Loading...
Ord 03-442ORDINANCE NO. 03-442 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF FEDERAL WAY, WASHINGTON, ADOPTING AMENDMENTS TO THE CITY'S GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND ADOPTING AMENDMENTS TO THE CITY'S ZONING MAP. WHEREAS, the Growth Management Act of 1990, as amended, (Chapter 36.70A RCW or "GMA") requires the City of Federal Way to adopt a comprehensive plan which includes a land use elemeat (including a land use map), housing element, capital facilities plan element, utilities element, and transportation element (including transportation system map[s]); and WHEREAS, the GMA also requires the City of Federal Way to adopt development regulation~ implementing its comprehensive plan; and WHEREAS, the Federal Way City Council adopted its comprehensive plan with land use map (th~ "Plan") on November 21, 1995, and adopted development regulations and a zoning map implementing thC Plan on July 2, 1996; and subsequently amended the comprehensive plan, land use map, and zoning map on December 23, 1998, September 14, 2000, and November 1, 2001; and WHEREAS, under RCW 36.70A. 130, the Plan and development regulations are subject to continuing review and evaluation, but the Plan may be amended no more than one time per year; and WHEREAS, under RCW 36.70A. 130, by December, 2004, all jurisdictions within Washington Sta~e must take action to review and, if needed, revise its comprehensive plan and development regulations t~ ensure that they comply with the GMA; and WHEREAS, the City may consider Plan and development regulation amendments pursuant to Article IX, Chapter 22 of the Federal Way City Code (FWCC); and WHEREAS, in September 2001, the City of Federal Way accepted requests for amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan and applications for site-specific changes to the Plan's land use map and ORD # 03~442, PAGE I the City's zoning map, and considered amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan and t6 the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning map; and WHEREAS, on June 29, 2002, the City SEPA Responsible Official issued a Determination o~f Nonsignificance on the proposed amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan and on thc site-specific changes to the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning map; and WHEREAS, the proposed amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan and the site- specific changes to the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning ~nap address all of the goals and requirements set forth in the GMA; and WHEREAS, the City of Federal Way, through its staff, Planning Commission, City Council committees, and full City Council has received, discussed, and considered the testimony, written comment*, and material from the public, as follows: 1. The City's Planning Commission considered the requests for amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan at public hearings held on November 6, 2002, and November 20, 2005, following which it approved and recommended adoption of the Plan text and map amendments; 2. The City's Planning Commission considered the requests for site-specific changes to the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning map, and considered the proposed amendments, on December 2002, following which it approved and recommended adoption of certain of the requested site specific changes and denial of others; 3. The Land Use and Transportation Committee of the Federal Way City Council considered the proposed amendments to the text and maps of the comprehensive plan and site-specific changes to the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning map on December 16, 2002, January 6, 2003, and January 27, 2003 following which it recommended adoption of the plan text and map amendments and recommended adoption of certain of the requested site-specific map changes and denial of others; and ORD # 03-442, PAGE 2 4. The full City Council considered the matter at its meetings on February 18, 2003, and Marct 4, 2003; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires to adopt the Plan text and map amendments and certain of thC requests for site-specific changes to the Plan's land use map and the City's zoning map. NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Federal Way, Washington, does hereby ordain ag follows: Section 1. Findings. A. The proposed amendments to the comprehensive plan, as set forth in Exhibit A heretc~, reflect new or updated information developed since the initial adoption of the comprehensive 'plan, ok various elements of the comprehensive plan and comprehensive plan policies. They therefore bear a substantial relationship to public health, safety, and welfare; are in the best interest of the residents of the City; and are consistent with the requirements of RCW 36.70A, the King County Countywide Planning Policies, and the unamended portion of the Plan. B. The proposed amendments to the comprehensive plan land use map, set forth in Exhibit B attached hereto, are compatible with adjacent land uses and surrounding neighborhoods and will not negatively affect open space, streams, lakes or wetlands, or the physical environment in general. They will allow for growth and development consistent with the Plan's overall vision and with the Plan's land use element household and job projections, and/or will allow reasonable use of property subject to constraints necessary to protect environmentally sensitive areas. They therefore bear a substantial relationship to public health, safety, and welfare; are in the best interest of the residents of the City; and are consistent with th~ requirements of RCW 36.70A, the King County Countywide Planning Policies, and the unamended portion of the Plan. C. The proposed amendments to the Zoning Map set forth in Exhibit B attached hereto, are consistent with the applicable provisions of the comprehensive plan and the comprehensive plan land use ORD # 03-442, PAGE 3 welfare, and are in the best interest of the residents of the City. Section 2. Comprehensive Plan Amendments Adoption. map proposed to be amended in Section 2 below, bear a substantial relation to public health, safety, and The 1995 City of Federal Way comprehensive plan, as thereafter amended in 1998, 2000, and 2001, including its land use element mapg copies of which are on file with the Office of the City Clerk, hereby are and shall be amended as set forth i~ Exhibit A attached hereto. A copy of Exhibit A is on file with the Office of the City Clerk and is hereby incorporated by this reference as if set forth in full. Section 3. Zoning Map Amendments Adoption. The 1996 City of Federal Way Official Zoning Map, as thereafter amended in 1998 and 2000, is hereby amended as set forth in Exhibit B, a copy of which is on file with the Office of the City Clerk and which documents are hereby incorporated by this reference aS if set forth in full. Section 4. Amendment Authority. The adoption of Plan amendments in Sections 2 and 3 above iS pursuant to the authority granted by Chapters 36.70A and 35A.63 RCW, and pursuant to FWCC Section 22~ 541. Section 5. Severability. The provisions of this ordinance are declared separate and severable. Thb invalidity of any clause, sentence, paragraph, subdivision, section, or portion of this ordinance, or the invalidity of the application thereof to any person or circumstance, shall not affect the validity of the remainder of the ordinance, or the validity of its application to other persons or circumstances. Section 6. Savings Clause. The 1995 City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, and 1996 Zoning Map, as thereafter amended in 1998, 2000, and 2001, shall remain in force and effect until the amendments thereto become operative upon the effective date of this ordinance. Section 7. Ratification. Any act consistent with the authority and prior to the effective date of this ordinance is hereby ratified and affirmed. ORD # 03-442, PAGE 4 Section 8. Effective Date. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force five (5) days from anal after its passage, approval, and publication, as provided by law. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Federal Way this 18th day of March, 2003. CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ATTEST: ~I~ ~lerk, N. Christine Green,(L~,j~d /.~)r, 'Jeanne BurGi~ge ~2] APPROVED AS TO FORM: City Attorney, Patricia A. Richardson FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK: PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL: PUBLISHED: EFFECTIVE DATE: ORDINANCE NO: 02/11/03 03/18/03 03/22/03 03/27/03 03 -442 1:\2002 Comprehensive Plan Amendments\LUTC\Adoption Ordinance.doc/03/19/2003 11:46 AM OP.D # 03-442, PAGE 5 � � � � /� c ,� �- ,��;;� �'� � `� °� G� � � � � , Property of Ci Clerk's �v Office CITY OF COMPREHESIVE PLAN Adopted November 1995 Revised December 1998 Revised 2000, 2002 City Council Draft ����,,�: � , � Table of Contents CITY OF FEDERAL WAY Comprehensive Pian �--- - , - •- ••z _ . .. _ . . __ ... Chapter Contents One Two Three Four Five Six Seven Eight Nine Page G2 I-1 II-1 III-1 IV-1 V-1 VI-1 VII-1 VIII-1 IX-1 Lists of Tables, Maps, Figures,-8� and Charts Introduction Land Use Transportation Economic Development Housing Capital Facilities City Center Potential Annexation Areas Natural Environment Ten Private Utilities X-1 Glossary of Terms G-1 List of Acronyms �6-� G-11 � � � � LJ � FWC — Table of Contents Chapter Four -Economic Development Table IV-1 2000 Covered Em�lovment Estimates Table IV-2 2001 Sales Prices of Owner-Occupied Homes in Kinct Countv Table IV-3 Averaae Multi-Family Rents, Sprina 2002 �-a- Tabte IV-4 Tr. hl�� Table IV-5 Tr.hl� I�o Table IV-6 �°'�`i-�" Summary of ' I Economic Conditions in Southwest King County Cities Economic Development Areas and Actions Development Zones: Description Table IV-7 Development Zones and Land Use Chapter Five - Housing Table V-1 2000 H.U.D. Income Levels bv Household Size Table V-2 Affordable Housing for s Various Income Se4ments Chapter Six - Capital Facilities Table VI-1 City of Federal Way Facilities Plan - 1998 to 2014, Surface Water Management Component �Fe�l-3 Table VI-2 Summary of Existing Park-s and Recreation Areas Table VI-3 Parks Six-Year Capital Improvements Plan, 2002-2007 ��� D/YYLC Q �� !'Y�'1/�Y1 �IYI/VY1/"�11�_7'Clrl _ "" -� " �� Table VI-4 �-6 Table VI-5 �a�le� Table VI-6 �le-�� Table VI-7 ��e-�� Table VI-8 Revised-2998� Summary of Existing Community Facilities Project Community Facility Needs, 2001 - 2010 Summary of Existing Facilities Capacities Federal Way Schoot District Student Forecast Federal Way School District Six-Year Finance Plan c,3 � � � FWC — Table of Contents List of Maps ,�� � Chapter Two - Land Use Map II-1 Comprehensive Plan Designations Map II-2 Generalized Existing Land Use Chapter Three - Transportation Map III-1 Travel Patterns from Residential Areas in the Federal Way Planning Area Map III-2 Existing Significant Streets-8� and Highways Map III-3 Existing and Planned Traffic Signals Map III-4 °.,°�^^° `"'°°'�^'^.� T�^��^ "oo'') 2000 Traffic Volumes Map III-5 Functional Classification of Existing and Planned Streets and Highways s �� Maplll-6 �-I�-� Map III-7 �-$ Map III-8 Map III-9 Map III-10 * Map III-11 � Map III-12 Map III-13 � Map III-14 � � � Map III-15 Map III-16 Map III-17 Map 111-18 Map III-19 Map III-20 Map III-21 Map III-22 Map III-23 � Revised �2999 2002 � Planned Street Sections a4�-SB9� State Access Management Classifications Citv Access Management Classifications 2002 Congested Streets and Highways CVI[`�IY1/Y , oo� r-„n�o�+o,� c+.00+� 4 uc�h..��s 2008 Conaestion with Existing Streets and Highways -�BA� 2008 Congestion with-€�I5#-�g Pro�osed Stree#s and Hiahway Improvements �9a-� 2020 Congestion with-�993 200 f Stree#s-8� and Highway� Improvements 2020 Conaestion with 2020 Im,provements 7(11 S(�r�nnoc�o� C�roo�� ,.., �n, ���o+,.,��� Hiqh Collision Rate Intersections 11997 -1999j High £�b Collision Rate '^+°�°°^+�^^° Corridors� 1997 - 1999) High ' Collision Severity Intersections (1997 -1999) �..�� r�rlorJ AAr.i � ,r r C J� ° c °+ ci - �rr'�'rrpTV�i ° ��s Hiah Collision Severity Corridors �ea#e�-e# Sidewalks Inventorv on Major Streets {�R2 2002) �e�-lu4e#er+�ed Bicycle Facilities Plan All Day Transit Service Effective June 2002 Peak Hour Transit Service Effective June 2002 Proposed Transit Routes Helicopter Landing Areas c-s � � � � � � FWC — Table of Contents Chapter Seven - City Center Map VII-1 Vicinity Map Map VII-2 Boundaries of City Center Area Map VII-3 The Concept Plan Map VII-4 Map VII-5 Map VII-6 Map VII-7 Map V11-8 Map VII-9 City Center Land Use Designations Enhanced Street Network Principole Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections Potential Transit Alignments and Stops Potential Open Space and Bicycle Routes Phasing Concept, 1995-2005 Chapter Eight - Potential Annexation Areas Map VIII-1 ��-a- Map Vllt-2 A A .-.�i Map VIII-3 Map VIII-4 ��� Community Level Subarea Boundaries Fire Department Federal Way School District #210 Public Schools Map VIII-5 Parks Plan Planning Areas Map VIII-6 Parks and Cultural Resources���-4 Map VIII-7 Lakehaven Utility District Boundary Map VIII-8 Lakehaven Water Services Area Map VIII-9 Highline Water Service Area �-�4N-� Ma� VIII-10 Lakehaven Sewer Service Area-& and Basins Map VIII-1 1 Sewer and Septic �M�-�-6 Map VIII-12 Hylebos-� and Lower Puget Sound Basins s Map VIII-13 Local Surface Water Facilities Map VIII-14 Arferials and Local Streets Map VI11-15 Road Surface Map VIII-16 Sidewalks, Guardrails, and Street Li4hts Map VI11-17 Sensitive Areas Map VII�-18 Geologic Hazards ��s Map VI11-19 Potential Annexation Areas � Revised �2A88 2002 � ca � � � ' � FWC — Table of Contents Chapter Two - Land Use List of Figures Figure It-1 Percent Gross Land Area by Existina Land Use, September 2001 Figure II-2 The Concept Plan Diaaram Figure II-3 Population Projection, King Countv Chapter Three - Transportation � Figure III-1 Figure III-2 Figure III-3 � � � � Figure I11-4 Figure III-5 Historical Transportation Infrastructure Current Multimodal Transportation Systems Roadway Cross Section A-� and B Roadway Cross Section C-� and D Roadway Cross Section E� and F Roadway Cross Section G-� and H Roadway Cross Section I-� and J Roadway Cross Section K-8t and L Roadway Cross Section M� and N Roadway Cross Section O-� and P Roadway Cross Section Q� and R Roadway Cross Section S-S� and T Roadway Cross Section U� and V Roadway Cross Section W-� and X Roadway Cross Section Y-8� and Z Special Cross Sections Land Use Intensity vs. Transif Demand � Chapter Five - Housing � Figure V-1 Federal Way Age Distribution by Population in-�-9�0 2000 Figure V-2 Federal Way's Housing Stock � � Revised�A98� G9 � � � CHAPTER ONE - INTRODUCTION � � 1.0 INTRODUCTION � The Federal Way Comprehensive Plan WCP lays out a vision for the future of Federal Way during a 20-year period �� O°�� and responds to the requirements of � the Growth Management Act (GMA) of 1990 and subsequent amendments. The � FWCP also carries out Vision 2020, the Puget Sound region's multiple urban growth centers concept, and King County's Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs), which call � for multiple urban centers and a strong urban growth boundary. � This chapter gives an overview of the comprehensive planning effort, profiles Federal � Way's past and present, and concludes with a discussion of Federal Way's vision for its future. This plan contains a glossary of terms at the end of the document to help the reader with terms that may not be clear or understandable. � 1.1 THE COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING EFFORT , Why Plan? Federal Way plans for people. People need a safe and secure place to live, an economy � that provides jobs, a transportation system that allows them to get around, and schools, colleges, and recreational opporlunities. It is the city government's responsibility to provide public services and facilities, develop policies, and adopt regulations to guide � the growth of a city that meets the needs of its people. From incorporation to the present, the guide for Federal Way's growth and development has been the Comprehensive Plan. � What Is a Com rehensive Plan? p � The role of the r'� �� �'`x'°�,'° r^m^r°�,°�°;��° p�"' FWCP is to state clearly our community's vision for its future, and to articulate a plan for accomplishing this vision _, over a 20-year period �' °°� ''��. The � FWCP seeks to answer a number of questions: � ■ What areas are most suitable for development or redevelopment? ■ What areas should be preserved in their natural state? ■ Where should growth occur? � . �' ■ How can we manage that growth to realize our vision for the community? ' � � LJ � FWCP — Chaoter One, Introduction The GMA requires that each jurisdiction produce a comprehensive plan �s� that contains, at a minimum, elements pertaining to land use, transportation, capital facilities, housing, and private utilities. These elements must be consistent with one another. Jurisdictions also are required to adopt policies and regulations protecting resource lands and critical areas, such as agricultural land, wetlands, and hillsides. Each jurisdiction must coordinate its plan with the plans of surrounding jurisdictions. � The � GMA also requires that each city designate an urban growth boundary (UGA), or potential annexation area (PAA) as they are called in King County. The PAA defines the area within which the city anticipates it could provide the full range of urban services 1 at some time in the future. It also represents the area within which the city will consider annexations and the boundary beyond which it will not annex. � � � � � L� ' � LJ � Perhaps what most distinguishes the GMA from previous planning statutes is the requirement that public services be available or funded at some designated level of service before development may occur. If a jurisdiction cannot provide services to an area, then it may not permit development in that area. The 1991 amendments to the GMA require all counties planning under the act to adopt Countywide Planning Policies �CWPPs1. The jurisdictions in King County formed a group called the Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC) composed of elected officials from the King County Council; City of Seattle, and suburban cities. The mission of the GMPC was to draft the CWPPs for King County. These policies were adopted in 1992 and are binding on the jurisdictions in the County. In 1994, maior amendments to the CWPPs were proposed by the GMPC. These amendments were subsequently adopted by King County and are binding on all jurisdictions in the County, although it should be noted that Federal Way voted not to ratify. Since 1994, the CWPPs have been updated as needed. After approval and ratification bv the Kin� County Council, amendments are forwarded to the cities for ratification. Amendments to the CWPPs onlv become effective when ratified bv at least 30 percent of the citv and countv �overnments, representing 70 percent of the population of King County. The ' FWCP has been prepared according to the provisions of the GMA and the CWPPs. However, Federal Way's plan also contains many components that are not referenced in the GMA; these additional components are included in the plan due to their importance to the Federal Way community. Although Federal Way's goals and policies for growth and the provision of services are guided by GMA requirements, and are based in part upon state and regional goals, they primarily reflect the vision and goals of our own citizens. How Was the Plan Developed? The ideas in � the FWCP were developed through discussion, debate, and the � creative thinking of thousands of Federal Way citizens, working with City staff and elected officials. Consistent with the GMA, the City of Federal Way provided early and � Revised 2890 2002 1-3 � ' I FWCP — Chapter One, Introduction density, the more spread out the downtown. Participants concluded that a higher density, � pedestrian-friendly downtown oriented north/south from the center of SeaTac Mall made good sense and accommodated a high capacity transit system �}€�e�. � � i � O L� � � � � L�J � � Rev�ed �2899 2�,2 I On June 2, 1993, the sCity staff provided interested citizens with a short course in transportation planning. The presentation identified the congested street corridors as they were in 1992 and projected how and where congestion would increase by 2012, given the impacts of growth. Staff also presented five different arterial improvement alternatives which would either maintain or reduce congestion by 2012, together with some estimate of the effectiveness of particular arterial improvements for resolving transportation problems in the community. The participants concluded that the maximum construction option called "super widening" was not appropriate or even feasible. They did, however, favor a more modest list of arterial improvements, including a"diagonal parkway" along the BPA power line, which generally maintained the 19921eve1 of service. The last two public forums dealt with capital facilities planning. The first of these was held June 22, 1993. At this session, staff gave participants level of service options for streets and parks, provided cost estimates associated with each level of service, and asked participants working in groups to agree on the level of service they wanted for streets and parks based on their willingness to pay for service. With a high level of consensus, participants were willing to pay for a parks level of service of 10.5 acres per thousand population. Given the cost for streets, the desired level of service was to lower the standard about 60 percent from the 1993 level. The second capital facilities public forum was held December 9, 1993, and focused on how to pay for services. At this forum, each work group was given a work sheet that described total capital costs for parks and streets, and data describing the revenue sources available to cities and how much revenue each source could potentially generate. The objective was to develop a financing package, including recommended taxing levels, which would pay for the desired street and park system. There was a lot of disagreement, but voter-approved bond issues, impact fees, and to a lesser extent, utility taxes received some support as the preferred revenue sources. On the other hand, there was near total agreement that there should be no business and occupation tax in Federal Way. In November 1993, the City published a draft environmental impact statement that evaluated the various growth, land use, City Center, transportation, and capital facilities options. In addition, the staff-consulting team began writing the various chapters of the FWCP, consistent with the direction that emerged from the field trips, open houses, and public meetings. Early in 1994, the City's Planning Commission began holding work sessions, to which the public was invited, to review each of the chapters as they were written and provide comments and feedback as appropriate. The Commission started with the Private Utilities chapter on March 2, followed by Housing (3-9-94), Potential Annexation (3-16-94), Natural Environment (4-13-94), Economic Development (4-27-94), Land Use and City Center (6-1-94), Capital Facilities (8-3-94), and ended with the Transportation Chapter on September 7, 1994. �� � � � � � � I_�� � � � i J � � � FWCP — Chaater One, Introduction recognizes Federal Way's position as a major employer in South King County. The second is an annexation element as has been discussed earlier in this chapter. The third is a chapter that describes the City's commitment to the preservation of the natural environment and the policy direction to make it happen. Finally, the �r FWCP includes a subarea plan for the City Center that reflects the City's vision for the future and helps to implement the regional vision for a hierarchy of urban centers in the Puget Sound. Each of these elements has been coordinated with the others, resulting in a�plan, �v#is� that is internally consistent. Each of the goals in the � FWCP, while expressing a specific policy direction, also functions as part of a coordinated expression of the City's vision for the future. Plan implementation is the next step and is discussed in the final section of this chapter. 1.2 FEDERAL WAY'S COMMUNITY PROFILE: PAST AND PRESENT Planning for the future requires a good understanding of how our community has grown and changed in the past. The following discussion provides that backdrop as a context for subsequent chapters. The earliest recorded accounts of the Federal Way area tell of Native American families who resided in the area of the Muckleshoot Reservation on the east side of the Green River Valley and traveled west to the shores of Puget Sound for the plentiful fisheries resources. Generations of Muckleshoot Indians wore a westward trail across the heavily forested plateau to the area which is now Saltwater State Park. The arrival of the white man in the nineteenth century resulted in a steady decline in the Indian population and by 1890, nearly the entire population had disappeared from the area. Isolated on a triangular shaped plateau rising steeply from Puget Sound, the Federal Way azea had little waterfront access or roadways and accordingly, was sparingly developed compared to Tacoma and Seattle. As late as the turn of the century, the original settlers at Dash Point and Dumas Bay had to row to Tacoma for supplies and mail. Old Militazy Road, constructed around 1856 and extending north from Fort Steilacoom, past Star Lake to Seattle and Fort Lawton, was the first road through the area. � Over time, narrow dirt roads were added to provide east/west access and by 1900, a road � was constructed between Star Lake and Redondo. The second crossroad, the "Seattle Road," connected old Military Road and Kent. The Seattle-Tacoma Interurban Line, completed in 1901, provided a fast and easy way to reach these urban cities. Improved � access brought many visitors to the area and Star Lake became a popular summer recreation site. � Revised �889�2 �-� � lJ � FWCP — Cha�ter One, Introduction primarily through downtown condominiums. This pedestrian friendly, multi-use City � Center, with multi-story and underground parking facilities works well for many. �14@S� Federal Way citizens enjoy the pedestrian plazas of the City Center. � Statewide planning goal #6 states, "Private properly shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions." The City supports preservation of � private property rights; however, property rights must be balanced with the health, safety, and general welfare of the community. ' Economic Vitality: Strategically located in the Pacific Rim, between SeaTac Airport and the Port of Tacoma, Federal Way provides jobs as an international and regional retail and employment center. ^°°� "°a^° ^��•," Federal Way is also home to several corporate , headquarters located in East and West sCampus. Companies choose Federal Way for its sense of neighborhood identity, mix of housing stock, proximity to natural resources (mountains, oceans, and waterways), and safety. � The growth in the corporate headquarters segment of the economy has netted economic spinoffs for Federal Way's small business community, as small business provides support services for the corporate park companies. Growth in the small business � economy has generated some redevelopment of previously large retail warehouse facilities to accommodate office, retail, and light manufacturing. Quality jobs have boosted disposable income, supporting expansion of Federal Way's retail and � commercial sectors. The resulting enhancements to the community's tax base have helped to support a high quality of community life. � E�cient Tra�c System: Federal Way's transportation system links neighborhoods with th� City Center, and Federal Way with other communities in the Puget Sound region. Concentrated economic growth in �1��-se�e�a� East and West 6Campus and the City Center �� has allowed mass transit to connect Federal Way's economic core with the , economic and leisure hubs of Puget Sound communities. Concentrated gowth has allowed the community to maintain the infrastructure in outlying areas, focusing new infrastructure in the City's Center. Youth have found the transportation system easy and ' safe to use in getting to school. Safety, Infrastructure, and Utilities: This issue has been addressed at the neighborhood � level, where community-based policing philosophies and citizen efforts to create a sense of neighborhood with real and perceived safety are most effective. A professional and compassionate law enforcement force communicates clearly with the community's ' diverse populations and business community, providing a visible community presence, as well as acceptable emergency call response times. Improvements in safety have been a comerstone for the community's economic and residential growth. The utility and fire � districts share this community vision and have targeted their efforts and resources to continue to provide effective and efficient delivery of water, sewer, telephone, television, power, and fire services. Increased coordination between these districts and ' the City, and these districts and their regional counter-parts, has ensured adequate service expansion to make the community's development vision a reality. , Revised �899 2002 1-to ' � ' FWCP — Chaoter One, Introduction � � , � ' � i � ' � � , � � ' ' Revised �8 2�2 � Caring for Our Own: Governmental and social service agencies work in concert to provide a caring and safe environment for all Federal Way citizens. Ever-improving educational institutions, public and private, serve all interests and ages throughout the community. Neighborhoods have joined with the schools in their area to improve student achievement, school facilities, and resources. Strong educational institutions and the leadership of the Federal Way School District a� Highline Community College, and DeVry University have contributed to the community's economic growth, providing a trained work force and quality education for the families of ��� employees who locate here. The City has been the catalyst for creating a one-stop shopping center for human services, with programs at all levels of government requiring greater participation from clients in improving their individual situations. Quality Culture, Environment, and Play: Parks, trails, sports, and cultural arts facilities cater to the active lifestyle of Federal Way citizens. By partnering with the Federal Way School District and other agencies, the community has developed a long-range plan for facilities, parks, and services, which is yielding more and better facilities, and joint facility utilization than any one agency could provide alone. A performing and cultural arts center has been built, although it will require operating subsidies for its first eight years. The Federal Way area is blessed with a bounty of natural beauty and scenery. This bounty includes dramatic vistas of Mt. Rainier; numerous lakes, streams, and wetlands; the pastoral setting in the Spring Valley area; and views of Puget Sound and Vashon Island from the saltwater ridge. The City is committed to preserving this vast natural resource for the citizens and future citizens of Federal Way. Regional Player: Finally, Federal Way institutions and citizens are regional partners and participants in the economic, political, and cultural life of Puget Sound. This participation has yielded funding opportunities for community facilities, including housing and human services. Other regional efforts have safeguarded the community against outside impacts that detract from our community's quality of life. Regional participation has crossed the seas with sister city relationships which are supported by Federal Way citizens. These relationships have had significant cultural, educational, and economic benefits for the community. This vision will not be easily achieved. It will require difficult choices. In order to grow gracefully, and remain a healthy and desirable community, tomorrow's higher density growth areas must be accompanied by improved amenities for urban life. More resources will be required to maintain the high quality of life we currently enjoy, thanks to our parks, streets, and other public services. A combined effort of the public sector, neighborhood groups, businesses, schools, and individual citizens will be required. The early and continuing cooperation and collaboration of these groups in this process will ensure this vision will be realized. �-tt , � FWCP — Chapter One, Introduction � A Strategic Investment Strategy: This will describe a framework for making resource allocation decisions in an environment where wants and needs always exceed the finite resources available. Tradeoffs among many possible investment choices will be made to � achieve the � FWCP's goals. The framework will add dimension to the � FWCP's goals by enabling them to be addressed over time. , Human Services, Public Safety, and Environmental Planning: These will continue to build upon the foundation established by the �t FWCP. Much of the Ge FWCP, as developed to fulfill the GMA, addresses physical development and its related � regulatory and fiscal support. Federal Way works with other levels of government, non- profit providers, and citizen groups to support an array of activities and services that contribute to the quality of life of Federal Way's citizens. These include public safety; ' health, cultural, educational, and environmental activities; and human services. To ensure that the interrelationships of all aspects of urban life are addressed, planning will be undertaken by the City in a way that is supportive of and coordinated with the � ' FWCP. Monitoring and Evaluation: This will be done periodically to assess progress toward ' achieving ' -la� FWCP goals, as well as to measure the conditions and changes occurring within the City. Monitoring and evaluation will help ensure consistency within and among the � FWCP elements, as well as with the GMA, the ' CWPPs, and county and regional growth plans. Monitoring and evaluation will lead to both � FWCP amendments and improved ability to project future conditions. ' Citizen participation in City processes will build upon the dialogue between government and citizens that began with the development and adoption of the �t FWCP. The City will strive to find improved means to communicate with, and involve citizens in planning and decision-making. The City will strive to provide information that can be ' easily understood and to provide access for public involvement. This will include processes for making amendments to and implementing the � FWCP. � A pplication of the Plan ' The principal purpose of the Gcomprehensive �plan is to provide policies that guide the development of the City in the context of regional growth management. These policies can be looked to by citizens and all levels of government in planning for the future of , Federal Way. The � FWCP format generally presents a discussion about an issue followed by a ' goal, and some policies related to that goal. Goals describe what the City hopes to realize over time, and are not mandates or guarantees. Policies describe actions that will need to be taken if the City is to realize its goals. Policies should be read as if preceded by the ' words, "It is the City's general policy to...." A policy helps guide the creation or change of specific rules or strategies (such as development regulations, budgets, or program area ' Revised �AAA 2002 t-13 ' FWCP — Chaoter One, Introduction Comprehensive Plan Amendment Process The City will update t#�s-�,a� the FWCP annually in order to keep this document current with the community's vision and the City Council's policy direction. In addition to updating chapters, such as Capital Facilities, the public will also be notified that a comprehensive plan amendment will be taking place. Individual requests will be considered during the annual update process. Acknowledgments The City Council and staff thank the hundreds of citizens who have made the CityShape project a success. We look forward to working with you and others over the coming years to malce your vision Federal Way's future. � Revised�899 2002 1-15 � � � � CHAPTER TWO - LAND USE 2.0 INTRODUCTION ' Through the CityShape and Vision process, the community produced a general concept of what the City should look and function like in the future. This general concept was used to form the basis of the Land Use chapter. The Land Use chapter serves as the ' foundation of the Federal Wav Comprehensive Plan FWCP by providing a framework for Federal Way's future development, and by setting forth policy direction for Federal Way's current and future land uses. ' ' , � 1 � � � � Development of land, according to adopted policies and land use designations discussed in this chapter, should result in an appropriate balance of services, employment, and housing. The land use policies are supplemented by a Comprehensive Plan Designations Map (Map II-1, maps are located at the end of the chapter) that provides a visual illustration of the proposed physical distribution and location of various land uses. This map allocates a supply of land for such uses as services, employment, parks, open space, and housing to meet future demand. 2.1 THE LAND USE CONCEPT Federal Way's existing land use pattern (the physical location of uses) exists as a result of development administered by King County until 1990 and subsequent development under Federal Way's jurisdiction. As shown in Map II-2 (Generalized Existing Land Use) and Figure II-1(Percent Gross Land Area By Existing Land Use), in ��888 September 2001, 49 42 percent of Federal Way's gross land area was developed as single-family development, �3 11 percent as multiple-family development, and � 12 percent for office, retail, and manufacturing uses. Updates to the Ge�el�ie�s�ue�a� FWCP will not substantially modify this land use pattern. What will change is how various pieces of the land use pattern interact to achieve common land use goals. Figure 11-2 depicts the land use concept. The land use concept should result in the following: ■ Transformation of the retail core into an intensely developed City Center � that is the focus of civic activity which provides a sustainable balance of jobs and housing; � ■ Preservation and enhancement of existing residential neighborhoods; ■ Creation of a network of parks and open space areas; � I�� FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Fi�ure II-1 �-� ocn�cwrr ro�cc � �wm �oc � QV CV�CT�1V!` � AIUfI IICC � Commercial 6 � Industnal Vacant 3% 19 � Multi-Family 9% Office 4 0 Open Space 4% Park 8% �uasi-PuDlic 5°/, SingleFamily�� `��Recreation a0 % Religious � � Services 1% soaz CGmR1GlGi�l �d.��Y �� L�iiul�}G l;b Yacant � 1Z°� .l�duSki�J _ .. - 4�4 �° ' � OpanSpaco _ 5.°6 Puks 6k QwsiPuWic 4°6 . ..... &ocwation 1°J. �uic�s Siagla-Family ; � � 7�k 42°6 �� 11°k .Aolc Does no� include rieht-of-�cac ■ Diversification of the City's employment base by creating distinct employment areas; ■ Promotion of new opportunities for residential development near transit centers; ■ Provision of community and commercial services to residential communities; ■ To the extent practicable, preservation of environmentally sensitive areas; ■ Promotion of convenient residentially scaled shopping for residential neighborhoods; ■ Promotion of housing in the City's commercial areas close to shopping and employment; ■ Promotion of redevelopment of "strip commercial" areas along major arterials into attractive, mixed-use corridors served by auto and transit; ■ Promotion of the development of well designed commercial and office developments; and ■ Accommodation of adopted �rowth tar�ets for households and jobs and Puget Sound Regional Council PSRC growth projections within the proposed land use plan area. Revised 2A99 2002 II-2 ," w�� ��� E t y s Puget Sound -� � .�. — � �� ----_ . . . �--- � ; ,� - �I � ; �' � ,, f � / ��.�� �r-� � � -- _. I � � � __ � � � � � � ����� ert�C" t F` � 1 , . � � �. � � , �_ , � y �, , � ,,, L . � , � �• , �- , �, -- -- ��� " � ' '� � Povarty - �'��\�; �;� /i e'i' i,. � ' � �� 1 � . �� � J � � � ��-- � � � �--__� _ � ' � � � � ; - �°� � �- ,- �- st `� -� .- � _ � J ' -_ , ; i— �{ _ `=r ' � � � i'�' ��� ,��� � �i Dumae � � � � �I .r.___:�� Bey �Y ���� . _ � _; , , . ,, . r �� \�_� � � � ��� i : � � �, , � � �� `T � ` -- --'----� ;� � �- �a2p � � ' i � _ 1 J -=�� - ���--{ . _ �— �+'��> _ . �� _ -j =�` �> � � , ,e - ��- �� ' � �� � �� � i�� ��.��� � . �� � � . � ♦ - �_, -� � `�� �1��,�i � , i `� ��� � .�, ��� �� N� — — Y � � �� �- . �� '"'�FfORE PK`1'J Y �, O � � �, � � <� ` �� sr ' � `�� � � _ � �- ,`� �'�° � 1, ��"� - `� �'� �� ,�,� _ . � � r --��� a �� �� � Commrno�m�nt � . � ����� � � � .�fC� ST �- �` ��� t' �� - : � �S"` � `�- � . -- �,�� y �� � � � � LL1 � ' �+ c � � �!I � � � �� � � = __ - � ,, � � . � < < �� � g �C � �� �`c � , �� �� - � � �; ���� e f - =`�- � �i ,, •v ;�1� �� M � 9i NF I — \� �,i ��, hF � � - '0 �'.� 1 � --- . . � �°r � -� — � ;� � �� , � � r` �. � .-- , -_- ___ � t �� I ��_ _ -- �_ � � � � -- �. ,� -,,� �, - , _ � - � �' � � Y i O � � ' �- �� . �D Ii � � '`— � 1D O' � I' � ° J I� --� ` � � � - ,� _� ,� ____.,�, ���.� � � I� i =-._ . .�.` -- — �r r � �+L-. � Ls� ..' � �� � � NI __—_'�_—� . � n ''���� '', — 4� ► -- �f .= J � � ��zm �� ,� � _ �_ � �—� I ��� ' � '�,���, �,; �,; � � ���, � �` I ����-, - _. ' - - �; !,� - � -. � l_ _ - _ I—_ `�1' ' '�'R�"-,�^-.-7, � � I- - .=� 1L. j �L _- ( ' `� I � '- -��� � ,; - �� � ! j f � ; 1 , = � � � � ��. _.l __ � � � I �'' � T `� � - -- , w��- }g . L � � sa� � - -rr-� � � �,- ��``� � � � - _ ��: � J - ���-;' .%� ' � a - - _- � • ��.�� �' � ' �. ---- �` _ _ - �0�� � � - f '� � �� _ �'� � �� _ � � � `� - - �'�,�„ _ � � , _ o.,r, �.. ^ �� ��� a � � „ . � •� ' -__ _ . : � _ �ti � J � � ;�. , ;,_ ,. � . � _ , _ � -�� � . --�-�--�-L-- � , ��- �� �� ' �� N � ( �� ��� � f' • --��-. �, I . '� � _.�� . �%�� a _ =' I —' ~�- x _— � �-- � . . - � �w � � - �' `" ' , -- �,. �, � � �. -� -- � �. �- - - - - ,� q � Q � �� I � � � � ./—'" �i . � � � � 3 � , ]�!_� �J� ' /� 9 „' I I T � �'_ -..... .� l� I� . ��� � J �� r- � 1'T'_' � . � i� ' � �---_'` _' ��j� -, _ _— � - - . �� y �� r�t � � � - - : �' ----'^"_"'��}�.�--�-��_-�n� � _ `_�'-�.�—���'_ � . - � ���-�� � _ � - ; � - � � � _ 'iT I -- '__�LTON �WAY ' __ �. .��-----�--------� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN DESIGNATIONS REVISED DECEMBER, 2001 LANDUSE ELEMENT i�� Federal Way City Limits / ��,' Potential Annexation Area � City Center Core -� City Center Frame Corporate Park � Office Park Professional Office -� Commercial/Recreation Business Park � Neighborhood Business � Communiry Business Parks and Open Space Multi-Family Single Family-High Density -- -' Single Family-Medium Density Single Family-Low Density -- SCALE - 1 Inch equals 3,750 Feet � `Federa� way MAP II-1 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a qraphical representation only. The Ciry of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map prirrted February 2003 /data2/tabi[hartUcpmapsJcplanb.aml CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN GENERALIZED EXISTING LAND USE LANDUSE ELEMENT �'� Federal Way City Limits � ` Potential Annexation Area Other City Limits '�'�"�� County Boundary °� � Federal Way City Center � Agriculture Commercial � Industrial � Office � Public Park ' --J Residential - Multi-Family Residential - Single Family Open Space, Common Areas, and Drainage Quasi Public (i.e. schools, government services, etc.) --- Vacant `--J Recreation -- � Utilities 6ouroe: Kinp County Assessor. Data is besed on 2001 veluatbna. Lend use infomietion is not aveilaWe for allperoe la. No lend use infarmetion is available fir Pierce County. — SCALE — 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet � `Federa�way MAP II-2 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a qraphical representatlon anry. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map prirrted February 2003 /data2/tabithartUcF FWCP - Chaoter Two, Land Use Figure II-2 The Concept Plan Diagram Conccntratc new dexdopmmt in tf�e Nighttiay 99/65 conido�. De�reiap iafrasbvcture to suppo�#r corridor devctopment 7rar►sform retaii core into a aew � mi�ced-use C'ity Center. � P�eserve and enhance existIng single- fa�ily neigt�borhoods. Creatn a hetworlc of parla and open s{�ace corridars. � � DiversiEy erripiayrnent base by � cTeating disti�ct employrnent areas� � �� � (�✓'�, , Create new iatensive resid�ntsaf rnmmunities supported byt�auesiti� i .�� Provide communitv aad commercia) services t,o residesrtial aomrttunities. Pteserve eitvironmentally sensitive land trom adverse dtvclopment � � Revised �880 2Q02 II-3 � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use 2.2 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAND USE CHAPTERS The land use concept set forth in this chapter is consistent with all � FWCP chapters. Internal consistency among the chapters of the FWCP translates into coordinated growth and an efficient use of limited resources. Below is a brief discussion of how the Land Use chapter relates to the other chapters of the ���r� FWCP. Economic Development Federal Way's economy is disproportionately divided;. Based on PSRC's 2000 Covered Estimates bv iurisdiction, retail and service industries ee�sg compose �ea��ve- *'�:�� more than 70 percent of Federal Way's employment base. Covered estimates are iobs that are covered bv unemplovment insurance. Dependence on retail trade stems primarily from the City's evolution into a regional shopping destination for South King County and northeast Pierce County. Increased regional competition from other retail areas, such as Tukwila and the Auburn SuperMall, may impact the City's ability to capture future retaii dollars. To improve Federal Way's economic outlook, the economic development strategy is to promote a more diverse economy. A diversified economy should achieve a better balance between jobs and housing and support� the City's quality of life. In conjunction with the Economic Development chapter, this Land Use chapter promotes the following: ■ A City Center composed of mid-rise office buildings, mixed-use retail, and housing. ■ Community Business and Business Park development in the South 348th Street area. ■ Continued development of West Campus. ■ Continued �development of East Campus (Weyerhaeuser Corporate and Office Park properties). ■ Redevelopment and development of the SR-99 corridor into an area of yuality commercial and mixed use development. ■ T T�,� Continued use of design standards for se�i,� non-sin�le family areas. The land use map designations support development necessary to achieve the above (see the Comprehensive Plan Designations Map II-1). A complete discussion of economic development is set forth in the Economic Development chapter. Revised �89A 2002 � � � � � � � � � �� � ' � � �I-4 � � , ' � � , � � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Capital Facilities Capital facilities provided by the City include: transportation and streets, parks and open space, and surface water management. Infrasti-ucture and Urban Services To capitalize on the City's available resources for urban services and infrastructure, this ' Land Use chapter recognizes that concentrating growth is far more cost effective than allowing continued urban sprawl. Concentrating growth also supports the enhancement of future transit improvements. � � � � � Water Availability T'he amount and availability of urban services and infrastructure influences the location and pace of future growth. 'The City is responsible for the construction and maintenance of parks and recreation facilities, streets and transportation improvements, and surface water facilities. Providing for future growth while maintaining existing improvements �s d� depends upon the community's willingness to pay for the construction and financing of new facilities and the maintenance of existing facilities. As outlined in the Capital Facilities Plan, new infrastructure and services may be financed by voter approved bonds, impact fees, grants desi�nated capital taxes (real estate excise tax, fuel tax, utility t�), and money from the City's general fund. Based on reports from the Lakehaven Utility District, the estimated available yield from the underlying aquifers is 10.1 million gallons per day �MGD E10-year average based on average annual rainfall). T" * * ' ' � g ''+"-'' ' f +�'° '^ ' ° ° " a. cxu c:: icrx a=u�ru= ==o=== °_° `I r��'n �� � �� a �^���� ��^a��^*�^^�. The District controls which wells to use, thus which aquifers are being pumped from, based on a number of considerations including water levels and rainfall. In order to reduce detrimental impacts to its �roundwater supplies in the recent past the District has also augmented its �roundwater supplies with wholesale water purchased from the Citv of Tacoma throu�h water svstem interties. In addition the District has entered into a lon�-term agreement with the Citv of Tacoma and other South King Countv utilities to participate in the construction of Tacoma's Second Supplv Proiect (a second water diversion from the Green River) which will provide additional water supplies to the re�ion. As a result, the water levels in the aquifers have remained stable, and the District's water supply capacitv will increase to 14.7 MGD on an annual averag basis when Tacoma's Second Su,pplv Project is completed in 2004. Concentrating growth, along with conservation measures, should help to conserve water. Water Quality � � Revised �899�2 � Maintaining a clean source of water is vital to the health and livability of the City. Preserving water quality ensures a clean source of drinking water; and, continued health ii-5 ' FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use of the City's streams and lakes. Maintaining water quality is also important for maintaining the health of the aquifers � that rely on surface water for recharge. Contamination of an aquifer, by contaminated surface water, could lead to serious health concerns and/or expensive treatment requirements. To address this concern and impacts of new development, the City prepared a Surface Water Management Plan. The plan specifies actions to ensure water quality including the development of regional detention/ retention facilities to control rate and quality of water runoff. Furthermore, development of a wellhead protection program with the Lakehaven Utility District should provide guidelines to avoid possible contamination. Policies contained in the Natural Environment chapter provide direction for development near wellheads and in aquifer recharge azeas. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Capital Facilities chapter. Parks & Open Space One of the most important and valued elements of a high quality living and working environment is a parks and open space system. Providing parks and open spaces contributes to a reduction in environmental impacts such as noise and air pollution; increases the value of adjacent properties; provides areas for passive and active recreation; and helps preserve the natural beauty of the City. To maximize open space opportunities, the City will coordinate with adjacent jurisdictions to create a region-wide open space system as contemplated in the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs). Map II-1 depicts areas where existing and/or proposed parks and open spaces are located. This map is consistent with the City's Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Comprehensive Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Plan. Potential Annexation Area To facilitate intergovernmental planning and policy coordination, the CWPPs require each jurisdiction to, "...designate a potential annexation area" (PAA). The City's PAA lies within unincorporated King County, generally east of the present City boundary. The boundary has been defined through cooperative agreements between the City and adjacent jurisdictions. r.,.,a „ o ao�;�,„.,+;,,„� ., o,,.i., ,,,,* ,,,.,,..,,�oa �,<. ��,o �;.., f,,. , • , f.-+l�n D A A m <� l�n .�.�n.�nrnii 1.�� fl�n !'itc� 4� .+en:R.� lo.�a �• n rinnin..n+:�no or��i .s�nir�n In November 2001, the Citv of Federal Way, in partnership with King County, initiated the preparation of the Federal Wav PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation FeasibiliTy Study. This work will produce two distinct but interrelated products: a Subarea Plan for Revised �898 2002 ' � ' � , � ' � L� � � � � i�=s � � � ' � � � LJ u , FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use integration in the FWCP containin� policies and plans addressing the full range of land uses capital facilities public services and environmental issues• and an Annexation Feasibility Studv that will guide the Citv and inform the citizens about the feasibility and phasing of any potential future annexations. A complete discussion regarding the City's PAA can be found in the Potential Annexation Area chapter. Natural Environment Federal Way's natural beauty is apparent. Lakes, streams, wetlands, and Puget Sound provide a scenic backdrop as well as a source for active and passive recreation. The Land Use chapter seeks to protect Federal Way's unique natural resources through policies that support the preservation of these areas for future generations. For a complete discussion, please refer to the Natural Environment chapter. Housing Housing is a basic need and a major factor in the qualiTy of life for individuals and ' families. An adequate supply of affordable, attractive, and functional housing is fundamental to achieving a sense of community. The central issue related to land use is supplying enough land to accommodate projected growth for a range of incomes and ' households. Presently, housing is provided primarily in single-family subdivisions or multiple-unit complexes. ' This plan devises strategies to increase housing options and choices. The Land Use chapter advocates changes to current development codes to increase flexibility in platting land and encourage housing as part of mixed-use developments in commercial � areas. The latter provides an opportunity to locate housing closer to employment and shopping, and to create affordable housing. A complete discussion of housing can be found in the Housing chapter. � City Center � � ' i 1 Rev�sed �898� ' Map II-1 depicts two City Center land use designations the City Center Core and City Center Frame. The creation of an identifiable and vibrant "downtown" is one of the primary goals identified by the community during the CityShape planning process. The policies of the Land Use and City Center chapters envision a concentrated City Center comprised of mixed-use developments, pedestrian-oriented streetscapes, livable and affordable housing, a network of public spaces and parks, and development of superior design and quality. The City Center will provide a central gathering place for the community where civic and cultural activities and events take place. A complete discussion of the City Center can be found in the City Center Chapter. „_� �J FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use 2.3 POLICY BACKGROUND State and county land use policies provide a statutory framework for the development of City land use policies. It is important to briefly review state and county level policies to better understand the historical conditions � that have shaped the goals and policies in this chapter. Growth Management Act The Growth Management Act (GMA� acknowledges that, "...a lack of common goals expressing the public's interest in conservation and the wise use of our lands pose a threat to the environment, sustainable economic development, and the health, safety and high quality of life enjoyed by residents of this state" (RCW 36.70A.010). The � GMA provides a framework for content and adoption of local comprehensive plans. The �As� GMA provides 13 goals to be, "...used exclusively for the purpose of guiding development of comprehensive plans and development regulations." A number of the �t�at� GMA goals pertain to land use. They are as follows: Urban Growth — Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. Reduce Sprawl — Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. HousinQ — Encourage the availabilitv of affordable housing to all economic seQments of the population of the state, promote a varietv of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock. Open Space and Recreation — Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks. Environment — Protect the environment and enhance the state's high quality of life, including air and water quality and the availability of water. Public Facilities and Services — Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. Historic Preservation — Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance. Revised 2898 2002 ' � � ' r , � � � � � � � � ' � u-s � , � i 0 , ' FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Property Rights — Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions pursuant to state and federal law. Regional Policies ' i ' ' � ' � � � � ' � ' Revised �889 2002 � Vision 2020 and the CWPPs, both required by GMA, provide a regional framework to achieve the goals of the GMA. Vision 2020 is the long-range growth management, economic, and transportation strategy for the central Puget Sound region encompassing King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. It provides broad direction agreed to by member jurisdictions. Most notable is Vision 2020's direction for #regional �transportation. An important connection between Vision 2020 policies and the CiTy's land use policies is development of an urban center, referred to as the City Center Core in � the FWCP. Urban centers are to accommodate a significant share of new growth, services, and facilities. The idea is to, "...build an environment in the urban centers that will attract residents and businesses" by concentrating residences, shopping, and employment in close proximity to each other and regional transit. The CWPPs are a further refinement of policy direction contained in the GMA and Vision 2020 and are a result of a collaborative process between King County and the suburban cities within. Policies contained herein have been prepared to implement the CWPPs as they apply to the City. CWPPs provide a framework for both the county and its respective cities. Adherence to these policies ensures that plans within the county are consistent with one another. These policies address such issues as the designation of urban growth areas, land use, affordable housing, provision of urban services for future development, transportation, and contiguous and orderly development. CWPPs have the most direct impact on land use policies in this chapter. By undertaking the following actions, the Land Use chapter is consistent with CWPP's direction: ■ Promoting phased development for efficient use of land and urban services; ■ Creating a City Center (urban center) as an area of concentrated employment and housing, served by high capacity transit, public facilities, parks, and open space; ■ Limiting growth outside the City Center to areas that are already urbanized; ■ Encouraging in-fill development; ■ Expanding business and office park development to include limited commercial; and ■ Establishing incentives to achieve desired goals. II-9 FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use 2.4 PROJECTED GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY Projected Growth 1„ , ono ., .,,,,�o�.. �� n, n„o,,,,�o According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 83,259 , , e ople called Federal Way home. As of April 2002, the population had grown to 83,850 (based on the Washington State Office of Financial Management (OFM1 population estimates . Most of the growth to date occurred during the decades of the 1960s and 1980s, during which time the City's population doubled. Federal Way is now the s�k ei�hth largest city in the state and the � fourth largest in King County. Future population and employment growth has been forecasted , ' , by OFM (Figure II-3). T�'r^ +�' �'�xron t��rs-��g�t�g��#'�Asgti ia ., ,� o„�„� =e��-�e�v�� ev�� t-�� ��31�—�8-� P��� � a � ,� .,i �xT ',_.o�.ig-��t-a�'g�t-�easg� �v�s ��11�� '�� � ���-'r� ��34. -',' � �^,^'^. =���a� This future population and emplovment �rowth will be distributed between jurisdictions and unincorporated urban King�Countv through a methodologv that has been prepared by the King Countv Planning Directors and approved bv the Growth Mana�ement PlanninQ Council (GMPC). This methodolo�,y is more fullv discussed in the next section. Figure II-3 �'! 