ❑F FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN N w e s PUGET SOUIYD ti =-= -_ _ =_ ----- -_ _- _= = __ =�=== _ -_ = _� -=_-__ `" -- = _ � ~ - u� - � � } � _� �__°=____ ___=_ 3 H -_=_==- � � -= -_ � `� \ � __ �. f ` _� l � � . __-__ _ ��� _ � -_ _= ==��li, -_�_ � � �=__-��1���r�=��� l Y _ ��' � ��;� ��.� !� �0 s��� � � I ��_ _:�_�--� -_- " _ �� � � �II e =- —=- — ¢ _= _ __ �' � •_ - - - � � �- _ - �_ ,'���� � ����, - �� -� - _ -�_ -- ..g� �_-� � � � = � � y�� �, � � � _�� � �� � -- - �� �� �'. � � � � �`� _ � ���i� ° �� _;:�l���� � p ���aa �'� ���� _; - �� � '���� � �I . � - • � P���� � i� �� ' � ��? __� ��l�� � � ree � �i�� � � �!'�� _ � - �����������$�� 1 � - _ � � _ � , �� � �� = II `� � 1��a°'°°' �I���� �;� � � � — � ���� �� � � �� s � � � ' — ��� � i - s _� �� � -� � � ° � s _- m = . _; �� �� � '. ��y� � � �� �_ �' �'_� �� � =- _ . s- ��� ; ,� ' � ;-. =�� � _�� '�= e._ � �� .:� � a �� � �� ' . ! � �E� ��=� � = .� � � � � 3 �. - e � � �� � � �� ��� � � � � _� , , °� �l�� � = s � _ � � , ���°`� �;�� _ _� �� � �� � - � `�;; � � _ — . : . � � � - _ � T- �� � � _ - - _ �� �� _� � ! , i � '� �� _ �= ���� _ - - �-- - .� �� _ � =_ _ � � ' ��� � � _ �= - �_ % � �=-�- =°°� � � � €��= __ _-_ f G �_� a � = _ � _ - .� — �, — _ -_ '� � � "'} � � � ��� �!� � —=-i `e � � �-_�--� � � — � _ � �==�- �a � ��:;,� -' — �°_ a _ _ ,� � �• � �1 _ _ - ��` � ��� ,� -�. AREAS SUSCEPTIBLE TO GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION NATURAL ENVIR�NMENT ELEMENT LEGEND -•-•-•-•-•-•-•- FEDERAL WAY CITY LIM[TS — — — — — P❑TENT[AL ANNEXATION AREA _ �_ � -- = LAKEHAVEN DISTR[CT BDUNDARY WATER SERVICE AREA BOUNDARY � AREAS OF HIGH SUSCEPTABILITY TO GROUNDWATER CQNTAMINATION � AREAS OF MEDIUM SUSCEPTABILITY TO GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION � AREAS OF LOW SUSCEPTABILITY T� GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION N❑TES Th�s Map cor�p�les ex�st�ng geotog�c, so�ls, and depth to ground water �nfornat�on to est�nate the locat�on of areas where contaM�nat�on May readily enter ground water, Its purpose �s to cor�r�un�cate the approx�rnate locat�on and area extent oF geolog�c cond�t�ons �n the greater Federo.l Way area favoro.ble to the mtroduct�on of contaminants to ground water. Th�s mnp does not dep�ct aqu�fer recharge areas. This r�ap is intended for plo,nning purposes only and is not guaranteed to exhibit accurate �nformation. Land use deGS�ons should be based upon s�te-spec�f�c data. Source� Searttle/K�ng County Health Departr�ent, King County Dept. of Developr�ent and Environr�ental Serv�ces, Ground Water Mano.ger�ent Area Techn�cal Reports. �� G GIS DIVISI�N MAP IX-1 SCALE: 1" = 5,000' DATE; DECEMBER 1995 SURFACE WATER RESOURCES 1 I � � u � � , � , ' , ' 1 �-, J � I1 � , � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment NEP27 Erosion control measures shall be used for any work in or adjacent to stream or lake buffers. NEP28 Appropriate mitigation for detrimental impacts may be required for construction work within the buffer area associated with a stream channel or a lake. Furthermore, the City should work in cooperation with the Depariment of Fish and Wildlife through the Hydraulic Project Approval permit process for all development proposals which involve streams. NEP29 Essential public facilities and utilities may cross lakes or streams where no other feasible alternative exists. The amount of intrusion shall be the minimum necessary to complete the project. Frequently Flooded Areas Frequently flooded areas aze defined as, "...azeas in the floodplain subject to a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given yeaz including but not limited to, such azeas as streams, lakes, and wetlands." Development in floodplains reduces the storage capacity and increases the amount of runoff. Increased runoff overtaxes both natural and man-made conveyance systems and leads to damage of public and private property. Currently, there are no frequently flooded areas recognized by the Federal Emergency Management Act (FEMA} within the City of Federal Way. However, there aze areas which meet the City's definition of frequently flooded azeas. The policies below have been adopted to address those areas. Countywide Planning Policy � CAl2(b) Each jurisdictions policies, regulations, and programs should effectively prevent new development and other actions from causing significant adverse impacts on major river � flooding, erosion, and natural resources outside their jurisdiction. ' ' ' Goal NEGS To prevent the loss of life and properry in frequently flooded areas. Policies NEP30 The City should restrict the rate and quantiry of surface water runoff to pre-development levels for all new development and redevelopment. NEP31 Where feasible, the City shall protect and enhance natural flood storage and conveyance function of streams, lakes, and wedands. Wetlands Wetlands aze valuable natural resources. There are several types of wetlands in the City and each plays a valuable role in the hydrological system. Wedands types include mazshes, bogs, ponds, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. By storing flood waters, wetlands reduce flooding and down stream erosion; trap and absorb sediments; and help protect water quality. Furthermore, wetlands discharge water to aquifers and streams and help serve to replenish groundwater and maintain base flows of surface water systems. In short, wetlands are productive biological systems providing rich habitat for fish and wildlife, and important storage capacity for the hydrologic system. Federal Way has several regionally significant wetland azeas. The lazgest can be found in and adjacent to the West Hylebos State Park, Dash Point State Park, Dumas Bay, and throughout Spring Valley. Other smaller wetlands also dot the landscape. While many of the Ciry's wetlands have been identified both by private property owners and the City, undoubtably there are other wetlands which have not yet been precisely located and mapped. The following CWPP's and City policies address the protection of wetlands. Countywide Planning Policies CA1 All jurisdictions shall use as minimum standards the 1989 Federal Manual for ldentifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands and reference the 1989 manual in their wetlands protection ordinance. CA2 In the long term, all jurisdictions shall work to establish a single countywide classification system for wetlands. ix-� Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment CA3 Within each basin, jurisdictions shall formulate their regulations and other non-regulatory methods to accomplish the following: protection of wetlands, assure no net-loss of wetland functions; and an increase of the quantity and qualiry of the wetlands. The top class wetland should be untouched. CA4 Implementation of wetland mitigation should be flexible enough to allow for protection of systems or corridors of connected wetlands. A tradeoff of small, isolated wetlands in exchange for a lazger connected wetland system can achieve greater resource protection and reduce isolation and fragmentation of wetland habitat. Goal NEG6 Protect and enhance the functions and values of the City's wetlands. Policies NEP32 The City will protect its wetlands with an objective of no overall net-loss of functions or values. NEP33 The City shall, as a minimum standard, use the 1987 Federal Manual for ldentifying and Delineating Wetlands, as now existing or hereafter adopted or amended. (Note: This policy intentionally differs from Countywide Planning Policy CA-lwhich suggests use of the 1989 Manual. Use of the 1987 Manual is consistent with the Department of Ecology, Environmental Protection Agency, and the Corps of Engineers]. NEP34 The City will work with other jurisdictions, tribes, and citizen groups to establish wetland policies and a classification system for wetlands that allows for the designation of both regionally and locally unique wetlands. At present, all wetlands in the City are afforded a 100 foot uniform buffer regazdless of wetland size or type. While this allows for predictability, it dces not provide for fle�bility nor does it reflect the varying degrees of wetland functions, values, and quality. The result may be in either excessive or insuf�cient wetland buffering. To improve the sophistication of Federal Way's wetland buffer requirements, the following policies call for a review of the present buffering requirements. Goal NEG7 Develop a wetland buffer system reflective of the variety of wetlands found in the City. Policies NEP36 The City should consider implementing a tiered wetland classification system based on wetland functions and values. The wetland classification system would set forth the appropriate wetland buffer widths. Furthermore, any new wetland classification system should also contain provisions for allowing buffer width averaging. As a reference point, the City should consider the classification system and protection measures contained in the Department of Ecology's Model Wetlands Ordinance. 1VEP37 Required wetiand buffers shall be comprised of native vegetation typically associated with the type of wetland in question. Intrusion into the wetland buffer may be restricted, except for the location of essential public facilities and utilities where no other feasible alternative exists. No complete inventory of Federal Ways wetlands has been done to date. The Ciry has identified the need for an inventory to assist with wetland protection. A complete wetland inventory will help the City create policy that reflects local as well as regional conditions. In addition, the public will be able to better identify existing wetlands. NEP35 The City will work with the Lakehaven Utiliry District to evaluate pumping rates within the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound drainage basin to establish the effect of groundwater withdrawal on streams, lakes, and wetlands. Goal NEG8 Conduct a wetland inventory and map the wetlands using the Ctty's geographic information system. ix-s � � ' 1 � ' � ' � � , � i� 1 � � LJ � Fede�al Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment Policy NEP38 As sufficient funds are budgeted, the City will complete an inventory of its wetlands to better understand the wetland system, and to refine the policies and regulations that protect the resource. Inventoried wetlands should be ranked, delineated, and mapped on the Ciry's Geographic Information System. The City may permit urban development to cause the destruction of wetlands determined to be replaceable based on a variery of factors. In these situations, compensatory wetland mitigation, such as wetland creation, restoration, or enhancement, must be provided. The City recognizes that the elimination of certain wetlands in exchange for appropriate mitigation can contribute to the overall wetland system, and may in fact achieve better resource protection. Goal NEG9 Explore ways of mitigating wetland loss Policies NEP39 The City should develop a wetland mitigation banking program. The plan will address restoration, creation, enhancement, monitoring, and contingency planning for the replacement or enhancement of wetlands. NEP40 Mitigation sites should replace or augment the wetland values to be lost as a result of a development proposal. Sites should be chosen that will contribute to an eaListing wetland system or, if feasible, restore an area that was historically a wetland. NEP41 All wetland functions should be considered in evaluating wetland mitigation proposals, including fish and wildlife habitat, flood storage, water qualiry, recreation, educational opportunities, and aesthetics. NEP42 The City will protect wetlands by maximizing infiltration opportunities and promoting the conservation of forest cover and native vegetation. NEP43 Wetlands created as a result of a surface or stormwater detention facility should not be considered wetlands for regulatory purpases. Special regulations conceming these facilities should be developed. Shorelines The Ciry of Federal Way adopted the King County Shoreline Management Program (Program) shortly af�er the City's incorporation. King County's program is a functional plan and was developed in compliance with the State Shorelines Management Act. However, a new program needs to be developed for the City that better reflects the values of the community; is consistent with Environmentally Sensitive Areas regulations; and, supports the land use policy in the Land Use chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. Goal NEG10 Create a new shoreline master program that is consistent with community values, land use, and environmental protection. Policies NEP44 The City should create a new Shoreline Master Program that is consistent with State law, and the policy direction of the Natural Environment and Land Use Chapters of this Plan. NEP45 The Shoreline Master Program should recognize the unique recreational and natural habitat of the Ciry's shorelines. 9.3 GEOLOGIC HAZARDOUS AREAS Geologically hazardous areas include: steep slope hazard, landslide and erosion hazard, and seismic hazard (liquefaction-prone) areas. WAC 365-195-200(9) defines geographically hazazdous areas as, "... areas that because of their susceptibility to erosion, sliding, earthquake, or other geological events, aze not suited to siting of commercial, residential, or industrial development consistent with public health or safery concerns." IX-9 In Federal Way, geologically hazardous areas have been mapped along much of the Puget Sound shoreline and in more limited azeas north of Steel Lake, and west and south of Hylebos State Pazk. Landslide Prone Areas represent a potential hazazd to people and property. Inappropriate development activities may disturb the natural stability of soils, surficial geology, slopes, and hydrology to the point that mass wasting, erosion, high run off, and stream siltation may occur. There are many areas in Federal Way, particulazly the high bluffs along Puget Sound, that have high potential for landslide. These areas typically have slopes greater than 15 percent, springs or groundwater seepage, and highly permeable sand and gravel soils overlaying relatively impermeable silt and clay soils. Sersmrc Haaard Areas are characterized by low density cohesionless soils in association with a shallow groundwater table. During an earthquake, these soils become highly unstable and are unable to adequately support structures. With appropriate construction techniques, such as soil compaction or pile construction, building owners can minimize the potential for damage to some extent. To identify seismically hazardous sites and recommend appropriate construction techniques typically requires the services of a qualified geotechnical engineer. Soil Erosion problems are typical in all areas of Federal Way. Generally, these problems aze the result of improper or inappropriate grading and construction practices. However, there are small areas of the City where the soils are so erosion sensitive that urban development is not appropriate because of the sensitivity of these soils to disturbance. Steep Slope Areas are typically found along the western portion of Federal Way, as the land ends in high bank above the Puget Sound shoreline. In addition, there are other isolated azeas throughout the Ciry. These hillsides are either naturally unstable, or susceptible to instabiliry when disturbed. The following CWPP's and the City policies address protection of geologically hazardous areas. Countywide Planning Policy CA13 All jurisdictions shall regulate development on certain lands to protect public health, property, important ecological and hydrogeologic Federal Way Comprehensive Pian - Natural Environment functions, and environmental qualiry, and to reduce public costs. The natural features of these lands include: a) Slopes with a grade greater than 40 percent; b) Severe landslide hazazd areas; c) Erosion hazard areas; d) Mine hazard areas; and e) Seismic hazards. Regulations shall include, at a minimum, provisions for vegetation retention, seasonal clearing and grading limits, setbacks, and drainage and erosion controls. Goal NEGl l To adopt standards to ensure against the loss of both public and private property in geologically hazardous areas. Policies NEP46 Land uses on steep slopes should be designed to prevent property damage and environmental degradation, and to enhance open space and wildlife habitat. NEP47 As slope increases, development intensity, site coverage, and vegetation removal should decrease and there-by minimize drainage problems, soil erosion, siltatioq and landslides. Slopes of 40 percent or more should be retained in a natural state, free of structures and other land surface modifications. NEP48 Landslide hazazd areas should be free of development, unless the risks and adverse impacts associated with such development can be reduced to a negligible level. NEP49 In areas with severe seismic hazards, special building design and construction measures should be used to minimize the risk of structural damage, fire and injury to occupants, and to prevent post-seismic collapse. NEP50 Prior to development in severe seismic hazard areas, the City may require special studies to evaluate seismic risks and to identify appropriate measures to reduce these risks. NEP51 The City should develop special regulations that address construction on or near marine bluffs of Puget Sound. Regulations should take into tx-�o � � � � � � ' � ' � r � ' � t � ' � GEOLOGIC HAZARDS ' r ' u I� � � � � � � consideration landslide potential, drainage, and vegetation removal. NEP52 Proposals for development on or near marine bluffs should substantiate, either through design or adherence to special development regulations, that the development has less than a 25 percent chance of failing by collapsing, or becoming dangerous and/or uninhabitable due to slope movement within a 50 year time period. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment Countywide Planning Policies Through the following goals Federal Way sets out to conserve, protect, restore, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat azeas. CA8 NEP53 Development along marine bluffs should take into consideration the unique habitat these azeas provide by leaving as much native vegetation as CA9 possible, especially snags. 9.4 FISH AND WILDLIFE HABITAT AREAS Fish and wildlife habitat conservation areas are considered critical areas and are necessary for either resident animal species, or seasonal migratory animal species. These habitats are extremely important and, if altered, may reduce the likelihood that a given species will survive. Habitat conservation azeas may include areas of species richness, breeding habitat, winter range, and migration corridors. These also include habitats that are of limited availability or high vulnerability to alteration, such as cliffs, talus, and wetlands. All jurisdictions shall identify critical fish and wildlife habitats and species and develop regulations that: a) Promote their protection and proper management; and b) Integrate native plant communities and wildlife with other land uses when possible. . Natural drainage systems including associated riparian and shoreline habitat shall be maintained and enhanced to protect water quality, reduce public costs, protect fish and wildlife habitat, and prevent environmental degradation. Jurisdictions within shared basins shall coordinate regulations to manage basin and natural drainage systems which include provisions to: a) Protect the natural hydraulic and ecological functions of drainage systems to maintain and enhance fish and wildlife habitat, and restore and maintain those natural functions; b) Control peak runoff rate and quantity of dischazges from new development to approximate pre-development rates; and c) Preserve and protect resources and beneficial functions and values through maintenance of stable channels, adequate low flows, and reduction of future storm flows, erosion, and sedimentation. CA10 Jurisdictions shall maintain or enhance water This chapter also recommends that the City complete the quality through control of runof� and best necessary studies to identify and map habitat management practices to maintain natural conservation area so that they can be protected. aquatic communities and beneficial uses. Significant habitat also exists in aquatic, wetland, and � riparian areas and on steep slopes that are privately owned, but protected by development regulations. Linking public and private natural areas can provide � food, shelter, and migration comdors for a healthy and sustainable population of salmon, songbirds, and other species. ,, I� ' � Urban landscaping, pazks, and open space are valuable supplements to natural areas in terms of providing habitat for a wide variery of wildlife. The loss of natural wildlife habitat to urban development can be partially offset by landscaping that includes a variery of native plants which provide food and shelter for wildlife. CAl l Jurisdictions shall coordinate land use planning and management of fish and wildlife resources with affected state agencies and the federally recognized Tribes. Goal NEG12 Preserve, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat. Policies NEP54 As feasible, the City will conduct studies needed to identify and map critical fish and wildlife , ix-� 2 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment habitat conservation areas and may re-evaluate existing regulations for the protection of these azeas. NEP55 The City should manage aquatic and riparian (stream side) habitat in a way that minimizes its alteration in order to preserve and enhance its ability to sustain fish and wildlife. NEP56 The City should preserve and enhance native vegetation in riparian habitat and wherever possible. growing air pollution problem, it must develop a more efficient and less auto-oriented transportation system. The following CWPP's and City policies are adopted to protect air quality. Countywide Planning Policy CA14 NEP57 The City should encourage residents and businesses to use native plants in residential and commercial landscaping. Goal NEP58 The City will protect wildlife corridors in the City owned open space where appropriate. These azeas should use native plants that support native species of birds and animals where appropriate. NEP59 As feasible, the Ciry will adopt and implement fish habitat conservation plans for the salmon nu�s in the Hylebos drainage, Lakota Creek, and any other identified salmon streams. These plans will include recommendations for improvements to the riparian comdor and provisions for adequate buffers adjacent to all proposed development. NEP60 The City should encourage informational and educational programs and activities dealing with the protection of wildlife. An example of such a program is the Backyard Wildlife Sanctuary program established by the State Department of Fish and Wildlife. 9.5 AIR QUALITY Air quality, once a problem for other regions of the United States, is now a major problem in the Pacific Northwest. The preservation of clean air is essential to maintaining the quality of life enjoyed in this region. Air pollution in the Puget Sound Region is the result of increased vehicle emissions primarily from cars and trucks. Therefore, if this region is going to resolve its All jurisdictions, in coordination with the Puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency and the Puget Sound Regional Council, shall adopt policies, methodologies, and standards that promote regional air quality, consistent with the Countywide Policy Plan. NEG13 To protect air quality. Policies NEP61 Support State and Federal air quality standards and the regulation of activities that emit air pollutants. NEP62 Encourage transportation demand management and alternatives to the single occupancy vehicle in order to reduce energy consumption, air and water pollution. 9.6 NOISE Noise pollution can be harmful to the general public's health and welfaze and has adversely affected the livabiliry and comfort of neighborhoods within the Ciry of Federal Way. Noise is primarily generated by: air traffic from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Sea- Tac); vehicle traffic; and construction activities. The Ciry will need to continue its efforts at the regional and state level to mitigate the impacts associated with the Sea-Tac Airport. Goal NEG14 Develop programs andlor regulations to address noise pollution in all areas of the Clly. IX-13 � I � � � ' � � � ;� '� � � � � ' ' � ' �� J aPRIORITY HABITATS & SPECIES �' LEGEND ' Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environme�t � Policies C � � � � � � L_� Countywide Planning Policies NEP63 The City should develop and adopt construction CC7 All jurisdictions shall work cooperatively to standazds to mitigate noise generated by Sea- identify and protect open space corridors of Tac Airport and Interstate 5, as well as other regional significance. major arterials. CC8 Jurisdictions shall work to protect visual access NEP64 The Ciry will evaluate potential noise impacts to water bodies an drivers, and provide for associated with non-residential uses located in physical access where appropriate. residential areas as part of the site plan review process. The City may adopt noise level CC13 All jurisdictions shall develop coordinated standazds for all non-residential uses. level of service standazds for the provision of pazks and open space. NEP65 The Ciry will continue to work with the Port of Seattle to mitigate noise impacts within the 65 ldn contour. In this effort, the City will work with the Port to field verify the results generated by the Integrated Noise Model. Goal NEG15 Develop an open space nehvork throughout the City and with adjacentjurisdictions. NEP66 The City will continue to work in concert with the Puget Sound Regional Council, Regional Commission on Airport Affairs, and the Airport Communities Coalition, or their successors or other entities, to resolve problems associated with the proposed expansion of Sea-Tac Airport. NEP67 In developing new roadway systems, the City � will evaluate the noise impact on residential neighborhoods as appropriate in, or through, residential areas. � 9.7 OPEN SPACE , � �J � � Trails and open space corridors form linkages between and within neighborhoods, commercial areas, and neighboring jurisdictions. Open space corridors also provide wildlife habitat, recreation areas, as well as visual and physical sepazation between land uses. In order to achieve an affective open space system, the City will work cooperatively with surrounding jurisdictions to construct a network of open space. Open space can include: environmentally sensitive areas, forests, pasture land, lakes, and waterways. Areas identified as open space in the Comprehensive Parks Plan may be purchased or otherwise protected from development by the City. Policies NEP68 Open space is as important as wildlife habitat and should be linked with open space identified in the King County Open Space Plan. NEP69 The City should identify an open space plan and develop a program to acquire or accept donations of these areas for preservation. NEP70 The City should consider innovative ways of acquiring properly for open space such as transfer of development rights and development incentives for set asides. 9.8 IMPLEMENTATION The implementation of the policies contained in this chapter will occur over a number of yeazs and is dependent on resources available to the City and the community. The following implementation strategy lists six actions that the City may take in the next five years. 1. Revise the City's wetland buffering requirement; 2. Develop a new Shorelines Master Program to be consistent with the policies of this chapter and the Land Use chapter, community values, and State law; � IX-15 Federai Way Comprehensive Plan - Natural Environment 3. Adopt a new definition of stream to distinguish between man-made conveyance systems and natural streains, requiring a definition change to the Environmentally Sensitive Areas Ordinance; 4. Map wellhead protection zones; 5. Inventory wetlands; and 6. Update aquifer recharge area maps. � ix-i s L__ -�L--- - _—, � ---- ._ I � 1 -- �- - - � � �� - __L__ - - �- -- �- � � ) � . _—._ — � r---- �--- - i � --- �_.__� � �0 ..�� d� �� �� �� � .� � .A� �. � �'J �� �i� rnva�e u�nu�ca r , � ' L� , i � � � � � ' ' �J Federal Way Comprehensiva Plan - Private Utilities 10.0 INTRODUCTION his chapter satisfies a Growth Management Act (GMA) requirement that cities prepare a Private Utilities chapter. This chapter describes the location of existing utilities and the proposed location of new utilities, as well as the capacity of existing and pro- posed utilities. The GMA requires the Comprehensive Plan to have internal consistency. This means that the Private Utilities chapter must be fully coordinated with other chapters of the Comprehensive Plan. This is particulazly important for Federal Way's City Center and in the I-5/99 corridor where new development and other land use change is anticipated in the near future. In accordance with WAC 365-195-320(2)(c), this Private Utilities chapter includes plans for natural gas, electriciry, and telecommunications for the City and its planning area (Map X-I - Planning Area). Each utility plan will describe and analyze existing and proposed utility systems within Federal Way and improvements necessary to meet growing consumer demand. In most cases, maps aze provided to illustrate the e�cisting system and proposed improvements. Plans for water supply and sewer are found in the Capital Facilities chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. The City sees the GMA's requirement to prepare a Private Utilities chapter as an opportunity to identify ways of improving the quality of services provided within the City. The Ciry will use this Private Utilities chapter to identify goals and develop policies to ensure that provision of utilities is properly coordinated with land use. The City aclrnowledges that it would not have been 1 possible to prepare this chapter without the assistance of Puget Power, Washington Natural Gas, Viacom, TCI, US West, and AT & T Wireless. , 1 , , 10.1 ORGANIZATIONAL AND LEGAL CONTEXT Privately owned elecri natural gas, and line telephone utilities are regulated by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC). Cellular telephone communication companies are licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Private utilities, with the exception of cellular communication and line telephone, must have a franchise agreement to place utilities in the public right- of-way. Franchise agreements give each utiliry the nonexclusive right to provide its category of service within the City. At the time of writing, the City has a franchise agreement with Washington Natural Gas and Viacom Cable TV, and is in the process of negotiating with Puget Power and TCI Cable TV which are presently covered by franchises made with King Counry. As each of these franchise agreements expire over the coming yeazs, the Ciry will negotiate its own francluse agreements with the utilities. 10.2 COUNTYWIDE LAND USE POLICIES FOR UTILITIES The King County Crrowth Management Planning Council (GMPC) drafted the following Countywide policy which is relevant to private utilities: C06 Aggressive conservation efforts shall be implemented to address the need for adequate supply for electrical energy and water resources, protect natural resources, and achieve improved air quality. Efforts shall include, but not be limited to, public education, water reuse and reclamation, landscaping which uses native and drought- resistant plants and other strategies to reduce water consumption, small lot size, low-flow showerheads, conservation credits, and energy efficiency incentives in new and existing buildings. This Private Utilities chapter is consistent witt► the aforementioned Countywide Planning Policy. 10.3 NATURAL GAS PLAN Washington Natural Gas (WNG) provides natural gas to the Ciry and its planning area as part of a service area that also includes the cities of Tacoma and Auburn. The components and hierarchy of Washington Natural Gas's supply system is illustrated in Figure X-1. Natural gas is supplied to the entire Puget Sound Region from the ' x-i � �' c m � � a �- � � �- � � � � m � a� � � y o� c 0 � � y 3 •� - a 0 ° GA7E S7ATION ��p� « . .� � . .v ,:' ,.:�. � �� ;� �`r The point at which qas ;�: ;�"�, h �.�.<�;:� s.�£<:ry;- � ' � '��'�A � �, . ��>`.� `' a��,� Irom NW Pipeltne enters '�;�`'~.:t. ;'�'� �'�'".:h� . :�.'"� `'; • . : � �:� ,x..>x 4 ;e° .{ , <���� �,:>�. ' the WNG system. Nere ' REGULATOR Most ::„ . ,. .,... .� an otlorant Is added meter sets include a `: .• ` � lor salety. Pressure ts requ►ator whlch culs ;M; :� q '" UMITING STATION the pressure to aboul ''{� `" ���. �,. ".�. ie0uced to 200 �0 300 .. a; T ��'�'� psl, and the qas Here the pressure is 1/4 psl. The METER ���.. � Y > reduced Irum 250 psi at your home measures ";��` . Is metered. � , to between 60 and 2� pst. the amount of natural Limiting statbns are ollen gas being used fa above•qround st\ ures. space and waterhealinfl and other uses. f.'^"'�`"'�: � • n• �•, SERVICE UNE � �� .:# '.� Most ranqe In slze Irom 5/B . . .�SO• <.:-�� 7 > >: �. 4. > •� ,�•. n .'� , ... � � inch (residentiaq to 2lnches °- � ; ° '� . � �•� , R�,' � . - n v �n diameter, with pressure „, °. •: : ° ° � ` � ���•�; lrom 45 to 60 psl. „ � • i: �.', '� I �. • ` tr9 ` y J J � � . ^ 114 v ki�111IttWdA n • �WI ��� }�{�».� � ,�itt•• . •,� ;s� , f,'., t , /� V , . . . ,w�] A �1f.�i: � � /� �/ A � .•� � � 1 > > � v � � > > 'i. > > > > : � � -- TRANSMISSION LINE � IIMITED SUPPLY LINE � � t � .�' � � } �� �"=;;?: �� :` y �. : ;:. ; ,;�; �":� � 3: s ' � .¢� .... `t��. `ca%`�c'.i;::..�- v✓ :l�YU.s .,��; }�::Iiy..y.; f1►I)j'�'. > > > > > > > > > 1 � � These underqround Ilnes are between 6 These underqround Ilnes are IN7ERMEDIATE PRESSURE '— IP OISTRIBUTION MAIN � and 16 Inches In dlameter. Pressure In between 6 and 12 Inches (n (�Pl DISTRICT REGULATOR These underpround tines � ^ these Ilnes auerapes around 250 osl. diameter and carry pressures Here the p�essure Is reduced vary in site Irom 1 y inches � averaglnq 125 psi. apaln to between 20 and 60 psi. to 6 inches In diameter. Dlstrict repulatas lurnlsh pas P�essures ave�age 35 psl. � lo WNG's Intermediate pressure C NORTHWEST PIPELINE (IP) disltibutlon system. The interstate plpeilne servinp WNG I5 NW Pipeline, whiCh ConSlsts ot 2 � parallel pipes, a 26•incti ar� a 30�Inch, Pressure varies trom 600 to 900 C pounds per square Inch (psq. The natural qas ;!ppiy orlpfnates prlmarlly trom Canada and the southwest United Siates. r � r � � �r r � � � r � � � � � � a� � COUNCIL APPROVED PAA BOUNDARY , ' �� ,; � ,� � � � ' � � � �� � ' Northwest Pipeline. The "gate station" on the Northwest Pipeline that provides most of the natural gas to Federal Way is located in Derringer (near Auburn). Federal Way's e�usting natural gas supply system is shown on Maps X-2 and X-3. Map X-2 shows the supply mains within Federal Way and Map X-3 shows the existing pressure on a very cold (10 degree Fahrenheit) day. System Analysis Washington Natural Gas Company records show that its customer base in Federal Way increased by 76 percent between March 1982 and March 1995. There were 16,039 customers within the City of Federal Way on March 1, 1995, compared with 9,117 customers on March 1, 1982. Current demand in Federal Way is for an average of 1,058,191 cubic feet per hour (at 250 psig). Currently, most Federal Way neighborhoods have access to natural gas with the exception of small isolated multi-family developments, and some areas east of I-5. As shown onMap X-3, Federal Way's natural gas supply system meets existing demand. This map shows that on a 10 degree Fahrenheit day, when demand for natural gas is at its greatest, the lowest gas pressure in the system is in the western portion of the City. In this azea, gas pressure drops to between 20 and 30 psig, which is more than adequate to meet domestic demand which requires supply at approximately 2-3 psig. Proposed New & Improved Facilities Map X-4 shows proposed system improvements, � specifically the proposed location and size of pipes. Future projects shown on Map X-4 include: , � ,� I ,J � �� ' ■ Installing a new valve in Pacific Highway South and shut to redirect and increase flow to neighborhoods between South 248th and South 288th Streets, west of Pacific Highway South (to be completed by September 30, 1995). ■ Installing a four inch distribution main in Redondo Way between 13th Avenue South and Marine View Drive (to be completed by September 30, 1996). Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities ■ Installing a four inch distribution main in 16th Avenue SW and SW Dash Point Road (to be completed by September 30, 1996). ■ Building a six inch main along lst Way South. Washington Natural Gas has a policy of expanding its supply system to serve additional natural gas customers upon demand. Therefore, the locatioq capaciry, and time line for improvements will depend on population growth. The maximum capacity of the existing distribution system is continually being evaluated and expanded to increase supply pressures, expand supply capacity, and reinforce existing systems. Proposed improvements shown on Map X-4 are based on laiown demand and projected population growth. The specific location for construction of new distribution lines will depend on right-of-way permitting, environmental impacts, and opportunities to install pipelines with new development, highway improvements, or installation of other utilities. 10.4 ELECTRICITY PLAN Existing Regional System Puget Sound Power and Light Company (Puget Power), a private investor-owned utility, supplies electricity to almost the entire City except for some small pockets neaz the Pierce County line, which are served by Tacoma City Light. As of April 1995, Puget Power delivered service to approximately 820,000 metered customers in its nine county service area. The quality of service within Federal Way is dependent on the local delivery system operated by Puget Power, the bulk transmission system operated by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and power generation by a number of agencies including Puget Power. In 1991, Puget Power met 96 percent of total energy needs from its own resources. Energy purchases from other sources supplied the residual demand. Because electricity cannot easily be stored for future use, northwestern utilities exchange power with utility companies outside the region. This process of moving electricity into a common transmission grid and distributing it where needed is called "wheeling." X-4 Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities Bulk Transmission System The Bonneville Power Administration operates a regionwide, interconnecting, transmission system that supplies electric power to utilities from Federal hydro- electric projects east and west of the Cascades. The primary service BPA provides to Puget Power is wheeling energy around the region. System Analysis - During the severe cold spell in February 1989, the region's heavily loaded system experienced power flow problems. Although no major loss of power occurred during that period, the BPA power system and local utilities hit a record peak demand of neazly 11,000 megawatts— twice its average power use. The crisis created an awareness among energy companies of a power problem in the Puget Sound azea. BPA initiated a public process in 1990 to review the problem and identify potential solutions. The following four goals were identified by the Puget Sound Reliability Study, produced by BPA: ■ Increase conservation activities. ■ Implement comprehensive load management programs. ■ Expand the transmission system. ■ Build new generation facilities west of the Cascade mountains. These measures are now being implemented jointly by BPA and local utilities including Puget Power. In addition, at the local level, Puget Power is pursuing an energy conservation program by offering grants, technical advice, and assistance to its industrial and commercial clients. There is also an active conservation education program to raise consumer consciousness. Both BPA and Puget Power are working hazd to manage demand. The aim is to reduce demand at peak times, and spread demand more evenly over the diurnal and seasonal cycle. This can be achieved by encouraging commercial customers to carry out high energy- consumption processes when supply is plentiful in off-peak periods. Another policy currently being explored is to charge less for power in off-peak periods to encourage customers to use power when greater supply is available. Transmission System Schematically, Figure X-2 describes how electriciry is transmitted from a generation source to customers. Map X-S describes that portion of Puget Power's trans- mission system which covers the City. It is a grid which provides a link between BPA's Bulk Transmission System and the local distribution system which connects with customers. All of the transmission lines supplying Federal Way aze energized at 115kV. These lines supply power into the Federal Way distribution system and provide connections to Tacoma City Light, King, and Pierce County. Power is transfened from the trans- mission system to Federal Way's local distribution sys- tem at six distribution sub-stations shown on Map X-S. A list of these substations, their capacities, and loading levels are shown in Table X-L Power also comes into the City from substations situated in Pierce County and unincorporated King County. System Analysis - Puget Power has prepared a 30 year South King/Pierce County Draft GMA Electrical Facilities Plan, 1992, which analyzes and proposes improvements for the transmission system for the sub- area which includes Federal Way. This Plan uses Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) population and employment forecasts to project growth in electrical load over a 30-year period. The Plan concludes that the facilities which supply power to the Federal Way area are currently working below their capacity. However, there is a need to maintain this spare capaciry for back-up purposes. Table X-I shows that while 94.4 percent of the system's rated capacity is utilized at peak winter load, there is adequate supply of electricity for the existing City pop- ulation. However, the system will need to be upgraded in the near future as it is presently neaz capaciry. Based on PSRC population and employment forecasts, Puget Power predicts that the required load for the greater Federal Way area will grow by 103.9 MVA between 1990 and 2020. Table X-1 Substation Loads and Capacitv. nictrihuHnn Rgting Wintnr i.n9d Substations (MVA) 1?./Z1�90(MVA) La(cota 25 23.5 Kitts Comer 25 32.3 Belmore I 25 21.7 Belmore II 25 18.0 Marine View Stanwood ' ' � ' ' , � � _1 � � ' � , , ' � 25 26.0 ' 25 20.8 Wect ('mm�nc '�S 99 7 � 8 V�8� "�P�tY utili�ation rate" of 94A"/o X ' , WASHINGTON NATURAL GAS SUPPLY MAINS SYSTEM PRESSURE ON A VERY COLD DAY PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS LEGEND : ;�;;: i,,i �.': . ,� � ) ±• r.;�� ' ,' !• � (, 'i�� . � ,, ;j. S .. }.. e.:, , �'V ��, � � Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities Proposed Improvements - The South King/Pierce County Draft GMA Electrical Facilities Plan for the Christopher- Fredrickson subarea sets out a range of proposed improvements to deal with the transmission system issues. The Plan works to a standazd that ensures that if one element of the system breaks down, power can still be provided from another source without exceeding system capacity. The Plan also makes contingency for a double system failure under certain circumstances. There are also several improvements in progress which are not in the City but will improve service within the subarea. These include a new switching station east of Puyallup South Hill (Alderton), a Bceing-Puyallup substatioq and a new substation at Dupont. Future Transmission Lines and Sub-Stations Map X-S shows proposed transmission lines and substations necessary to increase service reliabiliry and/or capacity in Federal Way to meet projected load growth over the next 30 yeazs. The additional substations needed to serve the forecasted load growth include: ■ Enchanted ■ Killarney ■ Dolloff ■ Steel ■ Five Mile Lake ■ Twin Lakes ■ Federal Way Puget Power forecasts that these improvements, along with others elsewhere in the subarea, will produce a system that will be operating at 72.5 percent of capaciry by the year 2020. In order to serve additional substations planned across the subarea, several transmission projects are planned. A new 115 kV transmission switching station, Freeman, is proposed southeast of Milton. This new switching station would allow 115kV lines to be connected with Starwood, White River, and the proposed Alderton station. Additional transmission line and transformer capacity may be necessary on the Puget Power-Tacoma City Light (TCL) intertie at Stazwood. Proposed cogeneration facilities in TCL's tideflats area could potentially expand the existing system. The timing of any improvement would depend on the design and capacity of the cogeneration facility. 10.5 TELECOMMUNICATIONS PLAN The telecommunications section focuses on line telephone, cellulaz communicatioq and cable TV. Telecommunications is not only important for voice transmission but also provides the infrastructure for the transmission of images and electronic data such as faxes and electronic mail. In the City, telecommur►ications service providers include US West (New Vector), which operates both land-based and cellular telephone systems, AT 8c T Wireless which provides cellular telephone service, and Viacom and TCI which provide Cable TV service. The line and cellular telephone portions of the telecommunications industry are extremely competitive and for this reason, the Ciry had difficulty obtaining detailed information about operations and plans. As a result, this section of the plan addressing telephone service: (i) reflects the Ciry's commitment to providing reasonable telephone services; (ii) provides a general description of how the etcisting system works; and, (ui) describes the process for improving delivery. Telephone System Existing Facilities and Operations - US West Com- munication, Inc. delivers telecommunication service to the Federal Way planning area as regulated by WUTC. A local exchange area is served by a Central Office (CO), which contains various kinds of switching equipment. From a CO, there are typically four main cable routes extending relatively north, south, east, and west. From each main cable route there aze branch distribution routes. These facilities may be aerial or buried, copper or fiber. Extending from the branch distribution routes are local lines which can be used for voice or data transmission by subscribers. Proposed Improvements - US West is required by law to provide adequate telecommunications services on demand. Accordingly, US West will provide facilities to accommodate whatever growth pattern occurs within the City. Due to advances in technology, additional capaciry is easily and quickly added to the system. x-i i � ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' � ' � � ' � , � � ' ' � ' ' ' 1 , ' �J I� � ' �I � � , u � � ' Cellular Networks Existing Systems - The Ciry of Federal Way is currently served with cellular service by AT & T Wireless and U5 West Cellulaz (New Vector). Cellular communication is becoming increasingly important in the telecommuni- cations world. It is a combination of a portion of the radio frequency spectrum with switching technology, making it possible to provide mobile or portable tele- phone service to virtually any number of subscribers within a given area. Transmission quality is comparable to that provided by conventional wireline telephones, and the same dialing capabilities and features available to wireline users aze available to cellular users. The wireless/cellular communications sector of the economy is growing at between 30 to 40 percent per year. The number of wireless service providers (cellular phone, paging, two-way radio, etc.) aze increasing, therefore, it will be important to address design standards and land use review procedures for siting facilities associated with these services. All of these technologies use a line-of sight radio signal transmitted and received by antennas. Therefore it is not possible to underground the antennas or structures on which the antennas aze mounted. The FCC regulates the cellular telephone industry by controlling where carriers can operate and what frequencies can be utilized in their operation. This ensures that their operation does not interfere with AM/FM radio and cable television transmissions. If interference does occur, the cellular tower operator is required by the FCC to eliminate any noise or interference which impacts local citizens. For example, if a television set or radio experiences interference from the tower, the operator must either correct the problem or disable the cellular site. Wireless service transmits and receives low power high frequency radio signals. The basic technology is as follows: l. The service originates from a cellulaz phone, pager, computer, dispatch service, or personal communications service. 2. The signal is transmitted to the nearest cellular communications faciliry, known as a cell site which processes numerous cellulaz phone calls and routes them to the nearest hub cellular switching office. 3. At the cellular switching office, also known as a Mobile Telephone Switching Office, the call is further processed and the call is routed to the party Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities being called. The call may be routed via traditional land line or via a cellular network depending on the nature of the receiving device. System Capacity - Capacity is a function of frequency of use, the number of cell sites in a geographic area, and the number of customers. Both AT 8c T Wireless and US West Cellulaz consider the number of calls handled, number of customers, and cell site capacity to be proprietary information. Improvements to the Cellular System - Like the non- cellulaz telephone companies, AT 8t T Wireless and US West Cellular expand services in response to growth. For this reason, both companies closely analyze market demand to detemune expansions into new service areas. The cellular network is expanded by dividing a lazger cell into several smaller cells to increase the number of available channels. The location of future cell sites is considered proprietary information by the cellulaz companies. More recently, cellulaz call capacity has been expanded through technological advances in digital equipment. Cable TV Plan Cable television service is the third private utility discussed under the Telecommunications Plan. Figure X-3 is a general description of the components of the cable TV (CATV) system and shows supply from source to customer. One of the primary components of a cable system is the headend site—an electronic control center where the information signal is processed for distribution through the cable system. The signal can be received either off a hazd line (cable), a satellite dish, microwave antennae, and/or a TV antenna. Existing Conditions The City is served with cable TV by both Viacom and TCI. Map X-6 shows the Viacom and TCI service azeas covering the City. The majority of the Ciry is served by Viacom. A small area in the northem part of Federal Way and parts of the area to the east of I-5 are served by TCI. The Viacom system serving Federal Way is supplied by a headend taking in transmissions.l`his facility is sited north of South 312th and between 20th Avenue South and 22nd Avenue South. The system has been designed x-�2 CABLE SERVICE � � T �' c m w n n� a m � 0 � m 0 n c y O � CD � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Federal Wey Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities and built at a capaciry of 450 MHZ. Viacom has 17,726 existing customers within the Ciry. The TCI system is served from a headend at 206 SW 112th Street. The TCI azea in the northem part of the Ciry is fed directly by coaxial cable from this site while the area to the east of I-S is fed by AML Microwave from the 112th Street headend to the Federal Way water tower site. From there service is delivered by coaxial cable. TCI has 1,380 existing customers within the City. System Analysis The regional system, fed from both Viacom's Tacoma headend and TCI's headend at the Federal Way Water Tower site, have been designed at 450 MHZ. The Viacom system has also recently been upgraded to 450 MHZ. There are no limits to the number of customers who can be served by extension of these systems. Proposed Improvements Cable television installations are made to new subscribers (either to new dwelling units or, to a much smaller degree, to residences who have not opted for cable before) at published rates, provided that they are less than 150 feet from a distribution or feeder line. Connections requiring longer runs are charged on a time and material basis. Most public work considerations, such as tree trimrning, work in the right-of-way, restoration of property, and so on, are covered in the City of Federal Way Master Cable Television Ordinance and Franchise Agreement. Viacom and TCI work closely with utiliry companies and the City to stay informed on proposed developments so that cable can be a part of a development's plans. Each year, engineers assigned to the Federal Way azea assess the need for system expansion based on telephone inquiries, pemutting data from the City and County, and technological advances in distribution equipment. The total mileage of cable plant within the City is appro�umately 280 miles. Of this, Viacom has 263 miles and TCI just over 17 miles. Both cable eompanies will shortly begin replacing their existing copper cable trunk lines with fiber optia 10.6 GOALS AND POLICIES FOR CITY ACTION The Utilities Element provides an opportuniry for the Ciry to assist utility companies in delivering efficient service to customers, and to seek to reduce potential negative impacts on the natural and built environments. This section builds upon system descriptions to identify issues and sets forth policies to coordinate the provision of utilities with Ciry planning. The Growth Management Act requires that the utilities element include the general location, proposed location, and capacity of all e�usting and proposed utilities. This has resulted in cities and counties becoming more actively involved in the way in which utilities aze sited and provided. In order to protect both citizens and utiliry customers, the City will work in accordance with the following goals and policies: Goals PUGI Work with private utility companies to allow them to provide full and timely service which meets the needs of the City's residents and businesses, both present and future. PUG2 Work with private utility companies to allow them to provide service in a way that balances cost-effectiveness with environmental protection, aesthetic impact, public safery, and public health. PUG3 Process permits for private utility facilities in an ef�icient and timely manner, in accordance with franchise agreements, development regulations, the Comprehensive Plan, and adopted codes. PUG4 Ensure that development regulations aze consistent with public service obligations imposed upon private utilities by Federal and State law. Policy and Issue Statements Issue Statement: Provision of Timely and Economic Services to the Citizens and Businesses of Federal Way. X-15 ' ' I r---� J � � �,� i� I� ' � ' � i � � , � � ' ' Partnership with private and public service providers is a continual theme of this Comprehensive Plan. The City plays a critical role in the provision of private utilities. The City approves pemuts that allow utilities to build transmission towers, lay distribution lines and connect customers. If the Ciry responds quickly and appropriately, it helps the utility companies respond to customer needs quickly and efficiently. However, the City must balance these considerations with its other responsibilities, including bringing them into compliance with due process, ensuring consistency with this Comprehensive Plan, addressing aesthetic impacts, and protecting the natural environment. Therefore, the City must continue to communicate with utilities and periodically review their needs as well as the policies in this plan and its permit processing to ensure that the results are in the best interest of Federal Way residents and businesses. The City must also be mindful of the need to provide a choice of energy sources to Federal Way's residents and businesses. Choice of energy source is important because it creates competition in the marketplace which helps to keep costs down. Providing alternative energy sources is also important because if one energy source fails, the other may be available. Policies PUPI The City's right-of-way permitting process should not unnecessarily delay the expansion or improvement of the utiliry network. PUP2 The City will, if possible, coordinate with other jurisdictions on proposed utility improvements that impact a multi jurisdictional area. PUP3 The City should work to encourage, to the extent possible, the supply of both electriciry and gas to existing and new homes, offices, industrial, and commercial buildings. Issue Statement: Coordination Between Utilities, Capital Facilities, City, and Private Developers. The costs of pipe, cable, or conduit installation can add significantly to the cost of providing service. Installing utility lines, which follow existing right-of-ways and easements, can also create disruptions to traffic and cause damage to pavement and landscaping. These costs and disruptions can be reduced if utilities share the same trench and perform work simultaneously. Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities Consequently, the City encourages utilities to continue exchanging information about plans for expansion, maintenance, and upgrading of facilities. The Ciry presently provides information to all utilities about its public works projects, such as highway improvements, which may provide opportunities for installing new systems. Policies PUP4 The Ciry encourages the joint use of trenches, conduits, or poles, so that utilities may coordinate expansioq maintenance, and upgrading facilities with the least amount of right-of-way disruption. PUPS The City encourages utilities to inform one another of plans to expand or improve utiliry services. PUP6 The Ciry will endeavor to infoim utilities of upcoming improvements or expansions wluch may provide opportunities for joint use. PUP7 The City will endeavor to notify utilities of proposed plans to make highway or right-of-way improvements. PUPB The City hereby incorporates by reference Puget Power's GMA Electrical Facilities Plan into this private utilities element as now existing or hereafter amended or adopted. Issue Statement: Energy Conservation. State and Federal law requires energy conservation in building design. State and Federal statues also require that power providers implement energy conservation policies. In accordance with these mandates, Puget Power offers grants, loans, and consulting to their customers to improve energy efficiency. State law requires that the City's building code conforms to the Washington Energy Code (WAC 51-11). However, the energy code sets out only minimUm standards for energy conservation. Therefore, cities have developed conservation conscious design codes which go beyond the min�mum requirements of the energy code. Policies PUP9 The City shall, at minimum, ensure that its buildings comply with State and Federal standards for energy conservation. x-� s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities PUP10 The City will endeavor to work with utility comparues to promote and educate the public about strategies for conserving energy. Issue Statement: Importance of Telecommunications and the Information Superhighway. Society is in the midst of a revolution in information and communication that has the potential to change the way that people interact with each other. For example, in the near future, most of the transactions and communications that make up the majoriry of our day will be possible from a single work station. This revolution is being fueled by recent advances in computing and telecommunication technology. There are two basic technological innovations that will stimulate these changes in our lifestyles: fiber optic cables and the "Integrated Services Digital Network" (ISDl�. Fiber optic cables and ISDN will combine to expand the capacity of the telecommunications network. This expansion will allow the provision of a diverse range of services on one system including, telecommunications, cable TV and radio, business services, shopping, and professional services. It will also be possible for institutions such as schools, universities, govemment, and emergency services to broadcast on this single system. Technology is also being developed to expand capabilities for transmitting information. At the present time, one can transmit voice by telephone, texVgraphics by facsimile, and data by modem. In the future, it will be possible to transmit video images, and potentially to broadcast to a mass audience over the fiber optic cable network. These advances in technology are forcing telecommunication companies to re-evaluate their business strategies and will lead to profound corporate restructuring in the telecommunication sector. Technological change has made it possible for all services to be provided on one cable, and companies are jockeying for position to create that system. These advances have great potential to alter the way we do business in Federal Way. For economic development reasons, the City must ensure that the fiber optic network is developed in Federal Way at the earliest opportunity and that there is adequate capacity to meet the community's growing needs. It is critical for people and businesses to have access to the information superhighway if they are to enjoy a fully active role in society and the economy. In this sense, the information superlughway is analogous to the road network, where all citizens have a"right-of-way." For this reasoq govemment has an essential role in ensuring that the right of citizens to both receive and transmit information is protected. This right of access issue is central to most ethical debates about the growing information-based society. It is possible that the Federal and/or State government will choose to protect right-of-access through regulation. If this dces not happeq it may be left to cities to protect equal access through their franchise agreements with the utility providers. Policies PUPl l The Ciry will encourage and work with telecommunication and cable companies to develop fiber optic cable networks and to increase interconnectivity between different networks. PUP12 The Ciry will endeavor to work with utility companies and other public institutions, such as the School District, to develop a full range of community information services, available to citizens and businesses through the telecommunication network. Issue Statement: Health Impact of Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMFs) and Microwaves. There is much public and scientific interest about the health effects of Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMF's) created by the electricity supply system. This interest has resulted primarily from studies that suggest a possible link between EMF's and certain forms of cancer. However, this statistical link dces not necessarily indicate cause-and-effect relationships. Considerable reseazch is underway, supported in large part by the $65 million funding provision in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. Puget Power has taken an active role in this debate and has recently worked with the City of Bellewe's Citizens Advisory Committee to investigate the health impacts of EMF's. However, there are, as yet, no agreed upon safety thresholds or tolerance levels for human exposure to EMF's. Electro-Magnetic Fields are found wherever electricity exists. EMF's aze generated by high-voltage transmission lines, low-voltage lines, and sub-stations, x-i � ' ' ' ' � ' , ' , ' ' , � � ' � , , , ' ' � ' � ' � ' ' � ' ' � � � � � ' � as well as electrical appliances and devices found in homes and businesses. The strength of an EMF depends on the amount of current flow, not on voltage, and current is a function of energy consumption. Research is clear that EMF's are not blocked, reduced, or altered by most solid objects. This means they are not blocked by vegetation, nor by any form of screening, or covering by earth. It is, however important to note that EMF's diminish rapidly with distance from source. Research on both EMF's and microwaves has been contradictory and generally inconclusive. However they are issues that must continue to be monitored. Policy responses to this issue must be adopted as more information becomes available. Policies PUP13 The City shall continue to monitor research into the health effects of Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMF's) and microwaves. The City will take appropriate action once defuutive conclusions about health implications are reached. Issue Statement: Environmental and Aesthetic Impacts. Utility systems have a broad range of associated environmental and visual impacts. Much of Federal Way's electrical, telecommunications, and cable system is mounted on overhead poles. Pole-mounted systems not only reduce the aesthetic appeal of streetscapes but also contribute to system failures and power outages caused by falling trees and branches. Undergrounding utilities is a potential solution to both problems, but must be balanced against the cost associated with such undergrounding. As with other types of development, the impacts of utilities on environmentally sensitive azeas need to be evaluated. These impacts are addressed in the context of broad environmental protection policies in the Natural Environment chapter of this Plan and through measures for protecting critical areas in the zoning code. On the other hand, there is also a need to provide for the location and continuing maintenance of essential public and private utilities in environmentally sensitive areas, if no feasible alternative location exists. The existing Federal Way zoning code makes provisions for this in the environmentally sensitive area provisions. Existing City code sets out some requirements for undergrounding utilities in new subdivisions and in existing right-of-way in accordance with the WUTC. Federal Way Comprehensiva Plan - Private Utilities These exemptions include the undergrounding of transmission lines 115 kV and greater. The Ciry should continue to work in partnership with the utility companies to further address aesthetic impacts. Requiring undergrounding across the entire Federal Way area is prohibitively expensive. However, there are key areas, such as the City Center and along Highway 99, where undergrounding of utilities is important to improving the visual image of the azea in order to stimulate economic development. The City should work with the utilities and also support Statewide efforts by WUTC to devise a method of paying for such improvements. The City has a right-of-way vegetation ordinance which allows removal or pruning of vegetation wit.hin rights- of-way without a permit only when there is imminent danger to the health, safery, or welfare of residents. This process could be further improved if the City and utility companies prepared a right-of-way vegetation plan meeting utility needs and addressing environmental and streetscape improvements to be made by the City. This approach to streetscape is particulazly important in the newly-developing City Center. Poticies PUP14 To the maximum extent possible and based upon applicable regulations, the City should require the undergrounding of utility distribution lines in new subdivisions, new construction, and significantly reconstructed facilities consistent with all applicable laws. PUP15 To the maximum extent possible and based upon applicable regulations, the Ciry should work with the utilities in preparing a plan for undergrounding utilities in areas where their visual impact is critical to improving the appearance of the Ciry, such as the City Center and along Highway 99. PUP16 The City should, to the extent practical, work with utility providers in preparing a right-of- way vegetation plan which ensures that the needs of landscaping and screening aze balanced with the need to prevent power outages. PUP17 The City should require that site-specific utility facilities such as antennae and sub-stations are reasonably and appropriately sited and screened to mitigate adverse aesthetic impacts. x-� s Federal Way Comprehensive Plan - Private Utilities PUP18 The City should work with the.utilities and also support Statewide efforts by WLJ'TC to devise a method of paying for improvements associated with environmental and aesthetic impacts. PUP19 The City should modify the zoning regulations to address the siting, screening, and design standazds for wireless/cellular facilities, sub- stations, and antennae facilities in such a manner as to allow for reasonable and predictable review while minimizing potential land use and visual unpacts on adjacent property. Issue Statement: Planning to Meet the City's Future Needs. The plans for system improvements and extensions described in the Private Utilities chapter aze based on the population and growth forecasts provided by the utilities. The Land Use chapter will provide utiliry providers with information on where and when new growth will occur in the City. This will allow utility companies to plan for expansion of their systems to meet future needs. The City may assist the utilities by continuing to provide them with future plans and by soliciting input for future planning projects. Policies PUP20 The City should provide utiliry companies with plans, forecasts, and supporting data to assist in the proper planning for utilities. The City should integrate communication with the utility companies into its Management Information System to allow for fast and ef�icient communication. ' � � ' PUP21 The City should encourage utility providers to ' base extension and sizuig of systems on the Land Use Plan in order to adequately serve anticipated growth. � PUP22 The City should encourage utilities to provide them with their utility service plans to allow � better integration with other utilities and City plans. PUP23 The City and utilities should be encouraged to develop an integrated Geographical Information System (GIS) to better serve mutual needs and those of the public. �iF � � � , ' � � � � � , X-19 � CITY OF _�_ w . � Par�, Recreation and Cultural services Department : Com re ensive p Par � Re Cre ation � an � en p pa�e P an em er 1 1 5 Nov 2 99 , � � �l City of Federal Way Planning Team crrY courrcII.. Mary Gates, Mayor 7ack Dovey Hope Elder Ron Gintz Mahlon "Skip" Priest Michael Park Phil Watkins PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION '� � James Baker, Chairperson Laird Chambers Karl Grosch David Kaplan Bob Kellogg, Sr. � Dean McColgan Margaret Nelson Bobby Roach Jack Suchy ARTS COMIVIISSION � Joan Tabrum, Chairperson Jeanne Burbidge Betty Huff Nancy Ise Joy Melgard , 7oann Piquette Robert Ratcliff Toska Rodriguez Bette Simpson Donna Welch Jane Yambe � , ' � � YOUTH COMNIISSION Carrie Scott, Chairperson Mohana Kumar, Co-Chairperson Jason Buckner Fiona Otway Cindy Chun Jenny Rafanelli Natalie Cruz Jason Recek Phuong-Thao Hong Naazneen Siddiqui Naria Kim Kelly-Elizabeth Thayer Naila McKenzie Kim Vu Catherine Nam �� ' I � � PARKS, RECREATION AND CULTURAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT u Jennifer Schroder, Director David Wilbrecht, Deputy Director Brent Mason, Manager - Recreation & Specialized Services Mary Faber, Manager - Recreation & Cultural Services Kurt Reuter, Manager - Recreation & Leisure Services Barbara Simpson, Parks Landscape Architect Jon Jainga, Parks Development Planner Scott Robinson, Supervisor - Park Supervisor Vicki Norris, Supervisor - Park Supervisor Steve Ikerd, Supervisor - Park Supervisor � Re ort Pre ared b• P p Y• JC DRAGGOO & ASSOCIATES � Jerry Draggoo Kevin Apperson Rick Wagner � � � � � �� � ' TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I INTRODUCTION Mission Statement Introduction Public Involvement I-1 I-1 I-2 SECTION 11 COMMUNITY PROFILE Regional Location Planning Area History Climate Physical Features Water Resource Areas Stormwater Runoff and Flooding Fish and Wildlife Land Use Population Characteristics Population Projections SECTION III EXISTING PARK AND RECREATION SERVICES Introduction Pazk Land Definitions Existing Pazk and Recreation Facilities �nventory of Existing Sport Facilities Department Organization Department Operations Recreation Progcams SECTION IV RECREATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT Introduction Methodology of Developing Needs for Federal Way Park Land Nceds Specialized Facility Needs SECTION V GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Introduction Goals and Objectives II-1 II-2 II-5 II-5 II-5 II-6 II-6 II-6 II-9 II-9 II-12 III-1 III-1 III-9 III-20 III-24 III-25 III-25 N-1 N-1 N-4 N-13 V-1 V-1 SECTION VI SECTION VII PARK POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA Introduction Mini Pazks Neighborhood Parks Community Parks Large Urban Parks Regional Parks Linear Parks Natural Open Space Areas Special Use Areas Trail Systems PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS Introduction Recommendations for Park Sites and Open Space Areas Planning Area A Planning Area B Planning Area C Planning Area D Planning Area E Planning Area F Planning Area G Planning Area H Trail Systems Major Facilities Administrative and Management Recommendations Park Maintenance Operations Recreation Services Cultural Arts SECTION VIII IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Introduction Project Priorities Project Improvements Funding Sources Capital Improvement Plan APPENDIX Cultural Arts Plan LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Regional Map � Planning Area Map Map of Aquifers and High Infiltration Areas Map of Existing Pazk Sites , Map of Existing School Sites Facility Plan VI-1 VI-1 VI-1 VI-3 VI-4 VI-4 VI-5 VI-5 VI-6 VI-6 VII-1 VII-7 VII-19 VII-25 VII-31 VII-37 VII-43 VII-49 VII-53 VII-57 VII-58 VII-61 VII-63 VII-63 VII-64 VIII-1 VIII-1 VIII-1 VIII-5 VIII-8 II-1 II-3 II-') III-5 III-7 VII-3 SECTION I INTRODUCTION SECTION I INTRODUCTION NIISSION STATEMENT Listed below is the Park, Recreation and Cultural Services Department's mission statement. "The mission of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department is to build a better community through the provision and stewardship of parks and programs that enrich the lives of our citizens. " INTRODUCTION ' The City of Federal Way was incorporated on February 28, 1990 and instantly became the sixth largest city in the State. Because park and recreation services were a major reason for its incorporation, one of the first studies completed was a comprehensive park and recreation plan. � � � Since then, the City has made major strides in park and recreation services. These include: 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. The creation of a full leisure services program The assumption of ownership and management of the park system from King County The development of a comprehensive recreation program Acquisition of a 83.5 acre multi-purpose park site Acquisition and/or development of 15 park sites Upgrading of 9 park sites. One of the key points in the original park and recreation plan was a concern for acquiring future park � sites. Because of rapid growth, land for new parks were rapidly being lost. The plan called for an aggressive park acquisition program while opportunities existed. While some park land has been reserved, the City has found it difficult to acquire park and open spaces. � The City has had four years to reflect on the plan and during that time many improvements and changes have been made. The purpose of this plan today is to reflect these changes and decide how to meet future demands for park and recreation services in the Federal Way area. l � [ ' � � The primary goal of the Plan is to assure that every neighborhood in Federal Way is served by a park. This goal will be met through Public Parks, Open Space, Special Use and School facilities. The e�usting park and open space land in the planning area is 1,406.07 acres. The total amount of park and open space land needed to service the planning area until the year 2020 is 1,933 acres (this means, 265 acres of additional park land is needed and 262 acres of additional open space is needed). City o1'Federa! Way Con�prehensive Park, Recreation and Onen Sndce Plan Section 1- Introduction Page 1- 1 The City currently provides a level of service of 10.9 acres per 1,000 population within the city limits. The planning area. provides a level of service of 17.1 acres per 1,000 population. The planning area includes the total acreage of public parks and a portion of the school district facilities used for recreation. The City's standard will remain at 10.9 acres per 1,000 population. The City's goal for the planning area will 17.1 acres per 1,000 population. The City will work together with all public agencies (state, county and school districts) to achieve this goal. Developing a park, recreation and cultural services program will provide benefits far beyond that of the actual recreation opportunity itself. Such benefits as community pride, participation in civic affairs, social interaction and a sense of belonging are all outgrowths of this service. Recreation not only provides a diversion and refreshment from the pace of our complex lives, but it also enriches our physical and mental health. PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT Public participation and involvement played a key role in the development of the City's first Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan that was adopted December 3, 1991. Input into the plan consisted of the following: • The creation of the Federal Way Parks Advisory Task Force representing various interests of the community. This organization provided background information and assisted in developing the recommendations found in this document. • A random household survey. • Two community workshop meetings held at the beginning of the study to solicit public needs and community issues. • A series of newspaper articles on the plan. • Distribution of the recreation needs assessment to public agencies, private groups and other interested parties. • Participation in a community forum (open house) dealing with park and recreation issues. • Meetings with selected neighborhoods dealing with park design issues in their neighborhood park. • Public hearings on the draft plan. The 1995 update of the Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan received extensive review from the Parks and Recreation Commission and city staff. Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv of Federal Way Page 1- 2 Section 1- Introduction SECTION II COMMUNITY PROFILE � � 1 ' REGIONAL LOCATION SECTION II COMMUNITY PROFILE � The City of Federal Way is located in the Puget Sound Region, between Seattle and Tacoma. It is approximately 25 miles south of downtown Seattle and eight miles north of downtown Tacoma. The City is composed of 13,440 acres of land that stretches from east of Interstate 5 on the east to Puget � Sound on the west and from the Pierce County border on the south to a combination of South 272nd and the old Water District 56 boundary on the north. The major arterials that serve the City are Interstate 5 and State Highway 99. Highways 18, 161 and ' S09 also serve as important connections to surrounding communities. ' � � � � � � , IJ � �� City ofFederal Wav Conrprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Snace Plan , Section II - Community Profile Page 11- 1 PLANNING AREA The planning area (or potential annexation area PAA boundary) for this study stretches from the ridge line that overlooks the Green River Valley on the east to Puget Sound on the west and from the Pierce County line and the City of 1Vlilton border on the south to South 272nd on the north. The planning area contains a large unincorporated area east of I-5. Comnrehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wav � page II _ 2 Section II - Community Profrle PLANNING AREA � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY CONIPREHEI�ISIVE PARK, RECR�ATIaN & CfPEN �P��E PLAN pug �t SQu nd � � �.h., _,.�: �� Comrr�er�ce�ent Bay .�����' . Leg�nd : — Planning Area Boundary .___.._...,. City Limits , J o ,� � ,� � � �C D J C DRAGGO� & ASSOCIATES November 21, 1995 � � HISTORY , � � The Federal Way area began as a historical logging settlement, shipping its products to the booming towns of Seattle and Tacoma. As these two crties grew in population, so did Federal Way. Located between the two large cities, it became the commercial comdor and a transportation center for products of all types. During the Indian Wars of 1855-56, an old Indian trail was expanded into a military road. One branch of this trail went from Tenino to Tumwater and the other toward the Nisqually River, Fort Steilacoom and Fort Lawton area. The trail to Tacoma was the same route eventually followed by Old Highway 99. U.S. Route 99 (Pacific Highway South) was completed in 1929. Because it was federally financed, ' the road was known locally as a"federal highway." The first school built along this route took the name "Federal Way," and in 1929, area school districts were consolidated to form the Federal Way School District. Soon after, the surrounding community adopted the name Federal Way. I��M � , ' � � This region between Seattle and Tacoma has a relatively mild and temperate climate, which is heavily influenced by its proximity to Puget Sound. The abundance of moist marine air keeps the temperature mild year round. The Federal Way area reaches an average high temperature of 75 degees in July and an average low temperature of 33 degrees in January. The mean average temperature is in the mid 50's. Precipitation ranges from .71 inches in July to 5.7 inches in January. Annual precipitation is about 38 inches a year. PHYSICAL FEATURES The Federal Way area is located on a plateau between Puget Sound and the Green River Valley. The majority of the surface area lies between 300 -500 feet elevation above sea level. The land is largely undulating, with slopes generally less than 15%. However, the area between the valley floor and Puget Sound is ringed with steep hil(sides or bluffs, which have slopes of 25% to 45%. These bluffs offer spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. ' Along the Puget Sound coastline, the bluffs are interrupted by several steep ravines that start at the ocean and extend inland. These ravines usually contain creeks and small streams that flow into the Sound. The bluffs overlooking the Green River Valley extend 200-300 feet above the valley floor. � � � �J ' The area is unique in that it is scattered with numerous small lakes and wetiand areas. While there are many miles of freshwater and saltwater shoreline, very little of it is available for public use. In total, the City has over eight miles of shoreline along Puget Sound. Of that amount, less than one mile is in public ownership. Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Snace Plan ' Section 11- Community Profile Page II - S WATER RESOURCE AREAS Water service for the entire Federal Way area is provided by the Lakehaven Utility District and Tacoma Ciry Water. The primary source of water is from wells which are drilled into underground aquifers and therein lies the problem. The water level in the primary acquifers has been going down for several years while consumption continues to increase. In short, aquifer recharge is not keeping pace with consumption. Recharging of the aquifers comes primarily from groundwater infiltration beginning at the soil surface. As the surface area is sealed with paving and other urban uses, runoff increases and infiltration into the underground aquifer is reduced. Therefore, a significant benefit of park and open space is to serve as aquifer recharge area. This is especially true where infiltration occurs at a higher than average rate. The map on the next page identifies the location of high ground water infiltration in the Federal Way area. STORMWATER RUNOFF AND FLOODING The Federal Way area is divided into drainage basins consisting of the lower Puget Sound Basin which drains the north half of the area and the Hylebos Creek Basin which drains the southern portion. Both basins are experiencing the severe effects of flooding, channel erosion and sedimentation, habitat destruction and a deteriorating water quality. The conditions causing these problems include increased peak flow and flow duration caused by urban development. The City's Surface Water Management Plan, recently completed, addresses the problems described above. Parks, wetlands and other open space areas can help to mitigate these effects by providing storm water retention and other water quality improvement. FISH/WILDLIFE Federal Way has several streams and many small lakes. These are important habitats for many species of fish and wildlife. Joe's Creek, Lakota Creek and Hylebos Creek are streams that generally flow the year round, be it in minor quantities during certain parts of the year. These streams are important for fish habitats and were known at one time to contain androgynous fish. Wetlands are the primary source of wildlife habitat in the Federal Way area. According to King County, forty-six areas have been identified as sensitive areas in the Federal Way area. Wetlands are important for a variety of reasons aside from their habitat potential. They serve as retention basins that store excess water during times of heavy precipitation and reduce the flood potential downstream. Wetlands also help purify contaminated water that is absorbed into aquifer recharge areas. Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan City otFederal WaY Page 11- 6 Section II - Community Profile CIYI� �F FEDE�AL WAY CGMPREHENSIVE F'�A��C, RE�REATItJI�I � O�'E111 SPACE PLAN puq et SdU� -: _ ,� � � I �� �� t� �l� � f' � � ��: , ��� � � ���� � � ������ , �,�� � u �, ���� ,,;� - �� _ ��., { ;;� -� �-� ,, _�-�� _���_ ,; ,� ----� - _ �-�� -- � � � � r1 � Cvmmencemenl Bay , ;:. ; ��..:. ; i: { ;',a. ;C ;\ �_ � _� ' `� � � ; . �`\ �\ �- �, � �� ,�� : :� .;w. � � � �� �1,: - � ��, �- - 1`,'_ _ ; I _a � ,i� . � I � __�_.. -�- �/ � j ): , ___.� s , . ,._ T� i �_ _L_ � ; i HIGH INFILTRATIC�N AREAS Legend : �� Redondo - Miltan Channel Aquifer (R-MC) - �_��- �--� Intermediate Aquif�r � High Infiltration Area -- Planni�g Area ��undary ,--� � �� 0 1000 2000 �000 9000 o�' � � �C D J C DRAGGOO & ASSOCIATES November 21, 1995 �� i LAND USE � Federal Way is different from most cities in that it lacks the traditional central business district or commercial core. However, the developing commercial center along south 320th, between I-5 and the Pacific H'ighway is becoming the shopping area for the City. In addition, there is strip commercial � concentrated along the Pacific Highway comdor as well as small shopping centers scattered throughout the area. � Overall, little land has been devoted to industrial uses. For the most part it consists of warehousing or very light manufacturing. There is, however, a significant amount of office space in the City, vv�th much of it located in the West Campus area. , ' ' � The remaining land is residential or vacant. Very little land in the City is vacant, with a significant amount of it being wetlands or other undevelopable classification. More undeveloped land is found east of the I-5 Freeway, which is still unincorporated. Multi-family housing comprises about 42% of the housing stock in Federal Way. This type of housing is scattered throughout the planning area but is usually found along the major transportation corridors of the City. POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS An analysis of population characteristics is important because age, income and education are major determinants of recreation interests. In general, the older the population, the less they participate in active or competitive recreation activities. The youth age groups tends to participate in recreation activities more frequently than any other age ' goup and they tend to favor activities that are more active and competitive in nature. This would include activities such as basketball, baseball, soccer, swimming, bicycling, etc. Young adults (ages 18-35) are also an active age group and form the core of adult competitive sports. Adults (ages 35- 65),typically have less time to devote to recreational activities and tend to be more concerned about � maintaining a home and a job. Recreational time is at a premium and often limited to weekends and occasional evenings. ' According to the US Census, the City's 1990 population was placed at 67,554 persons. This is a 94% increase from the 1980 population of 34,788. The 1995 population is estimated at 74,413 persons. ' Table 1 on the following page illustrates population growth for the City of Federal Way as well as for King County since 1960. As can be seen, the growth rate has risen significantly over the last thirty years. , , , , Cit,y ofFedera! Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan , Section II - Community Profile Page II - 9 � Source: City of Federal Way The demographic profile for the City of Federal Way is slightly different from the rest of King County. In general, the population as a whole is significantly younger than the population of King County. An analysis of the age groups indicates a higher percentage of people under the age of 18. The demographic profile also indicates a significantly lower percentage of people over the age of 65. Overall, the age distributions suggests a younger age profile characterized by families with young children. This means that currently or in the near future there will be a demand for children's playgrounds and other similar facilities. In a few years, this same population will be seeking places for active sports, such as baseball, soccer and basketball. Source: City of Federal Way � � � � _J , ' ' � � � ' � Income levels are also important clues in recreation planning because the higher income groups tend , to be more active and participate in the more expensive types of activities. Household income levels within the City of Federal Way are significantly higher than the rest of King County. , ' � Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan City otFederal Way Page II - 10 Section II - Community Profile ' Table 1 Historical Population Growth 1960-1990 City of Federal Way and King County Tabie 2 Age Distributions 1990 City of Federal Way A comparison of the 1990 household incomes is shown below: Table 3 Household Income Levels 1990 City of Federal Way Source: City of Federal Way An analysis of the labor force in Federal Way revealed that the largest class of employment type is retaiUtrade followed by services. This employment distribution would tend to support a suburban population profile. A breakdown of employment classifications is listed in Table 4 below. Table 4 Employment Classi�cation 1990 City of Federal Way Source: City of Federai Way City ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section 11- Community Profrle Page 11- 11 PUPULATION PROJECTIONS Shown below is the population projection for the City of Federal Way. This is based on a 1995 estimated population of 74,413. Table 5 Population Projections City of Federal Way � 'a: s 2010 102,900 2020 113,050 Source: City of Federal Way Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wav Page II �2 Section II - Community Profile � � � � � � �� ' � � u � ' � LJ � 0 SECTIOI\T III ' EXISTING PARK AND RECREATION SERVICES u ' ' � � C� � SECTION III EXISTING PARK AND RECREATION SERVICES INTRODUCTION This section of the report summarizes park and recreation services within the City of Federal Way area. This includes park and open space facilities, department organization and staffing levels, department operations, and programs and services. PARK LAND DEFINITIONS In order to address specific land needs, existing parks and recreational areas have been divided into � nine categories. Each category represents a distinct type of recreational activity or opportunity. Please note that this classification system is for the existing parks only. It does not necessarily represent the recommended park categories found in Section VII. ' � � � Mini-Parks Mini-parks, tot lots and children's piaygrounds are all small single purpose playlots designed primarily for small children usage. Because of their size, the facilities are usually limited to a small open grass area, a children's playground and a picnic area. Neighbofiood Neighborhood parks are a combination playground and park Parks designed primarily for non-supervised, non-organized recreation activities. They are generaliy small in size (about 2-7 acres) and serve an area of approximately one half mile radius. Typically, facilities found in a neighborhood park include a children's playground, picnic areas, trails, open grass areas for passive use, outdoor basketball courts and multi-use sport fields for soccer, Little League baseball, etc. � Community A community park is planned primarily to provide active and Parks structured recreation opportunities for young people and adults. In general, community park facilities are designed for organized activities and sports, although individual and family activities are also encouraged. � Community parks serve a much larger area and offer more facilities. Their service area is roughly a 1-2 mile radius. Large Urban Large urban parks are designed to serve the entire community and generally provide a wide range of specialized facilities. They usually exceed 50 acres in size and should be designed to accommodate a large number of people. ' � � CitZofFederal Wav Comprehensive. Park. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page Ill - 1 Regional Parks Regional parks are recreational areas that serve the city and beyond. They are usuaily large in size and often include one speciflc use or feature that makes them unique. Typicaily� use focuses upon passive types of recreational activities. Special Use Special use areas are misceilaneous pubiic recreation areas or land Areas occupied by a specialized facitity. Some of the uses that fail into this ciassification include single purpose sites, watertront parks, landscaped areas� community gardens, sports field complexes or sites occupied by buildings. Linear Parks Linear Parks are maintained areas that generally follow a stream corridor, ravine or some other elongated feature� such as a railroad right-of-way or powerline. This type of park area usually contains a trail system. Natural Open Natural open space is defined as undeveloped land left primarily Space Areas in its natural environment with recreation uses as a secondary objective. It is usually owned or managed by a governmental agency and may or may not have public access. This type of land often includes wetlands, steep hillsides or other similar spaces. In some cases, environmentally sensitive areas are considered as open space and can include wildlife habitats, stream and creek corridors, or unique and/or endangered plant species. Undeveloped Land Pathway and Trail Systems This is undeveloped public land designated for future parlc or open space use. Pathways and trails are designed to accommodate walking, bicycling and other non-motorized means of transportation. Cilv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan � PQBe III - 2 Section III - Ezisting Park and Recreation Services Summary of Park, Recreation and Open Space Areas Table 6 Summary of Park and Open Space Areas Federal Way Planning Area . City Park and Recreation Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mini-Parks ...._........-•••• ......................_.................-•---......--•-•-........... ______Neighborhood Parks Communit Parks .. Lar�e Urban . Parks ,...... .............._............................. .___ Parks ._ .........................................._..........._.......... _ Special Use Areas Open S ace Areas ....-•-•-Undeveloped. Land ................................... Subtotal ....•• ...........................................................__................., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . County Park and Recreation Areas Communit Park Special Areas _........ •••• ......................_...._........._... ,.....__ Open . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Undeveloped Land Subtotal State Park and Recreation Areas , ....................................................................................... _ Re�ional .. ............................................, ____Special Use Areas Subtotal School District Areas * . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nei�hborhood . Parks (School Grou _ Special Use Areas (Sports Fields) Subtota/ ' 1.50 , ................ 45.50 82.50 _ 51.70 . ............ 72.80 ................. 40.41 375.04 130.16 0.00 0 ...�.�.:�� .....................� ...... 0.00 ............. 0 ...--•........ . 0.00 0 1t.10 2' ...................... .................. 295.00 2 .... .0.00 ...... ............... 71:40 ...................15 63.28 6 1 �10 3 1 _. 4 22 3 1.50 ........... 45.50 82.50 ... 51.70 72.80 ,. _..-•••..... 40.41 387.62 130.16 45.00 2 ... 11 �10 2 16.30 '--•- ...........•••• ._...._......••• .... .........••-...... 30.00 1 902?10 ' 6 ...................... ........_........ 295.00 2 ...................... ....._........... 6.80 2 96 ..... .........� 20 93.28 8 1 10 3 1 .. 4 23 3 * Only includes Federal Way School District sites within the PAA Boundary Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section III - Existing Park and Recreatio» Services page III _ 3 CITY !�� FEDERQL WAY Ct3MPREHENSIVE PARK, RECREATION & OPEN �PACE PL.AN vuge S° `�� d �� ,������ � � Peuk �.. _ Ylaiialion Ratreet end � ' � Cuinuei cerner i • - � _ . { .. `. — ... _ . � � ' �. Dumes BaY Perk � � � PeAc ' - � 4 _ �, �� � I�i d� _ ` �,.� P � ( , _ __ i �� � 1L-- -� �'� � I , � -L, 1 �_ � a ��,,\ � '�� ,�� �t ;.� �- �p � ��u . �,, � � ��}; � 1 � `.II _,_ '� ,�� I � { � �=_-�-=�_ # _{,� � p, -- ��- � �� ,� �� ���� r� �; � Co�rmer,�cemenl Bay \'i 1 � � � -- _ - , ' �� �; � - '� _. .�.�.Y!-. ...._. � � �_ � -�- �� j` - . , �, � , � ._ _ _-�-- ; ; � � �� ,: _ , �; -��_; ��,� - � � � . : � , � �� � ��� : � � � � j I�,- , i ' I —I �—� �� °� I ' �_ � � ; �-_ — - ., i �1 i '� � <. '� a- � �`�� � ,` �, ` �,_- �`���� % � , !I � ;- _ �_` � ,, _, -- iane�re� Peik v) _ I i l l S �Hro ar __ � -, , , �' �` _ I J �/ ��_ '� P ( ) � -� � � )i '����(_-�� ,. �:= ' "1 . _l_� _ �l '` EXISTING PARK & UPEN SPACE AREAS �egend: � City Park � County Par�c !- ) State Park Schools � Planning Are� Boundary o ,000 200o a000 e000 o�' a � J D J C DRAGGOO & ASSOCIATES November 21, 1995 EXISTING SCHOOL SITES �iTY 4F FEDERAI� WAY GOMPREHENSIVE PARI�C, RECRE�A►TIaN & �►P�1� SPACE PLAN Pu� 5 ���� � 4 _ -�- I �I � � ��� � �,�,. ;, i � ,�� ��-��,,;; � - � �- ��-�- : � _ � :�, , � �...� _ � � �'�, � , � � ` f � , � ~ ��.�,� 1 __Ll� - �� � __� t-� � ���++44 � . _ , ,- , L �� \ I � ::�� � - �4 � A;��\\ � \;���,p � ��� - , - , �x '������_��� � � .� . ---, Cv�ninencement 8ay �_ �I 1 �- � - r �i _ r� ��E S _ , � � � -� ( �L_. �1 ' 'i Legend : Federal Way Schoo9 District #210 —�— Planr�ing Area Bc��ndary �L.J�J 0 1000 2000 �000 8000 o�' � J D J C DRAGGOO & ASSOCIATES November 21, 1995 � � �. EXISTIl�TG PARK, RECREATION FACILIT�S AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Listed in the following tables is an inventory of the existing parks, recreation facilities and open space areas found in the Federal Way planning area. The existing areas ha.ve been categorized according to the managing agency. City of Federal Way Park, Recreation and Open Space Areas In the table below is a list of developed park and recreation areas that are owned and managed by the � City of Federal Way. Tabie 7 � Inventory of Existing City Developed Park, Recreation and Open Space Areas Federal Way Planning Area � I � • . , ; Adelaide Pa�lc 6.70 : Pla round, icnic area, trails : : Park . 35.10 s Play�round�picnic area�trails_: ......_..._...._ .............._..........._...........__....--•..........._...... Y9 � P � : ; Alderclale Park 2.00 : Pia round icnic area basketball court, tennis court, � ...: open area and pathwax_� ; • ................_......................._.._...._........._....... ..._............_... . . : BPA Trail Park hase I 45.0 : Paved trail 1 mile : Coronado Park 1.50 : Basketball court, playground, ;_._._.._._. . . .._ , _; area, open pl� ......_. _ ...................._..._...._. __. _ .._..............._. . , : ; Dash Point Hi hlands Paric 5.00 : O en la area la round Dumas Ba Park 19.30 Birci sandua , trails French Lake Park 10.00 Piayground, picnic area, arkin area ; Klahanee Lake Community/Senior 7.11 : Community center, gym, � Center � _ a �ame room_andparkin�_area .....__ .... .............................._..._....... ........_. _.... : : ; Lake Grove Park 4.80 Playground, basketbali court, ;........�............_.._�......_.... . . .¢ area. open pia,y a�ea ....._..._---------------��------_...... _. .........-------..__. . . _ : Lakota Park 28.20 ' Football field/track softball fields, soccer field, open play ;........._ ...................�................._.._...._._._. .......a..area:.Pa�icin� area ...__....._._._.: ._ ............... ........_......_. Y9 � P p � ; Minor Lake Park 3.40 ; Pla round icnic area, o en ' ;........_..._...._........_._....._.._.._.._... ._. _. . . .�..P..lay area . < .................._... .-•-.... ...... _. _....... Y9 ......_.._......... . .._. Olympic View Park 20.75 Pla round, open play area, trails : Palisades Pa�ic 3.20 : Playground, open piay area, ; pic�ic area, basketball court Sacajawea Park 18.30 Track, football field, softbali field, tennis courts, open play area, playground, restrooms, ' .......�..picnic area ' ._ ..................................•----�---..........._..__.......................... -----------�--__. ...._-___._........: � Cit�ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Ill - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page Ill - 9 � Table 7 (Continued) . . = Saghalie Park 36.00 : Softball field (lighte�, baseball field (lighte�, � footbali field (lighted), soccer ' fieid, piayground, restroom, tennis courts, basketball ; :. court, parkin� a�ea '_' ....... ............._....._......._...._............. ..._....._................ ................ ..........._.......; : Steel Lake Park 51.70 Softball fields, soccer field, � community center, picnic area, shelter, boat launch, swimming beach, restrooms, open play area, basketball cou�t, voileyball court (sand), fishin dock € SW 312th Sports Cou�t Park 2.00 : Basketball court, tennis court, � : ; �ickelbali,cou�t : �...._._ ..............._.._..__..._.._........•-••••........._...•_••••.....__............................, . ................._._._..............; : Visitation Retreat and Cuitural Center 12.00 Meetin /cultural art facilities West Cam us Trail 27.80 Trail, o en s ace Wildwood Park 2.30 Playground, open play area, traii !.TQTAL:Dk���.�?P.ED:51.TE� .; :.: : .:.:. 34�;i6 : � Listed below is an inventory of existing undeveloped sites � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive. Park. Recreation and Onen Snace Plan � Page 111- 10 Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Table 8 Inventory of Existing City Undeveloped Park, Rec�eation and Open Space Areas Federal Way Planning Area [� f Tabie 8 (Continued) � King County Park, Recreation and Open Space Areas � In the table below is a list of developed park and recreation areas that are owned and managed by King County Department of Natural Resources, Park Division. Table 9 � Inventory of King County Parlc, Recreational and Open Space Lands Federal Way Planning Area ,� � � . 1 ' Camelot Park * 16.30 � Wetland, ravine ' ;....••-•....._--•••-•-•_......_ ...................._.........___............_....... _........_.._............;._....._..................._......_..................___..._....; : Five Mile Lake Park " 26.50 's Tennis courts, basketbali court, swimming beach, gazebo, picnic area, fishing pier, restrooms, concession building, kitchen/picnic shelter, open play area, ; a_walkin� : track_ _ : >... ........... ............_.._._••••••••....... ..•• • ........._.� ....»........... ..................... ..... •••.............. ..»............._.. . ; Lake Geneva Park * 18.50 ': Fishing pier, picnic shelter, open lawn, area, soccer fields, restrooms, sunbathing, _ ._......_ ............................�...... : trails : .. _.. _ .................... _............ .......................... �. .. .... _.... _................. _........... _.. _ _.....; : Federal Way Pool (Kenneth Jones 0.50 ' Indoor pool Memorial Pool) �. Puxallup Landfill _*..._.. ... _ 4 Meadow ..............__._.__. . ..t •-..._ ........................._. ...... P � P 9 ................... . : Weyefiauser King County Aquatic 10.60 : Indoor oot arkin area Center ..,,„; A T�?TAL ......:: 1 Q2 40 ; : > .......... .....::.: ........: .....:.... ._....:.: . ._....:.. .......::. .....:::. ...:::...: ..:...__:. .......... .. * Outside c' limits � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Onen Space Plan Section 111- Existing Park and Recreation Services Page III - 11 Washington State Park, Recreation and Open Space Areas In the table below is a list of developed park and recreation areas that are owned and managed by the Washington State Parks Department and the Washington Department of Wildlife. Federat Way School District #210 School Recreation Areas In the table below is a list of developed school sites that are owned and managed by the Federal Way School District. Please note that the acreage listed only accounts for the amount that is used for � public recreation purposes. This includes sports facilities, playground areas, open play areas, paved court surFaces and a percentage of the parking area that is proportional to the size of the recreation area. (This is calculated at a ratio of 5 spaces per acre of public recreation area.) ;� � � '� Citv ofFederal Wav Comnrehensive. Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Page III - 12 Section Ill - Existing Park and Recreation Services Table 10 Inventory of Washington State Pa�ic, Recreation, and Open Space Areas Federal Way Planning Area Table 11 Inventory of Federal Way Schooi District #210 School Recreation Areas Federal Way Planning Area � � Table 11 (Continued) �' � � � . . � ... .............._......._.._.................._............._.._..._;.... ...••--•_...._. _................................_...__......_._..._..._.__ ....................___. Lake Dolloff Elementa School "�� 5.00 O en la a�ea, la round, aved court Lake Grove Elementa School : 5.79 O en la area, la round, aved court ... Lakeland Elementa� School_" ; 5.00 Open_pl� area ,..play�round : _paved court_ _. ._... ._.._._...... . _... ... ......._ . ._.....___ ...... _ .. ...... Mark Twain Elementary School ;._._..__ 2_83 ._ __Open play area court .._� .._..... ._..........__.........._......... Mirror Lake Elementa School 4.52 O en la area, la round, aved court Nautilus Elementary School 5.03 Little League fields, open field, playground, � paved, court ._..._.... .._.... ........_....�..._ ................_ ... .. ..... ... .. ..`........ . ...«.... . ..... .......» .............»...... ........». ....'..... "'......... ....... . ............... .. .. ... ... ... Olympic View Elementary School 5.64 Little League field, open play field, ; play�round,, paved court .... .. .«.... .. ... "'�"""'. . .. ........... ..... ......... «. ...»..»......... .«...» ............... ......« ............. ...... ............... .. . ....... ...... .»..... "' _ Panther Lake Elementary School _� _ 5.13 _Open play field,_�lay�round court ................. Rainier Vew Elementa School *'•. �f� 5.00 O en la fieid, la round, aved court Shervvood Forest Elem. School 4.68 O en la field, la round, aved court Silver Lake Elementarx School _ . _ . :_ ......... 5.23 . Open_play feld ,.play�round :.. paved court ...................._..._...................._...._..... .... ..._.. . ._.................. .Twin Lakes Elementary Schooi _ : 5.03 . Open . pia�_fieid, .pia�r�round �paved court ._.__... --_.•. � Valhalla Elementa School ` :�� O en la field, la round, aved court Wiidwood Elementa Schooi 3.76 O en la field, la round, aved court Subtotal < > : ;J2:45< >:;; -• .............................._....._.._............._............._.............;::.._................... ._........._........_...._....................__........_.............._-_•-•-•........_........ ..._....._ ......................_....._.......... ..................................:........................... ................................_.........................._......................_......................... Junior Hi h Schools Iliahee Junior High School 15.82 Baseball field (305'outfield), softball field, `:• , tennis court (2�, track, footbali field . ._.._ ........................._..._ g _...._............._._..._......._.......,.. ._.._.__......... . _........••-.................................................. Kilo Junior Hi h School * :� Baseball field, softbaii field, footbail field, __...._,,.�..._�„�_�.. '• track lane cinder) ..................;_...... . ...... ......._................._.........._................ ._.........._._... ••_-•-_....-- •- • ..... .. ........... ...... .. _...... Lakota Junior Hi$h School_ ....................:. 5.72 courts �12) . _ .. _ . _ ..•-••.. � ... � ..... _ ....................... ..._... . . __-•••._..... _.. ......_....... ... . .._....... _. _. _. Saca'awea Junior Hi h School 3.72 Sa halie Junior Hi h School --- �see sa9na�e Pa►�c� Subtotai 35 26; . "' ..«....».....».««......»...« .....................6........................ .........«......................................».»........"'...............«.."""....."'........ ...................«..... ...».. .. .. ... Hi h Schools Decatur Senior High School 16.64 Baseball field (306' outfieid), football field, ........•••--••• ........................•••••--•-•..... : track, tennis courts 4 .. ................. ... . .........c.a._ __..... .. ... ... ..._.... ....... ....... ..................... .............._.......... .. ..... ........ _.._........... -.---- -- Federai Way High Schooi 21.38 Footbali stadium w/track, p�actice field/track, � _ baseball field, tennis courts (3� ..................•---................................-•-•-._..............................:....._........ .. . ... .......................---••••••-•-•__...--•••••_-•.._- ---•-.....---........-----........ . .. ... . .. Harry S Truman High School/Merit : 3.95 Open play area School . Jefferson Senior Hi�h School *: 20.00 Baseball field tennis courts (4� . football_field ... ... ........q,.. ................................�...................«.....«......... � " ................«.... . .... .. Subtotal S1'.97. TOTAL , : 189.68 _ . _ _ . . _ _ _ __ ,__ _ _:. .............................................._.._.................---...---.._...........:.....................-•---- •---........................................-••........................................._..................... * Outside city limits : ............... .............--•��--•-----......_..._.... ....__..........................._............_............................._........_•••............. ........_.. . ........................................... .. .. ... (9) Assumes 50% of total site is devoted to recreation purposes (2) Acreage is induded in Saghalie Pa�lc Citv ofFederal Wav Comnrehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page III - 13 � Private Recreation Facilities/Miscellaneous Facilities �thin the Federal Way planning area there are several associations and organizations that provide non-profit recreation opportutities. The facilities are listed below: Table 12 Summary of Private Recreational Areas and Facilities (Non-Profit) Federai Way Area w � � � � : Cam Kiiworth Bo Scouts * 52.0 : Cam in , traiis, lod e ; Federai Wax American Little Lea�ue_ _ 2_58 ; Little Lea $ue . fields �2�_ ; Federal WaY Nat'I Little Lea$ue 21.40 ��L'ittle Lea�ue fetds �� �� = Glendawn Bible Baptist Camp *� �20.00� Camping, lodge, R.V. hook-� : up, cabins, swimming beach, � baseball field, soccer field, ;.._......�...._.__.�....._..._ .�....._......_.._ _.; covered�pla�r.a.rea, .._...._ ' .....; ; Cheri Association _�_�. _ 0.75� Outdoor pool Marine Hilis Rec. Assoc. 3.00 ��Tennis co�urts, outdoor ool • Ponce DeLeon Park 2.00 � Open play area, lake access, ' = pla round ;.._........_._......._......._. _. j _:.. .__..-.: ; Star Lake Boat Access "� 0.24 : Lake access `: Twin Lake Golf Course 120.00 ' Golf course, outdoor pool, _ .._�__ ` tennis courts. clubhouse = Treasure Island Park 4.80 � Open play area, lake access, ;.. ..�...___..__.____..._._._. ... _�IaX�round_ ___ ' The Rid�e Park � 5�10 � Open play ar� ea, �lay$round �' ....: ��We erhauser Bonsai Garden �� �0.50 �µ Bonsai arclen, trail : We erhauser Rhododendron Gar+den 24.00 € Rhododendron arden ; Weyefiaeuser Trails and Open 175.00 ; Trails and Open Space S ace ; ;., . , _ �:. � .......:::::.._........:.::.. ........_.::.............:::: _._._..:. �43'l: 3T ....;.................._....................................._.._.......: >•--......__........_........_ ..................._._.................._............. ..___..................:.._..................... ......._..........._....._........; ' Outside C Limits � � � � �� � � Citv otFederal Wav Comprehensive, Parl� Recreation and Onen Space Plan � Page Ill - 14 Section Ill - Existing Park and Recreation Services � � Below is a list of organizations thax offer commercial recreational opportunities Table 13 Summary of Private Recreational Areas and Facilities (Commercial) Federal Way Area � � 'I � �� � � a 4 2 Bally's Pacific West Sport & Racquet Racquetball courts, tennis ' Club : courts, indoor lap pool, : aerobics, wei htroom Boys/Gir1s Club � Gym, game room, crafts ; _.._.._.�..._....._..__.._. ; room, library � ; ...._...._.__ ................_.....___..._........ ; ._...... Brooklake Communit Center : Lod e meetin hall = Cascade Athletic Club ; Raoquetbali, gym, aerobic, _� indoo�ol : ••__•• •_.__...........___. ........, Christy's Golf Range "� Driving range, putting green, � 9 hole par 3�oif course � ... ......_....;... .--..-......: Enchanted �Ilage/Wild Waves "� Rides, zoo, aviary, museum, ; wading pond, picnic area, 13- '• : hole, Krogolf, water slides, : wave ool Federa Wa y Senior Center * � Senior cente : ..., ................._........... _ Gy_mnastics Unlimited ����� .�_ � �_; Gxm�astics trainin� Pattison's West Skatin Center : Roller skatin rink Secoma Lanes ; 32 lanes, pro shop, � restaurant, loun�e_ _.__.�' ».........._......._ ................................»................_....._........a•-._»..»_....._................» i * Outside Cit Limits Cilv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page Ill - 15 i Listed below is a breakdown of existing park, recreation and open space areas by type within the Federal Way planning area. Each site has been categorized according to the definitions listed on the previous page. Table 14 Summary of Park Areas By Type Federal Way Planning Area • � 1 � Mini Pa .........._..._....._......._..._ ................. .....__._.........._ _..�.... ,.._..........�... _..._..........._ ...............__......_._.... _..........._.._................................._......... .._... ; Coronado Park 1.5 : Partiali develo ed Subtota/ >:1s5:»:<:: ;............ ......_._-..•••..........._ ....................._........__...........................;.._.__....................___ ..... .......; ;�Nei�hborhood Parks € : . _ ........... ..... . . ............._........._......... _ .__.......... .........._ _..... .. .... ..._......_ ....:......... ._....� Adelaide Elementary School 4.78 � Developed �.....�...�School District)__..__...._...._�...._......._ .._...._......_......_:.._...� ..............._...�....�...�...._..._.._ _: � Adelaide Park . . . 6.70 �. Partiail�develo� . _............_........... _ ................._. ..._ . .__.__..............: : Alderbrook Park Portion 5.10 Partiail develo ed ' Alderdale Park 2.00 Develo ed _ Brigadoon Elementary School 4.14 Developed School Distrid Camelot Elementary School * 5.00 Developed „_ �Schooi Distrid� . ......... __-___.......:_ .__.....�......_._.._........_....._..�....< Dash Foint Hi hland Pa�lc ��� 5.00 Develo ed Enterprise Elementary School 5.00 Developed ' �School District�_......._......_..._ ................... . _ ` :........_ ._.....__•_ ••••..._.•-•..._...._..:....._.._........._............ ....__. _: French Lake Park 10.00 Develo ed ' Green Gables Elementary School 5.89 : Developed : (School District� _.._._...._....._---_._...�.._ _. ; ' y........... . a » .............._........................................_...� ° Lake Doiloff Elementary School * ��� 5.00�� �; Developed '• „._ �School Distrid ._..__..._.....�.._. _.._-• - «.__.__.._.........�.._...__._..._.._._._..._.__.; Lake Grove Elementary School� 5.79� Developed School Distrid 's Lake Grove Park 4.80 ; Partiall� develo�ed ����� �........_....___.......___.__...._..._._.......__......._...._ ............ .... ' Lakeland Elementary School * t � 5.00 ��� Developed � School District Mark Twain Elementary Schooi 2.83 Developed Schooi District Harry S Truman High School/Merit 3.95 Developed : scnool (school District�.__.._..__.._ ' ` :..................._....... ..__..._•_••_•••••-••;.........................._..........__.._..........................; Mirror Lake Elementary School 4.52 ; Developed ;__W.�School District�_..._..__._........_. . ..;_...._..._.••_••..._.__...__._. . ._. ...; ................ ....................... • ............. .._... : Mirror Lake Park .... 3�40 : Partiall�r develo�ed _ _ _ _ �.: ;...__. .••.....••...._............_..._..._.__ .............._............... . ............ _. ...._... Nautilus Elementary School 5.03 : Developed : �(School District)__ ___...___._. : ; ......_.__ ... .......................... :_.•••_••.......................__......._._.........._........_.. Olympic �ew Elementary School 5.64 ' Developed School District � � ..._.........._......._.._._.___...-••-- -.......•••....._.......� ........_........ __...__._....... ' ..................««......«..»... . . . p....................«.... . ...� :......... " Outside Cit,� Limits_ : : ...... _....... ___. _. ...................... .............._........._:...._...........__._.._.._......._.............................. ; �(1) Assumes 50% of total site is devoted to recreafion purposes. � � � � � � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive. Park. Recreatio� and OQen Space Plan � Page Ill - 16 Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services � � Table 14 (Continued) . .. . ; _ ._ ' .... ' � OI m ic View Park Portion� �3.00 Develo �� Palisades Park 3.20 : Develo Panther Lake Elementary Schooi 5.13 � Developed School District = Rainier View Elementary School * 5.00 : Developed � `• �School District� .._ ' _� � Sherwood Forest Elem. School� 4.68�� D veloped : �School Distrid.�____..__..........._... � : ;.......... ........... ......._.._.....__................._. p .. .__. _....... Silver Lake Elementary School 5.23 : Develo ed School Distrid Twin Lakes Elementary School 5.03 Developed School District Valhalla Elementary School * 5.00 Developed ; (School District�___._.._� ............:.........__ . � ` Wildwood Elementary School � 3.76 �� Developed ������ 's (School District)_..__._....._-_••-•.�......._._.... _.... `• ; ;.._....... ..__.........._...:...... ._ ........................._........ .....; � Widwood Park 2.30 € Developed _._____.___. �. ' y.......••••••••...».........._ .........................»»............................». ......... n .......... ` ..... . . ....i Su�`0�, :�'''��.��y�a7.V;`��':'':. ; Communit� Parks � � ,..._....._ ............... ...........__..............w.......................... _..............__.....4........_ ... ............____......_.._.; : Five Mile Lake Park (County) ._.. ...._ 26.50 . µDeveloped .�..��._�_..�; ;....._..........__ ..................__._........................ • Lake Geneva Paric Count * 18.50 : Develo ed Lakota Park 28.20 • Develo d 's Saca�awea Park _ 18.30 ; _Developed : ..........._ ................................... .............._.: .........._...._.._..................: ;.._._._......... , : Sa�halie Park . ..._._._. 36.00 � Develo�ed .�......_._.�._..__.._.._.� >_ .............. .._............_...._...._. ; .,........._W....,,,..-••............... Subtotal <::12�y5Q:;;>>::; ; Lar e Urban Parks � : r ..........�.•••..••••••••_••••••••...••••.......•••...._...._..»»•••••••••_•••••.._ ..............._....._.. :_ _ Steei Lake Park 51.70 ; Developed __ _ _ � . : ._ ..................._...._...................................._........ .......... ......................_. ............ Subtotal <:5'1:70::>:::::>- : Re�ional Parks ..... � .. � . � ........... . s :.......... . .... ..._ ................. .......•--_............._:.._......._......__._..._..............._..............._....._. ; � Dash Point State Pa�ic �State) __....... _. 230.00 a Partiall� developed .__.._...._._._. : ;... ........................................._...._.._....... . ..•••...._.. . . West H lebos State Park State 65.00 : Partiall develo ed � Subtotal >295:DQ:;::;>::;: ; ..............«....«.......«...»»......._..................«............«."'._."' ".............._.._....*. ... ..............._......_»............._......i : Linear Parks : � ;........_........_....••_•-.._......_ ................_••-••-....___.._...._...... ..........._............. :..............._.........._.........................._._......._... ; West Cam us Traii 27.80 � Partiail develo ed BPA Trail Park Phase I 45.00 ; Develo ed ' Subtotal T2;80 : ' ;_....._ .............•--.._.........___............---_...__........._-----_.._..._ .................._.._.:..................._...._..__..._................__._.._...; " Outside C' Limits (1) Assumes 50% of total site is devoted to recreation ur oses � Ciiy ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Oven Snace Plan Section III - Ezisting Park and Recreation Services Page Ill - 17 � Table 14 (Continued) . � . ___. _...._..____.....; S S ecial Use Areas = Decatur Senior High School r .16.64 Developed '• _ �School Dist�d� _ ' i Dumas Bay Park 19.30 � Develo� ; ----: `• Federat Way High School (School 21.38 : Developed _ : € i Distrid) : _ = F�ed rae I Way Pool (Kenneth Jones 0.50 De loev�ped �� Memorial Poo Count -_ Iilahee Junior High School (School 15.82 Developed District = Kilo Junior High School •(School 10.00 Developed District� ........__ .. ._..___. Klahanee Lake Community/Senior � ��7.11 � �Developed Ce nter :. ....................._......._................_.................__....- •-•••••-..___....._......................._.._... ............_......................; Lake Dolloff Fishing Access 1.30 ' Partially developed State " � Lakota Junior High School (School 5.72 Developed _ Distrid North Lake Fishing Access 5.50 Developed '• State * � � _..... � Sacajawea Junior High Schooi � � ~ Developed ���� � ; / School Distrid1 : ���.��.�...���.a t......... \ ................................d._....._.....�...................._....... __. p............_........ � Saghalie Junior High School �0.00 ��' Developed School Distrid : SW 312th S�orts Court 2.00 : Developed � � �� � � �� � �; : ................._..........._._ ......__........._......_... .........._.........•- Thomas Jefferson Senior High 20.00 Developed School * School District Vsitation Retreat and Cultural 12.00 Developed Center Weyerhause� King County Aquatic 10.60 ; Developed = ; ' Center �Count� : : .__ 3ubtota/........._.._........._. :15�;a�::::.....;... ........__.._.._..._.._...._.....�......., � * Outside City Limits : }».........»......« ................... ..........."'.................».....""......... ...........».......«....p......................."'..........«...................................i (1) Assumes 50°K of total site is devoted to recreation purposes (2) Acreage is included in Saghalie Park � � � � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive, Parl� Recreation and Onen Space Plan � Page Ill - 18 Section 111- Existing Park and Recreation Services Table 14 (Continued) en Space Areas Aiderbrook Park Camelot Park (C Camelot Open S Campus Open S, Dumas Bay Opei Fisher's Pond hlerita�e Open S Herita�e Woods Lake Killamey Ope •-...---• ................•-- Lochaven O�en Sp Madrona Meadows Madrona Trails O Maribrook Open S� . _ ..................._._. Meadows Open_Sp, , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . Olympic View Park Panther Lake Park Poverty Bay Park SW 363rd Open Spac Twin Lakes Vsta Ope Wed�ewood S� .._...._......_. . .._� West Campus Open .... .........._._. Subtotal Undeveloped � - -- ................... ....... .._. BPA Trail Park �Phas� ............ _._ .............. Celebration Park Herita e Woods Park . Puxallup . Landfill �Co� Subtotal . II 8 II . 30.00 � Partia 16.30 ; Unde� _..... ............... _........... 12.58 ; Unde� •••_•••.._..._...;.. 2.60 � Unde� 2.40 Unde� 13.00 : Unde� .. _. _. _ .. :..............., -••-- __ 3 50 : Unde� _.... . 2.61 Unde� 38.02 Unde� z 10.82 : Unde� ..... .. ........_._.._ ...._...... 14.40 ; Unde� ,............•••••--:.._......._... 6.20 : Unde� � 2.20 Unde� 2.10 Unde� .. _......... _. _:.... _. _....... ..3.30 : Unde� ...... 17.75� Partia 70.30 Unde� 48.00 Unde� _.;._ .. 45.39 Unde� ......._ ..........: ...._......... 5.05 : Unde� . 3.60 Unde� 2.00 Unde� . ___...� .....:......._....... 51.80 ; Unde� 45.00 : U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83.50 U i 1.66 U --�— 30.00 : U * Outside Citv Limits Cit�ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and O�en Space Plan Section 111- Existing Park and Recreation Services Page III - 19 � INVENTORY OF SPORT FACILITIES Table 15 Inventory of Existing Sport Facilities Federal Way Area . ► . � .......................... ....«........ ""'..........».........«..............p..........«.«................................»............«..........j ; Baseball Fields ���������� ���.....�.�. • • :•......•-•._..._....__. ........_ ............................_••--......_.__............._.._..._...........;.---..._.......•-•-----_..................._...............•....••- 1 Decatur Senio� Hi h School 1 Federal Wa Senior Hi h School : .1 Kilo Junior Hi�h * : ' ............. ........ .... .... ....................................:............................._.......................................... : � 1 Illahee Junior High School � � ........................... ............................................................................................4....................................................._...._••-.........; 1 Lakota Park : 1 li hted 1 Saca'awea Park 1 li hted : 1 Sa�halie Park ......................•--........... : 1 li�hted•--•--....._..................... � � .......................... ..... . . .................._..p......... .................5 � 1 T. Jefferson Senior Hi h School * : ' .�_ ............................_....._......................_._... <� Total �elds��3li��hted ;• .......................... ._......... .............................._.._...................:..................--•-...-••.............._.............................; ; Softball Fields r ............... � > .......................... ........_..........._.................................................._..................4.-•--••-•••-----......._..........._........._..._.•..•--.......... 1 Illahee Junior Hi h School � 1 Kilo Junior Hi h School * '• 1 Saca�awea_Park : 1 li : j ............» ............ . .......... ..................._......................»...........p.........!l................."""'................».....«.............� : .....1 .. Sa�halie `--1 li$hted...._......._.... ......__..... � : ...... ....._. ......... ........._ ......................................... •-• - • •••--........... 2 Steel Lake Park 2 li hted • ._ _. . _ ___ _ ._ .... . .... . ..__ � . S Tc�ta! F�elds 4 li `hfed ;.._ ..............._..... ............................................. ......................a......• : Little Lea ue/Youth Softball rir """""""""" ; : 3 Adelaide Elementa � 4 Bri�adoon . Elementarx ':. ': , .......................... ......... . ................. . ......................4..-••-•---••-•-..._..._...................._..._.._.................; : .3 Camelot Elementary .* _ � ; ............ ............................. .... ..._. .._.................. :....._..--•--••••---.......................•••....---•..................; 0 Ente rise Elementa 2 Federal Way American Little League ; � .Complex .. _ .......... � : > .......................... . ........ .. ..................................»...................d............«..............."'.........................................� 4 Federal Way National Little League : .Complex ................................... `• ; } ..............'"'......_.. . ...__... .. ..................................p..............................................»..._.....................t :............1 Glendawn Baptist.Bible_Cam ._..............:........._..•-•-...............................•--......................: ...... ..._. p...* .... ... ..... .... 0 Green Gables Elementa 2 Ha S. Truman Hi h/Merit School 4 Lakota Park :.........._ ............... ......................................._......._.......................................... :.............__...................................__.........._......: '• 4 Lake Dolloff Elementar� " � '• } .......................... ........................................................ . ......................�..................................................................»......( 3 Lake Grove Elementary 4 Lakeland Elementa * � 2 Mark Twain Elementary ; : , ..................................._............................................. ------•-•---•--.......¢.....................................................---.................; :................ ........... .....................•---------...............-•-----�-----------........................... ;............................_.........._....................._..........: * Outside City Limits : 1) Invento does not reflect ualit or condition of facilit � � � City o1'Federal Wav Comprehensive, Park, Recreation and Onen Space Plan � Page 111- 20 Section III - Ezisting Park and Recreation Services � � Table 15 (Continued) � � !__l �� � � . . . _ } 2 Mirror Lake Elementa� ������ 2 Nautilus Elementa � 3 _� Olxm Ye w Elementary�_ ����_�. .�,,,,__.____� �.3 Panther Lake Elementa �_����_�„_ , .___ ................._.........._......�!.......................... ' � 1 Rainier �ew Elementa * 2 Sherwood Forest Elementa : 0 Silver Lake Elementar�__ ; � .... ... -_••..•• ................._......_...._........... ........ , : 1 Steel Lake Park �._�__��_�„_�.�� _..�__..� „........_ ............. _.. __. _.................... ` 2 Twin Lakes Elementa 4 Valhalia Elementa * ; 3 wldwood Elementar� � � �� ��� _ ; '•. t•••�..... ................., ..............«......«...................«............ ��i:�i:�;_��.~?: . .::5:9<::>:<::;;>:;�;; �„��::>::::r:v:���;�:::>::?!�:�:i:::>::::::>:::::: :� � ,. . ............................. .'TQ�'dl>�l�lfiS:::::'::>:>':> `:»:'::»::>:::>:::>::>:::»= i:.::s:::»:::::.::::::» ::: ::::::::::::::::::.:::::::::::::::::::»::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::...»..._......... .____......._....._._.....................�............... : Soccer Fields ;.._..........__......... __ ..............._..__....._.__......_..........._....................._.....••- :.........................._...M._. ..._.........__.....; : 1 Adelaide Eleme�tary __._....�._____. ____: ..__,_� y .......... ....... . ..... ..... . 4............«................�..........................». ...... .. ...............«» «.«......» ..... 1 Bri adoon Elementa 1 Camelot Elementa * ; 1 Enterprise Etementa� : ....__. � ,...........__........... _...._..._ . ...._ ..............................._..................._. .. : 1 Glendawn Ba�tist Bible Camp * : : ; .... .... _ .............. .....__.._.._................ .... . _.......;...._..... .�...... ._.._. _; '• 1 Green Gables Elementa ; 1 Ha S. Truma� Hi h/Merit School : 1 .... Lake Dolloff ElementarX * _�__.�_. �.._..._...._._._..�__._�_��� ;........_._.......... .........._._ ....................._.............. , : : 2 Lake Geneva Park ' � : ,.._ ...................... ......__...._............._-•-_._......_...............................--•••........t..................__..._........._.____....._..._..__..< 1 Lake Grove Elementa 1 Lakeland Elementa * 3 Lakota Park One is all-weather ;.........._........_ ... ...................._•_•••-•--_............__.............._..............___....;......................._._......_....._..._..__.._...............; = 1 Mark Twain Elementa�_ _ __.._. � � :-•••--•-...._._.----._. •••.._...._ .............._._.................___ . ..............�._••-_••.._.•_•-•..._.._ .............__................; 1 Mastis Field ; 1 Mirror Lake Elementa '_. � 's _ Nautilus Elementary ____.._._.._.__.._.__���____. _ :__. .._ ......... ......................._.._................ ......__..............................._....._.....: : 1 Olympic View � : y .......................... ......... ... ...»............... ••••......»»i..........................................•••••__........