4 � 0 �3 _ 9 co � 0 a� 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 This ta61e is to be deleted �nd realaced with the table to the right. 2. 5 2 � c s� 1.5 c � 1 0 � 0.5 0 1970 1980 1990 20� 2010 2020 2025 Source: Office nf Financial Mana¢emrnt 2002 Uodate to Growt6 Manasement Aa Medium Review Pooulatwa Proiectioas Revised �999 2�2 II-10 Po�ulation Projection King CounN Population Projection Central Puget Sound Region C � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Development Capacity . _ .. - , , � �. .,_ ' , � - _ - ' The purpose of Buildable Lands is to measure capacitv to accommodate projected growth and to evaluate the effectiveness of local plans and regulations. Kin� Countv and five other cities must report to the state bv September 1, 2002, and everv five years , thereafter on their capacitv to accommodate �rowth during the 20-vear Growth Management period In order to accomplish this the Buildable Lands program requires annual data collection to determine the amount and densitv of new development, an ' inventorv of the land supplv suitable for development, and an assessment of each jurisdiction and the entire Urban Growth Area (UGA) to accommodate expected �rowth. � . � � ' ' � ' Revised �889 2002 ' ::.=�. c*=T= ^•=_�_--',� In order to determine whether Federal Wav has the capacitv to accommodate future growth Citv staff prepared a land inventorv of buildable lands. Buildable lands are those parcels that are either vacant or redevelopable and are free of constraints to development, such as being environmentally sensitive. The capacitv for future development in terms of number of new housin� units and square footage of new commercial square footage is then derived based on densities achieved bv development over the previous five yeaz period, 1996 through 2000. King Countv Assessor's records were used to identifv vacant and redevelopable land. In general, parcels were divided into three categories: fully-developed and parcels that were excluded from the capacity analysis; parcels that could be redeveloped; and parcels that were vacant. With the exception of surplus lands owned bv public agencies, such as the Citv countv state and utilitv, school, and fire districts �parcels owned by public a�encies were excluded from the capacity analysis ' � ', as thev are unlikelv to be developed for private use. Common areas and open space in subdivisions were also excluded from the inventory. Commercial and industrial zoned parcels categorized as redevelopable are those where the ratio of improvements to land value is less than 50 percent. In residential u-� � ' FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use zones, redevelopable parcels are those parcels which can be subdivided, or where the density can otherwise be increased, for example, redeveloped from single-family to multiple-family. The City has mapped environmental constraints; (such as wetlands, streams, and geolog,ically hazardous areas) and their respective setbacks, and therefore, critical areas were taken out at a parcel level. The remainin� lands were then summarized by zonin� designation. A series of discounts were then further applied. , �These discounts included right-of-way, and public purpose factors °^a'^���'a�^^ . , �es�-�as�e�s. In addition to the reductions outlined above, a market discount factor was applied on a case-by-case basis depending on local conditions. Application of the market factor (discount) acknowledges that not all potentially developable parcels will be available for development and that some parcels may not be financially feasible to develop or redevelop. This year, the methodolo�v for capacitv analvsis was modified to conform to the Buildable Lands requirements. In the past, capacitv analvsis was based on the theoretical maximum development allowed by zoning. In the current analysis, densities achieved over the last five years were used. For residential areas, the average number of units per acre achieved was used, and for commercial areas, average attained floor area ratios (FAR) were used. Densities and FARs were then divided into the available land totals for residential and commercial land respectivelv, to estimate development potential. For redevelopable areas, the current existing buildin� area or number of units were subtracted in order to determine additional capacitv. Lastiv, the number of units or the buildin� square footage of pendin� projects was added to the subtotals, for a final estimate of capacity. Based on this methodology, Federal Wav has the capacity for 5,538 new residential units and 16,194 new jobs. � .�.�,r.�„C� • �r��r�Tr r .- _ •,• , - - — _ - - - - �� ��� - _ �� ; - - = — - - �• � - r. �� . �, .� - _ -_ - _ - - � � - - - - Revised �888 2002 i � �J , , , � , � '�J , � � l� , �� t1-12 , � :d� � _ .� � � J O 3 F- N N L U t a U � � • � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � •. �������� � �������� . � � .N .; .� .� M � � � a a> � � _ � � � - - _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ � - _ _ ' FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use T..l, z-w.v � 2001 - 2022 Household and Job Targets During their September 25, 2002 meeting, the GMPC adopted a motion to add tar�ets for new households and jobs for the period 2001 — 2022. These tar�ets were based on a methodology developed over a two-vear period bv the King Countv Planning Directors. This methodolo�v is summarized in the followin� section. Kin� Countv was divided into four subareas. These four subareas are SeaShore, East Kin� Countv South Kin� Countv and Rural Cities. The City of Federal Way is part of the South King Countv Subarea that includes Renton, Burien, SeaTac, Tukwila, Normandv Park Des Moines Kent Covington, Maple Valley, Black Diamond, Federal Wav Auburn, Milton Pacific Al�ona, West Hill PAA, East Renton PAA, Fairwood/ Soos Creek PAA, and Southwest King County PAAs. The PSRC's 2000 to 2020 small area emplovment forecasts were used as a basis for allocatinQ population forecasts to these subareas by applying the employment percenta�es to the OFM countvwide population forecast so that the proportion of housing to jobs is balanced at a certain ratio. The household size of the various subareas were then determined based on the 2000 census, and adjusted downwards for 2022 based on the assumption that household si�es would decrease in the future. The household size for each subarea was used to determine how manv new housing units would be needed to accommodate new population in 2022. Next, the remainder of the current household target bv subarea at the end of 2000 was compared to the new households needed to accommodate new population. If South Kin� Countv were to achieve their remaining household 2012 target, this would actually exceed the number of households needed to accommodate the 2000 to 2022 projected new households for the subarea (Table II-1). As a result, the methodology proposed that South King County receive no new targets for the 2012 — 2022 tar�et extension period. However, because South Kin� Countv's remaining tar�et of 50,430 households exceeded the 42,355 new households needed to accommodate 2001 — 2022 � the methodology proposed to credit the sub-re�ions the difference, thus reducin� remainin� Revised 2888 2002 ' u � , , � , , , � , , ' ' , � ii•ia , , FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use targets. Table II-2 shows the 2001 — 2022 household targets by jurisdiction in the South King Countv Subarea with the adjustment made for the credit. As in the case of the household target extensions, the starting point for employment allocations was forecast from estimates derived for each citv bv the PSRC 2000 to 2020 small area emplovment forecasts. Future emplovment was then allocated to iurisdictions based on location of current emplovment as well as location of commercial and industrial zones. The adopted 2001 — 2022 iob tar�ets are shown in Table II-2. Table li-1 Household Tar eg ts by King Count_y Urban Subarea Subarea 1992 2012 Tar�et Remainder New Household Additional Total Households 20 Year Achieved of Current TarLets to Households to Accommodate Ta rget 1993-2000 Tar�et at Accommodate Needed Be 30-Year Population End of 2000 New 2000-2022 Current Tar�et (1992-2022) Population SeaShore 57,905 16,375 41,530 56,369 14,839 72,744 East KinQ 48,348 25,665 22,683 47,645 24,962 73,310 Coun South King '73,387 22,957 50,430 42,355 N/A 65,312 Coun — Rural Cities 8,828 3,265 5,563 2,255 Na 5,520 Sur lus 11 585 ^ N/A Total 188,468 68,262 120,206 148,624 28,418 216 6 Revised-2898 2002 11-75 Table II-2 South King County Subarea Household and Job Targets, 2001 2022 � FWCP — Cha�ter Two, Land Use Develoament Capacitv and Taryets As discussed in the previous sections, in 2001 when the data for the Buildable Lands Studv was prepared the Citv of Federal Wav had a capacitv for 5,538 new residential housing units and 16,194 new jobs. In comparison, the adopted 2001 — 2022 targets are 6,188 new residential units and 7,481 new jobs. As a result, at that time the City had an 8,713 surplus capacitv for jobs and a deficit capacity of 650 residential units in relationship to its tar�ets. Based on residential units in the pipeline today, the City now has a deficit capacitv of 410 residential units. In order to increase residential capacitv to meet the adopted targets, City staff will propose that a definition of densit,y for conventional subdivisions be added to Federal Way City Code (FWCC) Chapter 20, "Subdivisions." The definition of density will be based on gross acreage, which should result in relativelv more lots than presently allowed, based on the requirement for minimum lot sizes. In addition, City staffwill continue to monitor the Citv's pro�ress towards reachin� its tar�ets, and will propose additional chan�es to the Citv Council, if warranted. 2.5 URBAN DESIGN AND FORM In addition to guiding development, the Land Use chapter � also guides the quality and character of the City's future development pattern through goals and policies related to the form, function, and appearance of the built environment. These goals and policies, related to quality development, serve and will continue to serve as a basis from which to develop appropriate implementation measures. �Design guidelines, adopted in 1996 and 1999 �e-b� are used as an integral component of the development review process. r • � •a �• �n ,.► ,.o�,o,.�;.,o Y' :^. Y�'.:=:��'�� .,,�a,.e��;,,.. ;„+o,.,..,+;,,,, .,..,� ,,,.o�e,.,,.,+;,,,, �.f„�+,,,-�1 fo�r,,.-on� Design �uidelines address location and type of pedestrian amenities and public spaces; pedestrian and vehicle circulation; building setbacks, orientation, form, and scale; landscaping; and mixed-use design. , , , Goal LUGl Improve the appearance and function of the built environment. Revised �AA9 2002 ' � , � ' ' , ' 1 � ' , ' L�J , ' II-16 , � � ' ' � ' ' FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Policies LUP1 LUP2 LUP3 Use residential design performance standards to maintain neighborhood character and ensure compatibility with surrounding uses. Use design and performance standards to achieve a greater range of housing options in multiple-family designations. Use design and performance standards to create attractive and desirable commercial and office developments. , 2.6 DEVELOPMENT REVIEW PROCESS ' The Land Use chapter provides the policy foundation for implementing zoning and development regulations. In developing policy concerning future land use regulations, or revisions to existing regulations, every effort �as has been made to instill certainty and ' efficiency in the development process. State legislation has focused on developing streamlined and timely permit processing. The City has conducted Developer Forums to solicit input regarding the City's permit processing system. Comments received during , the Forums provided invaluable information to evaluate the City's permit system. In 2002 the Citv formed a stakeholders �roup that reviewed the Citv's permittin� process and made recommendations on how to improve or modifv the re�ulations and processes. ' Through the following policies, the City continues to strive to provide an efficient and timely review system. ' � ' �. J ' ' � Goal LUG2 Develop an e�cient and timely development review process based on a public/ prfvate parmership. Policies LUP4 LUPS LUP6 LUP7 Revised �2898 2002 Maximize efficiency of the development review process. Assist developers with proposals by continuing to offer preapplication meetings in order to produce projects that will be reviewed efficiently. Conduct regular reviews of development regulations to determine how to improve upon the permit review process. Integrate and coordinate construction of public infrastructure with private development to minimize costs wherever possible. u-n �_J � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use ' LUP8 Increase e�ciency in the permit process by responding to state legislation ' concerning development review processes. 2.7 CITYWIDE POLICIES Citywide policies apply to all ��� FWCP designations. These general policies are intended to maintain the quality of the living and working environment and ensure that the interests, economy, and welfare of the community are considered. Policies LUP9 Designate and zone land to provide for Federal Way's share of regionally adopted demand forecasts for residential, commercial, and industrial uses for the next 20 years. LUP10 Support a diverse community comprised of neighborhoods iv#�sl� that provide a range of housing options; a vibrant City Center; well designed and functioning commercial areas; and distinctive neighborhood retail areas. LUPll Support the continuation of a strong residential community. LUP12 Evaluate household and employment forecasts on a periodic basis to ensure that land use policies based on previous assumptions are current. LUP13 Distribute park and recreational opportunities equitably throughout the City. 2.8 LAND USE DESIGNATIONS The land use designations in the ��a� FWCP recognize the relationships between broad patterns of land uses. The designations set forth locational criteria for each specific class of uses consistent with the long-term objectives of the � FWCP. These designations provide the purpose and intent for specific zoning districts. The location of comprehensive plan land use designations are shown on the Comprehensive Plan Designations Map (Map II-1). Revised �2A88 2002 , 1 , ' ' ' ' ' � ' 1 , , ' II-18 ' u � ' 1 � ' ' ' ' ' ' � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Residential Areas Single Family Federal Way is known for its quality single-family neighborhoods. This section contains goals and policies that will shape future development and protect or improve the character and livability of established neighborhoods. The demand for and development of single-family housing is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. Single-family development will occur as in-fill development of vacant lots scattered throughout existing neighborhoods and as subdivisions on vacant tracts of land. To address future housing needs, the Land Use chapter encourages new techniques for developing single-family subdivisions. Such techniques include clustering, planned unit developments, lot size averaging, a� zero lot line development:, ,.T * i f -�;�•, �o;..�,�,^r�.^^a� ;� *�.o ;^+.�^.�„^+;^^ ^f accessory dwelling units and special needs housing . , �a +• i a . . .i� a,� *�, *•�,•�•.� a a �: „�; �ii rv�xaivirciur-vvav-ivrroxvxrv--rrm-ccrnzrvv� cxxaT-vvrripacrvzrrc] a .,� ..' "" Single Family Low Density The Single Family Low Density designation retains larger urban lots in order to avoid development pressure on or near environmentally sensitive areas and to retain areas that have unique area-wide circumstance. There are two notable locations: Spring Valley, located in the southern portion of the City; and along Puget Sound near Dumas Bay in the vicinity of Camp Kilworth and the Palisades Retreat property. The Single Family Low Density designation continues the historic application of low ' density zoning in areas that lack urban services and infrastructure. Moreover, the application of large urban lot zoning is appropriate to avoid excessive development pressures on or near environmentally sensitive areas as well as to serve as a buffer ' between adjacent land use designations of higher densities. Upon provision of urban services such as water and sewer an increase in densitv mav be warranted. ' The Single Family Low Density designation in the Spring Valley and Dumas Bay areas have numerous environmentally sensitive features including, but not limited to: wetlands, flooding potential, geologically hazardous areas, streams (including salmonid ' habitat), and wildlife habitat, and groundwater infiltration potential. Due to the sensitive nature of this area, the Draft Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound Plan recommends zonmg of one lot per five acres. ' Single Family Medium Density ' The Single Family Medium Density designation creates urban lots with a density range of one to three dwelling units per acre to avoid developing on or near environmentally sensitive areas. T'he Single Family Medium Density designation can be found along the ' . �. Revised �808 2002 n-�s ' ' FWCP—ChaoterTwo, Land Use Puget Sound shoreline and south of South 356th Street, both east and west of SR 99. Lot sizes of 35,000 and 15,000 square feet provide for a transition in densiTy between land designated as Single Family High Density Residential and �� Single Family Low Density Residential. Some areas designated as Single Family Medium Densi Residential still lack urban services and infrastructure. U�on provision of urban services, such as water and sewer, an increase in densitv mav be warranted. The relatively large lot sizes along the Puget Sound shoreline areas are appropriate due to geological features including steep slopes and landslide hazards commonly associated with marine bluffs. As with the Single Family Low designation, the Single Family Medium designations south of South 356th are located in the West Branch Hylebos Creek Sub-Basin. As noted in the Single Family Low Density description, this sub-basin contains a number of environmentally sensitive areas. Single Family High Density A majority of the single-family residential land in the City is designated as Single Family High Density. Urban densities of approximately 4.5, 6.0, and 8.7 dwelling units per acre in the RS 9.6, RS 7.2, and RS 5.0 zoning districts respectively, provide for a range of housing densities. Single Family High Density residential designations are located within close and convenient proximity to neighborhood business centers, areas of existing or future employment, transit, and existing urban infrastructure and services. Future Single Family High Density development should �da have good access to collector and arterial streets. Goal LUG3 Preserve and protect Federal Way's single family neighborhoods. LUG3.1 Provide wide range of housing densities and types in the single family designated areas. Policies LUP14 Maintain and protect the character of existing and future single-family neighborhoods through strict enforcement of the City's land use regulations. LUP15 Protect residential areas from impacts of adjacent non-residential uses. LUP16 Revise existing land use regulations to provide for innovation and flexibility in the design of new single-family developments and in-fill. LUP17 Encourage the development of transportation routes and facilities to serve single-family neighborhoods. Special attention should be given to pedestrian circulation. Revised �29A8 2� l� ' , ' , ' ' ' , ' ' , ' � ' , �►-20 ' ' � , ' FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use LUP18 Encourage the development of parks and the dedication of open space in and adjacent to res:dential areas to preserve the natural setting of Federal Way. LUP19 Consider special development techniques (e.g., °^ ^� a�=�°���^^ "^'+°, zero ' lot lines, lot size averaging, and planned unit developments) in single-family areas, provided they result in residential development consistent with the quality and character of existing neighborhoods. � � ' LUP20 Preserve site characteristics that enhance residential development (trees, water-courses, vistas, and similar features) using site planning techniques such as clustering, planned unit developments, and lot size averaging. Multiple Family The multiple-family residential land use designation represents an opportunity to provide ' a range of housing types to accommodate anticipated residential growth. �s�eas�g The increase in population, � decline in average family size, and ��g increased cost of single-family homes have created heavy demand for new housing types. The Land � Use chapter encourages the development of � housing types, such as duplexes, townhouses, and condominiums in existing multiple-family areas and within mixed-use development in commercial areas. C � , ' ' ' ' ' During the 1980s, the City's landscape changed, as a number of large apartment complexes were constructed. These apartments, often built without regard to scale or amenities, created a general dissatisfaction with the appearance of multiple-family development. �..� ._ _.,a_ ._ ........... ..'