_...».......� 1 Panther Lake Elementa 1 Rainier View Elementa * : 1 Saca,�awea Park : � ,...................._ .............._ ...._..................._.........._.........._............_..............._...._...._........._.... _.< ; 1_ Sa�halie _ ; li$hted; all __ :•----._. ..._........._.. ..._......-••_......__..._._.....__. ;...... 1 Sherwood Forest Elementa 1 Silver Lake Elementa ; 1 Steel Lake Park : all weather ; ._..__. ........_ ................__-•-..._......_.........................._..........._.._.._........: ....._............_.._..: : 1 Twin Lakes Elementary _ _ '• : ,...._.......••--••-•••••- •-•-.......-•••-_•-•••....__..._.._.•••.... .. ..._........_.......:._......_._.._ .............._......._........._...................< 1 Valhalla Elementa * 1 Witdwood Elementa School ;::<...::<:<::�:: :::� � :��:�'.`�f��s:���ti�ls::��` �.<>::>:::�::.<.:��<::>::>;;::>�»:::::::_ ........::..................:...:..,.::... . :.... : .......... :.:...:.: . . .... .:. ..........:...... .....::::. . .. . . ........ ... :::::. .....:.:.. :.:::::::::.:.:.::.;.:::._ ..:. .. . .:. , . ..... ..... .... ...::. ::: :::........... :.::::.�::::::.:::::...... ._:;:..:::::::: .::: :.:..:. . .......... ...... .:....:..:.:.:.r,.::::.,:� �>:,::;:r�:.::..�::::.,;r:;:........;:;;:;;,;::,::.:::..::::...;..,;.,..:;::::,.1.::;.:.:r,.: ............................_.........._._...--••...._._..._....... :.............. 4 < � ......................«... ......................................................................_..................... �............_......«........«..»............."".."'.....«...... '• * Outside Ci�y Limits } 1) Invento does not reflect ualit or condition of facil" Cilv otFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan ' Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page III - 21 • a , � . � F o ball Fields = 1 Decatur Senior Hi h Schooi 1 Federal Wa Memoria Field 1 Stadium ; ! 1 Federal Wa Senior H�School ? _ > 1 Kilo Junior Hi h School * '• 1 Illahee Junior Hi h School � � 1 Lakota Pa�1c � > ............{ = 1 Saca'awea Pa 1 Sa halie Par1c � � Li hted = 1 T. Jefferson Senior Hi h School ` s<:>:::;:»:::,: : :o' ' �is ::::::::::::::::::;;::;::»::::>:::::::::«:::»::<: :.�:::>:::::> <::::>::::::>>>::::::::>::::::;:::::::<>:::«::« ::::T. � >: :... ::.. t. t.�iel .....:,....... ' ::::::.... . _ _ ; : � Ten nis Courts � "'..._"..`.._. .__....._.._.._;_._... ... ......._ .; ��� .Public Tennis Courts .�...��...�� ��.... ����.� ...� 1 Alderdale Park 1 Adelaide Pa�ic ;.._ ...................... __.._..._....................................._.........__.........__...........:.__...._. ................._...._............_ < ' 4 Decatur Senior Hi�h School______�� ;.� ........................ :._.._.......... _...._...__............... 3 Federal Wa Senior Hi h School 2 Five Mile Lake Park • � 1 Illahee Junior Hi�h � � _; „ 2� _ Lakota WastewaterTreatment Plant��;��� � ��� 2 Saca'awea Paiic ����� Li hted 4 Sa hatie Park Li hted � ' 4 T. Jefferson Senior Hi h School ' ` ° ...._.._.... ......._........_..........._ ..............._� �...._...................._........;.........._......................._.....................................€ : 1 SW 312th SPorts Cou�t_Park � . M... � .. � .µµ. � .. � > .............._......__ .... ....._..... ..._...._......_................................ 25 Subtota/ _ ' Private Te nnis Courts '• ;.__. ........._ ................ ..._.............._.........._........__._ ' _......._..._.............. � ....._......_.... ..;.._...._........._ ' 6 Pacific West S rt and Ra uetball : • _ ..P° ............. �.._.............. .._........................__...... ............... 2 �Twin Lakes Golf Course 10 Subtotal > •••..... 3� ..... .....�..... ......._ To#at �ourts�.........�........._... �� _.._�.�. ._...._..�.�......._....� .._.....�.-••�... ` :::.. ..< � Racc�uetbail Courts : : ,......._.... ._.__. .._ ....................____......_.._..............;._.._................_............_.._....._...._......._......; : 9 Cascade Athietic Club ; .Private � ����� � ��_ 7�� Baily's Pacific West Sport and���� � Private r : R�uetball.Club ,,,.�,,,,,�.,,.,,,,,,.....� ........................:._._...____..._.._......_.... .•,•,,,•,,,,•,,,,-.-•,.•,,_•r .::::::, ...... ................. .....::: , ........................._...i ��:�i>:�>:�>:�i:�; � �.G::::::::>::::::> : ::>:: > ::>:::> :: :::::::: >::: <:::>To�af; . �ur�s:: >::>::>:::;;;::>::>::;:::;:>> ; «.;:.; ;:.;:.: . . . :::.::... . ::::::::. .._....._. .................. .. . _ ..:;;;;;;::::.:.,::.;;;;:.;:::,: : : s» :::::::..:::............ .:::.:::::::.::::�:::::::..:::::::::::.:»:::::::::.::........................_......».»�._...................................._....._............•-••.........� ' * Outside City Limits ; �!� lnventory does not reflect quality or condition of facility : Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive. Parlk Recreation and Onen Space Plan , Page 11l - 22 Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services � � ,'I � � � r� I U � � � � � � � � Tabie 15 (Continued) . . . _ . . : _ '_'_'_'_''_ _ = Swimmin Pools � W ' 1 Batly's Pacific West Sport and : 61ane 25 yanl indoor lap pool ; � Rac�uetbaii Ciub_� _ ___._ .�_�._ � 1� Cascade Athletic Club �10 yar+d x 23 yarci indoor lap ' ....... . _.__.. ..Pool �� 1 Federal Way Pool (Kenneth Jones �: 6 lane indoor pool, 25 yard Memorial Poo : "T" ' 1 Marine Hills Recreation Association � 2�arc1 outdoor o�ol�_ � '������µ Weyerhauser King County Aquatic ����� 50 meter indoor pool, 25 ya Center indoor pool, indoor diving ; _._...... . ._. _....._._.........:..P°ol ..._..... ....._..� 1 Twin Lakes Golf Club : 25 arcl outdoor ol 1 Mar Cheri Association : 52' x 27' outdoor ool ;:><::>::::>::<:: . ,: . #jt7!> „` `I '':<;::>::»»::>;;>:>:;:::::>`:::::»:<: ..:::: .: :>�:0::::::>:::::>::::: »:<:::;>::;:»<::>:::::::>::::>::>::::<:>::::>T_. P00 5<: ; ...:: :::. ,: :.: :. .... . �::,. . . ...�.F...�.::::�:.. ..�:::::: ..�.�.:F::.:..;;.:... ;;:.;.; : : ::.:.:.:::: ;;. � _ « ....................... . .»1........»......«...«...._.... ..._.........».................«.............................« Tracks ; 1 Decatur Senior H�h School ��_ ; All Weather � _ .....__... _. ........._...... •-•-_._..... ............._.................................................: � 1 Federal Way Memorial_Fieid �. �� 1 All Weather : ;.. _..... ............ . ..._......+ ....................._................................._......_.......� 1 Federal Wa Senior Hi h School 1 Cinder 1 Five Mile Lake Park * 1 J in Trail �1 F(ito Junior Hi�h School E 1 Ci�der � .........._........... ............. __.........._< ._........ ._....._..._ ' 1 Illahee Junior Hi h School ; 1 Cinder ' ; ........ ._...... �........._._.........._.._....._......_ ..................._...... .......... ._.........._.... ; '• 1 Lakota Park 1 Cinder 1 Pacific West S ort and Ra uetball = 1 Indoor Track : 1 Sacajawea Park :_1 Cinder__ ; _......... _ .............. .. _......... .................... _... _.................. _.... : ....... : 1 Saca�awea Jr Hi�h_School .____. : 1 All-Weather __ __ _�� >...._ .................... _........». ....•••_•••••a•••••••••...............__..... 1 T. Jefferson Senior Hi h School " ; 1 Cinder <>:�1; >:<:;:::: : »'�°`otat::�'`racks: :::> <= »: =::>::::>:::::<:>::::;<::::>::: ;.....:.._.........-••._ .................__......................................_._..........._.........._...;...._........_.................................._.................._.; : * Outside City limifs : � :._...._ ...................... .._.........._....._...................................................-••-•••-•.. :_..._............_.._................_..........._._..............; :(1) lnventory does not reflect quality or condition of facility Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section 111- Existing Park and Recreation Services Page 111- 23 DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION The Federal Way Park, Recreation and Cultural Services Department is one of seven departments in the City. Each of these departments report directly to the City Manager who in turn reports to the Mayor and City Council. �thin the Park, Recreation and Cultural Services Department there are eight separate divisions. Four of these divisions report directly to the director and the other four report to the deputy director. The department organization is as follows: ..... Director Arts Commission Youth Commission ........••••-•- Parks and Recreation Commission Deputy Director Community/ Senior Center Community Recreation/ Cultural Services Athletics Capital Improvement Projects Vis'itation Retreat Center Grounds Facilities Total Stat�ing Levels Contract support Over the course of a year, the City Park, Recreation and Cu(tural Services Department maintains a permanent staff of 30 people and employees an equivalent of seven seasonal FTE's during the peak recreation season. The table below illustrates the staffing levels for the three major divisions within the department. Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive. Park. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Page Ill - 24 Section Ill - Fxisting Park and Recreation Services � Table 16 Staffing Level for Park and Recreation Department 1994-95 City of Federal Way � � DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS � Operating Cost The cost of parks and recreation services in Federal Way has averaged about 9.4% of the total city's � operating budget over the last four years. For the 1995 fiscal year, park, recreation and cultural services was 9.1% of the total city operating budget. � _J � � RECREATION PROGRAMS The table below summarizes recreation participation levels for Crty sponsored recreation programs. The heading "participant days" means one person participating in one activity in one day. For � example, one person taking a dance class that meets ten times, accounts for ten "participant days". Listed below is a summary of participation. � � � ��� Steel Lake Parlc - estimate based on a tally of beach users (daily attendance) � The total amount of participation in city-sponsored park and recreation activities represents about 3.9 occasions per capita. Cily ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section III - Existing Park and Recreation Services Page III - 25 � Table 17 Comparison of Park and Recreation Budget to Total City Budget City of Federal Way Table 18 Summary of Recreation Programs (Annual) City of Federal Way � � ° �'*w . * t ��'� � � '*�` �, � � � 2� . . �� t����' .��� � � ��`�� a ����� � a �� a $ � 8 �3, - � '� ' �� � 5 , � � , �"^��v��* M �`�, � � . t� � p � � . � h $� � a �� � � ��`�� �" ���� -n ' x a� _ �, { ,_ � ° �Y , �.� � �.a. � i y ry > � ' �t . 9 � _� � � � � '"� � � , �. f �� "i < ��� `!� t�� �" � y . � '^� a , �-+r r � V � . a � �, " a ° � ' � . a �a= , c�� c 8 an'� � & r.4'�C a � : - r �* .. a �+ , i � � � 'rC , � i , p .� $ i � q +a � � � E.. t . � 4 �. 4 �r F F F �1.� �9� Y ��"� � �* t� 1 '� 4 � �, -� t t �f �} �. 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"� �- } ` �������' � �Z ��, �t.� �;��`�;,,� �; � � � � , 1, ,r' , ) J . , ?��„ � � ,�� � � '��t�-�. ���; ��, � �„ � � � � � �" � � . � ��� r � � J � ���'� g � � � � � � < a � � � vn, g � � 4 � p t $ [ � a �.� + � wp» �" ��. t� . �'1` a,' C✓ k �f'x} �r°'� t" :`��� '�n�..'•^ ..,� � .�t� �„i�� .�� �,y .�� k, � i r_ s ct ��� .� g � � y �,� � ��' � �� �.t- �,� � � �� � �t'`�f � �„t ��,'� � �� �f,�� *� ! °���,�..: � "'�� � F � r � .F*a� t'k, �w� �3 � r f � e� � � �, '�� d ��`��¢ ��L�r'��x�' �s � {� 4 � `� �� �'`�*e4 i�� �� 9 ` T i•+,� z �� � � ��''� °�t.� �.r� � ��,�� � 4=�''+�-�'�'��� . �'� a � � k :r � c- �. � I �-&� ...., ..a ,a . ; �` �� � '�`� e� � 5 � `*�1"��' � d i'$,�' �.� �' � . � 'a s., ��. ." � � ..�'.�� �-� 'm � ,{ ,t""" - � e� ,,. � � � gT ,� �`b y�y' ,�r� � 3i � �,� _-f � -�� � �3 �,q '. a ��� s � �+° � �, f � ^-, wvw � t at �, j;�✓ �'s x 42 �eef ° »;-1��C � g . �.�b' A �. � �,�:� �n �.;. � '� ,; �, "'�� �� � � � 1 x � P=„q�� j ��� � { .. ��� arr� * � � ,r' � e=. � �� � �' .,,,� ,'�'. ` S �x �`.�"�,' n`'tk.� � � � e � �' ,tv� ��,;,s,��r�i°l�` er *` 1 ,�r L ��y.'� t " #����� �� � � «�d�l��"j;+�� '4� „�; �''��' dsB`� '."� � t , � ix ^�.�� . , �� . � y > � s � Mx �4 yi � � � �� "�.i� �,�s'. 1V ¢ v � � . � � R ' .�„ � �„° T ,� .m* �` R � � e r � ^ �a_'. �y` �.., +c�m,.� � t°# � - � , 3 7 ,� � +g �°R' °..�'` ' .�` ` ti,�� c ,�E'< a j�,�� `° '�t �[�"� � "��� � J�" . 3�a �e,�"�� �_ ; ��' � � �+& '� � � �'� , � , ,�"� ��' . -"`� � �� a � g �,- � }` � <� '"'�'�, ' •*< � ; up : � `� �a ` �,w4 €'+ � � �� � �t . ,.`'��� ? . .°�� � �* ,* `�_';� SECTION IV RECREATION NEEDS ASSESSMENT INTRODUCTION In 1990 a comprehensive recreation needs assessment was completed as part of the City's first pazk and recreation planning process. This element of the study included a community-wide household survey, the presentation of several public workshop meetings, contacts with user groups and input from a broad-based planning advisory committee. Since then, changes have occurred that effect community recreation needs. Some of them include: 1. 2. 3 The City's existing population has changed from 68,052 to 74,413. The population forecast for the year 2020 is 113,050. The planning area boundary has been reduced by 10% due to a reduction in the size of the potential annexation area. 4. While some acquisitions have occurred, the City has found it increasingly difficult to p anuire park land and still keep within the sernce levels recommended in the original In this section of the plan, an updated assessment of park and recreation needs in the Federal Way area is presented. These needs are documented for both park and open space land and for park facilities such as sport fields, basketball courts, etc. METHODOLOGY OF DEVELOPING NEEDS FOR FEDERAL WAY One way of ineasuring need is to develop a standard and measure that standard against the earisting mventory. Recreation standards are guides by which communities may estimate in quantifiable terms the number of acres of facilities required to meet recreation demand in their area. By attaching the standard to a population variable, it is easy to forecast future needs as the population grows. Standards are important for many reasons including: • Standards can be an expression of minimum acceptable facilities and areas. They can be looked upon as goals. • A standard is a guideline to deternune land requirements for various kinds of park and recreation areas and facilities. • Standards are a basis for relating recreation needs to spatial analysis within a community- wide system of park and open space areas. Cit�ofFederal Way Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Snace Plan Section N- Recreation NeedsAssessment Page IV -1 The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) published standards in 1970 that have been quoted almost exclusively for the last decade. Starting in 1979, NRPA developed a task force that worked three years to revise and update park and recreation standards. Published in 1983, the report titled "Recreation, Park and Open Space Standards and Guidelines", represents the most recent consensus on space and facility standards at the national level. In Federal Way, schools are now serving as local play areas. Because of this, an analysis was made of the outdoor recreational space on each site. This included the playground, open space areas and hard court surfaces. The actual amount of land deternuned for recreational use on each school site is found on Table 11 page III-9. This land was counted in the park inventory. Portions of the elementary schools were counted in the neighborhood park category and portions of the junior high school and high school sites were counted in the special use areas. Since these sites were considered for recreational purposes, the recommendations found in Section VII address how these sites should be upgraded to provide more local recreational opportunities. Approach Used to Assess Park Land Needs Developing a standard of land needs for park areas and open space is the most difficult of all types of needs analysis because it is dependent upon so many community values and variables. In fact, even the definition of park and open space is hard to establish. For instance, should one count school playgrounds, private'�golf courses, commercial landscaped areas, roof top patios, etc. as park and open space? The list can go on forever. To keep from getting into this trap, we have made a policy of only counting public recreation land and not considering school playgrounds, private landscape areas and other similar open space. To determine specific land needs for Federal Way, several analytical methods were used. These included a comparison to the NRPA Standards, comparison to other similar communities, an analysis of existing and potential park land and a look at areas of Federal Way that are not now being served. When applying a standard of open space, one must take into account the current inventory and the likely prospect of acquiring future park land. For instance, if a community is fully developed, it would be unreasonable to recommend a much higher standard than what now already exists. One important method used to identify neighborhood and community park needs for Federal Way was to analyze the cunent service areas and identify those neighborhoods not cunently being served. The service area of a neighborhood park is generally considered to be about a one half mile radius and that for a community park at a one mile radius. There are, of course, many factors that will influence the service area such as physical boundaries, population densrties, etc. Once the areas were identified that are currently not being served, it was then a matter of forecasting the number of park sites (under idea.l conditions) needed to fill the voids. Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv ofFederal Way Page IU- 2 Section IV - Recreation NeedsAssessment ' � Establishing standards for other park types is more difficult. It must take into account current � demand, as well as national trends, financial feasibility and land availability. It should be noted that even with a11 the statistical information available, a certain amount of subjective analysis and professional experience must be used to quantify the standards. Starting on the next page, recommended standards for specific types of park areas are given. � Eaisting Inventory The current park and open space system in the Federal Way planning area (PAA boundary) � contains 85 sites and consists of 1,406.07 acres. This includes land owned by the City of Federal Way, King County, State of Washington and the Federal Way School District. The park land vv�thin the Federal Way area is classified as follows: City orFedera! Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Onen Snace Plan � Section li�- Recreation NeedsAssessment Page IV - 3 Table 19 inventory of Park Land by Type and Agency (in acres) Federal Way Planning Area PARK LAND NEEDS Mini - Parks Anal.�: Cunently, there is only one mini-park in the Federal Way planning area. This is Coronado Park. On a per acre basis, these types of parks are very expensive to construct and maintain and generally serve a very limited population. Often this type of park is popular in new subdivisions which traditionally have a high ratio of young children. Comments: It is recommended that no parks of this type be developed. These types of parks should only be considered when no other options are available in a neighborhood for additional park land. Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wa� Page II� - 4 Section IV - Recreafion Needs Assessment Recommendation: (Mini - Parks) � � Neighborhood Park Needs � An—alvsis: Cunently, there are thirty (30) park or school recreation areas that fit this category. Twenty five (25) of these areas are currently within the city limits. The service area of a neighborhood park is considered to be a half mile radius. This , service area does not take into account physical boundaries such as freeways, topographic features, etc. that may influence the actual service areas. An analysis of neighborhood park service areas was made utilizing circles representing a half mile � radius. The results indicated that many neighborhoods are currently not being served. In order to cover the entire area under ideal conditions, about 11 additional neighborhood parks would be needed. This information was part of the basis for developing the neighborhood park standard. � Recommendation: (Neighborhood Parks) � � Comments: i The above goal of 1.7 acres per 1,000 population means that about 9.6 acres of additional neighborhood park land is needed for the present population. Using an average of five acres each, it means that 2 park sites are presently needed. In year 2020, the total need will be 192 � acres of neighborhood park land. �_� � L_J � � City ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section N- Recreation Needs Assessment Page II� - S � Community Park Needs Anal.�: , � Currently, there are five community parks within the planning area. However, only ■ three of these site are within the current city limits. The service area of a community park is considered to be roughly a mile to a mile and t a half radius, depending on external barriers. The community park service area analysis revealed that much of the south and extreme northeast areas of Federal Way planning area have the greatest need for community parks. � � � Comments The recommended goal of 1.4 acres per 1,000 population means that an additional � 21.7 acres is needed to meet the present demand. This is equivalent to one community park. Unfortunately, acquiring community park sites will be much more difficult � because of their size requirement. � � � ' � �� � Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv of Federal Way � Page li�- 6 Section IV - Recreation NeedsAssessment Recommendation: (Community Parks) ' �.� Large Urban Park Needs � Analysis: ,, Currently, there is one large urban park in the planning area. This is Steel Lake Park. 'I , Recommendation: (iarge Urban Parks) � �J � � Comments: The recommended goal of 1.2 acres per 1,000 population recognizes the eventual � development of Celebration Park. Based on the recommended goa1, a total of 89 acres are presently needed. By the year 2020, there will be a need for 135.7 acres of land. Once Celebration Park is fully developed, it will satisfy the need through the year 2020. , � � � �J � � Citv ofFederal Way Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section IV - Recreation NeedsAssessment Page li�- 7 � Regional Park Needs Analysis: , ' Currently, there are two regional parks in the planning area. Both are owned and � operated by the Washington State Parks Commission. Dash Point State Park maintains a large camping area which draws people from � throughout the state. To this point it serves more than just the Tacoma/Federal Way area. West Hylebos State Park is primarily a wetlands area and is designed to provide � trails and interpretative areas. Its regional impact is much smaller than Dash Point State Park. Recommendation: (Regional Parks) Comments: � � � L ' � � The recommended goal of 2.6 acres per 1,000 population is a reduction in the present � ratio. Based on this ratio, the 295 acres of regional park land will meet the need through the year 2020. � L.' �l 1 � � Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv of Federal Wax � Page IV - 8 Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment �� � , Linear Park Needs Anal,�: � Cunently, there are two sites that fit this category. These are the BPA Trail Park and West Campus Trail. LJ � lJ � � Comments: The existing ratio of 1 acre per 1,000 population represents about 74 acres of land. ' Based on the recommended goal, a total of 163.7 acres of land is presently needed. The City cunently owns an additiona145 acres of undeveloped BPA right of way that would meet a portion of this need once it is developed. By the year 2020, there will be a total need for 248 acres of linear park land. The recommended goal of 2.2 acres per � 1,000 reflects the potential for the expansion of the BPA Trail Park. � � � � � � Cit�ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV - 9 Recommendation: (I,inear Parks) � Natural Open Space Area Needs � , Anal.�: In the Federal Way area, a large amount of land is devoted just to natural open space. � Cunently, there are 415.97 acres of open space land within the planning area. Recommendation: (Natural Open Space Areas) Comments , i 1 1 The goal of 6.0 acres per 1,000 population is an increase over what now exists. � However, this is only a small fraction of the number of acres that could be preserved. A majority of this type of land is wetlands and steep hillsides that are not suitable for development. � The goal of 6.0 acres per 1,000 population means that 59 additional acres should be acquired. By the year 2020, a total of 678.3 acres will be needed to meet the demand. � � � � i � ! Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv of Federal Wav � Page IV - 10 Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment � � �_ � Special Use Areas Needs � Anal,ysis: , In Federal Way, this classification includes the indoor pools, waterfront access points and several special use parks. , � � � , Comments: The goal of 1.8 acres per 1,000 population increases the present ratio. The � recommended goal will accommodate enough acreage for additional shoreline acquisitions and a sport field complex. Based on the recommended standard, 19 additional acres are cunently needed. By the year 2020, a total of 203 acres will be .. needed. � � � � �J � , Citv ofFederal Way Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV - 11 Recommendation: (Special Use �►reas) Total Park Land Needs Analvsis: Within the Federal Way planning area, there are 1405.57 acres of park and open space land. This includes land that is owned by City of Federal Way, King County, State of Washington and the Federal Way School District. Of the 1,406.07 acres, 1240.39 acres is cunently within the Federal Way city limits. Recommendation: (Total Park Land) Comments: The recommended goal of 17.1 acres per 1,000 population is a slight increase over the present ratio. This recommended goal would provide increases in most park land categories. The most noteworthy increases are in the neighborhood, community, open space and linear park categories. This type of park site must consist of developable land and as a result will be costly and difficult to acquire. Most of the open space land is undevelopable as steep hillsides, wetlands or environmentally sensitive areas and can be acquired through the land development process. Because there is a surplus of land in the regional park category, the net overall park land need is only 32 additional acres. However, as a practical point, there is a slight to moderate need in the remaining park land categories. Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv ofFederal WaY Page IV - 12 Section IT� - Recreation Needs Assessment � , `J SPECIALIZED FACII.ITY NEEDS Establishing needs for specialized facilities such as sport fields, trail systems, swimming pools, etc. was also derived from several analytical approaches. These included: � • present recreation participation levels • needs expressed in the recreation survey (1990) • NRPA Standards • input from user groups ' • trends identified in national surveys • sport field team levels and play requirements • mathematical models � , f_ J i � � � [� � � , , � � While private facilities satisfy a certain need, they do not satisfy 100% of the public need. As a result, only a portion of their credit was given when counting the existing inventory. Starting below are recommendations for specialized recreation facilities. Tennis Court Needs Analysis: There are 25 tennis courts in Federal Way located at school sites or parks. In addition, there are ten indoor courts found in private clubs. Not included in this inventory are the occasional tennis court found in apartment complexes or other housing pro�ects. For purposes of analysis, we will give 25% credit to the private tennis courts facilities. This credit represents an addition of 2.5 courts for of total of 28 courts. Out of the 28 courts in the Federal Way planning area, six courts are outside the cunent city limits. Recommendation: (Tennis Courts) Comments: Based on the recommended goal, a total of 30 courts are currently needed. This represents a need for an additional8 courts. By the year 2020, a total of 45 courts will be needed. City o1'Federal Way Co�rehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section li�- Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV -13 Adult Softball Field Needs 275'-300' (feet) ou�eld for slow pitch; 225' (feet) for men's fast pitch and 250' (feet) ou�eld for women's slow pitch. Ali alysis: Most of the adult softball programs in the Federal Way area are managed by the Federal Way Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department. In addition to these programs, the City provides field space for South King County Modified Softball organization and the Weyerhauser corporation. All totaled, there are 87 adult softball teams. Currently, there are six softball fields in the Federal Way planning area. However, only five are within the current city limits. Four of the five fields are lighted. The best approach we have found to identify present need is to compare supply and demand. Lighted fields (4) will accommodate 3 games an evening (4 evenings a week) or 48 games per week. Unlighted fields (1) accommodate 2 games an evening (4 evenings a week) or 8 games per week. A softball league play occurs four evenings a week with weekends reserved for tournaments. Assuming two games per week, we ha.ve the following: 87 games per week demand 56 games present fields can accommodate Based on the current scheduling system, there is a deficit of 31 games a week. It is possible to gain an additional 14 games a week by scheduling games on either Friday or Sunday evenings. Even by scheduling games on both Friday and Sunday, there would still be a slight shortage of fields. Comments Based on the recommended goal, nearly six additional fields are needed. We suspect that if more fields were available, the number of teams would proportionately increase. By the year 2020, there will be a total need for 16 softball fields. It should also be noted that the above analysis does not take into account the quality of the fields. Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wuy Page IV -14 Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Recommendation: (softball fields) Youth BasebalUSoftball Field Needs Little teague, pony league and T-ball; 200' (feet) foul line �yS1S: Currently, there are 59 youth baseball and softball fields in the Federal Way planning area. Of the 59 fields, only 42 are in the Federal Way city limits. In Federal Way, there are three youth baseball progams: The Federal Way American Little League, The Federal Way National League and the Steel Lake Little League. They represent about 147 teams. In addition, there are 68 youth softball teams, and 35 Boys/Girls Club softball teams. In total they represent about 250 teams who utilize city and school fields. Like softball, the best approach we have found to identify present need is to compare supply and demand. The 42 fields accommodate 1 game a night (5 nights a week) and six games on Saturda.y for a total of 11 games per week. Assuirung two games per week and one practice, we have the following: 500 games/practice per week demand 462 games present fields can accommodate Comments It should also be noted that the above analysis does not take into account the quality of the fields which in many cases are quite poor. It is our recommendation that the City should assist in providing enough quality fields for league play. Based on the recommended standard, there is a need for eight additional fields. By the year 2020, there will be a total need for 75 fields. City o1'Federal Wav Comvrehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page N- 1 S Recommendation: (youth basebalUsoRball fieids) Soccer Field Needs Youth soccer SS z 100 yards; adult soccer 65 z 110 yards; championship soccer 75 z 120 yards Arialysis: Currently, there are 30 soccer fields in the Federal Way area. Of these, 22 are located in the Federal Way city limits. On a national scale soccer has become a very popular activity. This is especially true in Federal Way. Cunently soccer is offered by two organizations, an adult and a youth program. All totaled, there are approximately 200 teams. Soccer teams play two games per week and practice between 1 and 2 times a week (youth-twice a week and the adults-once a week). In general soccer is played four evenings a week (one game per night) plus five games on Saturday and Sunday Therefore, each soccer field can accommodate up to 14 games per week. Based on this we have the following: 500 games/practices per week demand 308 games present fields can accommodate Comments From the above analysis there appears to be a substantial shortage of soccer fields. Based on the recommended goal, there is a need for 10 more fields at the present time By the year 2020, there will be a need for a total of 49 soccer fields. Again, this analysis does not take into consideration the quality of the existing soccer fields. Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv otFederal Way Page N- 16 Section IV - Recreation NeedsAssessment Recommendation: (soccer fields) � � Football Field Needs ' Anal ' Currently, there are 9 football fields in the Federal Way planning area (PAA boundary), of which two are located outside the city lirruts. I ' The youth football program in Federal Way is provided by the Federal Way Junior Football Association. ' Recommendation football fieids ( ) �J ' � ' Comments: ' Based on the recommended goal, there are no fields needed at the present time. By the year 2020, a total of 11 fields will be needed. �J � i �� 1 1 1 Cit�of Federal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan ' Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV - 17 Gymnasium Space Needs Janior high - 74'z42' (feet); high school - 84'z50' (feet); collegiate - 94'L50' (feet) Analysis: In the Federal Way planning area, there are 37 gymnasiums. Of this total, nine are located outside the crty lirruts. With the exception of the gym at Klahanee Lake Senior/Community Center, all of the gyms are located at school district facilities. Currently, the Federal Way Park, Recreation and Cultural Services Department offers both a basketball and volleyball program. These programs utilize the school distriet gymnasiums and the gym at Klahanee Lake Senior/Community Center. The Boys and Girls Club also offers a youth progam. All totaled, there are 190 basketball teams and 25 volleyball teams. For basketball, each team plays one game a week and averages two practices a week. Teams can practice on a half court. Two games per night can be played five nights a week for a total of 10 games per week. For volleyball, each team plays once a week. Four matches per night can be played five nights a week. Based on this, we have: 285.0 games/practices per week demand-Basketball 12.5 games/practices per week demand Volleybail 280 games courts can accommodate Recommendation: {gymnasiums) Comments The above analysis indicates a shortage of gym space. Based on the recommended goa1, two more gyms are needed at the present time. By the year 2020, a total of 45 gyms will be needed Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv ofFederal Way Page IV -18 Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment , , Pathway and Trail System Needs � Anal.Ysis: � There are two pathway/trail systems in Federal Way. They are the West Campus Trail which is about 1.5 miles in length and the BPA Trail (phase I) which is approximately one mile in length. There are a number of potential trail locations, including the ' extension of the BPA power line system. ' , ' ' Comments ' The recommended goal of 0.20 miles per 1,000 population means that an additional 12.4 miles are presently needed. The City is currently in the process of developing the first phase of trail construction along the BPA powerlines. By the year 2020, a total of , 22.6 miles will be needed. u � ' J ' � , Cit �LofFederal Way Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV - 19 Recommendation: (Pathway and Trail Systems) , Indoor Swimming Pool Needs 25 meter 61ane poo1= 3,608 sq. ft water area; 25 yard z 25 meter tee pool = 4,590 sq. ft water area; 50 meter z 8 lane poo1= 8,610 sq. ft water area. Analysis: Federal Way Pool (Kenneth 7ones Memorial Pool) and the Weyerhauser King County Aquatic Center comprise the only publicly owned swimming pools in the City of Federal Way. These are maintained and operated by King County Parks. Both pools are barrier free and meet the American with Disabilities Act requirements. The Federal Way Pool is a tee shaped pool of 25 yards by 25 meters. Depths vary from 3 feet to 12 feet. One one-meter diving board is located in the deep end. The facility has no meeting rooms, but does have one large outdoor patio. The pool was designed and is operated as a local community recreational facility. The Weyerhauser King County Aquatic Center was built for the 1990 Goodwill Games. The Center was designed and is operated as a world class competitive facility to host (2500 spectator seats) and train Olympic athletes in swimming, diving, water polo and synchronized swimming. The Aquatic Center has 3 separate rectangular pools. Each of these is listed below: Compefition Pool Diving Pool Recreation Pool 50 meters (165 feet) by 75 feet; depth varies 9 feet to 10.5 feet 75 feet by 60 feet; depth varies from 16.5 fcet to 17.5 feet; 2 x 1 meter diving boards; diving platforms of 1, 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 meters. 42 feet by 75 feet with a 4.5 feet by 62.5 feet pier down the long center, depth varies from 0 to 4 feet. The recreation pool is in a separate enclosure where most of the public programs can be run when competitive meets are being held. For purposes of analysis, we will give 25% credit to the private indoor swimming facilities. This credit represents an addition of 1,305 sq. ft(25% x 5,220 total sq. ft. of private indoor swimming space). Facility Total Surface Surface Area 5' deep Area (sa. ftJ or less lsq. ft. Bally's Pacific West 3,150 sq. f� 3,150 sq. f� Cascade Athletic Club 2.070 sa. f� 2,070 sp. f� Total 5,220 sq. f� 5,220 sq. ft A breakdown of the inventory for indoor swimming facilities is listed on the following page: Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv otFederal Way Page N- 20 Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment C� �J � ' ' � �J i ' ' ' � � � , � � � ' , , � � ' , ' � � �_J ' � I,� �''� �_J � 'i �� � Facility Total Surface Surface Area 5' deep Area (sq. ft) or less (sq. ft. Federal Way Pool King County Aquatic Center Subtotal (public facilities) 25% Credit for Private TOTAL 4,590 sq. ft. 19.125 sq,. ft. 23,715 sq. f� 1.305 sq. ft. 25,020 sq. ft. 3,150 sq. ft. 2.794 sq. ft. 5,944 sq. ft. 1.305 sc�ft. 7,249 sq. R. Based on the 1990 recreation survey, the estimated amount of indoor swimming in the Federal Way area is about 280,000 occasions. From past research we know that a peak winter month demand is about 15% of the total annual demand. This then gives us: 42,000 Peak 30 Day Swimming Demand Occasions In addition, our experience has shown us that a swimming pool should be designed to accommodate about 60% of the average daily attendance at one time. This standard will comfortably meet peak hour demand. In addition, we also know that 75% of the total swimming activity will occur in shallow water (5 feet or less). This data now gives us the information to develop the following formula: Shallow Water Demand Muldply 42,000 monthly swims x 75% Divide by average of 30 days per month Multiply by the 60% peak load factor Multiply by 12 sq. 8. per swimmer Deep Water Demand = 31,500 shallow swims = 1,050 daily swims = 630 peak swimmers = 7,560 sq. ft. water area demand Multiply 42,000 monthly swims x 25% = 10,500 deep water swims Divide by average of 30 days per month = 350 daily swims Multiply by the 60% peak load factor = 210 peak swimmers Muldply by 27 sq. ft. per swimmer = 5,670 sq. ft. water area demand Total Indoor Pool Area Demand: 13,230 sq, ft water area In summary, we have the following supply and demand for shallow and deep water. Shallow Water Deep Water Supply Demand Supply Demand 7,249 sq. ft. 7,560 sq. ft. 17,771 sq. ft. 5,670 sq. ft. City ofFederal Wav Comnrehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section IV - Recreation Needs Assessment Page IV - 21 ' Recommendation: (Indoor swimming Poots) L_� , I �� � , Comments: ' Based on our analysis, there is a slight shortage of shallow water area and a surplus of deep water area.. The recommended goal of 350 SF per 1,000 population reflects a ' slight increase in the need for additional shallow water space. � , C� � � , C� � ' I '� Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Ci1�fFederal Way Page IV - 22 Section IV - Recreation NeedsAssessment � * Partial credit for private facilities � � 0 � � � � � w � � U ti � O Q � � � O C7 SECTION V GOALS AND OBJECTIVES INTRODUCTION A very important element in this study was to determine what types and levels of recreation services should be offered by the City. This is reflected in the following goals and objectives. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Goals and objectives aze statements which an agency wishes to achieve. They provide direction for providing services. They can also be a means of evaluating the success of a program. Shown below are goals and objectives for the City's Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. They are not shown in any priority. De�nitions Goal: A goal is a statement of the City's aspirations as it relates to park and recreation services. It is the desirabte quality which the City wishes to ac6ieve. A goal must be realistic and flezible enough to allow a discussion of how it is to be achieved. Goals are long range and usually remain unchanged throughout the practical life of the plaa. Objectives: Objectives are working and measurable statements which identify specific steps needed to achieve the stated goal. Often one goal will have a number of objectives. Cit�o, f Federal Wav Comnrehensive Park, Recreation and Open Snace Plan ' Section V- Goals and Objectives Page V- 1 Goai # 1 Provide a comprehensive leisure services program offering high quality recreation facilities and Progr'ams. Objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Goal• # 2 Become the primary coordinating agency between the city and the state, county and school district for recreation services in Federal Way. Coordinate with the school district to utilize school facilities for recreational purposes. �nvolve special interest groups in the acquisition, development and use of special use facilities. Provide adequate staff to meet recreation needs of residents. Pursue joint ventures with private groups or individuals in developing recreation opportunities. Develop regulations that require developers to meet a minimum standard for on-site recreational facilities or equivalent in-lieu provisions. Maintain a high profile in the community to help promote the leisure services program. Provide an equitable distribution of recreation resources among park operations, recreation programs and other services. Develop staff growth and development by encouraging participation in and supporting educational classes and instruction. Encourage good public relations by all parks and recreation employees. Provide a high quality of park, open space and specialized facilities. Objectives: 1. 2. Upgrade eaisting and develop new park sites to provide a variety of recreation activities serving a wide range of user groups. Acquire and preserve land for parks and recreational use well in advance of development of an area to ensure affordable land prices and a choice of sites — even though limited financial resources may delay actual park development Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal WaY ' Page V- 2 Section [�- Goals and Objectives 3. 4. Develop and maintain a high quality of improvements for park areas and facilitics. Preserve areas with critical or unique natural features — such as strcam corridors, wildlife habitats, shorelines and wetlands — especialiy if endangered by developmen� 5. Support a city-wide network of open space and greenbelts to protect sensitive lands (such as stream corridors, wetlands and steep slopes), to serve as urban connectors and dividers, and to provide for passive recreation. Support pedestrian and bicycle connections tothe City Center core and nearby neighborhoods and parks. 