���'_a ��?ar°°° ;__ __ _ ^'r In 1999, the City � ,.0 0--- ---o amended its Communitv Desi�n Guidelines to address the appearance and scale '^^�*�^^ °^� *��^e of multiple family dwelling units. Incentives for creating desired development such as duplexes and townhouses should be considered. Multiple Family Multiple Family d��s uses in large part are in areas currently zoned for multiple- family development. Designations of 3600, 2400, and 1800 square feet per dwelling unit, corresponding to densities of 12, 18, and 24 dwelling units per acre respectively, will continue to be used. Opportunities for new development will occur through redevelopment and build-out of remaining parcels. Residential design guidelines that address design and appearance of multiple-family developments were adopted in �338 1999. The primary goal of residential design guidelines is to develop multiple-family housing that is reflective of the community's character and appearance. Goal LUG4 Provide a wide range of housing types and densities commensurate with the community's needs and preferences. � . •. Revised �8A9 2002 ��-21 ' � FWCP—Cha�terTwo, Land Use Policies LUP21 Allow and encourage a variety of multiple-family housing types in designated commercial areas, especially in the City Center Core and City Center Frame areas. LUP22 Use design and performance standards for multiple-family developments to achieve integration in commercial developments. Performance standards should focus on scale, appearance, and compatibility. LUP23 Support multiple-family development with transportation and capital facilities improvements. LUP24 Multiple-family residential development should be designed to provide privacy and common open space. Variations in facades and rooflines should be used to add character and interest to multiple-family developments. LUP25 Encourage the establishment of street patterns and amenities that encourage walking, bicycling, and transit use. Commercial Designations Existing commercial areas are auto-oriented and characterized by one-story low intensity development. In the future, these areas will become more intensively developed and pedestrian oriented, and in some designations, accommodate housing. Transforming existing areas into places where people want to live, shop, and work requires changes. Commercial areas should contain street furniture, trees, pedestrian shelters, well marked crosswalks, and buildings oriented to and along the street to provide interest and allow easy pedestrian access. General Policies for Commercial, Office, and Business Park The following general policies apply to all commercial, office, and business park designations. In some instances, �specific goals and policies �a�e-easl� may follow a specific land use designation , • , , Policies LUP26 Provide employment and business opportunities by allocating adequate land for commercial, office, and business park development. LUP27 Encourage development of regional uses in the City Center. Revised �A89 2002 ' ' ' � � ' � i �J i ' � ' ' � ' ��z2 i , i � � � � - �� - � = _ _ -- - - - -= �� LUP28 Provide for a mix of commercial and residential uses in commercial areas. LUP29 Use Communitv Design Guidelines to promote common open space, public art, and plazas in commercial and office developments. LUP30 Ensure compatibility between mixed-use developments and residential areas by regulating height, scale, setbacks, and buffers. � LUP31 Use Communitv Design Guidelines to �encoura�e quality design and pedestrian and vehicle circulation in office, commercial, and business park developments. LJ �' � u � LJ a � � Revised �998 2002 � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use LUP32 Use Communitv Design Guidelines to €encourage commercial development to locate along street edge (where deemed appropriate) to provide pedestrian street access. Provide pedestrian access between developments and to transit stations. LUP33 Identify and designate streets where on-street parking can be safely provided without unduly slowing traffic flow or jeopardizing traffic safety. LUP34 Provide developer incentives for inclusion of housing in commercial projects. Business Park The Business Park designation encompasses the uses found in areas where large undeveloped and underdeveloped parcels, having convenient access to Interstate 5 and Highway 18, provide a natural location for business park development. The Business Park designation is intended to capture the �g demand for higher quality, mixed- use business parks which permit a mixture of light manufaciuring, warehouse/ distribution, office, and limited retail uses to serve the immediate needs in the area. In the past few vears, the Citv has observed a marked increase in requests to change parcels from the Business Park desi�nation to another comprehensive plan desi�nation. As a result the Citv should explore potential changes to the allowable mix of uses in the Business Park zone in order to meet changing market conditions. Goal LUGS Develop a quality business park area that supports surrounding commercial areas. II-23 l FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Policies LUP35 Encourage quality, mixed-use development for office, manufacturing, and distribution centers. LUP36 Develop business parks �� that fit into their sunoundings by grouping similar industries in order to reduce or eliminate land use conflicts, allow sharing of public facilities and services, and improve traffic flow and safety � �� .. , � • - �� LUP37 Limit retail uses to those that serve the needs of people employed in the area. Commercial City Center Core The intent of establishing the City Center Core is to create a higher density, mixed-use designation where office, retail, government uses, and residential uses are concentrated Other uses such as cultural/civic facilities, community services, and housing will be highly encouraged. City Center Frame The City Center Frame designation will have a look and feel similar to the Core and will provides a zone of less dense, mixed-use development physically surrounding a portion of the City Center Core. �-ti,o �,..,,,,o .,,.o., .,,;n w.,.,o �;,,,;i.,,. �,,,,U .,„,� f o� „�.wo �,.,.e �.,,. � e€��� Together, they are meant to complement each other to create a"downtown" area. A more detailed description, along with goals and policies regarding the City Center Core and Frame, can be found in the City Center chapter. Community Business The Community Business designation encompasses two major retail areas of the City: It covers the "strip" retail areas along SR-99 and the large "bulk" retail area found near the South 348th Street area, approximately between SR-99 and I-5. Community Business allows a large range of uses and is the City's largest retail designation in terms of area. The Community Business designation generally runs along both sides of SR-99 from South 272nd to South 348th. A wide range of development Types, appearance, ages, function, and scale can be found along SR-99. Older, single-story developments provide excellent opportunities for redevelopment. Revised-2898 2002 � � � � � � � � �� � � II-24 � � � �` � C� � �: FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Due in par� to convenient access and available land, the South 348th Street area has become a preferred location for large bulk retailers such as Eagle Hardware, Home Depot, and Costco. Due to the size of these facilities, the challenge will be to develop these uses into well functioning, aesthetically pleasing retail environments. To create retail areas that are aesthetically and functionally attractive, revised development standards, applied through Community Business zoning and Community Desi�n Guidelines, address design quality, mixed-use, and the integration of auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Site design, modulation, and setback requirements are also addressed. Through regulations in the Community Business land use chart, �the size and scale of hotels, motels, and ��e� office uses s�e� have been limited in scale so as not to compete with the City Center. Goal LUG6 Transform Community Business areas into vital, attractive, mixed-use areas that appeal to pedestrians and motorists and enhance the community's image. Policies � �� LUP38 Encourage transformation of Pacific Highway (SR-99) Community Business corridor into a quality mixed-use retail area. Retail development along the corridor, exclusive of the City Center, should be designed to integrate auto, pedestrian, and transit circulation. Integration of public amenities and open space into retail and office development should also be encouraged. �49 LUP39 Encourage auto-oriented large bulk retailers to locate in the South 348th Street Community Business area. Neighborhood Business � � � There are � a dozen various sized nodes of Neighborhood Business located throughout the City. These nodes are areas that have historically provided retail and/or services to adjacent residential areas. � The FWCP recognizes the importance of firmly fixed boundaries to prevent commercial intrusion into adjacent neighborhoods. rl t .a 41. + '.�1 ♦ lii �-F 1 G .+ o� nf �+F++ei:r �.nw�morniol_uc.u__ A+ 41. *+' l. .-1 �1�' 1+' 1' a f+- �.40� ++ ++.+ln+i�r� nr�ii�hl+ n4i� �.+�e ---e�.� .. o�., �. °---- ------� --`-- --- ----. ------- ----- ----`-- r - r - - -- - �, .. AT 1,1 1, .7 T2 'i'4. �`'k �1. ..f«. o „n.i� Ad.,,-Ln1� z �ox nvo:x:vva va........,., ..... �.... �. .., ..� ..�_ --- -- - s ., "J - r '��= ° _�� ..- r�-r-,r�a n A.,n� Revised �898 2002 II-25 � � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use Neighborhood Business areas are intended to provide convenient goods (e.g., groceries and hardware) and services (e.g., dry cleaners, dentist, bank) at a pedestrian and neighborhood scale close to adjacent residential uses. Developments combining residential and commercial uses provide a convenient living environment within these nodes. In the future, attention should be given to design features that enhance the appearance or function of these areas. Improvements may include sidewalks, open space and street trees, and parking either on street or oriented away from the street edge. The function of neighborhood business areas can also be enhanced by safe pedestrian, bicycle, and transit connections to surrounding neighborhoods. The need to address expansion or intensification may occur in the future depending on population growth. Future neighborhood business locations should be carefully chosen and sized to meet the needs of adjacent residential areas. • Goal LUG7 Provide neighborhood and community scale retail centers for the City's neighborhoods. Policies �4� LUP40 Integrate retail developments into surrounding neighborhoods through attention to quality design and function. �43 LUP41 Encourage pedestrian and bicycle access to neighborhood shopping and services. �4� LUP42 Encourage neighborhood retail and personal services to locate at appropriate locations where local economic demand and design solutions demonstrate compatibility with the neighborhood. �44 LUP43 Retail and personal services should be encouraged to group together within planned centers to allow for ease of pedestrian movement. �� LUP44 Neighborhood Business centers should consist of neighborhood scale retail and personal services. �46 LUP45 Encourage mixed residential and commercial development in Neighborhood Business designations where compatibility with nearby uses can be demonstrated. Revised �2898 2002 II-26 � � � ;� � L, � ,ti � �. � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use �' �� LUP46 Neighborhood Business areas should be served by transit. �4� LUP47 The City shall limit new commercial development to existing commercial areas to protect residential areas. Commercial Recreation � The Commercial Recreation designation acknowledges the unique recreational opportunity associated with the Enchanted Park property. Enchanted Park is an indoor/ outdoor amusement facility most noted for its water park. A preannexation concomitant � development agreement has established the comprehensive plan designation and zoning (Office Park-4) particular to Enchanted Park. Office Federal Way is well known for its quality office parks. Developments within the East and West Campus areas embody good design and are representative of desired future office park development. Office park development in West Campus is complemented by the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Headquarters in East Campus. Together, office and � corporate park development will provide new job opportunities within the community. ' Professional Office '�, The Professional Office designation is intended to allow for well-designed small-scale � office development compatible to adjacent residential neighborhoods. Office Park �' The Office Park designation emphasizes high quality office development that allows for a mix of office and compatible manufacturing type activities. T'his classification also permits a limited amount of retail support services, along with the current mix of office ` and light manufacturing uses. Corporate Park T'he Corporate Park designation applies to the Weyerhaeuser Corporate Campus, generally located east of Interstate Highway 5. The property is a unique site, both in terms of its development capacity and natural features. � ''�� ��^^� . Office Park desi nations with OP-1 2 and 3 zonin and some >> � �� Revised 2808 2002 t1-27 u �� FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use residential designations north of Hi�hwav 18 surround the Corporate Park desiQnation. The� 9f�sg Corporate Park zones a� a�is��a�d�e is currently being developed as corporate headquarters, offices, and ancillary uses. These types of developments are characterized by large contiguous sites containing landscaping, open space, and buildings of superior quality. '','� n�r D t� ��-*�,° a�°'^^^�°_,� o = ���_ . Development standards and conditions for the� �e Corporate Park designation�-a� is unique to Weyerhaeuser's property and are outlined in a preannexation concomitant development agreement ���-i�e-l�}� between the City and Weyerhaeuser Corporation. Goal LUGS Create o�ce and corporate park development that is known regionally for its design and, function. Policy �49 LUP48 Continue to encourage quality office development in � the East Campus ��i� Corporate Park designations. 2.8.5 SHORELINE MASTER PROGRAM Purpose The Shoreline Management Act (SMA) identifies seven land and water use elements that, if appropriate to the community, are to be dealt with in the development of area- wide shoreline goals. They include: shoreline use, economic development, public access, conservation, recreation, historical/cultural, and circulation. Master programs are also encouraged to include any other elements which, because of present uses or future needs, are deemed appropriate to effectuate the policy of the SMA. Residential land use of shorelines of the state within Federal Way makes up the largest share of the developed shorelines in the City. Much of the undeveloped shoreline is in private ownership, subdivided into small lots and presently zoned to allow for residential use. Because of present and future needs of residential shoreline use, goals and policies have been formulated a$ part of a residential element to guide and plan for that development. The following comprehensive set of shoreline goals provide the foundation and framework on which the balance of the master program has been based. These goals and Revised-�A89 2002 ! ,� � . � { � � i1-28 � � � � policies are reflective of the level of achievement believed to be intrinsically desirable for all shoreline uses, needs, and developments, and establish a program policy commensurate with the intent and objectives of the S�• The policies contained herein should be enforced through the applicable chapters of the z��,a�,,,.� ur , �;.,, �,,,a„ FWCC �� � Goal LUG9 Preserve or develop shorelines, adjacent uplands, and adjacent water areas in � a manner that assures a balance of shoreline uses with minimal adverse effect on the quality of life, water, and environment. Policies �A LUP49 Shoreline land and water areas particularly suited for specific and appropriate uses should be designated and reserved for such uses. FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use Shoreline Use Element An element which deals with the distribution, location, and extent of: 1) the use of shorelines and adjacent areas for housing, transportation, office, public buildings and utilities, education, and natural resources; 2) the use of the water for aquaculture and recreation; and 3) the use of the water, shoreline, and uplands for other categories of land and water uses and activities not specified in this master program. �� LUP50 Shoreline land and water uses should satisfy the economic, social, and physical needs of the regional population, but should not exceed the physical carrying capacity of the shoreline areas. � �� LUP51 Where appropriate, land and water uses should be located to restore or enhance the land and water environments. � �l LJ i i1 I�e �4 LUP53 Revised � 2� Like or compatible shoreline uses should be clustered or distributed in a rational manner, rather than allowed to develop haphazardly. Multiple uses of shoreline should be encouraged where location and integration of compatible uses or activities are feasible. n-2s �'. � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use �� LUP54 �� LUP55 �� LUP56 Unique and fragile areas of the shoreline should be protected from uses or activities that will have an adverse effect on the land or water environment. Non-residential uses or activities �-that are not shoreline dependent should be encouraged to locate or relocate away from the shoreline. Federal Way shall consider the goals, objectives, and policies within the shoreline master program in all land use management actions regarding the use or development of adjacent uplands or the water areas, adjacent uplands and associated wetlands or streams within its jurisdiction where such use or development will have an adverse effect on designated shorelines. Pubiic Access Element An element making provision for public access to publicly-owned shorelines and assessing the need for providing public access to shoreline areas. Goal LUG10 Increase public access to shoreline areas provided that private rights, public safety, and the natural shoreline character are not adversely affected. Policies �� LUP57 Development of public access should respect and protect the enjoyment of private rights on shoreline property. a. Shoreline access areas should be planned to include ancillary facilities such as parking and sanitation when appropriate. b. Shoreline access and ancillary facilities should be designed and developed to provide adequate protection for adjacent private properties. �53 LUP58 Public access should be maintained and regulated. a. Public access should be policed and improved consistent with intensity of use. � � � i� t � Revised�2809� 11-30 � � � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use �, b. The provision to restrict access as to nature, time, number of people, and area may be appropriate for public pedestrian easements and other public access areas where there are spawning � grounds, fragile aquatic life habitats, or potential hazard for pedestrian safety. � c. Facilities in public shoreline access areas should be properly maintained and operated. �8 LUP59 Design of access should provide for the public health, safety, and enjoyment. a. Appropriate signs should be used to designate publicly owned shorelines. b. Within the shoreline environment, pedestrian and non-motorized access should be encouraged. � � � � � � c. Public access to and along the water's edge should be available in publicly owned shorelines that are tolerant of human activity. �� LUP60 Priority for access acquisition should consider resource desirability, availability, and proximity of population. a. A shoreline element in the parks acquisition and development program should be encouraged so that future shoreline access is acquired and developed by established criteria and standards as part of an overall master plan. �� LUP61 Public access should be provided in new shoreline developments. a. There should be incentives to encourage private property owners to provide shoreline access. b. Public pedestrian easements should be provided in future land use authorizations, and in the case of Federal Way projects along lakes, streams, ponds, and marine lands, whenever shoreline features are appropriate for public use. Shorelines of the City that include, but are not limited to, any of the following conditions should be considered for pedestrian easements: l. Areas of significant, historical, geological, and/or biological circumstances. � Revised �898 ?002 11�1 � � FWCP — Chaqter Two, Land Use 2. Areas presently being legally used, or historically having been legally used, by the public along the shoreline for access. 3. Where public funds have been expended on or related to the water body. �� LUP62 Shorelines of the City should be available to all people for passive use and enjoyment. a. Viewpoints, lookouts, and vistas of shorelines of the City should be publicly accessible. b. New developments should minimize visual and physical obstruction of the water from shoreline roads and upland owners. ��64 LUP63 General policies. a. Where appropriate, utility and transportation rights-of-way on the shoreline should be made available for public access and use. b. Publicly-owned street ends � that abut the shoreline should be retained and/or reclaimed for public access. c. Shoreline recreational facilities and other public access points should be connected by trails, bicycle pathways, and other access links where appropriate. d. Public pedestrian easements and access points should be of a nature and scale that would be compatible with the abutting and adjacent land use as well as natural features, including aquatic life. e. Access development should respect and protect ecological and aesthetic values in the shorelines of the City. Conservation Element An element which deals with the preservation of natural shoreline resources, considering, but not limited to, such characteristics as scenic vistas, park-ways, vital estuarine areas for fish and wildlife protection, beaches, and other valuable natural or aesthetic features. Revised 2999 2002 � I � � � � � � � I � � ti32 � � � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Goal LUG11 Assure preservation of unique and non-renewable natural resources and � assure conservation of renewable natural resources for the benefit of existing and future generations and the public interest. � Policies �� LUP64 Shorelines ��t that are of unique or valuable natural character should be acquired for public benefit, commensurate with preservation of the ecosystem. � a. Unique and fragile areas in shoreline areas should be designated and retained as open space. Access and use should be restricted or prohibited when necessary for their preservation. b. When appropriate, Federal Way should acquire those shoreline areas which are unique or valuable. Subsequent use of such areas should be governed by their ecological carrying capacity. �� LUP65 All renewable natural resources should be managed so that use or consumption does not exceed replenishment. a. Through policies and actions, Federal Way should encourage the management and conservation of fish, shellfish, wildlife, and other renewable resources. �� LUP66 Resource conservation should be an integral part of shoreline planning. a. When feasible, Federal Way should initiate programs to reverse any substantial adverse impacts caused by existing shoreline development. b. All future shoreline development should be planned, designed, and sited to minimize adverse impact upon the natural shoreline environment. �� LUP67 Scenic, aesthetic, and ecological qualities of natural and developed shorelines should be recognized and preserved as valuable resources. a. When appropriate, natural flora and fauna should be preserved or restored. � �. Revised �9 2()02 1133 � � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use b. In shoreline areas, the natural topography should not be substantially altered. c. Shoreline structures should be sited and designed to minimize view obstruction and should be visually compatible with the shoreline character. � d. Wildlife and aquatic habitats, including spawning grounds, should � be protected, improved, and, if appropriate, increased. � LUP68 Resources should be managed to enhance the environment with minimal adverse effect. a. Aquaculture in shoreline areas should be conducted with all reasonable precautions to insure the preservation of the natural character and quality of the shoreline. b. Shoreline activity and development should be planned, constructed, and operated to minimize adverse effects on the natural processes of the shoreline, and should maintain or enhance the quality of air, soil, and water on the shoreline. c. Any structure or activity in or near the water should be constructed in such a way that it will minimize adverse physical or chemical effects on water quality, vegetation, fish, shellfish, or wildlife. d. Use or activity which substantially degrades the natural resources of the shoreline should not be allowed. �8 LUP69 Salmon and steelhead habitats support valuable recreational and commercial fisheries. These habitats should be protected because of their importance to the aquatic ecosystem and the state and local economy. a. Salmon and steelhead habitats are: 1. Gravel bottomed streams used for spawning; � 2. Streams, lakes, and wetlands used for rearing, feeding, and cover and refuge from predators and high waters; 3. Streams and salt water bodies used as migration conidors; and � 4. Shallow areas of salt water bodies used for rearing, feeding, and cover and refuge from predators and currents. � Revised �889 2002 II-34 `�M t� � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use � b. Non-water-dependent or non-water-related uses, activities, structures, and landfills should not be located in salmon and steelhead habitats. � c. Where alternative locations exist, water-dependent and ��vater- related uses, activities, structures, and landfills should not be located in salmon and steelhead habitats. d. Where uses, activities, structures, and landfills must locate in salmon and steelhead habitats, impacts on these areas should be lessened to the maximum extent possible. Significant unavoidable impacts should be mitigated by creating in-kind replacement habitat near the project where feasible. Where in-kind replacement mitigation is not feasible, rehabilitating degraded habitat may be required. Mitigation proposals should be developed in consultation with the affected local government, the Department of Fisheries, the Department of Wildlife, and affected Indian Nations. e. Developments which are outside salmon and steelhead habitats but which have the potential to significantly affect these habitats should be located and designed so they do not create significant negative impacts on salmon and steelhead habitats. £ Bioengineering is the preferred bank protection technique for rivers and streams used by salmon and steelhead. g. Open pile bridges are preferred for crossing water areas used by salmon and steelhead. h. Impervious surfaces shall be minimized in upland developments to reduce stormwater runoff peaks. Structures and uses creating significant impervious surfaces shall include stormwater detention systems to reduce stormwater runoff peaks. i. The discharge of silt into waterways shall be minimized during in- water and upland construction. j. Adopt-A-Stream programs and similar efforts to rehabilitate salmon and steelhead spawning streams are encouraged. k. Fishery enhancement projects are encouraged where they will not significantly interfere with other beneficial uses. l. Project proponents should contact the Habitat Management Division of the Department of Fisheries, the Habitat Division of the � � •. Revised �899 2002 ��-� �1 � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Department of Wildlife or affected Indian Nations early in the development process to determine if the proposal will occur in or adjacent to a salmon and steelhead habitat. m. When reviewing permits for uses, activities, and structures proposed for salt water areas, streams, wetlands, ponds connected to streams, and shorelines adjacent to these areas; staff should contact the Habitat Management Division of the Department of Fisheries or the Habitat Division of the Department of Wildlife to determine if the proposal will occur in or affect an adjacent salmon or steelhead habitat. Staff should also contact affected Indian Nations. Recreation Element An element for the preservation and expansion of all types of recreational opportunities through programs of acquisition, development, and various means of less-than-fee acquisition. Goal LUG12 Provide additional shoreline dependent and water oriented recreation opportunities that are diverse, convenient, and adequate for the regional population consistent with the carrying capacity of the dand and water resources. Policies �� LUP70 Areas containing special shoreline recreation qualities not easily duplicated should be available for public use and enjoyment. a. Opportunities should be provided for the public to understand natural shoreline processes and experience natural resource features. b. Public viewing and interpretation should be encouraged at or near governmental shoreline activities when consistent with security and public safety. � LUP71 Shoreline recreational use and development should enhance environmental quality with minimal adverse effect on the natural resources. a. Stretches of relatively inaccessible and unspoiled shoreline should be available and designated as low intensity recreational use areas � `� � � � Revised �A98 2002 II-36 � !� � � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use with minimal developnient. Service facilities such as footpaths, � periphery parking, and adequate sanitary facilities should only be allowed where appropriate. � b. Beaches and other predominantly undeveloped shorelines already popular should be available and designated as medium intensity recreational use areas to be free from expansive development; � intensity of use should respect and protect the natural qualities of the area. c. Small or linear portions of the shoreline suitable for recreational purposes should be available and designated as transitional use areas that allow for variable intensities of use, which may include vista points, pedestrian walkways, water entry points, and access from the water; utilizing stream floodplains, street ends, steep slopes, and shoreline areas adjacent to waterfront roads. � � d. At suitable locations, shorelines should be made available and designated as high intensive use areas that provide for a wide variety of activities. e. Overall design and development in shoreline recreational areas should be responsive to the site characteristics of those areas and be consistent with the level of use in the area concerned. f. Recreation areas on the shoreline should have adequate surveillance and maintenance. g. The public should be provided with additional off-site and on-site guidance and control to protect shoreline resources. h. Where a wide berm is needed for dry beach recreation, and physical conditions permit sand retention, consideration should be given to creating a Class I beach' when such development does not destroy valuable biota or unique physical conditions. i. Access to recreational shoreline areas afforded by water and land circulation systems should be determined by the concept of optimum carrying capacity and recreational quality. j. Non-water oriented recreational facility development should be � kept inland away from the water's edge, except where appropriate in high intensive shoreline use areas. �. Revised �2898 2002 'Pursuant to Federal Way City Code, Chapter 18, Article III, Section 18-163, a"Class 1 beach means a beach or shore having dependable, geologically fully developed, and normally dry backshore above high tide." II-37 � � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use �� LUP72 The provision of adequate public shoreline recreation lands should be based on an acquisition plan with a clear public intent. � �4 ,� LUP73 A balanced variety of recreational opportunities should be provided for people of different ages, health, family status, and financial ability. �, a. Appropriate specialized recreation facilities should be provided for the developmentally disabled, or others who might need them. b. Shoreline recreation areas should provide opportunities for different use intensities ranging from low (solitude) to high (many people). c. Opportunities for shoreline recreational experiences should include developing access that accommodates a range of differences in people's physical mobility, capabilities, and skill levels. d. Shoreline recreational experiences should include a wide range of different areas from remote/outdoor undeveloped areas to highly developed indoor/outdoor areas. e. Recreational development should meet the demands of population growth � consistent with the carrying capacity of the land and water resources. Circulation Element An element dealing with the location and extent of existing and proposed major thoroughfares, transportation routes, and other public facilities; and coordinating those facilities with the shoreline use elements. Goal LUG13 Circulation systems in shoreline areas should be limited to those �aic-k that are shorelane dependent or would serve shoreline dependent uses. The physical and social environment shall be protected from the adverse effect of those systems on the quality of water, life, or environment. Policies �� LUP74 New surface transportation development should be designed to provide the best possible service with the least possible infringement upon the shoreline environment. Revised �A99 2002 II-38 � :� � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use � a. New transportation facilities and improvements to existing facilities that substantially increase levels of air, noise, odor, visual, or water pollution should be discouraged. �' b. Transportation conidors should be designed to harmonize with the topography and other natural characteristics of the shoreline through which they traverse. b. Surface transportation facilities in shoreline areas should be set back � from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary such protective measures as rip-rap or other bank stabilization, landfill, bulkheads, groins, jetties, or substantial site regrade. � —�_s:_. LUP75 Circulation systems should be located and attractively designed so as not to unnecessarily or unreasonably pollute the physical environment or reduce the � benefits people derive from their property; and they should encourage alternative routes and modes of travel. � � � � � a. Motorized vehicular traffic on beaches and other natural shoreline areas should be prohibited. b. Transportation facilities providing access to shoreline developments should be planned and designed in scale and character with the use proposed. c. Circulation routes should provide for non-motorized means of travel. �� LUP76 Circulation systems disruptive to public shoreline access and other shoreline uses should be relocated where feasible. a. Transportation elements disruptive to the shoreline character �sk that cannot feasibly be relocated should be conditioned or landscaped to minimize visual and noise pollution. �'7� LUP77 Shoreline circulation systems should be adaptable to changes in technology. a. Federal Way should promote and encourage modes of transportation that consume the least amount of energy while � providing the best efficiency with the least possible pollution. � � Revised -�890 2002 � � LUP78 General policies. n-�s � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use a. New transportation developments in shoreline areas should provide turnout areas for scenic stops and off road resi areas where the topography, view, and natural features warrant. b. Shoreline roadway corridors with unique or historic significance, or of great aesthetic quality, should be retained and maintained for those characteristics. c. New transportation facilities crossing lakes, streams, or wetlands should be encouraged to locate in existing corridors, except where any adverse impact can be minimized by selecting an alternate corridor. Residential Element An element dealing with housing densities, residential subdivisions, shoreline access, necessary support services, and locations of single-family dwellings (including manufactured homes) and multiple-family dwellings without distinction between part- time or full-time occupancy. Goal LUG14 Shoreline residential areas shall permit a variety of housing types and designs with densities and docations consistent with the ability ofphysical and natural features to accommodate them. Policies � � � � � � �8 LUP79 Residential developments should be excluded from shoreline areas known to � contain development hazards or which would adversely impact sensitive areas as identified in Chapter 18, Division 6 of the FWCC. � a. Residential development should be prohibited within the 100-year floodplain. b. Residential development should be prohibited in areas of severe or very severe landslide hazard. c. Residential development should be regulated in shoreline areas with slopes of 40 percent or greater. d. Shoreline areas containing other potential hazards (e. g., geological conditions, unstable subsurface conditions, erosion hazards, or groundwater or seepage problems) should be limited or restricted for development. Revised �809 2002 u-ao � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use �� LUP80 � � � �-� LUP81 e. The burden of proof that development of these areas is feasible, safe, and ecologically sound is the responsibility of the developer. Residential developments should have minimal impact on the land and water environment of the shoreline and minimize visual and physical obstruction. a. Residential development should be regulated in identified unique and fragile axeas as required under the City's sensitive areas regulations. b. Residential development on piers or over water should not be permitted. c. Landfill for residential development which reduces water surface or floodplain capacity should not be permitted. d. In residential developments the water's edge should be kept free of buildings and fences. e. Every reasonable effort should be made to insure the retention of natural shoreline vegetation and other natural features of the landscape during site development and construction. Residential use of shorelines should not displace or encroach upon shoreline dependent uses. �� LUP82 Residential densities should be determined with regard for the physical capabilities of the shoreline areas, public services requirements, and effects such densities have on the environment. � a. Subdivisions and new development should be designed to adequately protect the water and shoreline aesthetic characteristics. b. New residential development should only be allowed in those � shoreline areas where the provision for sewage disposal and drainage ways are of such a standard that adjoining water bodies would not be adversely affected by pollution or siltation. � � � Revised 2899 2002 � c. Residential development along shorelines should be set back from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary such protective measures as filling, bulk heading, construction groins or jetties, or substantial regrading of the site. n-�� � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use d. Residential developments should be designed to enhance the appearance of the shoreline and not substantially interfere with the public's view and access to the water. Shoreline Environments Purpose In order to more effectively implement the goals, objectives, and policies of this master program and the SMA, the shorelines of the state within Federal Way have been categorized into four separate environment designations. The purpose of these designations is to differentiate between areas whose geographical features and existing development pattern imply differing objectives regarding their use and future development. Each environment represents a particular emphasis in the type of uses and the extent of development that should occur within it. The system is designed to encourage uses in each environment which enhance the character of the environment while at the same time requiring reasonable standards and restrictions on development so that the character of the environment is not destroyed. The determination as to which designation should be given to any specific shoreline area has been based on, and is reflective of, the existing development pattern; the biophysical capabilities and limitations of the land; and the goals and aspirations of the local citizenry Each environment category includes: (1) a definition describing the development, use, and/or features which characterize the area; (2) a purpose which clarifies the meaning and intent of the designation; and, (3) general policies designed to regulate use and development consistent with the character of the environment. Urban Environment The urban environment is an area of high-intensity land use including residential, office, and recreational development. The environment is particularly suitable to those areas presently subjected to intensive land use pressure, as well as areas planned to accommodate urban expansion. The purpose of designating the urban environment is to ensure optimum utilization of shorelines within urbanized areas by permitting intensive use and by managing development so that it enhances and maintains the shoreline for a multiplicity of urban uses. The environment is designed to reflect a policy of increasing utilization and efficiency of urban areas, promote a more intensive level of use through redevelopment of areas now underutilized, and encourage multiple use of the shoreline if the major use is shoreline dependent. Revised �2899 2002 � � � � � CJ � II-42 � � � � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Policies ��4 LUP83 Emphasis should be given to development within already developed areas. �� LUP84 Emphasis should be given to developing visual and physical access to the shoreline in the urban environment. ,� �6 LUP85 To enhance the waterfront and insure maximum public use, commercial facilities should be designed to permit pedestrian waterfront activities consistent with public safety and security. �8P-� � LUP86 Multiple use of the shoreline should be encouraged. � � � � � � ��� LUP87 Redevelopment and renewal of substandard areas should be encouraged in order to accommodate future users and make ma�cimum use of the shoreline resource. �� LUP88 Aesthetic considerations should be actively promoted by means of sign control regulations, architectural design standards, landscaping requirements, and other such means. �A LUP89 Development should not significantly degrade the quality of the environment, including water quality and air quality, nor create conditions �} that would accentuate erosion, drainage problems, or other adverse impacts on adjacent environments. Rural Environment The rural environment is intended for shoreline areas characterized by agricultural uses, low density residential (where most urban services are not available), and areas which provide buffer zones and open space between predominantly urban areas. Undeveloped shorelines not planned for urban expansion or which do not have a high priority for designation in an alternative environment, and recreational uses compatible with agricultural activities are appropriate for the rural environment. The purpose of designating the rural environment is to preserve agricultural land, restrict � intensive development along undeveloped shorelines, function as a buffer between urban areas, and maintain open spaces and opportunities for recreational uses within the � Revised �2980 2002 i1-43 � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use ecological carrying capacity of the land and water resource. New developments in a rural environment should reflect the character of the surrounding area by limiting density, providing permanent open space, and maintaining adequate building setbacks from the water to prevent shoreline resources from being destroyed for other rural types of uses. Policies �9-� LUP90 Recreational access to the shorelines should be encouraged. Recreational facilities should be located and designed to minimize conflicts with other activities. �a LUP91 New development should reflect the character of the surrounding area by limiting residential density, providing permanent open space, and maintaining adequate building setbacks from the water. Conservancy Environment The conservancy environment consists of a shoreline areas which are primarily free from intensive development. It is the most suitable designation for shoreline areas of high scenic or historical values, for areas unsuitable for development due to biophysical limitations, and for commercial forest lands. Conservancy areas are intended to maintain their existing character. This designation is designed to protect, conserve, and manage existing natural resources and valuable historic and cultural areas. The preferred uses are those which are nonconsumptive of the physical and biological resources of the area. Policies � LUP92 New development should be restricted to those that are compatible with the natural and biophysical limitations of the land and water. �� � I � � � � �14 LUP93 Diverse recreational activities �-isl� that are compatible with the conservancy environment should be encouraged. �A-� LUP94 Development � that would be a hazard to public health and safety, or would materially interfere with the natural processes, should not be allowed. �96 LUP95 The flood hazard overzone regulations shall apply to development within flood plains. Revised �899 2002 II-44 � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use � � �� LUP96 Structural flood control devices should be strongly discouraged in the conservancy environment. �� LUP97 In areas with poorly draining soils, development should not be allowed unless connected to a sewer line. • � LUP98 Development should be regulated so as to minimize the following: erosion or sedimentation, the adverse impact on aquatic habitats, and substantial degradation of the existing character of the conservancy environment. Natural Environment The natural environment consists of areas characterized by the presence of some unique natural features considered valuable in their undisturbed or original condition and which are relatively intolerant of intensive human use. Such areas should be essentially free from development or be capable of being easily restored to natural condition, and they should be large enough to protect the value of the resource. � � � � The purpose of designating the natural environment is to preserve and restore those natural resource systems existing relatively free of human influence. These systems require severe restrictions of intensities and types of uses permitted so as to maintain the integrity of the natural environment. Policies �I'�A8 LUP99 Natural areas should remain free from all development �sk that would adversely affect their natural character. ��P� LUP100 The intensity and type of uses permitted should be restricted in order to maintain the natural systems and resources in their natural condition. �� LUP101 Limited access should be allowed to those areas in the natural environment. � � �A� LUP102 Uses which are consumptive of the physical and biological resources, or which may degrade the actual or potential value of the natural environment, should be prohibited. Revised �98A 2002 ��-� � �' FWCP — Chaqter Two, Land Use �� . LUP103 Uses and activities in locations adjacent to natural areas should be strictly regulated to insure that the integrity of the natural environment is not compromised. Shoreline Use Activities � Purpose Shoreline use activities are specific uses, or groups of similar uses, that have been outlined by the Department of Ecology Final Guidelines as being characteristic of the shorelines of the state. They have been formulated as implementing tools to further carry out the intent and policy of this master program and the SMA. They also represent a major criterion to be used in evaluating proposed development and alterations to the shoreline environment; with their ultimate influence, to a large extent, dependent upon how well they are enforced. The policies that make up each use activity have been founded on the premise that all reasonable and appropriate uses require regulatory control. Other provisions such as a view enhancement, public access, erosion control, water quality, long term benefits, and aesthetic considerations have also been reflected in policy statements. Shoreline uses and activities not specifically identified, and for which policies have not heen developed, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and will be required to meet the intent of the goals and objectives of this master program, the policy of the �� SMA, and shall be consistent with the management policy and character of the shoreline environment in which they propose to locate. Aquatic Resource Practices Of all facets of economic shoreline activity, production from fisheries is the most vulnerable to massive destruction from an error in environmental control. Close monitoring of water qualiTy and an aggressive policy of pollution abatement and control are mandatory for full realization and sustenance of this economic base. Aquaculture addresses state hatcheries, commercial hatcheries and beds, and natural hatcheries and beds within Federal Way shorelines. Underwater aquaria are considered as aquaculture although the use is principally recreational. Aquaculture has two modes: 1. The harvest of uncontained plant and animal populations that exist on the nutrients and foods available in the environment restock themselves according to the fecundity of the population, and survive as the food and nature allow. Revised �808 2002 � � � � � � � � � � ii-as � � � � lJ � � � � � FWCP—ChapterTwo, Land Use 2. Artificial stocking or raising of stock in feedlots or pens using selective breeding and controlled feeding programs for increasing production and rearing a uniform product. Pen culture requires confinement and the presence of fixed structures that compete for space. Pens, rafts, and hatcheries require certain environmental conditions to assure the survival of their contained populations. Some of these conditions are small wave forces, good flow, good water quality, temperature limits, good anchoring ground and accessibility, and, possibly, good natural food and nutrient supply. The confinement of fish or shellfish in concentration imposes an extreme biological load in a small area. Dense populations degrade water quality and deposit heavy fecal sediments below the pens or on the floor of embayments. The principal impacts of aquacultural activity within the shoreline are: 1. Pollutants in the water body such as fish, organic wastes, and additives for feeding and disease control. 3. Watercourse alteration to supply water. 2. Navigation hazards such as holding pens, rafts, nets, and stakes. 4. Netting and flooring of riverbeds for spawning channels. 5. Shoreline access limitations where shellfish are being protected and contained. Policies � � � � � � Revised �2A99 2002 � �1�5 LUP104 Federal Way's support should be given to the State Departments of Fisheries and Game to improve stream conditions, open new spawning areas, and establish new fish runs. �96 LUP105 Pens and structures for commercial aquaculture should not be located on Class I beaches, or swimming beaches. �A� LUP106 Aquacultural enterprises should be located in areas �ul� that would not significantly restrict navigation. �A� LUP107 In aquaculture enterprises, development of multiple aquaculture systems should be encouraged. u-a� � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use � LUP108 Aquacultural structures should use open pile construction where significant littoral drift occurs. �A LUP109 �� LUP110 Prior to use of an area for aquacultural enterprises, consideration should be given to the capability of the water body to absorb potential wastes. Shoreline areas having extremely high natural potential for aquaculture should be preserved for that purpose. j � Commercial Development Commercial development pertains generally to the use or construction of facilities for transaction and sale of goods and services as opposed to industrial development (treatment together with ports) which pertains to the design and fabrication of products. T'he principal impact factors upon the shoreline from commercial development are pollutants (e.g., erosion, sedimentary, chemical, and microbial) and aesthetic destruction. Erosive pollutants from commercial development are generated from surface runoff and both surface and sub-surface subsidence. Chemical pollution is derived from fuel spillage. Microbial loading arises from poor containment of organic wastes associated with human habitation and recreational activities. PoGcies �3 LUPlll Consideration should be made of the effect a structure will have on scenic value. �� LUP112 Commercial structures and ancillary facilities that are not shoreline dependent or water-oriented should be placed inland away from the immediate water's edge. ��4 LUP113 The use of porous materials should be encouraged for paved areas to allow water to penetrate and percolate into the soil. Use of holding systems should be encouraged to control the runoff rate from parking lots and roof tops. �� LUP114 Commercial enterprises locating within shoreline areas should be constructed to withstand normal rain and flooding conditions without contributing pollution to the watercourse or shoreline. Revised -2899 2002 � Li � � � � � � � � � n-as � � � � i FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use �� LUP115 Commercial development � that is not shoreline dependent should provide a buffer zone of vegetation for erosion control. Utilities � Few, if any, utility systems could be installed completely without coming under the jurisdiction of this master program. The focus of the policies in this section is on how these utility facilities within the shoreline environment can be planned, designed, � constructed, maintained, and rehabilitated to be consistent with the intent of the SMA � Types of utility facilities in Federal Way vary from regional transmission by trunklines, pipelines, and transmission lines to subregional distribution facilities. These aze essentially pipes and wires. Regional facilities generally are high voltage or high pressure � systems with substantial potential impact in case of failure. Their impacts on the environment are also generally greater because of their scale and safety requirements. � � � � � � The types of utilities covered are communications (radio, TV, and telephone), energy distribution (petroleum products, natural gas, and electriciTy), water, sanitary sewers, and storm sewers. Policies � � � Revised 2998�2 � TT�r LUP116 Utilities �#is� that lead to growth should not be extended into or along shorelines without prior approval of such extension by appropriate land use authority. �� LUP117 Utilities located in shoreline environments inappropriate for development should not make service available to those areas. �� LUP118 In developed shorelines not served by. utilities, utility construction should be encouraged to locate where it can be shown that water quality will be maintained or improved. ��38 LUP119 Federal Way should be consulted prior to, or at the time of, application for construction of regional utility facilities to be located in or along shorelines. �� LUP120 Utility corridors crossing shorelines of the state should be encouraged to consolidate and concentrate or share rights-of-way where: � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use a. L Public access (including view) would be improved. Concentration or sharing would not hinder the ability of the utility systems to be installed, operated, or maintained safely. L� � c. Water quality would be as good or better than if separate corridors were present. �-2.� LUP121 Public access consistent with public safety and security should be encouraged where rights-of-way for regional utility facilities cross shorelines of the City. �� LUP122 New utility facilities should be located so as neither to require extensive shoreline protection nor to restrict water flow, circulation, or navigation. �4 LUP123 Utility facilities and rights-of-way should be selected to preserve the natural landscape and minimize conflicts with present and planned uses of the land on which they are located. i i13riL LUP124 New utility routes should be designed to minimize detrimental visual impact from the water and adjacent uplands. �g LUP125 New freestanding personal wireless service facilities are discouraged from locating within the shoreline environment. Shoreline Protection Shoreline protection is action taken to reduce adverse impacts caused by cunent, flood, wake, or wave action. This action includes all structural and nonstructural means to reduce these impacts due to flooding, erosion, and accretion. Specific structural and nonstructural means included in this use activity are bulkheads, rip-rap, bank stabilization, and other means of shoreline protection. The means taken to reduce damage caused by erosion, accretion, and flooding must recognize the positive aspects of each, so that the benefits of these natural occurrences will be retained, even as the problems are dealt with. Erosion does not exist without accretion of material eroded, be it a bench or a sandbar. Likewise, accretion cannot occur unless material has been eroded. Revised �989 2002 � � � l � �I � u-5o � �J �� � � � �� � l� � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Policies �� LUP126 Structural solutions to reduce shoreline damage should be allowed only after it is demonstrated that nonstructural solutions would not be able to reduce the damage. �� LUP127 Planning of shoreline protection should encompass sizable stretches of lake or marine shorelines. This planning should consider off-site erosion, accretion, or flood damage that might occur as a result of shoreline protection structures or activities. �1�3 LUP128 �8 LUP129 � � �� L� � � �� LUP130 �� LUP131 �� LUP132 �4 LUP133 � �� LUP134 � � Revised �A99 2002 � Shoreline protection on marine and lake shorelines should not be used as the reason for creating new or newly usable land. - Shoreline protection structures should allow passage of ground and surface waters into the main water body. Shoreline protection should not reduce the volume and storage capacity of rivers and adjacent wetlands or flood plains. Whenever shoreline protection is needed, bioengineered alternatives such as natural berms and erosion control vegetation plans should be favored over hard surfaced structural alternatives such as concrete bulkheads and sheet piles. The burden of proof for the need for shoreline protection to protect existing or proposed developments rests on the applicant. Shoreline protection activities �sl� that may necessitate new or increased shoreline protection on the same or other affected properties where there has been no previous need for protection should be discouraged. New development should be encouraged to locate so as not to require shoreline protection. II-51 � FWCP - Chapter Two, land Use �� LUP135 Areas of significance in the spawning, nesting, rearing, or residency of aquatic and terrestrial biota should be given special consideration in reviewing of �3� shoreline protection actions. � � � LUP136 Shoreline protection actions should be discouraged in areas where they would block beach parent material. �� LUP137 Multiple uses of shoreline protection structures or nonstructural solutions should be encouraged. Transportation Facilities The circulation network use category addresses transportation facilities such as roads, railroads, bridges, trails, and related facilities. The impact of these facilities on shorelines can be substantial. Some existing facilities were constructed to serve transportation needs of the moment with a minimum expenditure and very little assessment of their primary or secondary impacts on shoreline aesthetics, public access to the water, and resultant effects on adjacent properties and water quality. Planning for new transportation facilities within the shoreline area today requires a greater awareness of the environmental impacts transportation facilities will have on shorelines, in addition to the necessity for integrating future shoreline land use plans with the transportation system that serves developments on the shoreline. Policies ��� LUP138 Pedestrian access should be built where access to public shorelines is desirable and has been cut off by linear transportation corridors. New linear facilities should enable pedestrian access to public shorelines where access is desirable. - - e� , i LUP139 New surface transportation facilities not related to, and necessary for the support of, shoreline activities should be set back from the ordinary high water mark far enough to make unnecessary protective measures such as rip rap or other bank stabilization, land-fill, bulkheads, groins, jetties, or substantial site regrade. _�� - LUP140 Shoreline transportation facilities should be encouraged to include in their design and development multi-modal provisions where public safety can be assured. Revised �899 2002 � �� � � � !