6. Provide facilities and opportunities for cultural recreation in visual, performing and literary arts. 7. Provide facilities and opportunities for indoor recreation activities. 8. Provide facilities and opportunities for outdoor active recreation activities. 9. Provide facilities and opportunities for senior activities. 10. 11. Distribute park facitities throughout City of Federal Way neighborhoods so that all neighborhoods have recreational opportunities, so far as it is practical. Provide for park facilities and recreation programs that meet the needs of special populations. 12. Provide adequate on-site conditions — such as off-street parking, handrails, ramps, lighting -- so that all members of the community have equal opportunity for safe and satisfying recreational esperiences. , 13. 14. Goai # 3 Ensure that park and recreation facilities are accessible. Preserve/renovate historical landmarks and buildings that have recreational potential. Provide a broad, diverse, fleaible and challenging program of recreation services to meet the leisure needs of all age groups and interests. Objectives: 1. Be a catalyst to see that all recreation needs are being met in Federal Way. This does not mean that the City needs to offer all of the services. 2. Evaluate recreation ciasses on an annual basis in terms of cost and participation levels. 3. Provide children's programs that meet the growing needs of families by providing latch key and other programs whenever possible. 4. Utilize to the mazimum eatent possible the variety of recreation opportunities presented by eaisting and new parks and recreation facilities. � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section U- Goals and Objectives Page v- 3 Goal• # 4 Encourage public involvement in the park and recreation planning process. Objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Goal # 5 Obtain citizen responses to specific programs, facilities and policy considerations as an integral part of the decision-making process. Monitor park and recreation preferences, needs and trends through questionnaires, surveys and public hearings. Provide public review stages in planning decisions which affect the public interes�t. Estabtish public relations and publicity efforts to inform citizens of the recreation opportunities available city-wide and in local neighborhoods. Encourage citizen involvement and participation in restoring the quality of park development and maintenance with programs such as adopt-a-park, etc. Provide a high quality and efficient level of maintenance for all park areas and facilities. Objectives: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Maintain park and recreation facilities in such a way as to make them safe, attractive and a positive amenity to the community and neighborhood. Maintain a high level of maintenance for parks and other facilities. Develop a maintenance management system that will track costs and forecast labor and equipment needs of new and eaisting facilities. Provide a training program for permanent employees to enhance professional maintenance operations. Coordinate maintenance operations with other agencies such as the Federal Way School District Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way ' Page I�- 4 Section V- Goals and Objectives SECTIOI�T vI PARK POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA � � � SECTION VI PARK POLICIES AND DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA INTRODUCTION � The following policies and design standards apply to the acquisition and/or development of parks, open space areas, trail systems and specialized facilities. Once adopted by the City Council, they will help guide the Parks and Recreation Commission, Youth Commission, Art Commission, Planning � Commission and City Council on issues dealing with the acquisition and development of park sites and open space areas. Mini Parks � Policies and Development Criteria: Because of their limited recreation value and other associated operational problems, the city should resist developing these existing sites. Only when there aze no other options available should these types of parks be developed. Neighborhood Parks Policies and Development Criteria - School Grounds: NP 1. The school park concept is primarily associated with elementary schools and should be planned and designed as a composite unit whenever possible. � NP 2. � NP 3. � NP 4. � NP 5. � NP 6. Site size can be smaller than a standard neighborhood park. Optimum size is five acres or more, but they can be as small as three acres. Because of the potential jointly developing school sites, facilities on the site itself should be a mixture of active and passive uses. This could include: • pathways systems • picnic areas/facilities • multi-purpose paved court • a sma11 piece of playground equipment • open grass areas for baseball and soccer Because these sites are on school facilities, landscaping should address safety and security issues Facilities generating crowd noise should be located in a manner so as not to disturb adjoining residential areas. When sport fields utilized for league play are located on school grounds, the city should assist in upgrading and maintaining these fields. Crlv otFederal Wav Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Onen Space Plan � Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria PQBe V! -1 Policies and Development Criteria - Standard Neighborhood Park: SNP 1 SNP 2 SNP 3. SNP 4. SNP 5. SNP 6. SNP 7. A neighborhood park should be developed when the area it serves reaches 50% developed (measured by either land mass or population). It should be 3-10 acres in size. However, as a practical point, the City may be forced to accept smaller parcels for neighborhood parks in areas where little vacant land is available. At least 50% of the site should be flat and usable and open for both active and passive uses. Appropriate facilities include: . . . Children's playground Unstructured open play area for general recreation use and practice games Paved games court Picnic area Trail system Natural open space Drainage corridors Other possible facilities: restrooms, picnic shelter building, tennis courts Facilities generating crowd noise should be located in a manner so as not to disturb adjoining residential areas. Parking guidelines: NI'inimum of 3 spaces per acre of active park area. The design should encourage access by foot or bicycle. Site selection criteria: • The site should be central to the area it serves. • The site should be adjacent to other open space areas or trail systems, if possible. • If possible, walking distance should not exceed one half mile for the area it serves. The need to cross major arterial streets or other physical barriers should be discouraged. • The site should be readily visible and have significant street frontage. • Access to the site should be via a local residential street. If located on a busy arterial street, appropriate fencing and other safety steps should be taken. Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFedera! Way Page i�I - 2 Section VI - Park Polrcies and Development Criteria Community Parks Policies and Development Criteria - Community Parks: CP 1. CP 2. CP 3. CP 4. CP 5. A community park should be developed when the area it serves reaches 60% developed. Acquisition of community park sites should occur far in advance of its actual need. Muumum size should be 15 acres, with the optimum being about 25 acres. At least ten acres of the site should be usable for active recreation use. Appropriate facilities include: • Regulation size athletic facilities - softball, baseball, soccer, etc. • Tennis courts • Open free play area • Restroom facility • Picnic facilities • Trail systems • Landscaped gardens • Outdoor basketball courts • Children's playground (if needed to also serve the neighborhood) • Natural open space • Indoor recreational facilities such as a recreation center, senior center, tennis center etc. • Outdoor sand volleyball courts • Space for special outdoor events CP 6. Parking guidelines: dependent upon the activities. Use 50 spaces per ballfield or 5 spaces per acre of active use. CP 7. Site selection criteria: • The site should be reasonably central to the area it serves. • The park should be located on an arterial or collector street and have significant street frontage. • If possible, some of the site shouid have a natural area or heavy landscape setback to help buffer active uses from residential areas. • Heavily wooded sites are acceptable but will require considerable clearing to accommodate the active uses. • Environmentally sensitive sites can be a part of this type of park if protected from active visitor use. Citv ofFedera! Wav Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Oven Space Plan Section I�I - Park Policies and Development Criteria Page YI - 3 Large Urban Parks Policies and Development Criteria - Large Urban Parks: • LUP 1. Nfinimum size should be about 50 acres with the optimum being about 75 acres or more. ' LUP 2. At least 75% of the site should be developed. LUP 3. Appropriate facilities are similar to that of a community park plus the following: • Indoor recreation facilities • Single-purpose specialized facilities (e.g. swimming pool, special landscaped features, etc.) • Group picnic areas � Food concessions • Event support facilities LUP 4. Parking requirements: dependent upon the activities proposed. LUP 5. High use areas should be adequately buffered from adjacent residential areas. Regional Parks Policies and Development Criteria - Regional Parks: RP 1 RP 2 RP 3. RP 4 The Regional Park should be designed to meet a wide range of activities and interests but can also emphasize a natural feature that makes the site unique. If the site will attract large volumes of traffic, access should be via a collector or arterial street. Possible facilities include: • Viewpoints • Trail systems • Special facilities for the physically disabled • Picnic areas • Open play areas • Water access facilities • Nature interpretative areas • Sport facilities • Group picnic areas • Specialized play equipment Parking requirements are dependent upon the activities offered. Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Cit� f Federal Wav � Page VI - 4 Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria RP 5. Linear Parks Location Criteria � Location is most often determined by the features it can offer. • Access should be from an arterial street if traffic volumes are expected to be high. • Heavily wooded sites can be appropriate. • Environmentally sensitive sites are appropriate if protected from active visitor use. Policies and Development Criteria - Linear Parks: LP 1. Activities are generally passive in nature. LP 2. Linear parks should generally follow drainage comdors, natural vegetation or other special feature strips. LP 3. If possible, linear parks should be at least 100' wide. LP 4. The natural vegetation should be maintained. � LP 5. Paved pathways should be designed to accommodate maintenance and patrol vehicles. (See trail illustrations pages 7 and 8.) LP 6. Where general public use is promoted, adjoining uses should be protected by fences or '� other features to control access. ', � Natural Open Space Areas Pohcies and Development Cntena - Natural General Open Space: NOS 1. � NOS 2 NOS 3. Where feasible, public access into these areas can be encouraged through the use of trail systems. . Improvements should be kept to a minimum with the emphasis placed on maintaining the natural environment. Environmentally sensitive lands should be acquired and placed in this category. NOS 4. Prior to acquiring an open space site, a thorough site analysis should be made to determine if unique qualities and conditions exist that warrant the open space designation. NOS 5. NOS 6. Natural open space should not be acquired just for the reason of defeating a land development opposed by adjoining neighbors. The intent of these policies is to insure that natural open space is maintained in its natural state but open to the general public. This land does not necessarily need to be City otFedera! W Comnrehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Space Plan �I � Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria Page VI - S I � owned by the City and public access can be assured through the use of access easements. Special IIse Areas Policies and Development Criteria - Special Use Areas: � � � SU 1. Prior to acquiring or developing any special use area, the City should first determine � the maintenance and operation costs. SU 2. Some sites should be developed primarily for use by the daytime employee. These sites should be located within a 3-5 minute driving time or 10 minute walking time of major employment centers. Their purpose is to provide passive recreation space for use during lunch breaks or similar penods. Appropriate facilities include landscaped areas, open grass areas, benches, picnic tables and trails. SU 3. Parking and access requirements will be determined by the type of activity proposed. Pathway and Trail Systems Policies and Development Criteria - Pathway and Trail S sty ems: PTS 1. Trails should be interesting and attractive to the user. Trails which follow natural water courses, traverse interesting scenery or cross areas of outstanding beauty provide interesting and enjoyable experience for the trail user. PTS 2. PTS 3. PTS 4. PTS 5. PTS 6. PTS 7. Trails should be looped and interconnected to provide a variety of trail lengths and destinations. Trail routes should take into account soil conditions, steep slopes, surface drainage and other physicallimitations that could impact the area. from over-use. Bicycle trails should provide opportunities for the recreational rider as well as the touring and commuter bicyclist. Bicycle routes and paths should minimize the conflicts between motorists and bicyclists. (street crossings) H'iking trails should have a variety of lengths and grades for the casual stroller as well as the serious hiker. Most paved trails should be wide enough to accommodate patrol and maintenance vehicles when appropriate. Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan Cilv ofFederal Wax � Page I�l - 6 Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria S,,,r,�,� o � e--• — , a e — • �. � � . � . ,,.. �. I I c R�wN r t�� � ;� �� _.- 4 t��«,�� �-- tx�PaN��c 2 � �o� VV�1t�l �R.YUJG L�1e�t. FURF�E �oR (KAINri�J�lAr10� NATURE TRAIL STANDARD t � �,. � , �o� �s�a,�a� • � � Aef'�bWTE. MIN. 2' LUCE. "(�.Ac1l. "nL�AD LJ / 5' SIDE UNPAVED HIKING/EQUESTRIAN TRAIL STANDARD Cit�afFedera! Wav Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Onen Space Plan Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria Page VI - 7 � MULTI-PURPOSE PAVED TRAIL STANDARD Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Ci1v ofFederal Way Page VI - 8 Section VI - Park Policies and Development Criteria G� � � Iv • - �•w� ' n � � • nL'41 !� APXfr �� _ i , . _� � ��� � � � � � e �� � � � - � , � A �I��i �` u I � � . a � � �� ��� �� _ t = � a r . �°" , r � z a ' �� ..� . � '"" s � .;,w �.,.. �� a «._"� ..,.. $�'�'�^x�� , 1 t. . '� A °. r � S � t� . t�' �'�` : �� �'�.+ b_�r� tt � " m:. � � ,��*i �� � � fi � y . , � � � �� ����� � ,� ` _,��. '1 , � '` ; � �.�,.{ ... _..._�. �ia 9 ._ � '� �i . � �... ` f � .. �£ � ' x5b fiB �` t � .�� � �'��� ' ��'�S i �i �: � �� .,�„ Y , . .�"` ;. �,� w �� d.r ,..+, e e ^�& r.a.+i �: ?e � � ��: �� ° ,.# .�,,.# ..,,, "h. ^�... 6 V� 3 ' � . � �� ,.j � � g .� � .. `� �; -. .. � M. � � �, � � , , 1 . . a, � ` t �! 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"at . � .. ,,. a .. .... �mv'" � .+a� iF" . +w"' . . a,..y_ .._ '� .. . , � � � INTRODUCTION SECTION VII PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS ;� In this section, specific recommendations are made for the development, rehabilitation, operation and management of the park and recreation services in•Federal Way. These recommendations are divided into the following categories: 1. Facility Plan (includes parks and open space) 2. Traits Systems 3. Major Recreation Areas 4. Administration and Management Recommendations 5. Park Maintenance Operations 6. Recreation Services 7. Cultural Arts ; ...,... . .. v r w.•nr i,W. n.:: •::.;w: :.::x•., v:. •.;•.;.}•.v v:x.....,M1. ..::::::ii.i:.i:i'i•::i•::i:i'\•::•::'+. 'f+:•+:ii•::v . }1+iir�Yi v " ' :'}i�r.•i:ii iY'vi:' }•.xi'v':i• . . l.'vh}�:'-:4 •.. . . . � : '�,'.,N, :4 .: .: .}, ,:: ;. :: •'•f:?.: �+.��} •::.{..:•:.:::.- vv r• v .. -0 .v�. }};.•:.?j:i �i•.}4f: •{+ii.taL`�:tt i s .r'N. •;�ry;: } %-'� . v.ti�i� r! .....ny.k}i>3' ' r } : Cn� . ;4 ' if: �"'v' ' ' t: t2- •.'•1 :� ;� ;� 'l. � vv[+. f+` :c, { • v r �`+ �������:��; .C;2� #•' ..',}'.�: v'.,'.',`�•S•`.. v`.'•;;;;:;�:":,'"�c 'v .. :9••:$::•.. ' '�. ',+ .�i•'. • ��'t ��J�?i�: :• .• :}'. ' k t:ST:, p 'i•. �.i+v:i: ;: •.: :.v �}iiih a..2:: ;.}• 'v1' J'v / h'•,i.: >. iv . iS � }: .2'l:;.vcsri<?c5tt:�>`.'�::?z::•'.:,:o-n,:u:�•::�, }:•:: ...x., �'�;;.ii>+;<c. •>i�.ri4;>»•.•::-.. 'r+:;+'r � ,t'�Sr�l:-`.-x S>.o,e�.:f..ar u� :;if•t , . ;an• � ...........2.k..:?S7:`%r'<•x.;;;=i:�`......�. ..........:............. � ......-----'•---...�.....�.x}����N��t-�...x......`.`.'9..................t�ar:. .. ..a?..:..... %�,.����,.��� The goal of the Facility Plan is to ass�re tl�at every c�eigl�bor-t�ood- i�� Feder-al� V�a�r is served- b3r. a par-k. This goal will be met through open space, parks, special use facilities and school facilities. The amount of land represented by the facility plan is about 1,933 acres and is designed to serve the City until the year 2020. This represents a sernce level for the planning area of 17.1 acres per 1,000 population. This is the level of service is provided within the total planning area. The City of Federal Way is cunently providing 10.9 acres per 1,000 population within the city limits. This level of service will remain to be the City's standard. A summary of this information is shown below. � Cit�ofFedera! Wav Comnrehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 1 Table 21 Summary of Service Level Recommendations Federal Way Planning Area General Notes About the Facility Plan 2. 3 The planning area is divided into eight planning districts (A to I� defined by the service area of existing or proposed community parks. These planning distncts or service areas were deternuned by the service radius of the community park, physical boundaries, land use or other features. The plan covers the city limits as well as unincorporated land making up the urban growth area. An (*) indicates that the park site is located outside the city limits. Each site is defined by a number and a letter of the alphabet such as 12 N The number is for site identification only. The letter represents the type of proposed park and are identified as follows: M Mini-Park N Neighborhood Park C Community Park LU Large Urban Park R Regional Park L Linear Park SU Special Use Area OS Open Space Areas 4. It is the intent to only show the general location of new park sites and open space �" areas. The exact size and boundaries will be deternuned at time of acquisition by ownership patterns and other factors. � 5. The location and arrangement of the neighborhood and community park system is � designed to serve the city when it is fully developed. 6. Most community parks will contain sport fields and should be lighted when feasible. Remaining high quality lighted playing fields will be located in proposed sports complexes. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Opett Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section Vll- 2 Section VII - Plan Recommendations � • � -► • � .. . � . . . � • • .: O►PEN SP:A►CE PLAN Coinn�e�ceine�l �y Puq ��� ,�, i \ ,�`�' -_ � 1 ---- -_ ��� ` _ _ _L_ � FACILITY PLAN Legend : C� City Park � County Park � State Parl� Public School� � Proposed Park and t�pen �- Space Areas � Qpen Space Areas . �� � Trails � Planning Area Boundary (PAA Boundary) Subarea �oundary N Neighborhood Park C Community Park i� Regional Park I_ Linear Park OS Open Space Area SU Speciai Use Area � � o ,000 �oo e000 e000 J D J C DRAGGOO & ASSOCIATES November 21, 1995 EXLSTII�TG PARK AND OPEN SPACE SITES PARK NAME Page # City of Federal Way Adelaide Park ...........................Page VII-11 Alderbrook Park.....».»............Page VII-15 Alderdale Park...........„............Page VII-19 BPA Trail Park ........................Page VII-20 Camelot Open Space ................Page VII-41 Campus Avenue Open Space....Page VII-15 Celebration Park ......................Page VII-30 Coronado Park .........................Page VII-19 Dash Point Highlands Park........Page VII-S Dumas Bay Open Space .............Page VII-9 Dumas Bay Park .........................Page VII-9 Fisher's Pond ............................Page VII 13 French Lake Park ....................Page VII-13 Heritage Open Space �srn�.......Page VII-29 Heritage Woods Open Space....Page VII-34 Heritage Woods Park ...............Page VII-34 Hylebos Creek Open Space......Page VII-25 Klahanee Lake Comm. Ctr......Page VII-30 Lake Grove Park ......................Page VII-12 Lake Killarney Open Space.....Page VII-47 Lakota Park ..................»..........Page VII-13 Lochaven Open Space ..............Page VII-10 Madrona Meadows Park..........Page VII-21 Madrona Trails Open Space....Page VII-19 Marlbrook Open Space............Page VII-34 Mirror Lake Park ....................Page VII-29 Olympic View Park ..................Page VII-16 Palisades Park ............................Page VII-8 Panther Lake Park ...................Page VII-20 Poverty Bay Park .....................Page VII-11 Marlbrook O.S . .......................Page VII-34 Sacajawea Park ........................Page VII-35 Saghalie Park ...........................Page VII-19 Spring Valley Open Space .......Page VII-24 Steel Lake Park ........................Page VII-37 SW 312th Sports Court Park...Page VII-13 SW 363rd Open Space .............Page VII-26 Twin Lakes Vista Open Space...Page VII-S Visitation Retreat Center.........Page VII-10 Wedgewood Open Space..........Page VII-16 West Campus Open Space .......Page VII-14 West Campus Trail ..................Page VII-29 Wildwood Park .........................Page VII-36 PARK NAME PaQe # King County Camelot Park .......................:...Page VII-41 Federal Way Pool �c�,�enao� Manorial Poon ..................»..........Page VII-37 Five Mile Lake Park ....»..»......Page VII-50 Lnke Geneva Park ...................Page VII-46 Puyallup Landfill ..........».........Page VII-47 Weyer/King Ca Aquatic Ctr...Page VII-20 State of Washington Dash Point State Park ............... Page VII Lake Dolloff Access ..................Page VII-42 Nort6 Lake Access ....................Page VII-46 West Hylebos State Park..........Page VII-24 Federal Way School District Adelaide Elementary.........».....Page VII-11 Brigadoon Elementary .............Page VII-16 Camelot Elementary .................Page VII-41 Decatur High ............................Page VII-10 Eaterprise Elementary .............Page VII-24 Federal Way High ....................Page VII-37 Grcen Gables Elementary.:....... Page VII-8 Harry S T�vman High/Merit...Page VII-29 Dlahee Junior High ...................Page VII-25 Kilo Junior High .......................Page VII-42 Lake Dolloff Elementary..........Page VII-42 Lake Grove Elementary...........Page VII-12 Lakeland Elementary ..............Page VII-47 Lakota Junior High ..................Page VII-13 Mark Twain Elementary..........Page VII-34 Mirrnr Lake Elementary.........Page VII-29 Nautilus Elementary .................Page VII 35 Olympic View Elementary.......Page VII-15 Panther Lake Elementary........Page VII-31 Ranier View Elementary .........Page VII-51 Sacajawea Junior High .............Page VII-35 Saghalie Junior High ................Page VII-19 Sherwood Forest Elementary...Page VII-20 Silver Lake Elementary ...........Page VII-15 Thomas Jefferson High ............Page VII-40 Twin Lake Elementary .............. Page VII-9 Valhalla Elementary .................Page VII-40 Wildwood Elementary ..............Page VII-36 Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section I�II- S PROPOSED PARK AND OPEN SPACE SITES PARK NAME Page # Bingaman Pond Wetlands (Prnposed)VII-40 E. Hylebos O.S. (Proposed)...»......... VII 51 E. Hylebos Park (Proposecn ............. VII 51 Evergreen Heights Park (Proposed) VII-42 Forest Greea Park (Proposed)......... VII-30 Hoyt Road Open Space {Proposed).. VII-16 Hytebos Roadside Park (Proposed).. VII-26 Dlahee Park (Proposed) .................... VII-25 Lake Dollof� Wetlands (Proposed)... VII-42 Lakota Neigh. Park (Proposed)........ VII-11 Lochaven Park (Proposed) ............... VII-10 Marine Hills Open Space (Proposed)VII-35 N. Cnmelot Pnrk (Proposed) ............ VII-41 Ocean View Park (Proposed)........... VII-12 Outdoor Ed, Site (Prnposed) ............ VII-50 Peasley Canyoa O.S. (Proposed)...... VII-46 Sports Complez (Proposed) .............. VII 25 Soundview Park (Proposed) ............. VII-12 Redondo Heights Park (Proposed)... VII-34 Spider Lake Pxrk (Proposed)........... VII-47 Spring Vsdiey Park (Prnposed) ........ VII-24 Steel Lake Wetlands (Proposed)...... VII-36 West Campus Park (Prnposcd)........ VII-14 Sist Avenue Park (Propose�........... VII-43 288th Street Park (Proposed)........... VII-40 Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan City ofFederal Wav � Section I�ll- 6 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA A (Includes the Dash Point, Adclaidc and Lakota areas) Summary of Rccommcndations Mini 0.00 : 0 �:. __ — � � Neighborhood : 85.30 : 18 ... t ........................... _................. Communit�' ........:.. ... ...1 --... Large Urban : 0.00 � 0 _ Rc i____�_onat__________w.___._230.00 _:._�__.__1 ___,__. Opcn Space ........:. . ....255.55 : 11 .. . . ....... . ........... _.. Linear 0.00 : 0 .................�--- � --�-�- - - --------... -> - � Spccial Usc '• - - --58.ffi ..:.__ � '��� � � '.... City of Federal 6t%nv Sectio�� VII - Plnn Reconrnie��datrons _ ;�' , �N?� J , i� A REA LOCATtnti I-5 ��� I-5 � Crnrrprel�ensh�c Pnrks, Recrentron nnd Ope�� Space Plrn� Sectio�� I7I- 7 ' I I � I CHARACTER: PLANNING AREA A This service area is primarily residential in nature with some scattering of small shopping centers. Most of the housing was built after 1980 and ranges from middle to upper middle values. Some vacant land exists but is fast being converted to housing. TOPOGRAPHY: The terrain in this area consists primarily of rolling hills that range in elevation from 200' to 400' above sea level. There are several areas, particularly along the drainage corridors and Puget Sound shorelines, that exceed 30% slopes. Some Natural Open Space Areas are available from the steep canyons that begin at the Sound and extend into the interior. EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Adelaide Park Adelaide Elementary School Park . ..........•••••• ..................••••••.....•••••••.............. Alderbrook Park (includes school # • ••••-...........•• ...............••••••••........._..........._... Bri¢adoon Elementarv School Pazk Cam us Avenue S ce Dash Point Hiphlands Pazk • ••...•-••••• ............. ... ........••-•••••••••••••••-••-•••••. Dash Point State Park (State) ............••••••........••••..........••• ............................. Decatur High School Park Ihunas Bay S ce Dumas Bay Park .....................•-••........................................._..... Fisher's Pond ...._.._...........•••••••••••••......•-•••••••••• ..................... French Lake Pazk Green Gable Elemen School Park Lake Grove Elementary School Park ....................•••••......................•••••.................... Lake Grove Pazk ..........................•••••..............•••••••••••................ Lakota Junior Higt► School Pazk Lakota Park Lochaven S�ace •---•••--•......-•---•--... _ . Ol�npic View Elementary School Olympic View Park Palisades Park Povertv Bav Park Silver Lake Elementary School Park ..••• ...............................................•----•----•------•------ SW 312th Sports Court Park Twin Lakes Elementar� School Park Twin Lakes Vista ................. .. .................. . Visitation Retreat Center ............................................................................ West Campus Oven Snace 6.70 .... 4: �g..... ; 35.10 ; . ......•--•--...; 4.14 2.60 ; ..... 00 .....� 230.00 � ..................: 16.64 2.40 19.30 � ..................: 13.00 •••••••.....•••••••: 10.00 5.89 : 5.79 ....• 4.80 : ............••••••; 5.72 : 28.20 : 14.40 : _..........•--....: 5.64 : ...--••••------•---• 20.75 : 3.20 : 48.00 's ...................: 5.23 ...-• ...- : 5.03 y 3.60 .................. : 12.00 : .........-•-�------� 51.80 � 2.00 ': � � � � PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE , AREAS Hoyt Road Open S�ace (Proposec : _ Lakota Nei�hborhood Park (Pro� . ................. ...... ................ .... . � Lochaven Open Space_Expansion . .. . . ..... ..... Lochaven Park (proposed) Ocean View Park (Pro sed r Pazk (Pro�osed) . West Camnus Neieh. Park (Pronc 10.00 3.00 60.00 5.00 3.00 3 0.00 Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section VII- 8 Section VII - Plan Recommendations ' PLANNING AREA A SPECIFIC RECOMI��NDATIONS Dash Point State Park Site 1-R Regional Park Located off Dash Point Road, this is one of two State owned and operated parks in the planning area. Since this site is not managed by the City, no changes or specific recommendations are made for the site. However, it is recommended that the State and the City coordinate their efforts in planning for non-urban trails in the area. Dash Point Highlands Park Site 2-N Neighborhood Park This 5.0 acre parcel situated directly south of Dash Point State Park, was originally � formed to serve as a storm water retention area. The site is located off Southwest 324th Place, with this street being the only access to the site. � � The site itself is relatively level except for the retention pond. The pond is dry except in times of heavy rainfall. The site also includes a children's playground. Specific recommendations for the site include: • Paved multi-use court • Multi-purpose soccer field • Two tennis courts • Picnic area with shelter • Restroom building • Paved pathway system • Parking (5-10 spaces) • Trailhead to Dash Point State Park Twin Lakes Vista Open Space Site 3-OS Natural Open Space Area � This existing 3.6 acre parcel is also located in the Dash Point Highlands area and is off 325th Way near the intersection with 47th Avenue. The site borders Dash Point State Park on the north and is heavily wooded, but offers little opportunity for development. � Green Gables Elem. School Park Site 4-N Neighborhood Park � It is recommended that the City work cooperatively with the School District to upgrade the 5.89 acres of active recreation area located at the Green Gables Elementary School. Palisades Park Site 5-N Neighborhood Park � This 3.2 acre park is located south of Dash Point Road directly east of 51 st Avenue. Facilities at the site include a basketball court, play equipment, open lawn area and a trail system. A small parking area is located adjacent to the roadway. � Cit�of Federal Way Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 9 PLANNING AREA A The park, as it now exists, has no opportunity for expansion or further development. Specific improvements recommended are: • Road improvements along west side of park • Improve site drainage • Add landscaping • Picnic area with shelter • Improve turf conditions (fertilization, seeding, etc.) • Work out use agreement with church for additional parking Dumas Bay Open Space Site 6-OS Natural Open Space Area This 2.4 acre parcel is located in the Dumas Bay area and was acquired through the King County transfer. It is located at the end of 214th Place and is adjacent to an undeveloped school site. Presently the site is hea.vily wooded but because of its size is quite limited to any activity beyond its open space classification. However, it may be possible to connect this site to the proposed Twin Lakes Park described below. Twin Lakes Elem. School Park Site 7-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the 5.03 acres of active recreation area located at the Twin Lakes Elementary School. Dumas Bay Park Site 8-SU Special Use Area This 19.3 acre park is located between Dash Point Road and the Puget Sound. The site is unique because it is one of the few areas along the Sound that is in public ownership. An unpaved trail begins at a parking area located off 44th Avenue and terminates at the beach about a quarter of a mile away. Only about 200 feet of sandy beach is available. The site also has a heron rookery and wetlands area. While the site could be expanded for other uses, the existence of the wetlands and heron rookery precludes any expanded use at the beach. Suggested improvements to the site should include: • Improve entrance to site and upgrade parking area and add interpretive sign • Add small restroom building • Pave pathway to beach • Add shelter building next to beach Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Oven Space Plan Ciy ofFederal Wav - Section VII-10 Section VII - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA A Decatur High Schoot Park Site 9-SU Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work with the School District to upgrade the recreation facilities located on the 16.64 acres of land located adjacent to Decatur H'igh School. Proposed Lochaven Park Site 10 N Neighborhood Park A neighborhood park of approximately five acres is proposed for the Lochaven neighborhood. It could be located along 30th Avenue adjacent to Decatur High School but a better location would be within the Lochaven open space area (Site 11-0). While this open space Area is mostly steep hillsides, there is some flat land along the south edge of the property. By locating a park in this area, it would also serve as a trailhead for the Freeway - Bay Trail. Proposed facilities at this park site could include: • Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court • Multi-purpose soccer/youth baseball field • Parking (15-25 spaces) • Trail conneetion/trailhead Lochaven Open Space Site 11-OS Natural Open Space Area This open space area is located along the Joe's Creek and Lakota Creek drainage corridors and contains over 75 acres of hea�ily wooded land. Out of the proposed 75.0 acres, 14.4 acres is in public ownership. An old rock quarry is found on the site. It is recommended that the steep hillsides and drainage corridors be preserved for general open space. The proposed Freeway to Bay Trail terminates at this site. Suggested improvements include: • Trail system • Viewpoints Visitation Retreat Center Site 12-SU Special Use Area This 12.0 acre site is located off Dash Point Road overlooking the Puget Sound. Facilities include meeting spaces and overnight accommodations. Suggested improvement to the site include: • Landscaping � Upgrade parking area • Add picnic shelter • ADA improvements • Pathway improvements Citv otFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plarr Recommendations Section Vll- 11 PLANNING AREA A Proposed Lakota Neighborhood Park Site 13-N Neighborhood Park A three acre neighborhood park site is proposed in the Lakota Neighborhood. A good location would be adjacent to Poverty Bay Park which could also act as a trailhead to that pazk site. Several locations at the ends of 300th Place or 302nd Place are possible. It may also be possible to develop a small neighborhood park within Poverty Bay Park if the terrain permits. Poverty Bay Park Site 14-OS Natural Open Space Area This 48 acre site is undeveloped and contains about 1,275 feet of shoreline. The land consists mostly of steep topography and a bluff that overlooks the Sound. Because of the bluff, little beach area is available. Access to the site is limited to several street stubs. The site has great view potentials of the Sound and Olympic Mountains. Recommendations for Poverty Bay Park are: • Identify public shore and tidelands • Develop picnic area Adelaide Elementary School Park Site 15-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work cooperatively with the School District to upgrade the 4.78 acres of recreation land located at the Adelaide Elementary School. Adelaide Park Site 16-N Neighborhood Park This 6.7 acre park is located adjacent to Adelaide Elementary School. Access to the park is off 16th Avenue Southwest from the east and 21 st Avenue from the west. The City recently completed the installation of a children's playground, tennis court, picnic area and improved sight lines in to this heaviliy wooded park. The site also includes a horse arena. The majority of the site is level and heavily wooded which has caused some concern by local residents regarding personal safety in the park. The site, as it exists now, lacks the facilities needed to make it a neighborhood park. Suggested improvements to the site include: • Add multi-purpose paved court • Add off-street parking • Pave more trails Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Ope» Space Plan Citv ojFederal Way Section VII- 12 Section VII - Plan Recommendations ' , � � � LJ � ' � , � , PLANNING AREA A Proposed Ocean View Park Site 17-SU Special Use Area Currently, 21st Place terminates at Puget Sound. The paved street literally extends into the water at high tide. While offering a place to see the Sound, there is very little paxlcing available because the street right of way is only 60' wide. Additional saltwater frontage is unavailable unless adjacent homesites were acquired. Recognizing the need for saltwater access, it is recommended that a small3 acre parcel of land be acquired in this general vicinity for viewpoints of the Sound. Several potential sites can be found between 21 st and 24th Avenues. Proposed Soundview Park Site 18-N Neighborhood Park This neighborhood needs a small park but locating a site may be a problem. The City should continue to explore for other possible sites. A three (3) acre site would be optimum. Lake Grove Park Site 19-N Neighborhood Park This long, existing narrow 4.8 acre park is located south of 308th Street. Access to the park is from 308th Street and 310th which stubs into the park on both the east and west sides. In general, the park is located in a very nice setting within a heavily wooded area. However, only a small portion of the site is actually developed and includes a small open grass area, containing a basketball hoop and a piece of play equipment. Because a majority ofthe site is undeveloped and remains heavily wooded, there is some opportunity for further development. Suggested improvments for this site include: � • Upgrade children's playground • Upgrade court area • Add two tennis courts , • Add off-street parking • Add a multi soccer/baseball field • Clear much of the underbrush �J Lake Grove Elem. Schoo! Park Site 20-N Neigh6orhood Park � Cunently, there are plans to upgrade the 5.79 acres of recreation area at this site. It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to insure that the facilities are developed and maintained to an accecptable level. � u Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensrve Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section I�II - Plan Recommendations Section VII-13 , PLANNING AREA A ' SW 312th Sports Court Park Site 21-SU Special Use Area This 2.0 acre park is located off 312th Avenue. Facilities include a tennis court, basketball court and pickelball court. Suggested improvements include: ' • Parking area (5 spaces) • Landscape buffer along south edge of site French Lake Park Site 22-N Neighborhood Park This 10 acre site is located south of 315th Avenue and west of 1 st Avenue South. This park consists primarily of rolling hills and trees. Suggested improvements for the site should include: • Pond rehabilitation • Upgrade pazking area • ADA improvements • Add restroom building • Add paved pathway system • Upgrade small children's playground • Picruc area/shelter • Tennis courts • Volleyball courts Fisher's Pond Site 23-OS Natural Open Space Area This site is located north of 320th and west of lst Avenue South. The site consists of a pond and marshy area. Recommendations for this site include preserving the naxural plant species, developing trails around the site and upgrading the existing structure for an mterpretive facility. Lakota Junior High School Park Site 24-SU Speciai Use Area It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the recreation facilities on the 5.72 acres of active recreation land. Lakota Park Site 25-C Community Park This existing 28.2 acre park is heavily used by Lakota Junior High School for its sports programs. In fact, this is one of the most hea.vily used parks in Federal Way. Dunng one summer afternoon in 1990, 18 teams were counted trying to find a place to practice or play on this site. The park is oriented towards active recreation use only and consists of one baseball and one softball field (both lighted), a soccer field, a restroom facility and a track. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section Vll-14 Section VII - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA A The site was at one time a lowland area, but has since been filled to provide a level surface for sport fields. Due to the high water table in the area, the park is subject to frequent flooding from the adjacent wetlands. The City is cunently master planning the site with the school district for improvements to the site. Once implemented, the recommendations should creaxe a"true "community park. Suggested improvements to the site include: • Add picnic area with shelter building • Add landscaping • New restroom/concession building • Add football field • Add parking • Renovate track West Campus Open Space Site 26-OS Natural Open Space Area This open space area contains about 51.8 acres of land and covers much of the steep and undevelopable land of the West Campus area. Most of it is heavily wooded and because of its character is not suitable for active recreation use. Its primary benefits other than the aesthetic quality are habitat protection, slope stabilization, erosion reduction as well as a place to replenish the local aquifers. The Freeway to Bay Trail travels through this site. Proposed West Campus Park Site 27-N Neighborhood Park A neighborhood park is needed in the West Campus Area. Parts of this neighborhood have very high population densities, especially in the vicinity of lOth Avenue S.W. There has been considerable discussion given to the idea of acquiring a ten acre surplus school site commonly referred to as "Site 40". Unfortunately, because of its physical limitations very little of the site would be useable for active recreation use. With this restriction in mind and the cost associated with its acquisition, it is not recommended that the city purchase the site. However, the need for a neighborhood park exists but there is no opportunity in the area to develop a standard neighborhood park. As a compromise, it is recommended that three small recreation areas be developed to replace the one needed neighborhood park. One site would be developed on a city owned property located on the West Campus Natural Open Space Area that fronts on the curve where IOth Avenue S.W. turns mto 330th Street. This site is called West Campus Park and would contain about three acres of land. The other two recreation areas would be developed on the West Campus Trail. Recommended facilities for West Campus Park include: • Open play area with children's playground • Connection to the Freeway - Bay Trail system • Multi-purpose paved court Citv ofFederal Wav Comnrehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Snace Plan Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section Vll- 1 S PLANNING AREA A Campus Avenue Open Space Site 28-OS Natural Open Space Area This 2.6 acre parcel is located on the west side of l lth Avenue S.W. between 326th and 329th Streets. This parcel was part of the King County transfer. It contairis a steep bluff and is surrounded by housing on three sides. Presently the site is heavily wooded and offers very little opportunity for any active recreation use. Silver Lake Elem. Schoot Park Site 29-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the 5.23 acres of recreation area located at the Silver Lake Elementary School site. Alderbrook Park Site 30-N Neighborhood Park/ Natural Open Space Area This 35.1 acre site is comprised of four separate parcels, three of which are relatively undeveloped. The developed portion is located along Southwest 325th Street and contains a playground and open play area. One of the other parcels is primarily a pond used for storm water retention. The three parcels are connected by a paved asphalt path. The path itself is situated in a nice wooded setting along the periphery of the park. Overall, the park lacks the facilities needed to make it a neighborhood park. However, the park does offer some opportunity for further development. Adjacent to the undeveloped portion of the park is the Silver Lake Elementary School. A joint use agreement with the school could create an outstanding schooVpark concept. Additional facilities that should be added to this park site include: • Expanded trail system • Add pathways • Add landscaping • Add paved multi-use court • Upgrade soccer field • Expand children's playground Olympic View Elem. School Park Site 31-N Neighborhood Area It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the 5.64 acres of recreation area located at the Olympic View Elementary School. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section Vll- 16 Section VII - Plan Recommendations �� ' PLANNING AREA A � Olympic View Park Site 32-N Neighborhood Park/ Natural Open Space Area ' ' , ' �-, , J This existing 20.75 acre park site is located within a heavily wooded ravine �located between southwest 30th avenue and southwest 32nd avenue. During winter storms considerable amounts of water flows through this ravine. Access to the park is from street stubs and no off-street parking is available. While most of the site is steep hillsides, there are about ten acres of land that are reasonably level. Within this area there are two small playgrounds. Some opportunity for expansion of use around the two playgrounds is possible but would require some clearing and grading. This would help to satisfy the neighborhood park needs that now exists. Recommended improvements to the site include: • Upgrade existing and develop new paved trails � Upgrade play area Proposed Hoyt Road Site Site 33-OS Natural Open Space Area � � ' � ' � 1 C� '� � r-, I I� This parcel is located along Hoyt Road south of 329th Place The site is very steep and heavily wooded. Some of this land should remain as undeveloped open space because it would require considerable grading and clearing to develop. Preservation of this area for general open space would provide a number of benefits to the community including habitat protection, slope stabilization and erosion reduction while presernng aesthetic and scenic quality. It is recommended that a minimum of 10 acres of this site remain as open space and that it be managed and maintained by a local neighborhood association. Wedgewood Open Space Site 34-OS Natural Open Space Area This 2 acre parcel is located west of 38th Avenue between 337th and 339th Streets. It is almost entirely sunounded by homes and has very little street access. Brigadoon Elementary Schoo! Park Site 35-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the 4.14 acres of recreation area located at the Brigadoon Elementary School site. Cit�ofFederal Way Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section Vll - P/an Recommendations Section VII- 17 � PLANNING AREA A ' ' � ' C J �J � ' , ' � ' ' � LJ � ' Comnrehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv of Federal Wav Section Vll-18 Section VII - Plan Recommendations ' PLANNING AREA B (Includes West Campus, Illahee and Olympic Heights neighborhoods.) 1�5 E F --- 1 Crtv orFedern! li�av _ ___ ________ __.__ C'on�rehensi��e Parks, Recreatron and Open .Spnce Plnn S'ection 1'II - Plan Recorrrmendations Sectior� ( 71- 19 Summary of Recommendations PLANNING AREA B CHARACTER: This area is mostly residential in character with a wide range of housing values and ages. Most of this area is developed except for land along the Pierce/King County border. TOPOGRAPHY: The tenain is mostly flat to gently rolling hills. EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS (I) Acerage for Saghalie Junior High is included in Saghalie Park PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS BPA Trail Park extension (Phase II/III) � 45.00 Madrona Meadows Park Conversion ' 0 00 TQ'�'A�, < �i5 Ob .>: • Development of Madrona Meadows Open Space for a neighborhood park Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv of Federal Way Section VII- 20 Section I�II - Plan Recommendations , , � � PLANNING AREA B SPECIFIC RECOMII�NDATIONS Alderdale Park Site 1-N Neighbor600d Park This existing 2.0 acre park is located west of 21 st Avenue and south of 336th Street. � Facilities at the site contain a children's playground, picnic area, tennis court and open play area. Suggested improvements include: ' • Add picnic shelter • Upgrade playground (ADA) Madrona Trails Open Space Site 2-OS Natural Open Space Area � , �J This existing 2.2 acre parcel is located within a residential neighborhood and is heavily wooded. No development is proposed for this site. Coronado Park Site 3-M Mini-Park This 1.5 acre park is located west of 21 st Avenue and south of south of 348th Street. No recommendations have been made for this site. Saghalie Junior High School Park Site 4-SU Special Use Area ' Refer to Saghalie Park for specific recommendations on this site. Saghalie Park Site 5-C Community Park This 36 acre park site is located east of 21 st Avenue and south of 336th Street. Since this site was recently developed, only minor improvements are needed. These include: • Add cover to baseball field dugouts • ADA improvements Citv otFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations . Section VII- 21 ' PLANNING AREA B � BPA Trail Park (Phase II/III) Site 6-L Linear Park This linear park site is located along the Bonneville power lines that extend through the entire city. In addition to the BPA right of way, this site include the Meadow Open Space srte. The proposed King County Covington/Tacoma Trail utilizes this corridor. About 45 acres of additional land would need to be acquired to extend this park to the County boundary. Facilities for the site could include: • Trail system • Seating areas • Three soccer fields • Open play areas Panther Lake Park Site 7-SU Special Use Area This park site consists of 70.3 acres and is primarily wetlands. Because this is a high aquifer infiltration area, every measure to maintain that quality should be maintained. However, some opportunities for recreation development exist. Recommendations include: • Develop a maintained grass area and trail system along a portion of the lake • Construct boardwalks and other trails into the wetlands area • Add limited picnic sites Weyerhauser King Co. Aquatic Ctr. Site 8-SU Special Use Area This 10.6 acre site contains a 50 meter indoor pool and support facilities. An addition ' has been proposed for this facility. Sherwood Forest Elem. School Park Site 9-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the Federal Way School District to ensure that the 4.68 acres of recreation area located at the Sherwood Forest Elementary School meet the local neighborhood needs. � � � � ' , Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan City otFederal Way ' Section i�ll- 22 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations , � PLANNING AREA B , Madrona Meadows Park Site 10-N Neighborhood Park This 6.2 acre neighborhood park site is located adjacent to the BPA right of way and is ' cunently open space. It is recommended that a portion of the site surrounding the water retention area be developed for a neighborhood park. Specific recommendations for the site include: � Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court • Open multi-purpose lawn area • Parking (5-10 spaces) • Trails • Two unlighted tennis courts �J �l 1� � i 1 1 ! � i 1 Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan , Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 23 � PLANNING AREA B I l� , � � � � � � � i �� 1 0 0 1 1 Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section Vll- 24 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations ' PLANNING AREA C (Includes the Dlahee, Hylebos and Spring Valley neighborhoods) Summary of Recommendations __,__..__,_ ._ .._,�_____. Mini Nei�hborhood Communit� ..................... ....... Lar�e Urban O��en Spacf Linear ...........'-'-._...... _._.. Snecial Use ____ -- 10.00 : ......................., ....... ...: o.�o : 65.00 : 113.96 �: ........................: 0.00 : ....................... a 50.82 : 0 2 ._ ........ 0 1 3 ---- ----�--0 ...... ....... I-5 E F - Zr AREA LOCATION City ofFeder�l Wnv ________________ _„_._ __.. ___Corn �•ehe_nsive Park,s, Recrention and Open Space Plan __ ._ _ . . Section IrII � Pl�n Reco�nnrendntions Sectio�� G77- 25 PLANNING AREA C CHARACTER: This area has the greatesi potential of growth in the city and contains most of the undeveloped land. Most of the land west of the Pac�c Highway is either residential in nature or undeveloped. The land east of the Pacific Highway contains a wide variety of land uses including light industrial, highway commercial and off"ice t�se. TOPOGRAPHY: Rolling: The Hylebos Creek Drainage Corridor is found in this area and drains most of Federal Way. EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS School Park Hylebos State Park (State) ..............••-•.--••----...-----•------•--....--•......... Hylebos_Creek O�en Space Illahee Junior High School Pazk Spring Valley O�en Space SW 363rd Ooen Snace PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Hylebos Roadside Park Hylebos Creek O n S Illahee Pazk (Prot>osedl SW 363rd Park 5.00 65.00 38.02 15.82 45.39 5.05 5.00 20.00 15.00 30.00 5.00 5.00 Comprehensive Parks Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv o/'Federa! Way Section VII- 26 Section VII - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA C SPECIFIC RECONA�NDATIONS Enterprise Elementary School Park Site 1-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the Federal Way School District to develop neighborhood park facilities on the grounds of the Enterprise Elementary School. West Hylebos State Park Site 2-R Regional Park Hylebos State Pazk is located between South 348th and 356th Streets. Presently, the park consists of 65 acres of land. Facilities will include an interpretative center and trail system. The site is a wetlands and an environmentally sensitive area. Proposed Spring Valley Park Site 3-N Neighborhood Park A five acre neighborhood park site is recommended just north of 359th Avenue near the Spring Valley Open Space site. One possible option, depending upon how the Spring Valley site is developed, is to locate the neighborhood park element on that site. Recommended uses for a park in this area include: • Two youth baseball fields • Multi-use paved court • Children's playground • Open multi-use play area • Parking (25 cars) Spring Valley Open Space Site 4-OS Naturai Open Space Area This 45.39 acre open space site is located east of the Pacific Highvvay. The site consists largely of open meadows and wetlands. Hylebos Creek flows through the property. A church located at the corner of 16th Avenue and 359th Street is occupying a building site of some historical significance. It is recommended that an effort be made to acquire this site for public use and maintain the historical character. Uses of the buildings could include recreation as well as a site for housing historical artifacts. This site is the south ternunus of the Freeway to Bay Trail. Possible uses for this site include: � • Trailhead for the Freeway to Bay Trail • Internal trail system • Viewpoints � • Wetlands • Riding arena and equestrian trail system � Cil�of Federal Wav Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section I�II - Plan Recommendations Section Vll- 27 PLANNING AREA C Proposed Sports Complex Site Site 5-SU Special Use Area Considerable interest was expressed during the study for a sports complex. One potential site is located in the Spring Va11ey area, adjacent to the Spring Valley Open Space site. It is recommended that approximately 30 acres be acquired in this area to develop athletic fields. Hylebos Creek Open Space Site 6-OS Natural Open Space Area (Includes Blueberry Farm/Pea Patch Site) This site is essentially a drainage corridor that extends from West Hylebos State Park to the south. The City has acquired 38.02 acres, which includes the "Blueberry Farn�/Pea Patch" site. It is recommended that the City contiue to acquire land along this corridor for the purpose of developing a trail system that would connect Hylebos State Park and the proposed roadside park. Additional improvements should be made to help prevent flooding and erosion problems downstream. Diahee Junior High School Park Site 7-SU Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work cooperatively with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the 15.82 acres of land located at the Illahee Junior High School. Proposed Dlahee Park Site 8-C Community Park It is recommended that a community park of approximately 15 acres be developed in close proximity to Illahee 7unior High School. Since the area is reasonably level, many types of active recreation activities could be accommodated. This park should be designed to also serve the neighborhood park needs of the area as well. Proposed facilities at the site could include: • Children's playground • Paved multi-use basketball court • Parking (about 150 spaces) • Two soccer fields • Trail system • Restroom facility • Four tennis courts • Two unlighted softball fields Comnrehensive Parks, Recreation and Oven Snace Plan CitZofFederal Way Section Vll- 28 Section t�Il - Plan Recommendations � � PLANNING AREA C SW 363rd Open Space Site 9-OS Natural Open Space Area This site is located off South 363rd Street between lOth and 14th Avenues. The site consists mostly of a small wetland area. The intended use for the site is prirnarily passive in nature. About 5 acres of additionalland should be acquired. � Proposed Hylebos Creek Roadside Site 10-SU Special Use Area This proposed five acre site is located west of Pacific Highway and is intended to be a roadside park and trail head for Hylebos Park and the Freeway-to-Bay Trail. I � I� I � Citv ofFederal Way Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan ' Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section Vll- 29 � PLANNING AREA C � C� � � � � � � � � �I Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Onen Space Plan Cit�ofFedera! Way Section VII- 30 Section VII - Plan Recommendations � PLANNING AREA D (includes the Downtown area.) Summary of Recommendations Mini Nei� Lincar S��ecial Use 0.00 ............ 20.00 �.00 83.50 .. ........ 0.00 . ........ 0.00 76.3 7.11 0 .............. 4 � 0 1 --�._.._ .............. 0 .............. 0 2 ___.._ i _..___ I-5 E F � AREA LOCATION Citv o�F'ederal 6[�nv � ��_�_______�____Con�rehe��sii�e Parks, Recrention and Open Spnce Plan Section I�II - Plan Reco�rrn�endations Sectio�� T�II- 31 PLANNING AREA D CHARACTER: This area contains the main commercial core of the City plus a large office area. The northern half of this area is mostly residential. TOPOGRAPHY: Gentle slope to the south EXISTING PARKS AND NATURAL OPEN SPACE AREAS BPA Trail Park ......................................................................... Celebration Park Harry S Truman/Merit School Park Klahanee Lake Senior/Comm.Center •••••• .........................••••-•••••............._._.._............. Muror Lake Elemen School Park ....................•••....•••...�.......................... Mirror Lake Park Panther Lake Elemen School Park West Campus Trail PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS 48.50 ............... 83.50 3.95 7.11 ••••.....•••••• _.... 4: 52. 3.40 5.13 27.80 � Forest Green Park �Pro�osed) 3.00 : t•� ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ; ,,,,,, .: ,,, --- , . ,,,,,,,,,,,,,...,,., . ,,,,. .,.,,,..,,,,,.,..,,,,,,,,; � ���'��, � 3 Ofl Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Cit�of Federal WaY Section Vll- 32 Section VII - Plan Recommendations , � PLANNING AREA D SPECIFIC RECOMI��NDATIONS Mirror Lake Elementary School ParkSite 1-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the School District to upgrade the 4.52 acres of recreation area located at the Mirror Lake Elementary Elementary School. Mirror Lake Park Site 2-N Neighborhood Park This park contains 3.4 acres of land and is located off south 315th Avenue. Facilities at the site include a small playground and large open lawn area. The character of the site is fairly level and partially wooded with a mixture of understory vegetation. The site offers some potential for further development or redevelopment. The park is only accessible from two small dead-end streets. '� � A meeting in the neighborhood revealed an interest in opening up more of the site and clearing much of the dense brush. A concern of personal safety in the park now exists. Recommended changes and improvements to this park include: • Identify parking area • Add restroom building • Upgrade playground • Clear out much of the dense brush • Increa.se size of open grass area • Add jogging trail • Add basketball court • Add multi-purpose soccer field • Improve drainage facilities Harry S. Truman/Merit School Park Site 3-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the School District to upgrade the 3.95 acres of recreation area located at the Merit High School. BPA Trail Park Site 4-L Linear Park See discussion on Site 6 L in Planning Area B for uses of the powerlines. Site 4-L � includes approximately 45 acres of land. This site also includes 3.5 acres of the Heritage Open Space site. West Campus Trail Site 5-L Linear Park � The West Campus Trail is a long nanow elongated park that extends from 320th to the BPA power lines. Another segment extends westward into the West Campus Neighborhood. In total, this land represents 27.8 acres of land. � City of Federal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Snace Plan � Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 33 PLANNING AREA D Based on the discussion for a neighborhood park in this area, it was recommended that portions of the West Campus Trail be developed with recreation facilities. One recommended site is a poRion of the trail between 326th and 330th. While most of the site in this area is only 100' wide, it provides some important recreation faciiities. Recommended improvements include: • Open multi-use soccer/play area • Picnic area/landscaping • Children's playgound • Parking (5-10 spaces) • Multi-use paved court • Landscaping Another recreation area recommended for this neighborhood is that part of the West Campus Trail located at the end of 2nd Place between 325th and 327th. This site contains about two acres of land and is heavily wooded. It is recommended that the brush be cleared and some areas opened up for general recreation use. A trail could connect to the main West Campus Trail to the east. Celebration Park Site 6-LU Large Urban Park This 83.5 acre site has undergone several ma.ster plans over the last several years. Proposals have included a variety of indoor and outdoor facilities. Once developed, it is recommended that this site serve both the neighborhood and community park function for the residents of this azea. If the City decides to develop an indoor recreation center, this site would provide an ideal and centralized location. Proposed Forest Green Park Site 7-N Neighborhood Park This proposed three acre park should be located on the north side of the BPA Power lines somewhere between First Way and 7th Place. This park site will serve that area up to 320th. Recommended facilities for this park should include: • Children's Playground • Open multi-use grass area • Trail connection to the Covington-Tacoma Trail • Picnic area • Parking (5-10 spaces) Klahanee Lake Community/Senior Center Site 8-SU Special Use Area This 7.11 acres site is located in the West Campus area between 1 st Way and 9th Avenue. Facilities include senior center element, gymnasium, kitchen, meeting spaces, picnic area and parking area. While this facility is cunently fulfilling the needs on a temporary basis, a larger facility indoor facility is needed in the long term. It is also recommended that a paved trail around the lake be developed. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv of Federal WaY Section VII- 34 Section VII - Plan Recommendations , ' � PLANNING AREA D Panther Lake Elem. School Park Site 9-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the School District to upgrade the 5.13 acres of recreation area located at the Panther Lake Elementary Schoo�. � � � Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section t�ll- 35 , PLANNING AREA D � � � � � � � � � � � Comprehensive Parks Recreation and Oven Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wav Section YII- 36 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations , p�,ANNIIV G AREA E (Includes the Steel Lake, Marine Rills and Laureiwood areas.) Summary of Recommcndations Mini 0.00 : 0 .................................. :.e....�. .................:.e...................,.._ . Ncighborhood : � 20.58 's � 6 � Communit� : __ _ 18.30 : � 1 � __ Lar�e Urban . _ 51.70 ; 1 Rc�ional 0 00 0 _...... . e...._.. ......... ..... ... . ........... . , Open,S��acc.»_��:_„a...�,_ .�'.,.._..,. ... L inear 0.00 : U ._ - • __ _ - -- S��ec�al Use � 25.G0 3 � � � .� � AREA LOCATION Citv o Feder�! YT�av --- C"am�»•crhensri�e Pn�-��s Recrenlior� niad Open Sl�crce Y/ai7 _ _-- -------_____ _ _ - _ _. _ _ — — Sectio�� I'II - Plan Reco��rmeradaliazs Sectia� 6�71- 37 PLANNING AREA E CHARACTER: This area consists of mostly older homes on larger lots. TOPOGRAPHY: Mostly flat with several minor drainage corridors. Steep bluffs overlook the Sound. EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS : _Federal Wa� High SchoolPark ......•• ••••• .............................. Federal Way Pool (Kenneth Jones Pool) � ..............(Coun�')....................................................... ; Woods SP ....................... Heritage Woods Park Mark Twain Elementary School Park :..... Marlbrook..OpeR.SP.a� ................••••••••.......... Nautilus Elementary School Pazk :.........................••••••..............................••••••................. Sacajawea Junior High School Park Saca'awea Park Steel Lake Park and Annex :....................................................................•••••........... y Wildwood Elemen School Park .. . .. ........................�?'................................... Wildwood Park PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS 21 : . . . ..•••.....; 0.50 .................i 2.61 : .................: 1.66 : 2.83 ; ...�:��.....: ... 5: 03.....; 3.72 18.30 : 51.70 i -••'3.76 ....� .... Comprehensive Parks Recreation and Oven Space Plan Citv ofFederal Way Section VII- 38 Section VII - Plan Recommendations , ! PLANNING AREA E SPECIFIC RECONIlVIENDATIONS Mark Twain Elem. Schooi Park Site 1-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City work closely with the School District to upgrade the 2.83 acres of recreation area located at Mark Twain Elementary School. Heritage Woods Park Site 2-N Neigh6orhood Park This 1.66 acre park site is located west of Military Road in the vicinity of 284th Street. Proposed facilities at the site should include: • Children's playground • Paved multi-use court • Open lawn area • Tennis court • Paved pathways Heritage Woods Open Space Site 3-OS Natural Open Space Area This 2.61 acre open qpace area is located west of Military Road in the vicinity of 284th Street. No recommendations have been made for this site. Proposed Redondo Heights Park Site 4-N Neighborhood Park This proposed five (5) acre neighborhood park is located off South 284th Street, west of Pacific Highway. The site is situated on top of the bluff overlooking the Marlbrook '� O en S ace site. This ark site is relativel level which offers several o ortunities for P P P Y PP the development of facilities. Specific recommendations for the site include: • Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court I �i � • Multi-use soccer/baseball field • Open lawn area �' � • Picnic area with shelter • Parking (15-25 spaces) Marlbrook Open Space � � Site 5-OS Natural Open Space Area This open space area is located along Redondo Way and contains about 19 acres of land. Two acres of land known as the Marlbrook Open Space site is already owned by the City of Federal Way. Considering the topography of the site, there is little opportunity for development. A majority of the site is too steep for active recreational uses, with the possible exception of a trail system. The recreational potential for this site would be limited primarily to passive uses. Cit�orFederal Wav Comnrehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section YII- 39 � PLANNING AREA E Preservation of this area for general open space would provide a number of benefits to the community including habitat protection, slope stabilization and erosion reduction while preserving the aesthetic and scenic quality of the ravine. Nautilus Elementary School Park Site 6-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the 5.03 acres of recreation area located at the Nautilus Elementary School. Proposed Marine Hills Open Space Site 7-OS Natural Open Space Area This proposed site is located along a ravine west of the Marine Hills neighborhood between 4th and 8th Avenues and contains about 32 acres of land. The site consists of steep wooded hillsides. Considering the topography, there are very few opportunities for development. A majority of the site is too steep for active recreational development, with the possible exception of an unpaved trail system. The recreational potential for this site would be limited primarily to passive uses. Preservation of this area for general open space would provide a number of benefits to the community including habitat protection, slope stabilization and erosion reduction while preserving aesthetic and scenic quality. Sacajawea Junior High School Park Site &SU Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work with Federal Way School District to upgrade the 3.72 acres of recreation land adjacent to Sacajawea Park. Sacajawea Park Site 9-C Community Park This park contains 18.3 acres of land and is located adjacent to Sacajawea Junior High School. The park is well designed and is also used by the school for its outdoor programs. Parking for the park is located on the school property. The site is divided into three distinct levels. The entry to the park is located on the middle level. This area contains two tennis courts, two lighted softball fields, a restroom/concession facility and a landscaped entrance feature. The lower level contains a footbalUsoccer field and cinder track. The upper level consists of an open lawn area, playground and a restroom building. There is a secondary parking area located off 16th avenue south that provides access to this area. This entire site is connected by a continuous path that meanders throughout the site. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv ofFederal Wav Section VII- 40 Section VII - Plan Recommendatrons � , PLANNING AREA E Recommendations for this site include: • Construct new bathroom/concession building � • Tennis court lighting • Add irrigation to baseball field • Add landscaping • Upgrade 16th Avenue parking area � • Upgrade sports fields • New backstop at east baseball field • ADA improvments Wildwood Park Site 10-N Neighborhood Park This 2.3 acre park is located off South 300th Street, adjacent to Wildwood Elementary School. Existing facilities at the park include a small playground area, open lawn area and a paved trail. Suggest improvements to this park include • Identify parking area • Upgrade drainage Wiidwood Elementary School Park Site 11-N Neighborhood Park It is recommended that the City coordinate with the School District to upgrade the 3.76 acres of recreation area located at Wildwood Elementary School. Proposed Steel Lake Wetlands Site Site 12-OS Natural Open Space Area This 5 acre site is located at the northwest end of Steel Lake and is essentially the drainage corridor out of the lake. At one time a lumber mill and pond were located in this area. Presently the site is a very important habitat for wild animals and bird species. It is recommended that this area be preserved with development limited to trails and viewpoints. �� � Cit�otFederal Way Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Oven Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section If1I- 41 � PLANNING AREA E Federal Way Pool Site 13-SU Special Use Area (Kenneth Jones Memorial Pool) This indoor facility is located adjacent to Federal Way High School. The pool is located on a half acre of land offPacific Highway South. Facilities at the site include a 25 yard Tee shaped pool and a small parking area. No additional land is available to expand this facility. Federal Way High School Park Site 14-SU Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work cooperatively with the School District to upgrade recreation facilities at this 21.38 acre site. Steel Lake Park Site 15-LU Large Urban Park This 51.7 acre site is the largest of the city owned parks and is extensively used. Because of its facilities, it serves the role of a community park for residents of this area. The southern portion of the site functions as the active recreation area. and contains two lighted softball fields; a lighted "cushion-turf' soccer field, volleyball courts, a concession/restroom building and a community center/administrative office building. A small wooded area also exists on this parcel. The northern portion of the site is oriented toward passive recreation activities with Steel Lake being the dominant feature. This site contains a beach, swimming area, picnic area, basketball court, picnic shelter, boat launch and a large open meadow. Recently, there have been a number of improvements to this site. They include a new play area, new picnic shelter and several picnic pads. Suggested improvements to the park include: • Install�irrigation system. • Improve site drainage conditions • Add 2-4 tennis courts • Add trails and picnic sites to the wooded area. • Add parking area Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan City otFederal Way Section VII- 42 Section I�II - Plan Recommendations � � � � � � Min� Nci�l � PLANNING AREA F (Includes th� Camelot, Lake Dolloff and Star Lake area.) Summary of Recommendations Urban u �en � acc : ....1..._.......�? .............a.:.... Linear .............................. a e a. y..,. Spec�al Use : 0.00 : 0 : 28 . 00 ....�........... �.....,....... 20.00 : 1 .............. .:.. .._....�...... ...... . 0.00 � 0____ 0.00 : v � __�.._. 46.88 ; �"_".__ 3 _ ................:........................... 75.00 : 1 . ............... s,...,...,......... _...,... 31.30 : 3 � � � � � � � , � � AREA LUCATION 1 Citv of Fecleral Wnv _____ __ Conprehensive Parks, Recrention nnc� Open Space Plan Seclion i�ll - Plnn Recom��rendations �� Sectio» 171- =l3 I � PLANNING AREA F CHARACTER: This area is mostly residential in nature on lots ranging from very small to very large. Ages of homes also vary considerably. All of this area lies outside the Federal Way City Limits. TOPOGRAPHY: Flat except for the bluffs that overlook the valley EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Camelot Elementary School Park :...... Camelot.Open. SPace...' .......................•••••- -• • - ••.... ; (County) .••••-••-•--•••• ................. Kilo Junior High School Park Lake Dolloff Elementary School Pazk : Lake Doliof� Fishin� Access (State) ,.....•••........••••• ....................... .•••••••••••••••••••................... Thomas Jefferson High School Park :..................••--•-•.......................--•-�----•�----...................... Valhalla Elementary School Park 5.00 12 16.30 10.00 5.00 . 130 20.00 5.00 " City owned parcel outside city limits; acquired with King Open Space Bond funds PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Bingaman Pond Wetlands •••........•••...••••••••••••• ..................... BPA Trail Park Extension •••••••-•••••••••......••••• ....................... Evergreen Heights Park (F Lake Dollofl' Wedands (Pr North Camelot Park (Prop� ........-••••.....••••••••••••......••••........ . 51 st Avenue Park �Propos� ............................... . 288th Street Pazk (Pronosc I5.00 75.00 20.00 3.00 3.00 .. 5.00 5.00 Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Cit�1'Federal Wav Section VII- 44 Section VII - Plan Recommendations � r , , � � PLANNING AREA F SPECIFIC RECOMN�NDATIONS Valhalta Elementary School Park Site 1-N Neighborhood Park Upon annexation, it is recommended that the City work with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the five (5) acres of recreation land located at Valhalla Elementary School site. Proposed Bingaman Pond Wetlands Site 2-OS Natural Open Space Area � This proposed site contains about 15 acres of open space and is located off 45th Avenue South. The site follows a ravine that extends from I-5 to 45th Avenue South. A majority of this site is a wetland area, which includes Bingaman Pond. It is � recommended that the wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas be preserved for general open space. The Steel Lake Trail follows the drainage corridor through the site. Minor improvements to the site could include: • Trail system • Develop boardwalk and interpretive trails • Parking for 5-10 cars T. Jefferson High Schoot Park Site 3-SU Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work with the Federal Way School District to upgade the 20 acres of recreation area located at the high school. Proposed 288th Street Park Site 4-N Neighborhood Park This proposed five (5) acre neighborhood park site is located off South 288th Street, just east of I-5. Locating a park site in this area will be difficult because a majority of the azea is already developed. Proposed facilities at the site could include: • Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court • Open multi-purpose lawn area • Parking (5-10 spaces) Cit�fFederal Way Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 4S PLANNING AREA F Proposed North Camelot Park Site 5-N Neighborhood Park This proposed three (3) acre park site is located south of 292nd Street. It is recommended that a neighborhood park site be developed in conjunction with an existing King County open space site. The County currently owns 6.5 acres of land that is used as a water retention area. However, there is enough land for the development of a small neighborhood park. By locating a neighborhood park adjacent to the proposed open space site, it would provide trail access as well as other recreational uses. Proposed facilities could include: • Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court • Open multi-purpose lawn area. • Trail connection/trailhead Camelot Open Space Site 6-OS Natural Open Space Area This pazcel of land was acquired through the King County Open Space Bond Measure. It is owned by the City of Federal Way and contains 12.58 acres of land located in a lowland area. The site is located outside the city limits off south 294th Street between 45th Place South and 39th Avenue South. In terms of future development, the site offers very little potential considering the drainage characteristics of the area. A majority of the site is wetlands with a seasonally higher water table. Camelot Park (County) Site 7-OS Natural Open Space Area This area contains 16.30 acres of land located in a lowland area. There are currently two parcels that are owned by King County. The first parcel, known as Camelot Park, consists of 16.3 acres. The second parcel is a King County water retention area, which consists of approximately 3.5 acres of land. In terms of future development, the site offers very little potential considering the drainage characteristics of the area. A majority of the site is wetlands with a seasonally higher water table. However, there are portions of the site that are developable. It is recommended that a interpretive trail system and boardwalk be developed. Camelot Park could serve as a trailhead for this site. Several other trailheads could be developed along the dead end streets that abut the site. Camelot Elementary School Park Site 8-N Neighborhood Park Upon annexation, it is recommended that the City work with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the five (5) acres of recreation land located at Camelot Elementary School site. Comnrehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan � Cit�ofFedera! Way Section Vll- 46 Section VII - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA F Proposed Lake Dollof�' Wettands Site 9-OS Natural Open Space Area This proposed three (3) acre site is located off South 304th Street and consists of several small ponds along the perimeter of Lake Dolloff. It is recommended that the wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas along Lake Dolloff be preserved as general open space. A portion of the Steel Lake Loop Trail abuts this parcel. Lake Dolloff Elementary School Park Site 10-N Neighborhood Park Upon annexation, it is recommended that the City work with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the five (5) acres of recreation land located at Lake Dolloff Elementary School site. Kilo Junior High Schoot Park Site 11-SU � Special Use Area It is recommended that the City work with the Federal Way School District to upgrade the ten (10) acres of recreation land, once this unicorporated area is annexed to the City. Proposed Evergreen Heights Park Site 12-C Community Park This proposed community park site is located in the northeastern portion of the unincorporated area and would contain about 20 acres of land. The recommended location is directly east of Kilo Junior High School. This could be a joint city/school effort. By locating a park adjacent to a school site, it would allow some joint use of facilities as well as reducing acquisition costs. The character of the site consists of relatively flat and rolling hills. Considering the topography of the site, there are unlimited opportunities for development of park and recreational facilities. Proposed facilities could include: • Children's playground • Paved multi-use court • Picnic area/shelter • Four tennis courts • Two soccer fields • Two softball fields • Three youth baseball fields • Restroom • Parking (125-150 spaces) Lake Dollofl Fishing Access Site 13-SU Special Use Area This 1.3 acre site is located on Lake Dolloff. It is currently owned and managed by the State. The site is primarily used as a fishing access. No specific recommendations are made for this site. Citv ofFederal Wav Comnrehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section VII - Plan Recommendations Section i�ll- 47 , PLANNING AREA F � BPA Trail Park Site 14-L Linear Park This segment of the power line contains about 75 acres of land and is partially developed with trails and other open areas. Proposed 51st Avenue Park Site 15-N Neighborhood Park � This proposed park site containing about five acres of land is located off 51 st Avenue South. The site is relatively level, which offers several opportunities for development. � Proposed facilities at the site should include: • Children's playground area , • Paved multi-use court • Multi-purpose soccer/baseball field • Parking (15-25 spaces) , � Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Cit�of Federa! Way Section Vll- 48 Section VII - Plan Recommendations ' PLANNING AREA G (Includes the North Lake and Lake Geneva Areas.) Summary of Recommendations Mini 0.00 : 0 �_._._.. • Nei�hborhood '; 10.00 : 2 �� . ...... ........................ r ...,....................... } .................,... _........... Communit� ....... : ........... 18.SO . e. ._. 1 ................... Largc Urban : 0.00 : 0 Rc ional � 0.00 � � O � _._______......�_. Open Space...,..,:.��.e.....95.82...:.......e...3 ......_..... Linear 0.00 : 0 ----�-----... -----------......;.._...._ ............................................. Special LJse : 5.50 : 1 I-5 I F AREA LOCATInN Citv a/`I�ederal Wav _____ ._____.__ __ _C_ �U��l rehensri�e_,Parks Recrecrtion a�td Open Space Plnn Section Y71 - Plan Recorrune�Tdntionc Section I7IT 49 PLANNING AREA G CHARACTER: The majority of this area consists of single family residences with a scattering of vacant land. A portion of this area lies within the citv limits. TOPOGRAPHY: The terrain is fairly level except for Peasley Canyon and the bluffs overlooking the valley EXISTING PARKS AND NATURAL OPEN SPACE AREAS Lake Geneva Park (County) :. . .. Lake KillarneY SP s � Lakeland Elementary School Park y ..............................................................'"""... North Lake Fishing Access (State' . PuvalluD Landfill Ooen Snace " Inside city limts 18.50 10 5.00 �5.50 30.00 PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS }..... Peasley Canyon Open Space �Pr°posed) ............ 55 : 00 ..... : S ider Lake Park (Pro sed 5.00 : ;:::;< >>:>:>:: Tp; <: `: '<;:>::::>::::>:::» : "»<::::::>:<:::::>::::>::>;>'::::»::<:<:;:<:>;:<:::::>:::: ;::::::>::::>:':::.:;:;.:. ,; ,,; ::» ::: : . :::..::..:'I'AI.:::::::::::. :. ::::::: ::.: :.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::: �E).il�:;:: :. Comprehensrve Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan City o1'Federal Way Section VII- SO Section I�II - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA G SPECIFIC RECOMNIENDATIONS North Lake Fishing Access (State) Site 1-SU Special Use Area This 5.5 acre site is located along North Lake and is currently owned and managed by the State Game Department. Facilities at the site include a boat launch and fishing dock. Prop. Peasley Canyon Open Space Site 2-OS Natural Open Space Area This proposed open space site is located along Peasley Canyon and contains about 55 acres of land. The site encompasses the Highway 18 corridor and the canyon along Peasley Canyon Road. It is recommended that the steep hillsides along the freeway be preserved for general open space. Preservation of this area for general open space would provide a number of benefits to the community including slope stabilization, erosion reduction and visual buffering while preserving aesthetic and scenic quality. Considering the topogaphy of the site, there are very few opportunities for development. A majority of the site is too steep for active recreational development, with the possible exception of an unpaved trail system. Lake Geneva Park Site 3-C Community Park This county pazk contains 18.5 acres of land and is located off Military Road along South 344th Street and 46th Avenue South. Access to the park is off South 342nd on the north and from 46th Avenue South on the south. The park is essentially divided into two distinct areas. The lower area, which is more oriented towards passive activities, is situated adjacent to Lake Geneva. This area. is heavily wooded and slopes gently to the edge of the lake. It contains a fishing pier, shelter building and a restroom facility. The upper portion of the site can accommodate more active and structured activities but at this time is underdeveloped. However, to accommodate the facilities suggested below, additional land will be needed. Suggested additions to the site include: • Children's playground • Paved multi-use court • Open multi-purpose lawn area • Two Soccer field • Two youth baseball fields • Two tennis couRs • Parking (75 spaces) Cit�of Federal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Snace Plan Section [�II - Plan Recommendations Section I�II- Sl � PLANNING AREA G Lake Killarney Open Space Site 4-OS Natural Open Space Area This 10.82 acre open space site is located along Lake. The site contains lake access and environmentally sensitive land along the perimeter of Lake Killarney. It is recommended that this site be used for passive recreational activities such as picnicking, fishing and trail related activities. Minor improvements to the site would include: • Trail system • �ewpoints • Picnic areas • Parking Puyallup Landfill Site Site 5-OS Natural Open Space Area This 30 acre site is owned by King County and once was an old landfill. Over the years there have been a number of proposed uses for the site including a softball complex. However, due to land settling and the potential for methane gas emissions, no development has occuned on this site. Based on this, it is recommended that the site be preserved as open space. If testing and soil stability analysis prove that the site is safe in the future, it is recommended that alternative uses be explored. Lakeland Elementary School Park Site 6-N Neighborhood Park ' � � ' � ' , � Upon annexation, it is recommended that the City coordinate with the Federal Way School Distinct to improve the 5 acres of recreationalland at this site. ' Proposed Spider Lake Park Site 7-N Neighborhood Park A five acre neighborhood park is proposed in the vicinity of Spider Lake to serve the east edge of the planning area. Proposed facilities at this pazk site will depend upon its specific location. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Citv ojFederal Way Section Vll- S2 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations PLANNING AREA H (Includes the Five Mile Lake area) Mini Nei�: Summary of Recommendations ............... unity Urban Linear _........---• ................... Special Use __...__„_._;_._,_._ ,..._.._ , ,,.., 0.00 : 0 10.00 ��_ �_? ..__._. ...............,.......................... 26.50 's 1 . .................................... 0.00 : 0 0.00 : � 0 �� 40.00 : w � 1 _ -- --_. ................:.........•--••----�------• 0.00 : 0 ...............,..._..-----------------... 25.00 : 1 1-5 E F �� I-5 AREA LOCATION �':�_I ,, L City orFec�eral Wav._-^-__--_-.—__--_ ---_--._.__....____ ___.....__. Lom rehen,cil�e Pnrks Recreation and Open�ace Plan Section I�7I - Plnn Recon��ne��dntion,s Sectia� VII- 53 PLANNING AREA H CHARACTER: The majority of this area is residential in nature but large amounts of undeveloped land exists. All of the area lies outside the Federal Way city limits. TOPOGRAPHY: The tenain is mostly level except for some deep canyons EXISTING PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS Five Mile Lake (County) 26.50 Rainier View Elemen School Park 5.00 � ;...,. .. .......,�}',,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,....,,,,, .,,,,,.,,..,,,,.,,,,....,.: ::; '�`a�`a�. > < � �i; so . ;: PROPOSED PARKS AND OPEN SPACE AREAS � E. H lebos Cr. S ce(Pro sed) 40.00 East H lebos Park (Pro sed) 5.00 � Outdoor Education Site 25.00 ': _>,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,;�--�--->,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..,,,,,->-->-,,,,,,,,, .,,.,,.,,,,,,,,,,,,.,,.,.: :.;:::; �c�'r� � �a � Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan City ofFederal Wav Section I�II- S4 Section I�11- Plan Recommendations � ' ' ' � � PLANNING AREA H SPECIFIC RECOIVIlVIENDATIONS Proposed Outdoor Education Site Site 1-SU Special Use Area This 25 acre site is located off South 360th Street and is currently owned by the Federal Way School District. It was originally purchased as a high school site but there is additional land that could be used for some other purpose. It is recommended that the city and the school district enter into a joint development agreement to create an outdoor education site for the school district and as a major group picnic area for the general public. It may be possible to construct a trail linking this site with Five M'ile Lake Park (site 2-C). Suggested facilities include: � • Open multi-purpose lawn area • Parking • Trail connection/trailhead • Interpretive building � • Picnic area • Restroom facility • Large group picnic area � • Boardwalks • Fishing pier Five Mile Lake Park (County) Site 2-C Community Park This 26.5 acre park has its access from Military Road and is just south of South 360th ' Street. The park is well designed with the northeastern portion of the park containing the more active sports activities. The park is oriented around Five Mile Lake and the activities it can offer. � �� � � , Existing facilities at the park include a softball field, two tennis courts, basketball court, open lawn area, swimming beach and pier, picnic shelter and restroom facilities. Presently, the majority of the site is developed. However, there is a wetland area that could be enhanced with some interpretive trails. Presently, the park is fairly well developed. There may be several opportunities for trail connections to the outdoor education site (See site 1-S). Suggested improvements include: • Trailhead • Trails/boardwalks • Youth baseball field • Two tennis courts Cit�ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan � Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section t�ll- SS r PLANNING AREA H I Proposed East Hylebos Park Site 3-N Neighborhood Park This proposed five acre site should be located along East Hylebos Creek Natural Open Space Area (See Site 7-O). By locating a neighborhood park adjacent to the proposed open space srte, it would provide trail access to the Natural Open Space Area as well as a place for more active recreation uses. Proposed facilities at the site could include: • Children's playground area • Paved multi-use court • Multi-use soccer/baseball field • Parking (15-25 spaces) • Two tennis courts Rainier View Elem. School Park Site 4-N Neighborhood Park ' , � L� � Upon annexation, it is recommended that the City coordinate with the school district to � develop neighborhood park facilities at this location. Proposed East Hyle6os Creek Site 5-OS Natural Open Space Area This proposed site is located off Route 161 (Puyallup Highway) and is located within the East Hylebos Ravine. The site is steep and heavily wooded. About 40.0 acres of land is within this ravine. Considering the nature of the area, its best use would be for open space. Comnrehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Cit�ofFedera! Way Section Vll- S6 Section VII - Plan Recommendations r �� A major intra-community trail system has been developed that provides linkages between many of the parks and open space sites. In addition, major trails also connect to the regional system providing pedestrian and bicycle access to Kent, Auburn, Tacoma and the rest of the Seattle metropolitan area. The following is a summary of recommendations for the major trail system. Trail l Freeway to Bay Traii 5.3 Miles , This trail system is designed to provide a major north/south paved pedestrian trail that connects many of the parks and Natural Open Space Area. It begins at the Spring Valley Open Space site near the I- 5 Freeway and continues up through the Hylebos Creek drainage corridor. It eventually terminates at � Puget Sound at the Dumas Bay park site (site 7 S in Planning Area A). This is a unique trail system in that none of it follows public streets. Its use will be primarily for pedestrians and bicyclists. � Trai12 Steel Lake Loop Trail 10.0 Miles The Steel Lake Loop Trail provides a circular trail system in the northern portion of the planning ' area. It begins at Steel Lake and travels mostly through open space comdors. Some of it does follow public streets, however. This loop system also connects to the Saltwater State Park Trail, the Green River Trail and the Covington/Tacoma Trail. , Trail 3 Covington/Tacoma Trail 6.7 Mites ' This trail follows the BPA power lines that extend through the entire planning area. Once completed, it will connect the Tacoma area with the Interurban Trail in the Kent Valley. ' Trai14 Olympic View Connection 1.5 Miles � The Olympic View Connection is a small trail that begins within Olympic View Park and connects to the Freeway to Bay Trail. Some of this route will be located along city streets and an access easement will be needed along the golf course driving range. � ' ' ' Cit�fFederal Way Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan ' Section I�II - Plan Recommendations Section Vll- 57 . ...v. �`},YiY :•:4'M:4: •x.}:c"-.�;._.;.;.:::a:•ik•\�i.'+::•iii:4hi':yr.:'i�i..:-:-n'ry*:vv}:;•••p -:{:p}r. •{•};::i:::i� +'�i: -}H:t�:•}} . . :� . � �.'� f, .. r� ...; - +fi�:•'•':i�'•ii:ii?•::�'�vQ::�n^:•,:;i•; i�:rnf:::`},i i p r, �. �`�' •.'.^� :• •. :''�,�rf:,' ` ai';,.h� ?:fs'',3ic`:};';F:;st:;}`..''`.c�`,'. 'y�' `' : ,' �++� ';::• .?::�:� %,4��i5' : `i;' t�:������t:l�?:�7���::•_f._.'�?2�`�+... �•::..:..�c+....::!?to: t'ui�.<,•.��:.°.L`::"C•.. . f+. .., { . r. . \��; ;:......::: \\4. vf.?::.: �r�+'�:. ;}� • •+ .; f. �� J ..{; . %H. t •.:v:r r.vr::.�:::::::.�::::::::::xx ••:.�.v:.v:x?:... r..r . ..++.� . n..r..'. � v:n•::}:}vj• .}•::. i'�i:•i:i:.:..t v �.•:�::...:\y}v..v�.....4,}v�., . . . ........ .n.....3} :...............................Ov......................r...:.r + . .......:................ :•:.v::.�::::::: :; ::.:.i•: •........::::,�v,•.. r: :.:::::.v..:::::.h•+? :'-.'.:::.:•..i+{ Several major recreation facilities are recommended in the plan. Each are briefly described below. Sports Fietd Complea A major sport complex is recommended and should contain a baseball stadium, softball fields, youth baseball Selds and soccer fields. It would be used primarily for city league play. This site should consist of appro�cimately 30 acres of land. One possible location is in the Spring Valley area (Refer to site 5-SU in subarea C) Outdoor Court Complez A complex of tennis, volleyball and other hard surface sports is recommended. These facilities should be lighted and built to league and instructional quality. They should be designed in a manner to accommodate major competitive events. Klahanee Lake Community/Senior Center Currently this facility contains a gymnasium, meeting rooms, a lcitchen, a senior center area, a game room and other miscellaneous spaces. With the development of an indoor recreation center, it is recommended that this facility be coverted to an alternative use. Indoor Recreation Center The survey and workshop meetings revealed considerable interest in a multi-purpose recreation center. The needs assessment indicated a specific need for a gymnasium and places to provide recreation classes and meetings. The interest in a recreation center has been heightened by the success of the nearby Norpoint Centre in Northeast Tacoma. The City of Federal Way has started a recreation progam but is using the schools and leased spaces. 1. Design Requirements for a Successful Indoor Recreation Center 2. 3. 4. A recreation center should be somewhat centralized to the community and should recognize the service area of the existing Norpoint Centre. The facility should provide a wide range of facilities and activities of interest to a11 age groups. Spaces should be provided for competitive and active sports, passive activities, limited cultural arts, receptions, etc. Multi-use spaces should be favored over single purpose spaces. Flexibility is very important. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Snace Plan Citv ofFederal Wav Section VII- 58 Section Vll - Plan Recommendations � I 5. The building should be attractive with a comfortable environment suitable for both active and leisure activities. Active recreation spaces should be clearly separated from passive spaces. Q 7 Because of the population growth in the area, the City,should consider constructing some lease space which would be converted to recreation space at a later time. Activities and spaces that generate revenue is very important. This will help to offset the operating cost. 8. While there is a large competitive pool and a smaller multi-purpose pool in Federal Way, the propo�sed recreation center should provide a lap pool along with a small leisure pool � for feac�ing and general recreation svv�mming. 2. Building Components: Recreation Component o Large multi-purpose gymnasium (7,920 sq. ft.) - 3 volleyball courts - 4 pickleball courts - 2 basketball courts o Racquetball courts (2-3) o Fitness Center o Multi-purpose reception/aerobics room o Meeting/classrooms (3-4) Estimated Floor Area: 21,600 sq. ft. Aquatic Component 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lap pool (3-41ane) "0" depth leisure /training tank Sma11 water slide Fountain Hydro therapy pool Public viewing area Outside sun deck Storage/mechanical room Shower/dressing rooms Pool control area. Estimated Floor Area: 11,900 sq. ft. � Citv of Federal Way Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 59 Support CompQnent o Warming/catering kitchen o Storage o Administrative space (Center only) o Public restrooms o Entrance, Control, Lobby o Building Operations Estimated Floor Area: 4,400 3. Site Requirements: Building Size Parking - 190 spaces Open space, landscaping Total 4. FinancialImpacts: Estimated Project Cost: Estimated Net Operating Cost 37,900 sq. ft. 66,500 sq. ft. 120,000 sq. ft. 224,400 sq. ft. (5.2 Acres) $6,000,000 $95,000 CulturaVPerforming Arts Center There is a great deal of interest to build an arts center in Federal Way. This project should be a joint effort among the City, private groups, individuals and non-profit organizations. Please refer to the Cultural Arts Plan for specific requirements. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Open Space Plan Citv orFederal Wav Section Vll- 60 Section I�ll - Plan Recommendations , � ' ' Since the City is new and administrative procedures are now being developed, the following recommendations are given to help manage the park and recreation program. � 1. � ' ' , ' 2. � ' 3. , ' ' 4. Update Development Fee Ordinance Based on Impact Mitigation The city should adopt a park and recreation growth impact ordinance that would require dedication of park land or a fee in-lieu-of dedication. Because of the fairly large daytime employment population, the City should consider this mandatory dedication for commercial and industrial projects as well as residential development. Authority for establishing a growth impact ordinance comes from the State Subdivision Law (Chapter 58.17 RCV� and from the State Environmental Policy Act. The proposed ordinance would estimate the impact of each new development on park and recreation facilities in the area and make provisions for setting aside park land, facilities or monies to offset the project's impacts. The developer should be given the option of choosing land dedication, cash or a combination as long as they meet the design and location criteria established in the park and recreation plan. In addition, a developer should be given some credit for park and facility improvements made within the subject property. Annual Goals and Work Program Each year at the beginning of the budget process, the Department staff should set goals and objectives for the forthcoming year. This type of strategy will give the staff a source of direction of what is to be accomplished for the year. At the end of the year an evaluation should be made to deternune the effectiveness of the staff in meeting the goals. Annual Report An annual report should be prepared each year describing the activities, participation levels and changes and other operating information that occuned over the past year. This document should be prepared in a professional manner and widely distributed. It is an important document to have available at budget time. Department Poticy Manual To help maintain a level of consistency, a policy manual should be prepared that deals with the ' various operations managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services. Once in place, it will help the staffto administer the various programs it offers. � �J Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan , Section I�II - Plan Recommendations Section VII- 61 5. 6. 7. 8. Cost and Revenue Reporting System It will be important to maintain a clear understanding of the costs and revenues generated by each type of recreation service offered by the city. To achieve this, costs and revenues should be identified for each major type of facility and recreation program. Given this type of information, judgments can then be made on what program or fee changes need to be made. Zoning Ordinance Amendments One concept that creates park and open space is to allow the clustering of development thereby leaving some land available for other recreation uses. Currently the City's zoning ordinance does not permit this approach, which is sometimes referred to as a PUD (Planned Unit Department). It is recommended that the City consider this approach. As an example, a developer might own a ten acre parcel of land in which 50 units are permitted on the site. Under the PUD concept, the developer would be allowed to cluster the 50 utits into one area leaving several acres of land for a park site. The city benefits in that it gets a park site at no cost and the developer benefits in that 50 housing units can still be constructed but at a lower total development cost. Contracting Park Maintenance Services As the city grows and the demand for maintenance increases, the city should consider contracting out certain tasks. Some possible tasks could include street tree maintenance, painting, tree removal, etc. Joint agreements with King County Since a considerable amount of the planning area is outside the city limits of Federal Way, King County will need to assume the responsibility of pazk land acquisition and development. Reco�ng that some of this unincorporated land may eventually be annexed to the city, Federal Way should have a keen interest in acquiring park land while it is available. Therefore, the city and the county should enter into joint agreements whereby the two jurisdictions can share in this responsibility. Comnrehensive Parks. Recreation and Oven Snace Plan Cit�ofFederal WaY Section VII- 62 Section I�II - Plan Recommendations � ' � ' 1. Develop Maintenance Management Plan ;� Effective management of park maintenance operation requires a maintenance plan to developed for each active and passive park under the junsdiction of the department. Elements of the plan will include the following information for each park. The elements are: site plan, utilities, facilities, total acreage, inventory of maintenance tasks, performance standards for i' each task and a maintenance calendar. Performance standards will be established by field observation of maintenance tasks, standards obtained through reliable sources and within budget appropriations. 2. Annual Goals and Work Program ', ' Each year at the beginning of the city's budgeting process, the department's staff will set goals and objectives for the forthcoming year. This type of strategy will give the staff direction of what should be accomplished for the year. As the year progresses, regular reporting will occur. The reports will include analysis of the work performed relative to annual goals and ,' approved work programs. At the end of the year, an overall evaluation will be made to determine the effectiveness of staff in meeting the goals. � 3. Annual Report ' �J � 1. An annual report will be prepared each year describing the activities, participation level and changes and other operating information that occurred over the past year. This document will be prepared in a professional manner and widely distributed. It is an important document to have available at budget time. Annual Goals and Work Program The philosophy of the Recreation Services Division is to provide a comprehensive diversified recreation program to the citizens of the Federal Way area. These programs include crafts and visual arts, dance, music, education, senior services, special interests, special populations, creative movement, health and fitness, athletics, outdoor activities, trips and tours, teens and special events. It is our goal to give the participants quality programs and introductory experiences to a variety of recreational opportunities and to provide a foundation on which a participant can build their knowledge and interest in a variety of leisure pursuits. '� Citv ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Parks, Recreation and Open Space Plan Section Vll - Plan Recommendations Section t�ll- 63 1. Annual Goals and Work Program The City of Federal Way Arts Commission was formed in January of 1991 to advise and recommend to the City Council and staff, activities related to all aspects of the arts visual, performing literary, and cultural. A Cultural Plan and Feasibility Study was completed in 1994 and now serves as a long-term planning document and work plan. The research determined that among the primary concerns of the community is the desire to create an image and identity for the City which recognizes the value of the arts and culture as an essential component of the community life. As a result of the Plan, six goals were identified. They are as follows: � To establish an on-going linkage between Federal Way's arts and business communities. • To crea.te, promote and advocate for arts education programs to serve all people of the community. • To improve coordination and the quality of arts marketing and promotional activities. • To improve existing festivals and establish a major "theme" festival for the community. • To utilize the Visitation Retreat and Cultural Center for cultural programming and develop a multi-user cultural arts facility before the year 2000. • Implement the goals and objectives of the plan through developing necessary partnerships such as the Chamber, Federal Way School District and the Federal Way Coalition for the Perfornung Arts. Comprehensive Parks. Recreation and Onen Space Plan Citv oJFederal Wav Section VII- 64 Section VII - Plan Recommendations � SECTION �III IMPLEMENTATION PLAN SECTION VIII I1��PLEMENTATION PLAN INTRODUCTION Contained in this section is a strategy for implementing the plan. The end product is the six year capital improvement plan (CIP) found on page VIII-9. It should be kept in mind that over time as funding opportunities arise or change, the CIP will need to be adjusted. PROJECT PRIORITIES 2. 3. 4. 5 6. 7. 8. Land acquisition should have the highest priority, especially for neighborhood and commuruty park sites. Park acquisition and development should have a higher priority in areas not presently being served. Upgrading existing park sites should have the priority because they can provide an immediate effect and will prevent further detenoration of facilities. The acquisition of community park sites should have priority over neighborhood park sites because of the difficulty in locating suitable parcels. Neighborhood park development should have priority over community park development because several large community parks already exist. The development of sport fields should be an on-going process but balanced against other needs. Trail development should be an on-going process. Trails should first be developed to connect existing trail systems. Open space should have a lower priority because usually it is land that is already protected by other governmental restrictions. A high priority should be placed on developing an agreement with King County to assure that future park sites outside the city limits are preserved PROJECT IlVIPROVEMENTS The following is a list of the project improvements recommended in the plan. This includes land acquisition, park development, park rehabilitiation, trail improvements and the development of major capital facilities. It should be kept in mind that the City will not be able to complete all of these projects in the near future. The purpose of this list is to identify all projects and be a source for revising the CIP in future years. City ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section f�Ill - Implemention Plan Page I�III - 1 PLANNING AREA A Cost of Improvements Project Type Acres Cost New Park Development Hoyt Road O.S. Lakota Park Lakota Park Expan. Lochaven Open S. Lochaven Park Ocean �ew Park Soundview Park West Campus Park Adelaide E. School Park Brigadoon E. School Park Decatur H.S. Park Green Gabie E. School/P Lake Grove E. School/P. Lakota Jr. Hi. School/P Olympic View E. SchooVP Silver Lake E. School/P Twin Lake E. Schooi/P SUBTOTAL Open S. Neigh. N/O.S. Open S. Neigh. Spec. Use Neigh. Neigh. Neigh. Neigh. Community Neigh. Neigh. Spec. Use Neigh. Neigh. Neigh. 10.00 3.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 4.80 4.10 16.60 5.90 5.80 5.70 5.60 5.20 5.00 $270,000 255,000 300,000 1,350,000 425,000 14,400 255,000 255,000 120,000 120,000 177,000 120,000 120,000 177,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 4,318,400 Park Rehabiliation Adelaide Park Alderbrook Pa�lc Dash Points Highlands Dumas Bay Park French Lake Park Lake Grove Pa�lc Lakota Park Olympic Vew Park Palisades Park Poverty Bay Pa�ic �sitation Retreat Center 312th Sport Court Pa�1c Neigh. Neigh. Neigh. Spec. Use Neigh. Neigh. Community Neigh. Neigh. Open S. Spec. Use Neigh. 6.70 25.10 5.00 19.30 10.00 4.80 28.20 20.70 3.20 48.00 12.00 2.00 $24,800 27,800 326,100 176,500 260,800 55,700 125,500 53,700 155,700 3,300 72,700 13,700 1,296,300 Comnrehensive Park. Recreation and Onen Svace Plan Citv otFederal Wav PaBe VIII - 2 Section I�IIl - Implemention Plan � PLANNING AREA B Cost of Improvements Project Type Acres Cost . New Park Development Saghalie Jr. Hi. School/P Spec. Use 36.00 $177,000 Sherwood E. School/P Neigh. 4.70 120,000 Madro�a Meadow Park Neigh. 6.20 310,000 SUBTOTAL 607,000 Park Rehabiliation Aiderdale Park Coronado Park Saghalie Park SUBTOTAL Neigh. 2.00 Mini 1.20 Community 36.00 $55,800 13,800 7,900 77,500 PLANNING AREA C Cost of Improvements Project Type Acres Cost New Park Development Hylebos Roadside Park Spec. Use 5.00 $32,000 Hylebos Cr. Open Space Open S. 20.00 540,000 illahee Paric Community 15.00 2,550,000 Spring Valley Parfc Neigh. 5.00 425,000 363rd Open Space Open S. 5.00 135,000 Enterprise E. Schooi/Park Neigh. 5.00 120,000 Iliahee Jr. Hi. School/P Spec. Use 15.80 177,000 Sports Fieid Complex Spec. Use 30.00 3,800,000 SUBTOTAL 7,779,000 Park Rehabiliation Hylebos - Blue. Farm Open S. 10.50 $186,100 SUBTOTAL 186,100 Citv ofFederal Way Comprehensive Park. Recreation and Open Space Plan Section VIII - Implemention Plan Page VIII - 3 PLANNING AREA D Cost of Improvements Proje Type Acres Cost New Park Development Forest Grove Park Neigh. 3.00 $255,000 TOTAL 255,000 Park Rehabiliation Mirror Lake Park West Campus Trail SUBTOTAL Neigh. 3.40 $223,900 Linear 27.8 43,300 $267,200 PLANNING AREA E Cost of Improvements Project Type Acres Cost New Park Development Marine Hills Open Space Open S. 20.0 $540,000 Redondo Hts. Park Neigh. 5.00 425,000 Redondo Open Space Open S. 17.0 459,000 Steel Lake Wetlands Open S. 5.00 135,000 SUBTOTAL 1,559,000 Park Rehabiliation Sacajawea Paric Steel Lake Park Steei Lake Annex Wildwood Park SUBTOTAL Community Large Urb. Large Urb. Neigh. 18.3 $106,300 51.7 121,100 18,800 2.30 11,300 257,500 Comnrehensive ParIG Recreation and Onen Snace Plan Citv of Federal Wuy Page t�lll - 4 Section Vlll - Implemention Plarr � � FUNDING SOURCES 1) � The following are possible funding sources for park and facility improvements. The number in front of each funding source acts as a key in the CIP found on page VIII-9. Washington Wildlife and A special fund created by a coalition of Recreation Coalition Fund recreation and wildlife groups with the intent of preserving wildlife habitats and open space and developing recreation areas. Approximately $58 million has been allocated each year since 1990. It is not known how long this funding source will continue. The City has received several grants from this program. Loca1 agencies must match the grant amount. 2) Property Transfer Excise Tax A tax assessed on the sale of property. City Park in Federal Way was financed by this method. 3) City General Fund General City funds allocated to the Park and Recreation Budget. Cunently most of the Department's budget comes from this source. Capital Improvement Fund Money allocated from the City's General Fund to finance major capital projects. 4) Park Impact Fees Development fees imposed by the City for park land acquisition and development. Fees charged to the developer are based on a set amount per residential unit. The City currently collects some money in a related SEPA process. 5) 6) Short Term Special Levy A property ta�c for construction and/or operation levied ��, for a set number of years. It is usually 1-3 years. A ' s ecial le re uires a 50% voter a roval and can ' � P �3' q PP continue up to six years. � 7) General Obligation Bond A property tax for the sale of construction bonds. The tax assessment can be levied up to 30 years. Requires a 60% majority approval of 40% of the voters who voted at the last election. � City ofFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan Section [�III - Implemention Pla» Page Vlll - S 8) �� 10) 11) 12) 13) 14) Revenue Bonds Revenue from the operation of the facility pays for the capital cost and debt service. Does not require a vote of the people unless required by local ordinance. Councilmanic Bonds Bonds that can be issued by the City Coun�il. Does not require a vote of the people but must be paid out of the City's annual operating budget. LWCF Grants distributed from the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. Grants pay 50% of the cost of acquisition and development. At one time, this was a ma�or funding program for recreation programs. Under the present admirustration, the program has been cut severely. The program is administered locally by the Washington State Interagency Committee on Outdoor Recreation. Park Revenue Revenue from park operations can be used to pay for capital improvements. Department of Ecology Grants from the Coastal Zone Management Account. Grants pay 50% and are primarily used for shoreline acquisition and public access. HUD Grants Grants from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for a wide variety of projects. Most are distributed in the lower income areas of the community. Grants can be up to 100%. Aquatic Land Enhancement This program, funded by the State Department of Fund Natural Resources, will fund up to $80,000 for acquisition and development of waterfront parks, public access and environmental protection. A new program has been added to the Aquatic Land Enhancement Fund called "Wetland Stewaxdship Grant Program". This program will fund up to $200,000 for the acquisition of locally significant wetlands. 15) Initiative 215 Boating Funds Funds received from boating gas tax are allocated to marine related projects. Up to $150,000 per project is available but a 50% match is required. Comnrehensive Parl� Recreation and Onen Space Plan Cit�o1'Federa! Way Page Vlll - 6 Section VIII - Implemention Plan 16) 17) 18) 19) 20) State Bicycle Funds From a portion of state gas taxes distributed to each city The amount is minor and is often used to help finance local street improvements. Certificates of Participation A lease-purchase approach in which the City sells Certificates of Participations (COP's) to a lending institution. The City then pays the loan off from revenue produced by the facility or from its general operating budget. The lending institution holds title to the property until the COP's are repaid. This procedure does not require a vote of the public. Transfer of Development A process wherein the development Rights rights of a specific parcel of desired open space land is transferred to a second parcel of land more suitable for development. The second parcel is then pernutted a higher level of development. If the two parcels are owned by two different land owners, the increased value of the second parcel is given to the owner of the first parcel. Work Release Program An alternative to jail time by providing community services such as working on a park maintenance crew or providing other recreation services. Centennial Clean Water A state program administered by the Program Department of Ecology and financed by a tax on cigarettes. The program is designed to provide grants and loans on projects that will enhance water quality. Typical projects related to parks and open space could include lake restoration, storm water retention, wetland enhancement and other water quality mitigating measures. Grants are available for planning, design and construction up to 70% of the total cost. 21) Conservation Futures Levy Counties can levy up to $.065 per $1,000 per assessed valuation for the acquisition of park land. King County is using this revenue source to help finance the shortfall in the Open Space Bond Program currently underway. 22) Utility Tax A tax on utilities. The City can charge up to 6% per utility. Citv ofFedera! Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plan ,� Section Vlll - Implemention Plan Page Vlll - 7 � � 23) Urban Forestry Grants The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) administers two funding grant programs in the area of urban forestry. The first in funded throgh the U. S. Small Business Administration and provides grants to purchase and plant trees. Urban street tree planting progams are sometimes funded by this method. About $250,000-300,000 annually is given to DNR to distribute. A 25% match is required. 24) ISTEA The "Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991" provides funding for bicycle transportation facilities, including new or improved lanes and paths, traf�c control devices, shelters and parking facilities. �- CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN � The following is a recommended strategy for implementing the first six years of improvements recommended in the plan. The numbers listed under the specific source refers to the funding � options listed on pages 5-8. Under impact fees, it is assumed an average growth of 760 housing units a year at an average fee of $1,200 each. � � Comvrehensive Park. Recreation and Onen Space Plan City otFederal Way 1 'aSe �II - 8 Section I�III - Implemention Plan � specific Sources: 1 Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition Fund 3 Cily General Fund 4 City Capital Improvement Fund 5 Park Impact Fees 9 Councilmanic Bond 24 ISTEA GreM Ci[y otFederal Wav Comprehensive Park Recreation and Open Space Plarr Section I�III - Implemention Plan Page Vlll - 9 � Table 22 Six Year Capital Improvement Plan Park and Recreation Facilities City of Federal Way � � � r: . � .i�r:� Comprehensive Park, Recreation and Open Space Plan � Cultu�al A�ts Plan (� City of Federal Way Comprehensive Parl� Recreation and Open Space Plan Appendix � � � � _ � _ • • • ; � � � � � �� � V 1 �� � ��� � � � � � _� ,'• �f / , _; / � f �� Cit of Federal Wa Y y Communit Cultural Plan y DECEMBER 1994 -.. -. �,-�,. .;� %..-. �:�v��i; i,� ► ,,n k���-�d�i� � i`r'a� �■ �I�%.1■lall i� A■I�! � /�i�'� �i� �I, � :r�r'��i��. ��%�;��w�'iiiY9 ��.�i� �� :�a�l�- ;� ;_��.,' ��" � ����' , PLANtJING & RESEARCH AMS Planning & Research 915 D Street, Petaluma, CA 94952 Funding for the City of Federal Way Community Cuttural Plan has been provided by the City of Federal Way Arts Commission, a City Council-appoirrted body �� FEDERAL WAY COMMUNITY CULTURAL PLAN The City of Federal Way: City Council (as of September 1994) Mary Gates, Mayor Phil Watkins, Deputy Mayor Hope Etder Ron Gintz Mahlon "Skip" Priest Robert Stead Ray Tomlinson City Staff City Manager's Office Kenneth Nyberg, City Manager Parks, Hecreation d� Cuttural Services Departmertt Jennifer Schroder, Director Cheri McCabe, Recreation SuperiMendent Mary Faber, Recreation Manager Sue Fbyd, Administrative Assistam Federal Way Arts Commission Jeanne Burbidge, Chair Patridc Fullmer Betty Huff Nancy Ise Nancy Jones Joann Piquette Robert Ratcliff Toska Rodriguez Bette Simpson Joan Tabrum Guy Trotter Cultural Plan/Feasibility Study Steering Committee Chair Jeanne Burbidge, Arts Commission Members Linda Anderson, Dance Unlimited Don Barrows, Music Director/Instructor Faye Clerget, Artist, fonner FW Arts Commission Ron Cole, Centennial Bank Craig Dennis, Federal Way News Bob Edwards, Hartnony Kings Bill Feldt, Centerstage Bill Gates, Merrill, Lynch foRner King Coumy Library Board D�. Richard Harris, Federal Way School District Kely Hartsell, SeaTac Mall Effenus Henderson, Weyefiaeuser Corp. Nancy Ise, City of Federal Way Arts Commission Adrian Johnson, Diversiry Commission Nancy Jones, City of Federal Way Arts Commission Dave Kaplan, Parks � Recreation Commission Beverly Kim, Diversity Commission Sharon Kline, Art Shows Northwest Jcel Marks, Federal Way Philhamronic, Lakehaven Utility District Diana Nielsen, Federal Way Philharmonic Pat Owen, Pat Owen Studio Joann Piquette, Coalition of the Performing Arts Jeff Stodc, Omni Properties Joan Tabrum, Coalition of the Performing Arts Pam Taybr, Federal Way Chamber of Commerce Tony Tebeau, Washington State Bank Mary Weis, former School Board Member Dot Weissman, Puget Sound Musical Theater Rubi Williams, Diversity Commission Consultants: AMS Planning & Research, Petaluma, California Robert Bailey, Vice-President Arthur Greenberg, Manager � � �� I � FEDERAL WAY COMMUNITY CULTURAL PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVESUMMARY ...................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................3 SUMMARY OF RESEARCH ..............................................................................5 SUMMARY OF GOALS & OBJECTIVES ...........................................................14 GOALS & OBJECTIVES ................•----...............................................................16 GOAL A. ARTS & BUSINESS ............................................................................17 GOAL B. ARTS EDUCATION ............................................................................21 GOAL C. INFORMATION & AWARENESS .......................................................26 GOAL D. FESTIVALS & SPECIAL EVENTS .....................................................28 GOAL E. CULTURAL ARTS FACILITIES ..........................................................31 GOAL F. IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................................35 � � EXECUTIVE SUMMARY -' he Federa/ Way Community Cu/tura/ Plan is the resu/t of tnput received from nearly five hundred people through the cowse of a � year-long p/anning process. It represents the collective vision of a broad representation of Federal Way citizens and has involved individuals � representing the city's arts and cultural organizations, individual artists, businesses, social service agencies, government, commissioners, and school district. Concurrent with the formulation of this Plan was a feasibility study to �, � determine cuftural facility needs and options for the community. A 30-plus member volunteer Steering Committee was established composed of individuals representing a broad cross-section of the community to guide the planning � process. Comprehensive research was conducted at the commencement of the project � including interviews with key leaders, a market analysis, surveys with arts and cultural organizations and individual artists, a random survey of households by telephone, and a series of community workshops to determine issues, goals and � objectives for the Plan. The Steering Committee subsequently held a series of planning meetings to formulate the text of this document. � The research determined that among the primary issues facing the community of Federal Way are the need for a facility to house cuftural and community events and the desire to create an image and identity for the city as one which � recognizes the value of arts and culture as an essential component of the community. Cultural organizations indicated that their chief concern is to � generate community support and awareness for their programs. Individual artists noted the need for exhibition, networking and funding opportunities. � The public survey determined that 55% of city residents attended at least one pertorming arts event during the past year while 51 % attended at least one v�sual arts exhibit. Attendance averages 2.3 pertorm�ng arts events and 1.35 � exhibitions. Most people indicate they don't attend more frequently because of insufficient time or lack of interest. Sixty percent of the sample noted that °arts and culture are important for the education of families and children.° � In order to address the issues and opportunities identified in the research, six goals and numerous objectives have been formulated which compose the text of � this Cultural Plan. The goals include: � � � Federa/ Way Community CulturaJ P/an Goal A(Arts & Business) is to establish an on-going linkage between Federal Way's arts and business communities. Key objectives relate to establishing a working structure to nurture arts/business partnerships, and the development of cooperative arts and business programs. Goal B(Arts Education) is to strengthen arts course offerings in the Federal Way School District, creating community-based arts education programs, and establishing an advocacy network involving local citizens and parents. Goal C(Information and Awareness) is to raise public awareness of Federal Way's arts and cultural programs and activities. A publiGprivate partnership is to be established involving arts and cultural organizations from throughout the South King County region. Brochures, a newsletter inventory, and a volunteer Arts Marketing Network are among the program recommendations. Goal D(Festivals and Special Events) is to improve the city's existing festivals and special events (through marketing, coordination, and site issues) and to create a major "themed° festival for the city. A volunteer Task Force is recommended, involving representatives of service clubs and festival boards, to work collectively on better promoting the city's annual events. Goal E(Cultural Facilities) states objectives relating to the creation and development of cultural facilities in Federal Way. This goal recommends utilizing the Visitation Retreat Center as a community cultural arts school and developing a new cultural arts center over the next decade. Goal F(Implementation) provides the structure which is necessary to implement the other goals and objectives of the Plan. Organizations that will play a role in implementation include the City of Federal Way Arts Commission, Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Department, the non-profit Federal Way Coalition of the Pertorming Arts, Federal Way Chamber of Commerce, Federal Way School District, City of Federal Way Parks & Recreation Commission and other commissions. Each of the goals' objectives has been prioritized by the Steering Committee and given a ranking between 1 and 5. The Federal Way Community Cultural Plan is grounded in a philosophy that a true public-private partnership is the key to successful long-term development of the arts and culture in the City and the South King County region. It is hoped that by sponsoring this Plan, the actions of the City of Federal Way will serve as a catalyst for cultural development and planning throughout south King County. In years to come, the City's leadership role in planning for arts and culture will be recognized as Federal Way fulfills its vision as a community that values quality of life and provides for the cultural enrichment of its residents and visitors. 2 � �I � INTRODUCTION he Federa/ Way Community Cultural Plan is the result of input � received from nearly five hundred people through the course of a year-long planning process. It represents the collective vision of a broad representation of Federal Way citizens and has involved individuals � representing the city's arts and cultural organizations, individual artists, businesses, social service agencies, government, commissioners, and school district. � The Federal Way Arts Commission embarked on the process of creating this Community Cultural Plan in 1993. Concurrent with the formulation of a Cultural � Plan was a feasibility study to determine cultural facility needs and options. AMS Planning & Research of Petaluma, California, was selected as the consultant team in late 1993, and a 30-plus member volunteer Steering Committee was � established composed of individuals representing a broad cross-section of the community. � The planning process commenced with comprehensive research to provide an overview of the cultural climate in Federal Way and the South King County region. A market analysis (demographic and lifestyle data) was prepared � covering the city of Federal Way and its immediate sphere of influence including the City of Des Moines, Woodmont and Redondo, portions of Kent, Auburn, Milton and Fife, and northeast Tacoma. The research also included personal � interviews with 30 key leaders in the region, surveys of arts and cultural organizations (9) and individual artists (22), and primary market research � (random-dial 20-minute telephone interviews) with 310 residents of the city and trade area. Highlights of the research are presented later in this document. � A facility workshop was held in January 1994 to begin determining facilities needs of Federal Way-based performing and visual arts organizations. The results of that workshop have been used to formulate Goal E of this Cuftural � Plan relating to Cultural Arts Facilities. A companion document, A Feasibility Study for Cultura/ Arts Facilities in the City of Federal Way, has also been prepared � Based on the cultural plan research, the Steering Committee determined topics for further community input covering the areas of Arts Education, Arts & � Business Programs, Cultural Facilities, Festivals & Special Events, and City Cultural Programs. Community members with interests and concems in these areas were recruited by Steering Committee members and through public � � 3 � Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ P/an notices. In February of 1994, AMS conducted focused group interviews on each ��'� of the topic areas at sites throughout Federal Way with participation from nearly I 100 citizens. i I The Community Cuttural Plan Steering Committee held two additional meetings to synthesize proposed solutions that were recommended in focus group � meetings, and to formulate goals and objectives into a unified cultural plan for the city. During the spring of 1994, a draft of the Community Cultural Plan was circulated to all participants for review and comment. This final documerrt was � adopted by the Steering Committee in September 1994. It is important to note that the Plan's goals and objectives have been extracted � directly from the minutes of Focus Group and Steering Committee meetings. The consuftants have attempted to preserve the collective direction of the Plan's participants and cultural community of Federal Way and the region through � minimal editing and addition. The goals and objectives contained in this Plan are grounded in a philosophy that a true public-private partnership is the key to suc�essful long-term development of the arts and culture in Federal Way and the South King County region. It is hoped that by sponsoring this Plan, the actions of the City of Federal Way will serve as a catalyst for cultural development and planning throughout southern King County. In years to come, the City's leadership role in planning for arts and culture will be recognized as Federal Way fulfills its vision as a community that values quality of life and provides for the cultural enrichment of its residents and visitors. � � II � � 4 � � � � MM SU ARY OF RESEARCH � INTRODUCTION he following section provides a summary of research conducted for the cultural planning process. Highlights of the following research components are included: • Key Leader interviews with 30 individuals representing various constituencies in the region (e.g., arts, business, government, education) • Surveys of 11 Federal Way-based arts and cultural organi2ations and 22 individual artists • Market Analysis (demographic and psychographic data) covering the city of Federal Way and its immediate sphere including Redondo, (Woodmont Beach and Des Moines are north of Redondo), Kent (north and east), Auburn (east), Edgewood (southeast), Milton (south), Fife (south), and northeast Tacoma (southwest). • Primary market research (random-dial 20-minute telephone interviews) with 310 residents of the city and trade area KEY LEADER INTERVIEWS Community lssues When asked to identify the key issues facing the community of Federal Way, interviewees noted these three issues most often: � Traffic, infrastructure, and transportation issues • Keeping taxes low for residents • Lack of identity and central downtown area (Federal Way is widely perceived as SeaTac Mall) Other community issues that emerged during interviews included: • Crime - the beginnings of a gang problem and other emerging social issues are being noticed in Federal Way � • Transient community - it's hard to get the word out to new arrivals, many of whom do not read local newspapers � � 5 Federa! Way Community Cultura/ P/an � Culturally-diverse population - with much growth among Russian and Korean populations • Business development - has slowed down considerably over the last 3-4 years; a hotel and conference facility was cited as a major need if the city is to make the transition from a bedroom community to a retail and commercial hub. • Federal Way's schools are a source of pride Cu/tura! Issues When asked to identify the key cultural issues facing the community of Federal Way, interviewees noted the following: • Lack of facility for cultural and community events • Image of Federal Way is young families, sports orientation • Cost of tickets for families is a problem • Lots of perticipation in community arts groups (e.g., Community Chorale). � The mostly small businesses in the community (retail and service) do not have major funds to support arts and culture. Larger companies are chains that don't provide much funding locally yet. • Arts and culture should be incorporated into downtown core development to help create a sense of identity and "place". ARTS ORGANIZATIONS' & ARTISTS' NEEDS Arts Organization Surveys • Eleven local organizations together account for attendance of nearly 22,000 people annually at performances, mainly at venues outside the city limits • Their combined annual budgets total over $320,000 • Revenues are derived from the following sources: � Earned (tickets, admissions): 61.6% � Private Contributions: 35.0% � Government 6.8% • Organizational needs were stated in the following areas: � Performance space � More community support and awareness � Public and private funding s Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ P/an � Technical assistance in fund-raising and marketing Individua/ Artists Surveys • Of 22 surveys received, although 14 different media were represented, 17 respondents identified themselves as "painters" • Income is derived from: � Teaching: 28% � Selling Work: 21 % � Commercial Work: 7% • Individual artist/craftsperson needs were noted as: � More exhibition opportunities � Networking � Funding � Better public awareness � Workshop/studio space � An arts center MARKET ANALYSIS The market area for Federal Way includes the city itself and all or part of the surrounding communities of Redondo, Kent, Auburn, Edgewood, Milton, Fife, and northeast Tacoma. The map on the following page illustrates the market area. Demographics The following tables provide highlights of greater Federal Way's demographic composition: Population � Family/Marital Status Married 56.8% Households w/ Children 34.5% � 2-Parents 74.6% 1-Parent 23.5% � � 7 Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ P/an Federal Way Market Area s � � � Federa/ Way Community Cuitura/ Pian Age � � Under 14 23.3% 50 to 59 9.2% 15 to 20 6.3% 60 to 69 5.6% 21 to 29 15.6% 70 and Over 4.8% 30 to 39 19.6% 40 to 49 15.0% Median 33 ears Income/Employment Race/Ethnicity � Education Lifesty/es Less Than H.S. 11.3% H.S. Graduate 27.3% Some Colle e/Graduate 55.6% Graduate De ree 5.9% • 82% of the market (or trade) area is represented by only 6(of 50) � lifestyle segments • Lifestyle segmentation shows good opportunity for family/community � theater, weak potential for commercial theater MARKET RESEARCH � � � Primary market research undertaken for the Plan consisted of 310 twenty-minute telephone interviews with residents of the city and surrounding trade area. The s Federal Way Community Cultura/ Plan following are highlights of the survey results (complete survey results are contained in a separate report): Arts and Cultural lssues • Annual attendance by residents is slightly lower than average in comparable market areas • 55% attended at least one pertorming arts event during the past year (Highest percentage - 16% - reported attending 5th Avenue Theater) • 51 % attended at least one visual arts exhibit during the past year (Highest percentage - 20% - reported attending Seattle Art Museum) • Average annual attendance at 2.3 pertorming arts events • Average annual attendance of 1.35 visual art exhibitions 10 • Reasons for not attending more frequently -"Insufficient time° and "Not interested° •"Popular Music Concerts° are most popular among respondents: Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ P/an OPERA SYMPHONY/ORCHESTRA BALLET/DANCE OTHER CONCERT PLAY/THEATER MUSICAL POPULAR MUSIC CONCERT 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% I • 5th Avenue Theatre (16%), Seattie Center and Tacoma Dome (both 9.5%), Paramount Theatre (7.7.%) are most frequently attended venues • Seattle Art Museum is the most popular museum with 20% of attenders followed by Pacific Science Center (6.4%) • 73% of residents said it is °Very important" for children to have access to arts classes in school or after school • Festivals, Popular concerts and Locally Produced theater are most preferred (Likelihood of attending): [�1 • . • theatrical Very Somewvhat Nat Likely Likely Likely &10 4 0-3 43.4% 44.6% 12.0% 35.6% 43.4% 21.0% 28.2% 49.1 % 22.7% 28.6% 45.4% 26.0% Multicultural arts r rams 5.04 20.8% 52.3% 26.9% Classical music concerts 4.83 23.5% 43.6% 32.9% BalleVother dance reserrtations 4.54 21.4% 44.5% 34.1% Lectures or et readin s 3.3 11.3% 33.9% 54.8% • 60% of sample agree that "arts and culture are important for the education of families and children° • 35.4% agree that it is important for the municipal government to provide financial support for arts and cultural organizations (lower than other studies) 11 Most Recent Performing Arts Attendance Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ Plan Reasons tor visiting Federa/ Way • Federal Way is a hub for services for residents of surrounding towns: Purchase food Purchase clothing Medical or dental service General recreational activities See a movie Go to Federal Way "a lot or sometimes" to• 89.6% 88.8% 71.6% 61.0% 58.7% • Most (63.5%) residents "don't know" where to take visitors for a cultural experience in Federal Way. Of those who did mention places to take visitors, the following were cited most frequently: � SeaTac Mall 7.1 % � Dash Poi nt Park 3.9% � Bonsai Gardens 3.5% Lif+esty/e Issues •"Being financially secure," "Having a rewarding job" and "Freedom to do anything" are most important concerns for Federal Way residents • Transportation and Parks are given highest importance for quality of life (percent ranking "Extremely" or "Somewhat Importarrt" and numerical rank out of 10-point scale): 12 Federa/ Way Community Culturai Plan Importance of Attributes in Impmviog Quality of Life (Numbers in bradcets indicate average rank on ten-polnt sca/eJ Improved Trans. System [824] Neighbortaod Parks [7.55� Walking or &king Trails n.�� More sporfs FiekJs [6.74] Cuitural Arts Facilities (626] 13 76% 78% 8096 8296 84% 88% 8896 90% 92% 9496 9696 Aeraer►t RaL'rrg Nery' or SomewhaY lmpo►tant SUMMARY OF GOALS & OBJECTIVES he following section provides a summary of the objectives recommended under each goal of the Plan. GOAL A - ARTS & BUSINESS Goal A is to establish an on-going linkage between Federal Way's arts and business communities. Key objectives relate to establishing a working structure to nurture arts/business partnerships, and the development of cooperative arts and business programs. Program ideas include better dissemination of information (such as calendars of events), promotion of the city's arts groups and businesses, and inclusion of arts and cultural activities among the Chamber of Commerce's priorities. GOAL B - ARTS EDUCATION Goal B is to strengthen arts course offerings in the Federal Way School District, creating community-based arts education programs, and establishing an advocacy network involving local citizens and parerrts. Among the objectives of this goal are methods to link local arts education efforts with county- and state- wide resources and establishing partnerships between schools and community organizations. GOAL C - INFORMATION & AWARENESS Goal C is to raise public awareness of Federal Way's arts and cultural programs and activities. A public/private partnership is to be established involving arts and cultural organizations from throughout the South King County region. Brochures, a newsletter inventory, and a volunteer Arts Marketing Network are among the program recommendations. GOAL D- FESTIVALS & SPECIAL EVENTS Goal D is to improve the city's existing festivals and special events (through marketing, coordination, and site issues) and to create a major �themed° festival for the city. A volunteer Task Force is recommended, involving representatives of service clubs and festival boards, to work collectively on better promoting the city's annual events. 14 Federal Way Community Cultura/ Plan GOAL E - CULTURAL FACILITIES Goal E states objectives relating to the creation and development of cultural facilities in Federal Way. This goal recommends utilizing the Visitation Retreat Center as a community cultural arts school and developing a new cultural arts center over the next decade. GOAL F - IMPLEMENTATION Goal F provides the structure which is necessary to implement the other goals and objectives of the Plan. Organizations that will play a role in implementation include the City of Federal Way Arts Commission, Parks, Recreation & Cultural Services Department, the non-profit Federal Way Coalition of the Pertorming Arts, Federal Way Chamber of Commerce, Federal Way School District, City of Federal Way Parks & Recreation Commission and other commissions. 15 GOALS & OBJECTIVES A. B. C. D. E. F. Arts & Business Arts Education Information & Awareness Festivals & Special Events Cuitural Arts Facilities Implementation is � I GOAL A. ARTS & BUSINESS Key Objectives • Develop cooperative arts and business programs to disseminate information in order to market Federal Way's arts and business communities • Establish structures to nurture partnerships between arts groups and businesses RATIONALE: everal issues and opportunities related to the arts and business communities in Federa/ Way emerged throughout the p/anning process. Federal Way's business community is characterized by a large retail sector, the majority of which is not locally-owned; a few major headquarters whose businesses are international in scope; and a number of "branch plants" in the service, distribution and manufacturing sectors. Local arts groups have had limited success in tapping corporate contributed and/or sponsorship funds, and have had difficulty in developing effective linkages with the city's small businesses. In the past there have been only limited efforts for collaboration beriveen the city's arts community and Chamber of Commerce. A well-attended focus group meeting held to discuss this issue revea/ed a host of common concerns and a strong willingness to work together. Meeting participants noted that some businesses seek to attract "upscale customers," and many arts patrons tend to �it this demographic profile. A philosophy of creating a`Ywo-way streeY' by asking such questions as "what arts groups can do to assist loca/ businesses, " in addition to identifying business support for the arts, guided the discussions. This goa/ addresses a number of partnership opportunities to link Federa/ Way's cultura/ and business sectors for mutual benefit. 17 Federa/ Way Community Cultural Plan OBJECTIVES: (not in priority order) Information/Promotions 1. Create a directory of spaces available at local businesses for arts- related activities (e.g., art exhibits in business lobbies, special events and small concerts in atrium areas, etc.) 2. Consider an "Arts Passport" to promote Federal Way's businesses and arts/cultural offerings 3. Create a directory of arts-related businesses (art galleries, craft shops, frame stores, etc.) 4. Consider establishment of an annual award program to identify and promote high quality design and architecture in Federal Way 5. Promote use of Federal Way pertorming and visual artists at corporate receptions and special events (create artists directory) 6. Educate corporate Human Resources/Personnel recruiters about local arts resources (information pamphlets, videos) for use in employee recruitment 7. Work with local Realtors to develop "Welcome Packets° showcasing Federal Way's arts and cultural assets for new home-owners, and to provide lists of new arrivals to arts groups for direct mailings and other marketing methods 8. Distribute calendars of upcoming arts events to employees of Federal Way-based businesses (through corporate newsletters) 9. Explore inclusion of promotional material for arts programs in business advertisements 10. Host a joint meeting of arts groups and local ethnic restaurants (and other related small businesses) to develop restaurant meals/arts event packages (See Arts Passport objective) 11. Increase frequency of Gallery Walk program Partnerships 1. Organize a Business Volunteers for the Arts (BVA) program or Corporate Council for the Arts (in association with Seattle and King County chapters) 18 Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ Plan 2. Explore feasibility of a Business Committee for the Arts to undertake coordinated fundraising 3. Involve service organizations (Kiwanis, Rotary, etc.) in arts and business community partnerships 4. Promote use of art by Federal Way-based artists in new and existing business buildings (murals, sculpture) 5. Develop employee giving (or matching contribution) programs at Federal Way-based businesses 6. Create a major Business/Arts Event (e.g., Business Arts Awards Annual Dinner) and/or Festival 7. Host joint Chamber of Commerce/Arts Community meetings to include presentations on arts activities at monthly Chamber luncheons 8. Work with Federal Way Chamber of Commerce to identify and recruit potential board members for arts and cultural organizations 9. Explore opportunities for businesses to make in-kind donations of goods and services to arts groups (auctions have been successful as fund-raisers) 10. Facilitate the exchange of mailing lists between arts organizations and arts-related businesses IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: Federa/ Way Arts Commission meet with Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors to assist with esta6lishment of a Standing (permanent) Committee for Arts & Culture Committee. When established, Committee would include representation from Commission, city departments, arts groups, artists, and businesses. Task-specific Sub-Committees would be formed on an as-needed basis (e.g., Design Awards Program, Arts Passport, etc.). PARTICIPATING AGENCIES: Chamber of Commerce, Federa/ Way Arts Commission, City of Federa! Way P/anning Department, Parks, Recreation & Cultura/ Services Department, Federa/ Way-based Cultura/ Organizations and Individual Artists 19 Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ P/an SEE ALSO: Goa/ C-Information & Awareness PRIORITY RANKINGS: Priority Rankings GOAL A-ARTS & BUSINESS 1 2 3 4 5 InformatioNPromotfons 1. Directory of spaces in businesses ✓ 2. "Arts Passport" � 3. Arts-related business directory ✓ 4. Design awards program � 5. Artists at corporate receptions/events ✓ 6. Educate recruiters about arts resources ✓ 7. Devetop welcome packets with Realtors ✓ 8. Distribute calendars of events � 9. Promotional material in business ads ✓ 10. Joint arts/restaurant meeting � 11. More fre uent alle walks �/ Partnershl s 1. Organize BVA/Corporate Council � 2. Coordinated fund-raising � 3. Work with service organizations ✓ 4. Promote use of art in business buildings � 5. Employee giving programs � 6. Create major business/arts event � 7. Host joint Chamber/arts luncheon �/ 8. Work w/ Chamber-recruit board members ✓ 9. Business in-kind donations ✓ 10. Exchan e mailin lists � � � � � � 20 � GOAL B. ARTS EDUCATION Key Objectives • Strengthen arts course offerings and arts- related curricula in the Federal Way School District • Create community-based arts education programs to serve citizens of the city • Advocate for increased school and community arts education programs RAnoNa�e: he "arts education crisis" is national in its scope, with schoo/ districts across the nation reporting cuts to arts programs in the face of budget deficits. Arts programs in the Federal Way Schoo/ District, while reportedly healthy in many subject and grade levels, have not been immune to budget cuts over the past decade. Whether it be the concems of parents wishing for "well- rounded children,"arts groups hoping for future audiences, or a community at large wanting opportunities for creative expression among its youth, arts education programs offer answers in each of these areas. National research has demonstrated that arts-based curriculum results in increased prob/em-solving and group process skills, reduced truancy, drop-outs, graffiti and vandalism. At the Arts Education Community Meeting, participants f+ocused on issues such as inadequate or non-existent pertormance and exhibit facilities at local public schools, inconsistent curriculum resulting from different "on-site management" policies, gaps in community recreation programming, and /ack of a central location for arts class offerings. They also highlighted available opportunities such as free pertormances for young peop/e under age 18 by the Federal Way Philharmonic, outreach activities by the Federa/ Way Symphonic Band, public library programs, and the availability of cultura/ education funding from King County. It is the intent of this goa/ to ensure that al/ people of Federal Way have access to quality arts education programs, and have amp/e opportunities to express themselves creatively. 21 Federa/ Way Community Culturai P/an OBJECTIVES (not in prior'rty order) Schoo/ Programs Work with Federal Way School District, King County Arts Commission, Washington State Arts Educators, and other local, state, and national resources (e.g., National Endowment for the Arts, Kennedy Center, Getty Institute) to expand curriculum-based arts programs 2. Establish "Resource Bank" of artist volunteers and arts materials for use by individual school principals 3. Appoint a single FWSD contact for development of arts-related partnerships and programs 4. Assist Federal Way School District in accessing grants for artist-in- residence programs (from King County and other sources) 5. Work with PTAs and Parent Booster Clubs to increase awareness of arts education benefits and develop school-based arts programs (assist with development of Resource Bank) 6. Seek donations of resources/time/funds for repair of musical instruments at schools 7. Promote donations of unused musical instruments for school-based music programs 8. Work with Federal Way School District in planning for new schools to ensure suitable spaces for arts classes and activities 9. Create opportunities for local artists to work in Federal Way schools 10. Ensure arts careers are represented in Career Days at Federal Way schools 11. Improve access/communication between Federal Way arts-related businesses and schools and Highline Community College 12. Utilize existing schooVcity collaborative structure for scheduling and partnership programs (as developed for community athletic facilities at Saghalie Junior High School) 13. Support and assist with School District's interest in pilot magnet arts school program rz Federa/ Way Community Cultura! Plan Community Programs 1. Work with youth ciubs (e.g., Scouts, Boys & Girls Club, Campfire) to increase awareness of arts programs and activities 2. Create central city-wide week-long arts festival (see also Goal D) 3. Program arts competitions/festivals/showcase opportunities for young people with city and business support 4. Develop arts programs in coordination with human, social service, and public safety agencies for "youth-at-risk" and other special populations 5. Expand city-sponsored cultural arts classes as resources become available Advocacy 1. Develop an Advocacy Network (consisting of parents, students, arts community representatives, educators) to promote arts education programs in the Federal Way School District: a) Research model local arts agency advocacy efforts (e.g., Vashon Island work with school board) b) Seek advocacy technical assistance from State of Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Education c) Reach parents through PTAs, libraries, school newsletters, athletic leagues, PTA council, boys & girls clubs, booster clubs, etc. d) Obtain and distribute relevant publications (Cultural Education Resource Guides) and attend advocacy forums sponsored by Washington Alliance for Arts Education e) Utilize resources of King County Arts Commission f) Explore potential of Federal Way Coalition of the Performing Arts taking lead in advocacy functions IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: School Programs - The Federa! Way Schoo/ District identifies a single contact person for school-based arts programs. The District works with the Federal Way Arts Commission (Education Committee) to develop programs and on going partnerships. � Federa/ Way Community Cultural Plan Community Programs - With respect to community arts c/asses, it shou/d be noted that, traditionally, and in the case of Federa/ Way, the Parks & Recreation Commission and the Arts Commission have distinct roles. Entry-leve/ arts classes are the purview of Parks, Recreation & Cultura/ Services Department, whereas advanced-leve/ and specialized arts c/asses and workshops should be promoted and initiated by the Federal Way Arts Commission. The Federa/ Way Arts Commission leads in advocating development of community-based arts educational opportunities for residents of the city. The Arts Commission considers the linkage of educationa/ programs in conjunction with grant-funded performances and exhibits. It is anticipated that the Visitation Retreat Center will be the location of many advanced and specialized arts classes (but not to exc/ude entry-leve/ and recreationa/ classes) that wil/ draw a city-wide and regiona/ audience. Advocacy - The Federa/ Way Arts Commission spearheads art education advocacy through the establishment of an Arts Education Advocacy Network. PARTICIPATING AGENCIES: Federal Way Arts Commission, Federa/ Way Parks & Recreation Commission, Federa/ Way Schoo/ District, Federa/ Way-based Cultural Organizations, King County Arts Commission, State of Washington. SEE ALSO: Goa! D-Festivals & Special Events, Goal E-Cultura/ Arts Facilities 24 ' , PRIORITY RANKINGS: Federal Way Community Cultural Plan Priority Rankings GOAL B-ARTS EDUCATION 1 2 3 4 5 Schoo/ Pro rams 1. Expand curriculum-based programs ✓ 2. Establish "resource bank" ✓ 3. Appoint single FWSD contact ✓ 4. Assist FWSD in accessing grants ✓ 5. Work with PTAs to increase awareness ✓ 6. Seek donations for repair of instruments ✓ 7. Promote donations of instruments ✓ 8. Plan for arts spaces in new schools ✓ 9. Opportunities for artists in schools ✓ 10. Represent arts careers in career days ✓ 11. Improve communication w/ Highline C.C. ✓ 12. Utilize school/city partnership structure ✓ 13. Assist w/ FWSD ilot ma net arts school ✓ Communi Pro rams 1. Increase awareness by youth clubs ✓ 2. Create central city-wide arts festival ✓ 3. Program arts competitions/festivals ✓ 4. Develop youth-at-risk arts programs ✓ 5. Ex and cit -s onsored arts classes ✓ Advocac 1. Develo Advocac Network ✓ � � GOAL C. INFORMATION & AWARENESS Key Objective • Explore public/private partnership to develop ideas and programs for dissemination of information and raise public awareness of arts and culture in Federal Way and South King County RATIONALE: hroughout the needs assessment phase of the Cultura/ P/an a common theme emerged centering on lack of public awareness of Federa! Way's arts and cultura/ offerings. Market research undertaken for the Plan revealed that a/most three-quarters of Federa/ Way residents "did not know where to take visitors for a cultural experience" within the city. Arts organizations have few marketing dollars, advertising costs are high, and professiona/ arts marketing assistance is lacking. Nestled between Seattle and Tacoma, local residents most often look to the neighboring cities for arts activities despite the existence of a solid core of Federa/ Way-based arts and cultural groups. It is the intent of this goa/ to strengthen and expand information dissemination and marketing activities and provide coordination of marketing efforts of loca/ arts and cultura/ organizations with the overall aim of raising public awareness of and participation in Federal Way's arts programs. OBJECTIVES (not in priority ornler) 1. Create inventories of newsletters and shared mailing lists of inedia outlets and arts patrons 2. Establish a volunteer Arts Marketing Network for South King County (with assistance from local business marketing professionals) 3. Establish a central contact for maintenance and distribution of a master calendar of cultural events in Federal Way (strengthen coordination with area newspapers, including Federa/ Way News, Seattle Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Seatt/e Post Intelligencer� 26 ' , !_J LJ Federa/ Way Community Cultura/ Plan 4. Develop a Federal Way Arts Brochure for distribution through local businesses, city recreation guides, and other publications 5. Federal Way-based arts groups should meet collectively with organizations in neighboring communities to develop cooperative marketing efforts involving trades of program ads, bulk purchase of printing/advertising, meetings with newspapers, etc. IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: Federa/ Way Arts Commission provides funding to retain marketing � professiona/ to prepare a comprehensive marketing action p/an. Commission initiates network with King County Arts Commission and South King County arts agencies to exp/ore cooperative marketing � opportunities. � ' ' PARTICIPATING AGENCIES: Federa/ Way Arts Commission, King County Art Commission, Federal Way Parks & Recreation Commission, Federa/ Way-based Cultural Organizations, South �ng County Cultura! Organizations SEE ALSO: Goa/ A-Arts & Business � u , ' ' i 1 �� PRIORITY RANKINGS: GOAL C-INFORMATION & AWARENESS 1. Newsletter inventory, shared mailing list 2. So.King Co. volunteer Arts Mktg. Network 3. Master calendar of cultural events 4. Federal Way Arts brochure 5. Cooperative marketi 112131415 ✓ ✓ � 2� � ' GOAL D. FESTIVALS & SPECIAL EVENTS � Key Objective • Create a Task Force to undertake coordinated research, improve aspects and promotion of existing festivals, and to plan and develop a new major themed festival RnnoN�e: any communities in the western United States have earned strong public awareness and, indeed, identity through Festivals & Specia/ Events. Monterey's Jau Festival, Ashland's Shakespeare Festival, Elko's Cowboy Poetry Festival, Seattle's Bumbershoot, and even Kent's Cornucopia Days and Canterbury Faire have become "signature events" which draw thousands of spectators. The resulting benefits to these communities include increased business activity, expanded loca/ access to cultura/ activities, and strengthening of loca/ cuitura/ organizations. For a newly incorporated city like Federa/ Way, there is an opportunity to stimulate community pride and develop a municipal identity through a major, annual special event. Participants in a community meeting discussed severa/ aspects of this issue, inc/uding the need to strengthen and expand existing festivals in Federa/ Way (e.g. Family Fest, Red White & Blues, etc.), to identify and secure a suitable venue, to alleviate logisticai problems involving traff'rc and parking, and to establish a"signature event" for the city which wou/d take its place among King County's list of "not-to-be-missed" events. This goal addresses these concerns and opportunities. OBJECTIVES (not in priority order) Promotion 1. Work with City to develop sign (banner) policies to facilitate promotion of Festivals & Special Events 2. Combine resources of existing festivals for shared promotions � Federai Way Community Cultura/ Plan 3. Undertake coordinated attender surveys at all Federal Way special events and festivals to aid in future planning Sites 1. Explore feasibility of use of school sites as festival venues 2. Develop festival facilities at Celebration Park or in conjunction with new cultural arts center New Festiva/s 1. Appoint volunteer Task Force to develop "signature theme° festival for Federal Way a) Consider hiring professional festival producer b) Use headline entertainment c) Use loaned business people to serve on Task Force and assist with event planning d) Consider focus on Federal Way's lakes and history of dance halls in the city as festival theme (responding to burgeoning popularity of social dance such as Western, swing, Cajun, Contra, etc.) IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: Establish FestivaUSpecia/ Events Task Force with staff support from City of Federal Way Parks, Recreation & Cultura/ Services Department, and membership including Chamber of Commerce, Federa/ Way Arts Commission, Federa/ Way Parks & Recreation Commission, Federa/ Way Human Resources Commission, Federa/ Way Diversity Commission, Federa/ Way Youth Commission, individua/ Festiva/ Boards and volunteers. PARTICIPATING AGENCIES: Ses Implementation Scenario. SEE ALSO: Goal B-Arts Education, Goa/ C-Information & Awareness 29 Federa/ Way Community Cultural Plan PRIORITY RANKINGS: GOAL D-FESTIVALS & SPECIAL EVENTS 1. Develop sign/banner policies 2. Shared promotions for existing festivals 3. Coordinated attender surveys Sites 1. Explore use of school sites for festivals 2. Festival facilities at Celebration Park New Festivals 1. Appoint volunteer Festival Task Force Priority Rankings 1 2 3 4 5 �O �� ✓ 30 GOAL E. CULTURAL ARTS FACILITIES Key Objectives • Maximize use of Visitation Retreat for arts- related activities • Undertake fundraising and advocacy for new cultural arts facility RATIONALE: he City of Federa/ Way chose to embark on a joint Cultural Plan/Feasibility Study project because of the often-expressed need for a performing arts facility in the city. Aside from an assortment of churches and schoo/ facilities, Federa/ Way-based arts and cultura/ groups are forced to offer programs in neighboring communities or where cultura/ arts centers do exist. Throughout the needs assessment phase of p/anning, artists, arts organizations and citizens continu�i to focus on their desire to develop a Cultural Arts Center in the city. A re/ated issue involves the city's pur�chase of Visitation Retreat Center and the ' unique opportunities it affords the city's cultura/ community. Participants in the p/anning process expressed their desires to.include cultura/ arts uses among the Center's activities and to further exp/ore partnership opportunities for summer , and year-round arts c/asses. This goa/ addresses Federal Way's cultural facilities needs and opportunities. OBJECTIVES (not in priority order) Visitation Retreat Center 1. City of Federal Way retain a full-time manager to oversee development and operation of Visitation Retreat Center 2. Undertake Master Plan/Feasibility Study for cultural arts activities at the Visitation Retreat Center '� , 31 � , Federal Way Community Cultural Plan 3. Explore public/private partnership opportunities for development and operation of community cultural arts school at Retreat Center (look to Seattle's Music Center of the Northwest as a model) 4. Explore national, state, and county funding sources to support development and operation of a community cultural arts school at Visitation Retreat Center including pertormance spaces, exhibit galleries, and classrooms. 5. Consider use of Visitation Retreat Center as a facility to house before- and after-school for-credit arts classes 6. Explore possibility of Summer Arts Camp operation at Retreat Center: � Seek designation as a"Governors School° of the arts such as in Califomia, New York, and 20 other states � Use bunk beds to accommodate more students � Use also as elderhostel � Provide multi-disciplinary classes � Provide programs for children and adults Other Facilities 1. Work with Federal Way School District to expand access to facilities for use by community groups 2. Coordinate arts facility planning with other communities in South King County 3. Ensure that mutti-purpose recreational community facilities are able to successfully acxommodate arts-related activities 4. Conduct advocacy and fundraising to develop a multi-use arts facility to include 1,000-seat theater, small theater and exhibit space * 32 ' Goals tor the Cultura/ Arts Center shou/d include: Federal Way Community Cultura/ P/an * Technical/Site/Space Considerations at the Center (p/ease see Feasibility Study, page 12): � Technical and support facilities (include rehearsal, storage, offices, set/prop/costume construction) � Space for social events - dances, parties, receptions � Optimal acoustic and sightlines for a variety of uses (music, dance, theater, film, meetings) � Plentiful convenient parking � Aesthetically pleasing design � Accessible public transportation � Explore joint development with Federal Way School District and real estate developers � Seek multiple funding sources for capital and operating costs � Seating capacity - large hall optimum size 1000+/-; small theater 300+/- (consider variable seating) � Coordinate with Planning Department studies and locate near central part of city � Incorporate business conference and meeting space � A gallery for exhibit of local art and historical artifacts � Orchestra pit for up to 50 musicians � Stage (at least 40 x 40 ft) with full wing space, resilient floor for dance and full-height fly gallery � Rehearsal room for music and dance and dressing rooms for chorus and actors � Adjustable acoustics - forestage pertorming area for orchestras � Meeting and class rooms, catering/concession facilities, central community box office � Include business ancJ education communities in planning for new cultural arts center IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: Continue ro/e of joint Arts/Parks & Recreation Commission Visitabon Retreat Committee to oversee p/anning and deve/opment of Visitation to inc/ude a wide range of uses, such as visua/ arts gallery, community arts (visua/ and pertorming) c/asses, historica/ museum, elderhoste/ programs, recita/s, readings and small performances, genera/ meetings and retreats. Staff 33 Federa/ Way Community Cultural P/an support should be provided by City of Federa/ Way Parks, Recreation & Cu/tura/ Services Department. Federa/ Way Coalition of the Pertorming Arts continues to advocate and seek opportunities (e.g., public/private partnership, Ce/ebration Park, State funding etc.) for deve/opment of proposed Cultura/ Arts Center. PARTICIPATING AGENCIES: See Imp/ementation Scenario. SEE ALSO: Goa/ B Arts Education PRIORITY RANKINGS: Priority Rankings GOAL E-CULTURAL ARTS FACILITIES 1 2 3 4 5 Visitation Retreat Center 1. Retain full-time manager ✓ 2. Undertake Master Pian/Feasibility Study ✓ 3. Explore funding sources ✓ 4. Explore publiGprivate partnerships ✓ 5. Use VRC for before/after school classes ✓ 6. Ex lore summer arts cam at VRC ✓ Other Facilfties 1. Access to school pertormance facilities ✓ 2. Coorclinate facility planning w/ other cities ✓ 3. Provide for arts uses in recreation facilities ✓ 4. Conduct advoca & fundraisin for CAC ✓ � ' � ' ' , 34 � GOAL F. IMPLEMENTATION Key Objective • City of Federal Way Parks, Recreation & Cuftural Services Department and Arts Commission oversee implementation of Cultural Plan • Encourage and foster existing and new arts organizations, including visual, performing, literary and historical to fulfill advocacy role RATIONALE: he comerstone of any successfu/ Cultura/ Plan rests with the organizations, agencies, vo/unteers, and government departments who will play ro/es in implementing the Plan's recommendations. The newly- incorporated City of Federa/ Way has carefully assessed its current cultural climate and developed a s/ate of program, information, and facilities recommendations to meet the community's current and future cultural needs. A public-private partnership should be formed to proceed with implementation. Key agencies participating in the partnership should include the City of Federal Way, Federa/ Way Arts Commission, Federa/ Way Parks & Recreation Commission, Federa/ Way Coalition of the Performing Arts, Federa/ Way Chamber of Commerce and individua/ businesses, Federa/ Way Schoo/ District, the city's community-based arts and cultura/ groups, individua/ artists, community volunteers and other related agencies and organizations. This goa/ addresses the recommended organizationa/ structures required to implement the Plan. OBJECTIVES City of Federa/ Way 1. The Federal Way Arts Commission should keep the City Council apprised of the community's cultural arts needs and their economic impact 2. Work toward increasing resources for City-run arts programs (facilities, funds, instructors, administration) 35 Federa/ Way Community Cultural Plan 3. The City of Federal Way should employ a person in the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services Department to provide staff support for implementation of the Cultural Plan, including enlisting and coordination of volunteers, assisting with initiating and scheduling meetings with various organizations responsible for aspects of implementation (e.g., Chamber of Commerce, FW School District). 4. Explore options for contracting the city's public information needs with the private sector, including promotion/information of cultural arts programs and activities in the city 5. The Federal Way Arts Commission should encourage more participation by non-commissioners on committees IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIO: Friends Organizatfon � assumes responsibility for advocacy, planning and development of cultura/ arts facilities. Federa/ Way Arts Commisslon � establishes committees with citizen participation � works with School District on creation of arts education programs � takes lead in developing community-based arts educational opportunities for residents of the city � considers linkage of educationa/ programs in conjunction with grant- funded pertormances and exhibits � encourages creation of Chamber of Commerce Arts & Culiure Committee � establishes Arts Education Task Force � initiates Information & Awareness objectives through subcommittee � continues to oversee planning and development of community cultural arts schoo/ at Visitation Retreat Center, with staff support from City of Federa/ Way Parks, Recreation & Cultura/ Services Department � establishes Festiva/ Task Force 36 , C J , � � Federa! Way Community Cultura/ Plan � retains marketing professiona/ to prepare a comprehensive marketing action p/an � initiates networic with King County Arts Commission and South King County municipalities to exp/ore cooperative marketing opportunities. Federa/ Way Chamber of Commerce � establishes Arts & Culture Committee and as-needed sub-committees Department of Parks, Recreation & Cultura/ Services � ' � provides staff support to Commissions, Visitation Retreat Committee, and Festiva/ Task Force � emp/oys person to assist with imp/ementation Parks & Recreation Commission � participates in Visitation Retreat Center Joint Committee �� , � continues to provide entry-leve/ cu/tura/ arts c/asses at community centers, Visitation Retreat and other locations in the city. Federa/ Way Schoo/ District �, , � participates in expansion of school-based arts education programs; works with Federa/ Way Arts Commission to expand access to school facilities for cultura/ arts programs. Cultura/ Pian Steering Committee � joint/y with the Arts Commission, oversees and monitors progress on imp/ementation of the Cultura/ P1an, meeting at least once a year ' � ' � convenes an annua/ Arts Forum of loca/ artists and arts organizations to discuss progress on the P/an, key issues and opportunities re/ated to imp/ementation, and obtain input on priorities for continuing imp/ementation and updating of the P/an. , 37 ,, .; ���� � _ ��. � � ����� a � �� � � �� ` � ��\�: :�� :���' � c °:: �. �`��\��\`�`��� �,�\ r� . ., � � : , � � �� � ��� ��,��; ��: � � � � \��� � � ��� � . �� . . ���\��� � :'\�� �>'� . . . N \ \ \ ��� �°�\ � \ �� � '�� � � � � . ��� . \� ��\ � h � ��\� \ ; ����� \ � �� �\��� � �' \��, `� �� ` a� �� � ��� �`�v�� � �����.. �' �o�� ��'� �. � � � � \\� ���\� ����\����\����\\v �� \ ��q � ���� �\ � � �`��� ��C; �� �� �\ ` � \�� `�\ .... .. ��: � . �:s.. � :..\\�\\������\\\\\�� ��\\�\�� \\�� ���.\ , �,_ c:`�l`. ,. .e.�����. �\��.���� �" Table of Contents � Comprehensive Surface Water Management Plan Foreword Acronyms and Abbreviations Ezecutive Summary Chapter I Introduction Background Pre-Incorporation Surface Water Management Programs The City of Federal Way: Surface Water Management Programs New State and Federal Mandates Summary Chapter II Surface Water Utility Mission, Goals, and Poticies Mission Statement: The mission of the Ciry of Federal Way Surface Water Management Program is to protect public health and safery; prevent property damage; protect, preserve, and enhance surface water and associated habitats; protect groundwater quality and quantiry; and to protect and enhance water and sediment quality by controlling and reducing harm from urban hydrologic changes and stormwater pollutants. • Goal 1: Protect the public health and safety and prevent property damage by reducing surface water problems. Policy # 1 Major CapitallmprovementProjectProgram Policy # 2 Annual CapitallmprovementProjectProgram Policy # 3 Maintenance Plan Policy # 4 Policy # 5 Policy #