__! � � � � � II-52 � � � � � � � � � � � � , � � � � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use �� LUP141 Shoreline transportation facilities should be planned to fit the topography and minimize cuts and fills; and should be designed, located, and maintained to minimize erosion and degradation of water quality and to give special consideration to shoreline aesthetics. �4� LUP142 Transportation and utility facilities should be encouraged to coordinate joint use of rights-of-way and to consolidate crossings of water bodies when do�'ng so can minimize adverse impact to the shoreline . ���44 LUP143 Transportation facilities should avoid shoreline areas known to contain development hazards (e.g. slide and slump areas, poor foundation soils, marshes, etc.). ' �4� � LUP144 Transportation facilities should minimize snoreline rights-of-way by orienting generally perpendicular to the shoreline where topographic conditions will allow. ��46 LUP145 Shoreline roadways should have a high priority for arterial beautification funds. �4� LUP146 Abandoned road or railroad rights-of-way � that contain unique shoreline amenities should be acquired for public benefit. i�1SI.C, �41 LUP148 Federal Way should extend its trail and bicycle trail system, particularly as it relates to shorelines, to western Federal Way. All transportation facilities in shoreline areas should be constructed and maintained to cause the least possible adverse impacts on the land and water environments, should respect the natural character of the shore-line, and should make every effort to preserve wildlife, aquatic life, and their habitats. Piers and Moorages � A pier is a structure built over or floating upon the water extending from the shore. Some are used as a landing place for marine transport or for recreational watercraft. Piers are designed and constructed as either water (floating) or pile supported, both of which have � positive and negative environmental aspects. Floating piers generally have less of a visual impact than those on piling and they provide excellent protection for swimmers �� Revised 2899 2002 II-53 � r FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use from boat traffic. Floating piers however, interrupt littoral drift and can starve down current beaches where pile piers do not. Pile piers can provide a diverse habitat for marine life. Both types can create impediments to boat traffic and near-shore trolling. Pier construction requires regulation to protect navigation rights, preserve shoreline aesthetics, and maintain the usable water surface and aquatic lands for life forms characteristic and important to those areas. Policies �A LUP149 Open pile pier construction should be prefened where there is significant littoral dri$, where scenic values will not be impaired, and where minimal alteration to the shoreline and minimal damage to aquatic resources can be assured. i jI 3Ci LUP150 Floating pier construction should be preferred in those areas where scenic values are high. �3 LUP151 Piers should be discouraged where conflicts with recreational boaters and � other recreational water activities would be created by pier construction. i i13L�c LUP152 The random proliferation of single purpose piers should be discouraged. Preference should be given to shared use of piers in all shoreline areas. �P�4 LUP153 Temporary moorages should be permitted for vessels used in the construction of shoreline facilities. The design and construction of such moorages shall be such that upon termination of the project the aquatic life can be returned to their original condition within one year at no cost to the environment or the public. �� LUP154 Shoreline structures that are abandoned or structurally unsafe should be abated. �� LUP155 Substantial additions or alterations, including but not limited to substantial developments, should be in conformance with the policies and regulations set forth in the master program. T7� LUP156 Piers, docks, buoys, and other moorages should only be authorized after consideration of: Revised -2�98 2002 II-54 l � � �� � � � � � � �J � � � � � � � � � � � � � � a. The effect such structures have on wild-life and aquatic life, water quality, scenic and aesthetic values, unique and fragile areas, submerged lands, and shoreline vegetation. b. The effect such structures have on navigation, water circulation, recreational and commercial boating, sediment movement and littoral drift, and shoreline access. �� LUP157 Moorage buoys should be preferred over floating and pile constructed piers on all tidal waters. �9 LUP158 Floating structures and open pile structures are preferred over landfills or solid structures in water areas used by salmon and steelhead. Recreation � I� �� � � � � � Revised �998 2002 � FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use Recreational experiences that depend on, or utilize, the shoreline include: harvesting activities of fish, shellfish, fowl, minerals, and driflwood; various forms of boating, swimming, and shoreline pathways; and watching or recording activities, such as photography, painting, or the viewing of water dependent activities. Principal focal points are at parks and access beaches, road ends, viewpoints, features of special interest, water-access points, and destination points for boaters. Facilities at these focal points may include fishing piers, swimming floats, paths, parking areas, boat ramps, moorings, and accessory recreational facilities. The management of recreational land is determined by balancing the recreational carrying capacity (or impact of the environment on people) and the ecological carrying capacity (the impact of people on the environment). Measures to accomplish this are by designation of areas for use-intensity, interpretation, and regulation. These different recreational use areas coincide with the four environments—natural, conservancy, rural, and urban. There are multiple benefits derived from the park program, for example: recreational lands contribute substantially to open space by conservation of land, preserving historic sites, offering aesthetic relief and variety, contributing to a healthful environment, and shaping and preserving the community form. In addition to the provisions of recreational opportunities, Federal Way coordinates with other governmental agencies, commercial, and volunteer groups to provide these opportunities for the public. The policies are directed toward providing shoreline dependent and water oriented recreational opportunities. They are also directed at protecting health and safety by separating incompatible activities and channeling them into their most appropriate environments. I� � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Policies �8 LUP159 The development of recreational acquisition plans should give emphasis to the acquisition of prime recreation lands prior to their being preempted for other uses. �� LUP160 In open spaces having an established sense of nature, improvements should be limited to those that are necessary and unlikely to detract from the primary values of the site. �� LUP161 �� LUP162 �4 LUP163 �� LUP164 The siting of all developments should aim to enhance and protect the area concerned. Structural forms should harmonize the topography, reinforce the use area, minimize damage to natural resources, and support recreation with minimal conflict. New buildings should be made sympathetic to the scale, form, and proportion of older development to promote harmony in the visual relationships and transitions between new and older buildings. Whenever possible, natural materials should be used in developing shoreline recreational areas. �� LUP165 Artificial irrigation and fertilization should be restricted to high-intensity use areas. ��� LUP166 Existing buildings that enhance the character of the shoreline should be used for recreation wherever possible. �� LUP167 Underwater parks should be extensions of shoreline parks, or be created or enhanced by artificial reefs where natural conditions or aquatic life could be observed with minimal interference. �� LUP168 Public recreational shoreline areas should serve as emergency havens of refuge for boaters. Revised-2899 2002 II-56 � � �� � � � � � �J C� � � � , � � � � ' FWCP — Chaater Two, Land Use � � � � �$ LUP169 Physical and/or visual access to the water should use steep slopes, view points from bluffs, stream valleys, and features of special interest where it is possible to place pathways consistent with public safety without requiring extensive flood or erosion protection. �� LUP170 The acquisition of public easements to the shoreline through private or quasi- public shorelines should be encouraged. �� LUP171 Existing public recreation shorelines should be restored where it is possible to � revegetate; resite roads and parking areas that are close to the shoreline; and remove stream channelization and shoreline protection devices when the facility has either deteriorated or is inconsistent with the general goals of this program. � � � � �� �� � � �� LUP172 Prime-fishing areas should be given priority for recreational use. ��4 LUP173 Boating activities that increase shore erosion should be discouraged. �1� LUP174 Effective interpretation should be provided to raise the quality of visitor experiences and provide an understanding of the resource. Residential Development � ' Revised�898�2 � The shorelines in Federal Way are more widely used for residential purposes than for any other use. Much of the undeveloped shoreline is privately owned, subdivided into small lots, and zoned to �ermit residential development. The pressure to develop shorelines for residential uses has continued to result in property subdivision and escalating waterfront land values. Residential development of shorelines is accomplished in a variety of ways from large plats and subdivisions to single lot development for housing; any of which, if poorly planned, can culminate in the degradation of the shoreline environment and water resource. The SMA generally exempts, "...construction on shorelands by an owner, lessee or contract purchaser of a single-family residence for his own use or the use of his family..." from its permit requirements. However, even though single- family homes are not considered substantial developments, the intent of the act has established the basis for planning and regulating them. ���� � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use Policies �� LUP175 Residential developments should be permitted only where there are adequate provisions for utilities, circulation, access, site layout, and building design. T 7� LUP176 Subdivisions should be designed at a level of density, site coverage, and occupancy compatible with the physical capabilities of the shoreline and water body. �� LUP177 Residential development plans submitted for approval should contain provisions for protection of groundwater supplies, erosion control, landscaping, and maintenance of the shoreline integrity. 7 iT� LUP178 Residential subdivisions should be designed so as to protect water quality, shoreline aesthetic characteristics, vistas, and normal public use of the water. kii�3[_71J LUP179 Subdivisions should provide public pedestrian access to the shorelines within the development in accordance with public access element of this master program. �� LUP180 The established velocity, quantity, and quality of stormwater discharge should be considered in terms of the sensitivity of the proposed receiving environment. The disposal mode selected should minimize changes in infiltration, runoff, and groundwater recharge. �2 LUP181 Developers of recreational projects such as summer homes, cabins, campgrounds, and similar facilities should satisfactorily demonstrate: a. The suitability of the site to accommodate the proposed development without adversely affecting the shoreline environment and water resource. b. Adequate provisions for all necessary utilities, including refuse disposal, and the compatibility of the development with adjacent properties and surrounding land uses. c. That recreational opportunity exists on the site and does not depend on adjacent public land to furnish the activity. Revised �899 2002 , � �� � � `� � � � � LJ l__J � � � � � II-58 , � �J ' � � � � � � � � �� � ;_J � i Phasing focuses growth to those areas where public investments for services are targeted. By doing so, these areas become more attractive for development. Consistent with the CWPPs, Federal Way proposes to use a tiered system for accommodating future growth. The primary purpose of this technique is to assure a logical seyuence of growth outward from developed areas. Future growth will be directed to the City Center and other areas with existing infrastructure and urban services. This will be followed by focusing growth to areas where in-fill potential exists. Lastly, growth will be directed toward areas of undeveloped land or to the City's ' ' PAA. For those areas of the City that are lacking services, these lands should be retained or reserved until build out has occurred in developed areas. Based on the phased growth concept outlined above, the City should develop criteria for � a phasing plan over the next 10 and 20 years. Phased growth will promote efficient use of land by: � � Revised �2899 2002 � FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use 2.9 ESSENTIAL PUBLIC FACILITIES Pursuant to the GMA, no comprehensive plan can preclude the siting of essential public facilities and each should include a process for siting essential public facilities. The GMA includes these provisions because siting certain public facilities has become difficult due to the impacts many of these facilities have on the community. In Chapter 22 of the FWCC, the City has defined essential public facilities and provided a land use process for siting them. Essential public facilities include those facilities that are typically difficult to site, such as airports, state or regional transportation systems, correctional facilities, and mental health facilities. Policy �� LUP182 The �ed� FWCC shall include a list of locally defined essential public facilities �s� that shall include the list of essential state public facilities maintained by the office of financial management. 2.10 PHASING ■ Reducing taxpayers costs by locating new development nearest to existing urban services; u-�s i� FWCP — Chapter Two, Land Use ■ Adding predictability to service & facility planning; ■ Reducing commuter miles and protecting air quality by locating housing and jobs near each other; ■ Encouraging in-fill and redevelopment where environmental impacts have already occuned; and ■ Reserving land for future parks and open space. Policies ��ns�� LUP183 Establish priority areas for public facility and service improvements, especially for transportation. Priority areas should be located where public facility and service improvements would effectively advance Federal Way's growth vision. Priority areas will shift over time as improvements are installed and an acceptable level of service is attained. lir�sE:L� LUP184 When and where service deficiencies are identified, the City, along with service providers, will develop capital improvement programs to remedy identified deficiencies in a timely fashion or will phase growth until such programs can be completed. �6 LUP185 Work with King County through the development of an interlocal agreement to assign phasing to the City's PAA. �i��� LUP186 The City should limit spending on capital facilities in those areas of the City and PAA that are not designated as priority areas for capital projects. 2.11 INCENTIVES In certain designations, incentives allowing more development than otherwise permitted should be used to encourage features � that provide a public benefit and/or contribute to the mitigation of growth impacts. For example, development in the City Center that provides common open space or affordable housing units, may gain additional floors or a reduction in the number of parking stalls. In addition, in order to encoura�e development in the City Center, the Citv is in the process of discussing a Revised �A89 2002 i �� � � � � � � L� � � � � � � �j u-so � , r ' � � � �� � i � � � �, � � � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Housin� Tax Exemption for multiple familv housing and is considerin� preparin� an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a portion of the City Center. Incentives can play an important role in the development of the City Center and must be substantial enough to influence market conditions by making them attractive to the development community. Policies ��� LUP187 Develop incentives to encourage desired development in commercial areas, especially in the City Center Core and Frame. � LUP188 Consider incentives for desired multiple-family residential development (townhouses, duplexes, etc.). 2.12 HISTORIC RESOURCES Historic preservation involves the identification, maintenance, renovation, and reuse of buildings and sites important to a community's history. Buildings or sites may be associated with a particular style or period in the community's past, or with historic or significant historic events or persons. Historic preservation to date has largely been undertaken by the Historical Society of Federal Way. Historic preservation is listed as the ��� 13"' goal in the GMA which encourages jurisdictions to, "Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance." Goal LUG15 Use historic resources as an important element in the overall design of the City. Policies � i � � Revised-2888� � �98 LUP189 Identify vista points and landmarks such as major trees, buildings, and land forms for preservation. � LUP190 Develop a process to designate historic landmark sites and structures. Use developer incentives or other mechanisms to ensure that these sites and structures will continue to be a part of the community. n-st ' FWC — Chapter Tw o, Land Use �� LUP191 �� LUP192 Recognize the heritage of the community by naming (or renaming) parks, streets, and other public places after major figures and/or events. Zoning should be compatible with and conducive to continued preservation of historic neighborhoods and properties. � � � �4 LUP193 Safeguard and manifest Federal Way's heritage by preserving those sites, buildings, structures, and objects which reflect significant elements of the City's history. T7� LUP194 Catalog historic sites using the City's geographic information system. � LUP195 Undertake an effort to publicly commemorate historic sites. , � � i i TT� LUP196 The City shall continue to work with the Historical Society of Federal Way ' towards attainment of historic resource policies. 2.13 IMPLEMENTATION The following actions are recommended to implement the policy direction outlined in this chapter. Implementation will occur over time and is dependent on resources available to the City and community. The following items are not listed in order of importance or preference. Establish Comprehensive Planning and Zoning for Potential Annexation Area Comprehensive planning and the assignment of zoning designations should be completed for the City's PAA. This will provide the City with needed direction relating to future annexations and growth. Planning for this area pursuant to WAC 365-195 requires a considerable planning effort and policy development. An interlocal ageement between King County and the City regarding planning actions should be prepared. Residential Code Revisions for Multiple Family Residential code revisions to implement design standards for multiple-family residential development were adopted in late 1998. Revised -2A98 2002 � LJ � � , ' � � lI-62 � t__1 �I l _J � � LJ , ' � , � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Subdivision Code Revisions Amendments to the subdivision code have been adopted to bring the code into compliance with state law and recent state legislation. Revisions to the subdivision code have provided platting options for single-family development, such as clustering and zero lot line development. Area-Wide Rezone Following adoption of the 1995 FWCP, a new zoning map was prepared and adopted to support the comprehensive plan designations. This update includes some site specific requests for changes to comprehensive plan designations. The zoning map will be amended to conform to the changes in land use designations. The Land Use Plan and �e Zoning Code Implementation of policies and goals of the Land Use chapter is done in large part through the zoning code. Following adoption of the 1995 G ' FWCP, the City made revisions to the zoning code, consistent with �'^�^r°��� FWCP direction. The zoning conversion chart, Tabie �S II-3, shows the connection between the various zoning designations and the Ecomprehensive �plan designations. Phasing Plan i� � � i� A phasing plan shall be prepared to prioritize areas of new growth based on available and proposed infrastructure improvements. Project Environmental Impact Statement for City Center To facilitate growth in the City Center and Frame, the City should complete Planned Action SEPA (PAS). By doing so, development consistent with the direction outlined in the PAS will not have to go through prolonged environmental review. This can be a powerful incentive for private development in the City Center. Subarea Plans � i � � Revised �888 2002 ' Over the years, citizens from various areas of the City have come forth to testify before the Planning Commission and City Council regarding their neighborhood or business area. Development of subarea plans can lead to area specific visions and policies. This type of specific planning, developed with citizen input and direction, can lead to improved confidence and ownership in the community. Areas where subarea planning should be considered include: SR-99 Corridor, South 348th Street area, and Twin Lakes neighborhood. n-s3 � FWCP — Chaoter Two, Land Use Incentives Develop an incentives program, for both residential and commercial development. Incentives should be substantial enough to attract development and should be used to create affordable and desired types of housing and to encourage development within the City Center. � Table � II-3 Land Use Classifications Comprehensive Plan Classification Zoning Classification Single Family - Low Density Residential Suburban Estates (SE), one dwelling unit per five acres Single Family - Medium Density Residential RS 35,000 & 15,000 Single Family - High Density Residential RS 9600, 7200, 5000 Multiple Family Residential RM 3600, 2400, 1800 City' Center Core City Center Core City Center Frame City Center Frame Office Park Office Park Park 1, 2, & 3 Professional Office Professional Office Community Business Community Business Business Park Business Park Neighborhood Business Neighborhood Business Corporate Park Corporate Park-1 Commercial Recreation Office Park-4 Open Space & Parks A variety of zoning is assigned. Revised �2898 2002 � , � ' � , � , � i ' , � r � �_ � II-64 � ' , ' 1 [1 CHAPTER THREE - TRANSPORTATION 3.0 INTRODUCTION � The Transportation chapter of the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan WCP establishes the framework for providing a transportation system (facilities and services) and focuses on actions needed to create and manage the transportation infrastructure and services. ' The GMA (RCW 36.70A.020[3]) "...encourages efficient multi-modal transportation systems that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with county and city comprehensive plans." In addition, the act outlines guidelines for the preparation of the , transportation plan, which is a mandatory element of the plan. Specifically, these guidelines (RCW 36.70A.070[6]) include: , ' ' , ' ' LJ ' , , LJ ■ The land use assumptions used in the plan; ■ Facility and service needs, including: ■ An inventory of existing facilities; ■ Level of service standards for all facilities and services; ■ An action plan for bringing system deficits up to standard; ■ Forecasts of future traffic growth; and ■ Identification of system expansion and transportation system management needs. ■ A financing plan which includes: ■ A comparison of funding needs vs. available resources; ■ A six-year financing strategy; and ■ An assessment of how funding deficits will be managed. ■ Intergovernmental coordination efforts; ■ A demand management strategy; and ■ A concurrency management strategy. This transportation plan is consistent with GMA requirements in terms of the general policy direction and that it includes all components required in a GMA compliant plan. This plan is also consistent with the direction provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Plan as outlined in Vision 2020 and the FWCP Land Use chapter ' �. As discussed in Vision 2020, this plan proposes a more diverse, multi-modal transportation system by encouraging viable alternatives to the single occupant vehicle, including car and van pooling, non-motorized vehicles, and improved public transit which allows integration for a possible future High Capacity Transit system. �s-sex��r-eke�si�e � The FWCP also includes a land use chapter that is supportive of this vision and the region's transportation future. It encourages densities and intensities in locations that support a more diverse, multi-modal transportation system. . ' ' FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Finally, this transportation plan conforms to the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) for King County as adopted in 1992 and amended in 1994. These policies include Framework policies FW18-20 and Transportation Polices T1-T23. In essence, these policies encourage development of a High Capacity Transit System, Public Transit, High Occupancy Vehicles (HOV), Transportation Demand Management and Systems Management options, Non-Motorized Travel, and regional coordination and cooperation. The policies also discuss the importance of level of service standards as they relate to financing and concurrency management strategies. Background Tfie process of providing a transportation system involves numerous agencies at the local, state, and national levels. The cycle of providing a system involves planning, change approval, funding, implementing, operating, monitoring, and administering the elements of the system. Some components are provided by other agencies, such as METRO, Sound Transit, and the Washin�ton State Deuartment of Transportation (WSDOTZ; the City can only influence their efforts and system components. The Transportation chapter, including the administrative procedures developed from it, guides the provision of facilities. Until recently, the cycle of planning and providing facilities could be summarized as shown in Figure III-1. Through a combination of national and state legislation, as well as regional planning efforts, the process has been changing in recent years. Physical and economic limitations of continued expansion of the highway system and other factors such as environmental issues have been key factors in the shift. Figure III-2 reflects the process as it might be viewed today. Areas of Required Action The City. has direct influence over certain aspects of the transportation system and indirect influence over others. Table Ill-1 provides a structure for understanding these areas of responsibility. It also reflects the organization of the remainder of the chapter for the Transportation plan. The Growth Management Act (GMA) requires that the Puget Sound Regional Council P( SRC) certify the transportation chapters of local comprehensive plans. Certification is based upon conformity with state legislation concerning transportation chapters and consistency of the City's plan with the Metropolitan Transportation Plan, which has become known as Vision 2020. Conformity focuses on five requirements for the Transportation chapter: Revised �A98 2002 ' , ' � , ' � � � ' '�_ J ���J ' LJ � , 1►1-2 , , FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation Figure III-1 Historical Transportation Infrastructure The Planning - Implementation Cycle Land Use Plan Transportation Plan Transportation Improvement Program Regional, State � Federal Funding Application Process Funding Design ' Right-of-Way Bidding Construction Operation Implementation _Process Revised �A99 2002 III-3 FWCP - Chaoter Three, Transportation Figure III-2 Current Multi-Modal Transportation Systems Planning, Implementation, & Management ......................... ,..........._............ : Land Use lhsion � : Fedenl Legislation : Existing Conditions • State Legislation � LOS Sfandxds Regional Poliaes ; Transportation Plan Facilities Services Region/State Local Transportation Regional Systems, Improvement Program Policies, Agreements, Etc. Transportation System Management Funding IMPLEMENTATION Local Regional ' Streets 8 Roads Tr�tsit Systern : ; Tr�sit Amenities ; MghwayslFiOV System : : TDIIA Programs . TDM Prognms : � Non-Motorized Non-Motorized � OPERATION MONITORING Revised 2999 2002 Iil-4 i � ' FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation ' ' I , ' �J , Table III-I , ■ Consistency with the Land Use chapter ■ Identification of facility and service needs ■ A financial plan to support the transportation plan , ■ An intergovernmental coordination plan ■ Development of Transportation Demand Management strategies ' Existing Conditions ' The following sections provide a summary of Federal Way's existing transportation characteristics. This information was developed during the preparation of the 1993 Community Profile report. , Who Travels Where and Why? ' ' , , ' Revised �899 2002 ' Travel patterns in the Federal Way planning area are shown on Map Ill-1 ma s are located at the end of the chapter). ■ About 57 percent of person trips originating each day in Federal Way are completed within the City and the immediate area. ■ One in three trips originating in the City are destined to points along the Seattle/ Tacoma high capacity transit corridor. ■ Nearly 75 percent of Federal Way travel is focused on the residence, either as the point of origin or destination. u� L� FWCP — Chapter Three, TranspoRation IIow Do People Travel? ■ As in much of suburban King County, the Single Occupant Vehicle (SOV) is the dominant mode of long distance travel. Nearly 8 out of 10 work trips occur by this mode. ■ Between 15 and 20 percent of all work trips are made by ' EHOVs,- . Of these, less than three percent are by transit. ■ The average occupancy of vehicles is similar to the suburban Seattle average at 1.2 people per vehicle. Raising the average occupancy would reduce congestion. ■ Most area employers (68 percent of those responding to a City survey) reported that bus service exists within one block of their work place. ■ Biking and walking modes are used for about seven percent of all trips. The value is somewhat lower for work trips. What Role Do Park & Ride Lots Play? ■ Park and ride facilities are in high demand in Federal Way, as throughout the region. Of today's �k�ea four lots, with a total of �9A9 2,500 spaces, � three of the four are filled on the average weekday. Increased bus service at the Twin Lakes lot ma result in reater use. Adding a lot at �-�` '�-(�ee�,as�-se�� SR99 at South 276 ' Street will increase area capacity by about 650 stalls. However, Metro studies have identified the need to double the present supply by 2010. ■ Utilization of the existing park & ride lots (at South 272" South 320` a� South 348`� and Twin Lakes) is a mix of regional traffic. Federal Way users range from a low of 44 13 percent � at the �e�t#�"�-� Twin Lakes Park and Ride lot to a high of 60 percent in the South 348�' Street facility. Are There Areas Needing Increased Transit Service? ■ Areas outside Federal Way which generate or attract city trips and which are not heavily serviced by transit include: ■ The Kent Valley (Renton, Kent, Auburn, and Puyallup) ■ Tacoma ■ Rainier Valley - Duwamish South Are There Existing Street Deficiencies? ■ Congested intersections are located predominately in the City Center area and along Highway 99. East/west routes that experience high levels of demand include South Revised �898 2002 , ' � ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 , ' L_J ' ' ui-s , , ' ' � 4 'J � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation 320` Street and South 348 Street. Con�estion occurs not onlv in the mornin� and evenin� commute times, but also during middav evervdav of the week in retail areas. ■ Traffic accidents cost travelers in the City over $�4 $39 million per year, based on 1999 collision data. Most accidents are congestion related. Federal Way's Subarea Roles In establishing a future direction for the City's transportation system, it is vital not only to � understand existing characteristics of travel, but also the nature of land uses which generate travel. � � ;I � � � � � � � Subareas of the City are readily identifiable. They range from mixed-use centers along the I-5 corridor to residential areas that developed with widely varied land use patterns. Following is a summary of the present characteristics in the subareas of the City. Western Residential Area The Western Residential Area consists primarily of suburban type dwelling units. Over half of all residential dwellings in the study area are in this area. While transit is provided to the area, the development patterns have been designed to accommodate the auto and not transit. The steady progression of residential development in the western areas of the City has resulted in a mix of middle and upper income residences. Dwelling unit density is around three to five units per acre. This density does not readily support transit service, nor does the existing street pattern (cul-de-sacs and few through roads). For example, the Twin Lakes area was designed with serpentine, discontinuous streets and cul-de-sacs that make it difficult for transit penetration and pedestrian connectivity. In general, there are too few streets; the arterial streets are used for nearly all traffic circulation, and there is a strong need for more easdwest corridors. The present street pattern focuses east/west trips from the Western Residential Area into the business core. This, combined with the north/south commute patterns, (predominantly to work centers along the I-5 and SR-99 corridors) and business district generated commercial and retail trips, results in high congestion in the business district, especially during the evening commutes. Commercial Core Area � The primary commercial areas lie west of I-5 and east of about 1 l�' Place South. This includes SeaTac Mall retail, SR 99 corridor, and office uses in the West Campus area. About 11,000 job opportunities amact Federal Way and regional trips to this area. Consumers and clients of core area businesses also contribute to the travel patterns of the area. While the Western Residential Area contains the highest concentration of housing, � Revised �998 2002 III-7 � � ' FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation the Core Area witnesses the greatest traffic demand. Today's 77,000 evening peak hour trips to and from the area are expected to increase to nearly 116,000 trips by 2015. Compounding the problems associated with the attractiveness of the area, trips beginning and ending in the Western Residential Area are funneled through this area by the limited system of east/west arterial streets, principally South 320�' and South 348`� as these connect to I-5. There is a need for improved circulation, fewer commute trips to help reduce peak period congestion, improved transit and access to transit, and a means to improve goods and services circulation both internally and to the regional transportation networks. East of I-5 Area The lowest level of development in and about the City falls east of I-5, within Federal Way's Potential Annexation Area PAA . This presents the possibility of large increases in travel demand in the future. As this development occurs, it will be imperative to the success of the overall vision that supportive development and transportation patterns be encouraged. In other words, there is a need for a sufficient grid of more inter-connecting streets. Regional Perspective Vision 2020, developed in the early 1990s, was updated in 1995 by �g� �gie�a�-�e�si�-FPSRC3 as its Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP). The objective is to assure compliance with federal and state legislation that has been enacted since the original adoption of the metropolitan plan. Key strategies of Vision 2020 include: ■ Creation of a regional system of central places framed by open space. ■ Investment in a variety of mobility and demand management options to support the central places. ■ Maintaini� economic opportunity while managing growth. ■ Conservation of environmental resources. ■ Early mitigation of adverse effects of concentrating development. ■ Monitoring and updating of Vision 2020. The MTP� is the product of the current planning efforts. It is coordinated and managed by PSRC and: ■ Identifies the transportation system of regional significance. ■ Determines modal performance expectations. Revised 2998 2�02 � � � � � �� � � .� � � '� � iu � � � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation ■ Documents needed improvements under Vision 2020, incorporating local level growth management plans, financial needs, and a regional congestion management system. A structure for monitoring progress towards the achievement of the plan and improvement to mobility issues is being designed. The City's role in this process has already been established through the involvement of key staff and elected officials at the regional and state levels. Coordination and planning with PSRC, WSDOT, METRO, King County, and the Sound Transit principally is an on-going local effort. The City is well positioned to capitalize on its close proximity to the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, and the SeaTac Airport. It is important to maintain efficient access and to support the viability of these international transportation facilities. Service Providers � � LJ � E� � Tabde III-2 lists key service providers in the region, and their primary functions with which the City maintains contacts through the planning process. Pertinent information on the impacts of their programs is noted in the text of the plan. Department King County Table III-2 Key Service Providers rs Primary Functions >f State Highways, Park & Ride lots, HOV I� SDOT) Transit, Pazk & Ride, CTR Coordination High Capacity Regional Transit Transit, Pazk & Ride, CTR Coordination Connecting Roadways & Tr�c and Land Connecting Roadways, Traffic Control De Land Use Change Impacts Puget Sound Energy, US West, and TCI fi District Utilities Within Right of Way Fire Hvdrants in Rieht of Wav Neighboring Cities °-�...� ---� ...�..._.., _____., _ Fife for Tr�c and Land Use Summary of Major Needs Maintenance, on In summary, Federal Way has defined its role through the end of the 20�' Century and �� into the 21 Century as one supporting the regional direction; becoming an urban center and developing the appropriate combination of transportation services and facilities to � support the inherent development pattern of the proposed land use plan. The following major needs or improvements are related to transportation in Federal Way: CJ Revised 2s99 2002 III-9 � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation ■ Assure Port and SeaTac Airport access. ■ Assure free moving intra- and interstate highways. This provides free moving people, freight, and goods to maintain economic viability of the region. ■ Provide a transportation system that supports the City's Land Use Plan. ■ Provide for additional arterial streets and interconnecting streets in both business and residential areas to reduce congestion and reliance on the few existing arterials. ■ Provide additional easdwest arterials or other ways to relieve east/west travel congestion. ■ Improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities with better access between cul-de- sacs, neighborhoods, to transit corridors and centers, and within business areas. ■ Provide alternatives to SOVs to reduce their use, relieve congestion on streets (especially in peak hours), and provide more rapid movement of people, goods, and services on streets. This may include helicopter, rail, increased transit, park and ride lots, car and vanpools, telecommuting, and information highway products. ■ Provide transportation system management techniques to improve mobility. This may include impact fees to build better transportation facilities, parking fees to reduce SOV use, subsidies for bus passes, car and vanpool use, free business area shuttle buses, and land use regulations that support transportation system improvements. ■ Provide a transportation system that protects and enhances the environment and quality of life. ■ Provide the funding needed to maintain existing infrastructure and implement needed transportation system improvements. ■ Provide cooperative transportation solutions that are inter-jurisdictionally coordinated to meet local and regional needs. Transportation Goals & Policies Goal TGl Maintain mobility for residents and husinesses through a balanced, integrated system of transportation alternatives that: Revised �A98 2002 111-10 � � � � � � � � � 0 � �, � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation a. Meets local and regional needs through inter jurisdictionally coordinated and integrated systems. b. Reduces auto dependency, especially ' OV� use. c. Supports the land use vision and plan. d. Protects and enhances the errvironment and quality of life. e. Provides acceptable levels of service for each transportation mode that is adso commensurate with their planned levels offunding. Policies TPl Integrate land use and transportation plan decisions to support the land use vision and plan. TP2 Implement federal, state, and countywide planning policies. TP3 Provide integrated, multiple travel options to residents and workers, especially those with disabilities that are also effective alternatives to the �g�e-ess� �e SOV TP4 Give priority to transit and supportive needs. TPS Protect neighborhoods from traffic impacts. TP6 Give priority to transportation alternatives that improve mobility in terms of people and goods moved for the least cost. TP7 Establish mobility levels of service appropriate for the alternatives and location. TP8 Provide funding necessary for transportation needs at the appropriate levels of service. 3.1 STREETS AN D ROADWAYS In Federal Way, the predominant mode of travel will likely remain the private � automobile. It is clear that major expansion of the highway system with the intent of expanding capacity for the single occupant auto will less frequently meet federal, state, and regional policies. Modifications to the transportation system that are likely to receive � funding are those that will promote the increased movement of people and goods as opposed to vehicles. r �' � Revised �A98 2002 III-11 � FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation Alternatives that move peo�;le rapidly to their destinations must be provided as c�ngestion grows and driving time increases for users of single-occupant vehicles. The future transportation system will be reprioritized to promote ' HOVs, trains, buses, carpools, and vanpools along existing rights-of-way, and to incorporate high capacity transit if it becomes available to Federal Way. r . _ — - - _ As part of adoption of its transportation plan, in 1995, the City accomplished the following: ■ Adopted �functional Classification of Streets . ■ Adopted Access Management Classification ■ Adopted Street Standards ■ Adopted Level of Service (LOS) Standards ■ Prioritized list of street and roadway improvements that support the Land Use Plan ■ Adopted a Financing Plan In addition, in October 2001 the City hired a consultant to prepare a Traffic Impact Fee and Concurrencv Management System. Existing Conditions An extensive inventory of the existing roadway system in Federal Way was reported in the City's 1993 Community Profile. The following excerpts on existing conditions are taken from that document. Street and Highway System Federal Way is served by a network of publicly maintained streets and highways connecting local communities and urban centers in the Puget Sound region, as shown in Map III-2. There are two major freeways in the Federal Way planning area: ■ Interstate S(I-S) is five lanes north of South 320'� Street and four lanes � ��stie� south of South 320`� Street, with a posted speed limit of 60 mph. This freeway serves as the main north/south freeway for regional travel in western Washington. ■ State Route 18 �SR 18,� is two lanes in each direction, with a posted speed limit of 60 mph. This freeway acts as an east/west alternative to I-90, Revised �998 2002 ' � �� � �� � � � III-12 � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation � connecting to I-90 east of Issaquah and serving the communities of Auburn, eastern Kent, Covington, and Maple Valley. ■ Pacific Highway South (SR 99) ■ Military Road South ,� ■ 1 �` Avenue South ■ 21�` Avenue SW ■ South 272" Street � ■ South 288�' Street ■ South SW 312�' Street '� ■ South 320`� Street/Peasley Canyon Road � ■ South 336`� Street ■ South 348`�' Street/Campus Drive SW ■ SR 509 (Dash Point Road) � ■ Enchanted Parkway (SR 161) ■ South SW 356�' Street These roadways serve major activity centers within Federal Way, including commercial activities in the South 320`� Street corridor between Pacific Highway South (SR 99) and ��a�a I-5 (the City Center), commercial developments along Pacific Highway South, at South 348`� Street and Enchanted Parkway South, and several smaller commercial centers located within various residential areas. 'The roadway system also serves concentrations of office uses located within the City Center, West Campus, and the Weyerhaeuser Headquarters/East Campus area. The roadway system within the City connects to the surrounding regional transportation network, which provides access to other major activity centers including Seattle, SeaTac Airport, Tacoma, the Port of Tacoma, Kent, and Auburn. Traffic Signpl Locations Map III-3 shows the locations of signalized intersections within the Federal Way planning area. Currently, signals are maintained and operated by the City under a contract with King County. The ability to coordinate signals along congested minor and principal arterials is important to achieve the maximum capacity of a given facility. South 320 Street currently has 13 signalized intersections that are inegularly spaced and, in some cases, spaced too close to each other. Coordination of the signal system on South 320�' Street was implemented in 1993, from � I-5 to 1�` Avenue South, together with the coordination of signals on SR 99 from South 288�' to South 324`� Street. In addition, coordination of the signal system along SR 99 � � Revised �998 2002 III-i3 Primary roadways in the Federal Way planning area include: � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation � from South 336�' Street to South 356�' Street and along South 348`� Street from I-5 to l Avenue South was implemented in 1995. Signais were coordinatsd on SW Campus Drive � and 21 Avenue SW in 1998. Benefits of signal coordination are quantified in Section 3.2, under Signalization Improvements. Traffic Volumes The � 2000 average weekday traffic volumes on selected arterials are shown on Map III-4. The roadway with the highest daily traffic volume is I-5. This facility carried nearly ��A88 171,000 vehicles on an average weekday in -�3� 2000 (WSDOT, -�� 2000). Historical growth on I-5 has fluctuated in recent years in the Federal Way vicinity. Between 1985 and 1990, the average daily traffic increased at an average annual rate of 53 percent. However, from �38 1992 to � 2000, the average daily traffic des�as�� increased at an average annual rate of €ea� one percent. Federal Way's busiest arterial, South 320`�' Street between I-5 and SR 99, carries � approximately �5 60,000 vehicles per day. On South 320`� Street, average weekday � traffic has grown at an annual rate of � one percent since -�$-S 1992. Other arterial roadways with significant daily traffic are portions of Pacific Highway South and South 348`� Street, carrying 48 42,000 and �9 59,000 vehicles per day, respectively. �� Forecasts of Future Travel Travel can be described in terms of the purpose of the trip and the trip beginning and end points. Federal Way exhibits a wide variety of travel purposes. Trips range from children walking to school to adults commuting. Not all of these trips are typically analyzed in transportation planning, although emphasis is increasing for non-motorized trips and transportation management systems. To assist in categorizing trips, the area of interest was divided into Transportation � Analysis Zones, or TAZ. This structure allows a link between travel data and land use data. Estimates of the number of households and employees were made for each TAZ. � These land use estimates were then translated into traffic demand on major arterials using a computer modeling process. The model was used to estimate existing and future tr�c volumes within the Federal Way planning area. The model can also be used to estimate � demands for various modes of travel, including auto, carpool, and transit. There is a fairly consistent relationship between the number of trips produced each day and the density of residential dwelling units. Depending on the density of the azea and � other factors, it is possible to forecast the total number of trips produced in an area. In a similar fashion, employment densities can be used to forecast person trips attracted to an area. Each parcel of land generates traffic based on its type of use and intensity of � development. The evening peak hour is a modeling standard, since it usually is when the highest demand occurs. Revised �909 2002 — � III-14 � � � , FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation � Future Travel De�nand � The community visioning process explored a series of future (2010) land use intensities and configurations. Concepts of future development that would accomplish regional and ` City goals were explored. The concepts were then turned into estimates of travel demand and the necessary transportation improvements were identified. Through the � Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process, a recommended alternative was identified, which includes significant improvements to the existing street system, along with other transportation demand management and transit actions. In general, between � 1990 and 2010, an increase in total person trips of approximately 40 percent is predicted. City Action Areas for Transportation Plan Adoption Functional Classification of Streets Public streets are classified according to their functions related to mobility and land access. These functional classifications help facilitate planning for access and circulation, standardization of road designs, and provision of a hierarchy for roadway funding. The classification system is typically shown in map form, which can be used by planners and developers alike to determine improvements and program needs. The types of functional classifications for Federal Way are described below. Freeway — A multi-lane, high speed, high capacity roadway intended exclusively for motorized traffic with all access controlled by interchanges and road crossings separated by bridges. - Principal Arterial — A roadway connecting major community centers and facilities, often � constructed with partial limitations on access and minimum direct access to abutting land uses. Minor Arterial — A roadway connecting centers and facilities within the community and serving some through traffic while providing greater access to abutting properties. Collector — A roadway connecting two or more neighborhoods or commercial areas, while also providing a high degree of property access within a localized area. Collectors have been separated into principal and minor designations according to the degree of travel between areas and the expected traffic volumes. � Local Street — All other roadways not otherwise classified, providing direct access to � abutting land uses and serving as feeders to facilities with higher functional classifications. Designation of roadway functional classification is an integral part of managing street use � and land development. In Washington, as in most states, classification of streets is necessary for receipt of state and federal highway funds. Inconsistent or misdesignation � Revised �808 2002 III-15 � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation of functional class (usually in the form of under-classification) can lead to poor relations with residents and the traveling public. Studies have shown that traffic volumes in excess of about 1000 vehicles per day on residenti�l streets produce markedly increased objection on the part of local residents. Misdesignation of a street segment to a lower classification when the amount of expected traffic warrants a higher class can also result in under-design of facilities producing long-term capacity problems. Table III-3 summarizes the typical characteristics of each functional classification. The latest functional classifications of roadways in the Federal Way planning area are shown in Map III-S_ . Illustrative examples of cross-sections A through Z are shown in Figure III-3 (a-b) to Figure III-4 respectively, for the street system within Federal Way. Table III-3 Characteristics of Functional Classifications of Streets Map � III-6 illustrates which cross-section would be used for each arterial and collector within the community. Since the City does not plan local street networks, the applicable street cross-section for local streets will be established through the City's development review process, which is ongoing. Access Management Classification Access management is the regulation of intersection and driveway spacing to improve the safety and preserve capacity of major streets. Roadway crash rates are heavily dependent on the spacing of turning conflicts. By reducing the number of driveways and turning movements through shared access to multiple parcels, and restricting turning movements in congested areas, the safety and efficiency of the City's streets can be maintained. Revised �A98 2UO2 L1 � � �' � � m-ts � � 1 Limited access, state jurisdiction. 2 Connects subregional activity centers and communi6es. 3 Provi�s major movement capacity; collecting neighborhood and business traffic to higher level arterials. 4 Connections behveen neighbofiood or commetcial areas. Design consideration for trucks. 5 Channels Iceal traffic to principal coilectors or arterials. Design for buses per METRO standards. 6 Primary function is access to abutting land use. Through traflic can be discouraged by use of trat�ic control devices. 7 The exact cross-sections and standards fm a pazticular street within the community will be established duough the City's desi� Development Standards. � � � ��� � � �� � � � �� � � � �� � �� \� � � FWCP — Chaater Three, T�ansportation ,�� y,SFl` Y � U /[!r � ��::�- Cross Section A -°..���� , � 4 Lanes + HOV 3' 8' 6` 12' 71' 11' 11' 6' 12' 17' 12' 6' 8' 3' . ,�.,t ,�., ,�„ ,.�,,,,,, ,�, ,�., ,�, �. + Median 0 �12' � 16' —�-12' —� Medifn (where LT not neede� 86' 12Q' ,�' '��� i'��"�� Cross Section B �:'�f.���: r .�t y�, ^ �°'�P' � � � 1 �, 4 Lanes + HOV �� a� ,r ir „� ,r� 4� ,s� ,r ,r s� + Median sr.wwc HoV teftTLm MOV aa.w.lt • F-12' —�-14' --�-12' —� ' Mad�n (vA�eralTnotneade� II� CI�/ CentCr 84' 100' �� Roadway Cross Section A& B �o � FIG ��� (a -b� Revaed �A89 � ���-,� FWCP – Chaoter Three. Transportation .�'� �''; ��-;;� ^=.�� � �= Cross Section C ,''- � - 3� s� 6� r „� „� „� 6� ,z� „� s� 6� s� 3� 4 Lanes + Bike � .�., .�. �,�, „a, .�, � ,w, + Median I—�r � �6� —"I—�r —I �"° hkdian (wF�ere LT not naededl 72' 106' t �. � j � �!/��: °� ����; Cross Section D �� t �:. � =����� � 4 Lanes + Bike s� �r s� �r ir i�� e �r »� s� ,s� s� + Median lhN. 51d�wYk d110! ��m Mk! 9daxAlk UGL � f-12' --f-16' ---�-12' ---� �"v bkdlan �e�T���� In City Center 72' ia�� Roadway Cross Section C& D �` � FIG ���-3 c�-a� Re���d �e z�z � � III-18 �' �� �� � � � � � � � � � � � � '� � � � �' � � � � � � � � � �, � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation :.',' �.;� . :�� � �� Cross Section E =��� � - � 4 Lanes + Median 3' 8' 6' 12' 11' 11' 6' 12' 12' 6' 8' 3' u�a stl.x�t� vluar LdtTum � swaw.� uri �" �-----12' T 16' �12' — � � hkdien (where LT not neadap 64' 98' j, ,i�i�}i� , ,:��_} Y� Cross Section F �����,, v. � � � , 4 Lanes + Median 3' 12' tY 11' 11' 6' 12' 12' 12' 3' uw. s�a.w.� taRTwn sdew.� w� �° F—,r —�--�6' —+—,2' —I �'' In City Center � (whe►a LT rot neede� 64� y4� Roadway Cross Section E& F ��""� � FIG ��� (e -fl R�� �ggg � III-19 FWCP — Chaotar Three. Transpo�tation Cross Section G � 1 � - 3� a� s s n� „� ,Z� „� „� s� 6� e� 3� 5 Lanes + Bike Sldwwi IYnnr !An pnar4n� !Iw prMn Sldcvw�c W. � �f� �� Cross Section H � � � 5 Lanes + Bike s� �r s� �r �r �r �r �r s �r s� ua. �a.� e+b. �.u�. �oe �a.�.� u�. � �"° In City Center �� �� Roadway Cross Section G& H ���U� FIG.III-3(g-h) Revised �899 2002 I I I-20 � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � '� � � '� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FWCP — ChapterThree.7ransportadon Cross Section I — � 1 1 J ! � 5 Lanes 3' S' 6' 1Y 11' 12' 11' 12' 6' 8' 3' $�d�Wilk Nu10v CMWIJM PINIIlf 9de1M�f UIY. � 58' 92' Cross Section J � — 1 � 5 Lanes a� �z� �z� »� �s� ��� �r �r 3� '� � �""'�'" �"` "` In City Center yMp �P 58' 88' Roadway Cross Section I& J �c� `�'�o � FIG u�-3 c;� Revised 2AA0 � I I I-21 FW P— Chanter Three. Transportation Cross Section K � �1 , 3 Lanes + Bike 3' 8' 6' S' 11' 12' 11' 5' G 8' 3' 9dlYV[ PYIIR !� CMl�M1�M �i PIMW $IJOIYiIk UTA. � �� 78' Cross Section L � � 3 Lanes + Bike s� �r s �r �z� �r s� u� s� � �� � �� � � � - � �„. In City Center �a� �a� Roadway Cross Section K& L G�� ���ao � FIG ���-3 ck-�� Revised 28A8 2002 I I I-22 � '� � � '� � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation Cross Section M � � 3 Lanes s� s� 6� �r ir �s� 6 a� s un sW.w� vr�w r«�wuM rr�. sia�.k un srta 36' �a Cross Section N � — 1 � 3 Lanes s� ,r s� ,r ,r ,r s� �r s� + Parking UtlL SIdMw�lk hildnp CaM�luw Prid�p Ad�wdk Utl. � � In City Center sm ea� Roadway Cross Section M& N ����o � FIG. III-3 (m-n) Revised 2A09 � III-23 W P— Chaoter Three. Transportation Cross Section � � � s� e� 6� s ,s� ,s� s� 6� s� 3� 2 Lanes + Bike � � � .�. �. �., � �. � � �a� 6e� Cross Section P 2 Lanes + Ditch 3' 6' 10` 4' 12' 12' 4' 10' 6' 3' . S01p � � � � � � � 32' 70' Roadway Cross Section �& P ��� �'��ao � FIG u� (o-p) Revised �A09 20�2, � � III-24 � � � �' � � � � � � � � �' � � � � � � � `� � � � � �' � � � � �� � � � � � F P— Chaoter Three. Transportati�on Cross Section Q 2 Lanes 3' 12' 8' 1Y 12' 8' 12' 3' � � � � �,,,,� �„� + Parking Strip �+ In City Center �o� �o� Cross Section R , 2 Lanes 3' 6' 4' 8' 12' 12' 8' 4' 6' 3 + Parking um. � � n�t�q �u � � � smv 40' �� Roadway Cross Section Q& R �°"�� FIG �r�-3 c Revis� �AA9 � III-25 FWCP — Cha�ter Three. Transparfation Cross Section S 3� s� a� a� �a �a s� 4� s� 3' 2 Lanes � � � � � � � �„� + Parking � �s� � Cross Section T � ' 2 Lanes 3' S 8' 2' lY 12' 2' 8' S' 3 + Ditch um. � dxn � � d� � � 28' 60' Roadway Cross Section S& T ��'��o � FIG ���-3 cs-t� Revised �998 2� III-26 � � �� '� � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � FW P— Chauter Three, Transpqrtation Cross Section U � 3' S' 4' 8' 8' S' S' 4' S' 3' 2 Lanes ,� � �,� � �, + Parking � � � � �� 32' 56' Cross Section V � , 2 Lanes �— 3' 5' S' 12' 12' 8' S' 3 + Ditch � pKN qtch � ULL 3eA0 24' 56' Roadway Cross Section U& V 0► F�d�r�al W�y Re��� ���-�� FWCQ — Chaoter Three. Transportation Cross Section W . II ' s� 5� a� e� ,s� a� a� s 3� 1 Lane � � � ,,,,,� � � � � + Parking � sz� Cross Section X � 2 Lanes a� s� e� ,o� �a s�s' + Ditch � � � �� � za sr Roadway Cross Section W& X �`��a � FIG ���-3 cW-x� Revised �999 2� I I I-28 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � Z� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FW P— Chanter Three. Transporfation Cross Section Y 9 s� r ,o� ,a 5� 3� Infill Cul-de-sac � � �� 20� �� tx ��a.' .� u ����������� Cross Section Z _ , �,;, �r' �+�:• `:::sd;; :3"�,. �.n ,£; '�,., i,}` , �'*`' "�. �, J` = Cul-de-sac � Terminus 3' S' 32' 26' 3Y 5' 3' � � ce�aw.�a � um. � �ro 90' 106' Roadway Cross Section Y& Z �°"�s � FIG n�-3 c�-Z� Rev'tsed �689 22�2 Iil-29 FWCP — Chaoter Three. TranspoRaUon Special Cross Sections G �� `��o � FIG n�-� Revised 2A99 2Q02 III-30 � � � � � � � �' � � � � � � � � � � � � ' FWCP — Chapter Three, TranspoRation � Access is one of the major factors influencing functional classification. Generally, higher classifications (interstates or freeways) serve a limited access function, while lower classifications (local roads, cul-de-sac streets) serve a local access function. The State of � Washington approved legislation requiring that access onto state facilities be granted by permit and that such access conform to an access management classification system (RCW 47.50). The WSDOT put into place two administrative codes. The first identifies � the administrative process (including permit fees for issuing access permits on state facilities), and the second defines the access classification system (WAC 468.51 and 468.52, respectively). � A summary of the access classifications from WAC 468.52 is provided in Table Ill-4. The criteria used to define the classification system included functional classification, � adjacent land use (existing and proposed), speeds, setting (urban or rural), and traffic volumes. The classification system was developed with assistance from the cities by the WSDOT Northwest Region planning office. � The authority to permit access to state facilities lies with the state in unincorporated areas and with the cities in incorporated areas. WAC 468.51 requires that cities with permit authority adopt a classification system equal to or more restrictive than that proposed by � WSDOT. � WSDOT required cities to establish an appropriate access classification system by mid 1996. All state routes within the City also needed to be classified, with the exception of SR 18 and I-5, which are limited access facilities and not subject to the � access classification system. Table III-S illustrates the City's �e�esg� ado ted access classification system. The � primary purpose of access management is to improve safety; therefore, higher access classifications are triggered either by crash rates or lane configurations that are less safe at higher volumes. Similarly, access spacing standards are the most restrictive for turning � movements with the highest potential for accidents. Map � III-7 indicates WSDOT's access s�ass�s classification on state highways in Federal Way. Map � III-8 indicates the access classifications within the City. These access standards � would be implemented as part of review of land development, as an element of street improvement projects, and to ameliorate locations with high crash rates as a part of tr�c , safety maintenance. Street Standards � As the transportation system evolves, periodic review of the sex� ' FWCP, _ changes to the subdivision code, and street standards are necessary. Street standards within city code convey the vision of the ser� FWCP in greater detail. � Similar to the classification map, they guide the development process activities. For example, components of the subdivision code can require certain types of street standazds (e.g. widths, parking, etc.) to support designated transit compatible development. Street � design standards show preferred cross sections for each arterial and street segment in the City. � Revised �898 � m�� � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Table III-4 Washington State Access Classification System Chapter 468.52 WAC (7-14-94) Posted Typical p�anned Minimum Planned Private Class Functional Characteristics Speed Intersection �� Median Spacing* Connection Treatment Spacing High speed/volume, long Vips serving: interstate, Resvictive, where I interregional, intercity travel. Service to abutting 50 to 55 multi-lane is 1.0 mi 1320 feet. land subordinate to service of major V�c warcanted. One per parcel movements. Medium to high speeds/volumes, medium to long Urban: 35 Restrictive, where trips serving: interregional, intercity, intracity to 50 660 feet. 2 travel. Service to abutting land subordinate to Rural: 45 multi-lane is 0.5 mi One per parcel. service of traffic movement. to 55 "�'�T�ted. Moderate speeds/volumes, short trips serving: Restrictive where Rural: 0.5 mi intercity, intraci Urban: 30 ry, intercommunity travel. Balance � 40 multi-lane is Urban: 0.5 mi/less 3 between land access and mobiliry. Used where warranted. Two- with signal 350 fcet land use is less than maximum build out, but Rural: 45 N left-turn lane progression development potential is high. to 55 may be u6lized. anatysis. Moderate speeds/volumes, short trips serving: �leA-r�sf�ic,�i�s Rural: 0.5 mi intercity, intracity, intercommunity travel. Balance Urban: 30 Restrictive if Urban: 0.5 mi/less 4 between land access and mobility. Used where to 35 avera�e daily with signal 250 feet level of development is more intensive and major Rural: 35 V�c volumes progression land use changes less likely than class 3. to 45 exceed 25,000. analysis. Low to moderate speeds, moderate to high volumes, primarily short Vips in intracity and 0.25 mi/less with 5 intracommunity travel. Service of land access 25-35 Non-resVictive signal progression 125 feet dominant function. analysis. Note: This table is for summary puryoses only and is not included in d�e WAC. Source: WSDOT *See text of the WAC for exceptions. Table III-S of Federal Wav Access Standards Through ,.,....,,,u.,, Access Median Traffic Crossing Left- Right- Right- 5 ��� Classification Lanes Movements Left-Tum Out Turn In Turn Out Tnm In �'ogression Efficiency�*i Only at signalized Only at signalized I Raised 6 intersections. intersec6ons. 330 150 150 40% 2 Raised 4 330 330 330 150 150 30'/e Two-Way 3 Left-Tum 4 150 I50' 150• 150" 150* 20% Lane Two-Way 4 Left-Turn 2 150* 150' 150" 150' I50' 10% Lane 'Does not apply to Single-Family Residential uses. •'Greater spacing may be required in order to minimize conflicts with queued traffic. *"If the existing efficiency is less than 16e standard, new tlaf5c signals may not reduce the existing �cirncy. a) Raised Medians will be required if any of the following conditions are met 1) There are more than two through tratfic lanes in eac6 direction on the street being accessed. 2) The street being accessed has a crash rate over 10 crashes per million vehicle miles, and currendy has a two-way left-tum lane. b) Two-way left-hun lanes will be required if the street being accessed has a crash rate over 10 crashes per million vehicle miles, and currendy does not have a left-twn lane. Revised 2999 2002 III-32 � � � �I � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Level of Service (LOS) Standards Level of Service (LOS) on a street or roadway is a qualitative description of traffic flow conditions during a specific time period. This measure considers travel conditions as perceived by motorists and passengers in terms of travel speed, travel time, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions, delays, comfort, and convenience. Levels of service have traditionally been given letter designations from A through F, with LOS A representing ideal operating conditions, and LOS F representing "forced flow" conditions beyond capacity. According to the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM), level of service is quantified differently for roadway segments as opposed to intersections. For example, on roadway segments the LOS is defined by the general spacing of cars traveling on the street and their level of interference with one another. At intersections, however, the LOS is defined by the length of delay a driver experiences in passing through the intersection or waiting to turn into or out of a side street. The definitions for each level of service and methodologies for. calculating LOS are contained in the Transportation Research Board Special Report 209, Highway Capacity Manual (' oQC� ,,,.a„+o,� � non 2000). � Level of service is used by the City of Federal Way for two primary purposes: (1) to calculate the amount of transportation facilities the City needs in the future, and (2) to measure the adequacy of the public services which serve existing and proposed � development. The first use of LOS is addressed in this section, in which alternative improvement scenarios are evaluated against these levels of service. The second use of LOS relates to the "concurrency" requirement of GMA, as described in Section 3.10. The � two uses of LOS utilize the same basic standards and methodology, such that consistency is maintained. � � � � LOS Standard — The City's goal is to maintain or improve upon a PM peak hour roadway LOS so that it is at least within capacity. The plan expects some change in the present patterns of travel behavior through increased use of non-SOV modes, such as walking, bicycling, transit, carpooling, and vanpooling. The LOS standard should reflect the impact of increased non-SOV modes of transportation. LOS Methodology — Within urbanized areas, most of the roadway congestion occurs at signalized intersections. However, it is not always practical to measure traffic flows at every intersection, and this type of detailed analysis does not provide a full perspective on how well the overall roadway network is performing. Due to the complex nature of tra�c flows and the ability of motorists to take alternative routes for similar trips, the City of Federal Way has selected a LOS methodology iv#is� that is an expansion of the traditional LOS measurements presented in the Highway Capacity Manual. The City uses the following two criteria for measuring LOS. Corridor and Roadway Segment Yolume/Capacity (Y/C) Ratio — The volume/capacity (v/c) ratio directly compares the volume on a roadway segment with the capacity of that segment to carry traffic volumes. The ratio, expressed in a range as shown in Table III-6, can then be used as a planning level LOS indicator. Rev�sed �A9B 2002 m-� � � FWCP — Chaqter Three, Transportation � Table IIi 6 Analysis Procedure Planning and Operational A B C 0.00 - 0.60 0.61 - 0.70 0.71 - 0.80 0.00 - 3:99 3� ^ -�o ".'�� 10.00 10.00 - 20.00 20.00 - 40.00 ion Research Circular 212. Interim Materials on HiAhway Capacil Levels of Service � 1 - 1.00 > 1.00 � i n _ �n nn �cn nn 40.00 - 60.00 � 60.00 - 80.00 �>80.00 The capacity of the roadway segment reflects the condition of the road (e.g. width of lanes, amount of driveway disturbances, whether there exists a left turning lane, etc.) and the type of traffic control along its length (e.g. frequent traffic signals reduce capacity). A v/c greater than 0.90 is used to identify locations for a more rigorous operational analysis. In an operational analysis, the level of service standard for planning purposes will be a v/c of 1.00, with a LOS of E, using a 120-second cycle at signalized intersections. In order to reflect an emphasis on non-SOV modes, LOS will be measured by average delay per person rather than the Highway Capacity Manual's average delay per vehicle. The City chooses this methodology to determine development impacts and mitigations. Current LOS Deficiencies — Map �8 III-9 illustrates the �9-9� 2002 PM peak hour level of service deficiencies on Federal Way's arterials. This figure indicates that ��9`� �, Pacific Highway South (SR 99), Enchanted Parkway, ��'�*°^� �^°�', and portions of South 348`� Street are among the most congested corridors in Federal Way. These are the primary routes that carry commuters, shoppers, business trips, freight and goods, and other vehicles throughout the day and especially during peak periods. Future LOS Deficiencies — Map �� III-10 illustrates the expected �88-3 2008 PM peak hour level of service deficiencies for the "current trends" if no additional improvements are constructed. Map �-� III-11 depicts 2008 congested streets with "' °°4-�nnz �rr�» proposed street improvements. The current trends condition assumes that limited roadway improvements would be made on the existing street system, while the recommended plan includes significant im�rovements to several major and minor arterial routes. Without improvements, South 320 Street, Pacific Highway South (SR 99), Enchanted Parkway, �►4i�ea� 1 Avenue South, and portions of South 348� Street would remain the most congested corridors in Federal Way. The recommended plan would improve conditions along all of these streets. Map �-� III-12 depicts congested streets in �8-1� 2020 if only the improvements in the '°O�� Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP� are constructed. Map �4 III-13 depicts congested streets if the '°O�Q--'�^ � Capital Improvement Plan (CIP� improvements are constructed. LOS on State Facilities — In the �8�5 2020 Current Trends Alternative, the entire portion of I-5 in the Federal Way planning area will experience severe peak-direction congestion in the PM peak hour. *�^°* ^�' cp °° °^a cp '�' ,°° ,•,°" °° mMajor portions of SR 18 will a�e be congested. " " , r.���,. ,.,,,,,.o�*;,,,, .,t,,,,,. cu oo .,..a cu t�i .,,,,ta t,o �,,,,,o.,,t,.,� ,.e,�,,,.va Revised � 2002 III-34 �yI l� � � � � � �� ,� � � � r � � LJ � FWCP — ChapterThree, Transportation Traffic Safety When considering transportation improvements, enhancements to traffic safety must be considered. Intersections with high s�as� collision rates are shown in Map �-� Ill-14 and major street segments with high s�s� collision rates are shown in Map �� III-1 S. In addition, Map III-16 shows hi�h collision severitv intersections for 1997 to 1999, and May III-17 shows high collision severity corridors. The majority of crashes in Federal Way are related to congestion. Intersections with high � levels of congestion create frustration for drivers who may then perform risky measures. Common manifestations of frustration include running a red traffic signal or a signalized intersection producing too small a gap at an unsignalized intersection, or speeding on � local streets to make up for time lost at a congested location. Many accidents in neighborhoods are related to speeding, but also to poor sight distance at unsignalized intersections. These safety issues can be addressed by implementing the following � � � ' � measures: ■ Identify high crash rate locations on an annual basis, and identify projects to improve safety at these locations. � Implement access management measures to reduce turning conflicts in high as�e� crash rate corridors. ■ Enforce intersection sight distance standards to remove vision obstructions on the corners of intersections and at driveways. ■ Where supported by neighborhoods, install traffic calming measures in residential areas. ■ Educate the public through project open houses and press releases on safety benefits of transportation projects. ■ Increase enforcement of traffic laws, particularly laws pertaining to behaviors that cause the most severe and highest frequency of crashes. � Street and Roadway Improvement Plan Table Ill-7lists major street and roadway projects �v#� that are included in the �A� � 2020 recommended transportation plan. ' ' � "m'-'�'. These projects will have the most significant impact on reducing corridor and system-wide congestion within the City. A full listing of recommended street and � roadway improvements is provided in the Transportation Improvement Program, described in the "Implementation Strategies" section. � The WSDOT has jurisdiction over state highways in the City. These include I-5, SR 18 (South 348�' Street), SR 99 (Pacific Highway South), SR 161 (Enchanted Parkway South), and SR 509 (Dash Point Road). However, since many residents depend on these �J Revised �899 2002 ,��_� � �^�'^.^' `"'° o'°^ FWCP - Chaoter Three. Transportation and other state facilities in the region, it is important the City consider the policies and efforts of the WSDOT. The City is responsible for the maintenance of �state routes (except I-5 and SR-18 east of 16` Avenue South) within the City limits and for the issuance of right-of-way use permits subject to WSDOT review. Table III-7 Major Street and Roadway Improvements # FACILITY FROM TO DESCRIPTION OF IMPROVEMENTS 1 Military Rd S S 272" S 288'� Widen to five lanes - provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. Widen to three lanes - provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, 2 Military Rd S S 288'� 31�` S illumination, landscaping, property acquisition (incl. S 304`�' to 28�' S). Widen to five lanes - provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, 3 S 356'� 1�` S SR 161 signal modification, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition, coordination with regional storm detention. Construct over crossing of I-5, construct new (5) lane 4 S 312�' 28�' S Military Rd S roadway, provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. 5 S 312`" Military Rd S 51" S Construct new (5) lane roadway, provisions for bicycles, sidewalks, illumination, landscaping, property acquisition. 6 SR 99 S 272" Dash Pt Rd Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 7 SR 99 Dash Pt Rd S 312'� Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 8 SR 99 S 312�' S 324`" Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 9 SR 99 S 324'" S 340'" Construct Arterial HOV lanes, both directions. 10 Dash Pt Rd SR 99 I" S Widen to three/four lanes. 11 S 316�' S1 S W Valley Hwy Extension. 12 I-5 SR 18 SR-161 Construct collector/distributor roads beside I-5 to extend the SR-18 interchange south to SR-161. 13 SR-161 SR 18 Military Widen to five lanes, curb, gutter, sidewalk, and illumination. 14 SW 336� Wy/ 26�' Pl SW Hoyt Rd SW W�den to five lanes, curb, gutter, sidewalk, and SW 340 St illumination. 15 S 320�' St SR 99 1" Ave S Construct arterial HOV lanes. .4-� :- 16 SR 99 S 340�' S 356�' Construct arterial HOV lanes. 17 S 348 SR 99 1�` Ave S Construct arterial HOV lanes. The state has enacted several policies to relieve the various problems facing travelers. These policies include: ■ Improve personal mobility (emphasizing movement of people and goods, over vehicles). ■ Enhance transportation to support economic opportunities. Revised 2A99 2002 ill-36 ' � � � � � � �� ■ Coordinate regional transportation planning and implementation. ■ Improve energy and environmental efficiency. ■ Promote public-private and public-public partnerships. ■ Improve freight and goods mobility. ■ Enhance transportation to support tourism. ■ Promote land use patterns to improve mobility. ■ Improve public transportation. ■ Enhance transportation system efficiency (i.e., management). ■ Improve air quality. � The City's plan has been developed in awareness of these policies and supporting programs. The City's plan is in compliance with the WSDOT's direction and vision. The transportation plan for Federal Way relies on the State in the following action areas: ■ HOV system completion on I-5 and other freeways. � ■ Implementation of the State System Plan. This plan identifies, in priority order, the need for maintenance, preservation, safety, economic initiatives, environmental retrofit, and mobility (capacity) improvements. The latter may not be fully funded and may therefore affect the implementation of the � following WSDOT projects: ■ HOV access improvements, primarily I-5 medians. � ■ Interchange improvements for I-5 from SR 18 to SR 161. ■ �': I mprove access between I-5 and the Citv Center. � ■ Arterial HOV and other enhancements on SR 99 south from South 272" Street to South 356�' Street. ■ Improvements to SR 509 (Dash Point Road) between SR 99 and � 21�` Avenue SW. ■ SR 509 extension from Burien along the western and southern sections of SeaTac Airport south to I-5. , ■ The SR 509 extension north from Tacoma to the new SR 167 connection on I-5 at Fife. This extension will likely occur in the 2015 planning horizon. To have I-5 and 509 coincident along I-5 from Fife to South 272 would be consistent with this plan. ' �. . . » � Revised �999 20�2 FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation III-37 � i� u FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation ■ Continued improvements to monitoring, with possible provision of information systems regarding travel conditio7s. ■ Right-of-way acquisition for rail and the above improvements before construction. ■ The addition of park and ride lots and added ca�acity for existing ones. �s � _ ■ SR 18 improvements east of SR 99. ■ Advanced vehicle identification (AVI) on SR 99 to provide transit priority. I-5 HOV Lanes — As noted in the section on transit and HOVs, a major improvement along I-5 proposed by the state is extending HOV improvements south to the Pierce County line. These changes are consistent with the assumptions included by the City in its analysis efforts, and support the concepts envisioned in the plan. WSDOT has also identified the next generation of improvements to the HOV system on I-5 (and other regional facilities). This effort will identify ways to improve HOV and transit access to the freeway (predominately along the medians of these highways). Such concepts are, again, consistent with this plan. SR 509 — Two projects will affect this facility; both outside the City of Federal Way. To the north, there is on-going planning for extension of SR 509 from Burien along the western and southern sections of SeaTac Airport to I-5. . "�� , , . It is consistent with the concepts embodied in this plan. The �e Tier I EIS for the SR 509 South Extension Project has selected Alternative C as the preliminary preferred alternative. 'This particular alternative would join I-5 near South 210"' Street, and add capacity to I-5 south to at-�s� South �"� 320�' Street. The second modification to SR 509 will be south of Federal Way. SR 167's connection to Tacoma from Puyallup will be improved during the planning horizon. As part of this effort, the connection with SR 509 in Tacoma will be modified. The state has not resolved the issues related to modifying this connection. Analyses will look into the best methods to accomplish this connection, and will likely examine how best to connect to an improved SR 509 to the north (see preceding paragraph). An option to have I-5 and 509 coincident alon� I-5 is consistent with this plan. Other Action Areas Sound Transit is reviewing a high capacity transit system altemative for a second phase in early 2006. The City plan identifies stations/transit centers on or near the I-5/SR-99 corridor at South 272° Street, South 316�' Street, South 336"' Street, and South 348�' Revised 2999 2002 L _J � � � � � � � � CJ � � �J � � J r Iil-38 � � ' � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation Street. Until light rail transit is extencied to Federal Way, the transit centers would be for , bus transit only. The integration of the road system for vehicles and buses with high capacity transit is incorporated into this plan. � METRO and Pierce Transit provide bus and park & ride facilities to Federal Way. These are also identified and integrated into the City's plan. King County, Pierce County, Tacoma, Kent, Auburn, Algona, Pacific, Edgewood, Milton, and Des Moines presently � border Federal Way or its potential annexation area. An integrated street system with these adjoining jurisdictions is incorporated into this plan. Sound Transit's approved plan includes regional bus service to connect transit centers. These could connect Federal Way � �e-�s�k with Tacoma and Lakewood to the south, te-�� with Tukwila and Seattle to the north, and to the northeast with Auburn, Kent, Renton, and Bellevue. �� ' � � LJ � � , � ��� �`��' �� e�� �` � E � - �� �� � . . . ,> - � � �1� �_� � � � �� � Revised �999 2002 111-39 � �t�a� � �'i � �� � � , FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation Transportation Goals & Policies It is proposed that the City adopt the following goals and policies with respect to transportation faciliTy improvements that allow it to maintain options into the future, especially with respect to transit enhancements. This may result in a conservative approach to highway improvements that might slow the rate of progress in the area of non-SOV mode use. Goal TG2 Provide a safe, e�cient, convenient, and financially sustainable transportation system with su�cient capacity to move people, goods, and services at an acceptable devel of service. The City shall develop and adopt policies for the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, and preservation of new and existing facilities. PoGcies Policies that affect streets and roadways are divided into five categories: General, Functional, Safety, Multimodal, and Community/Aesthetic. General TP9 Identify and implement changes to the transportation system that reduces reliance on the single occupant vehicle. Support state, regional, and local visions and policies. TP10 Protect existing and acquire future right-of-way consistent with functional classification cross-section (transit, rail, bike, and pedestrian) needs. Require developments to dedicate right-of-way as needed for development commensurate with the impacts of the development. At a minimum, setback limits shall be used to assure that buildings are not placed within the right-of-way requirements for planned transportation facilities. Right-of-way dedication shall be commensurate with a development's impact to the existing and planned transportation system. TPll Coordinate street and roadway improvement programs with appropriate state, regional, and local agencies. TP12 Maintain the transportation forecasting model for use in impact analysis, capital facilities planning, and monitoring of the plan. TP13 T'he maintenance and preservation of existing streets, roadways, and related infrastructure shall take precedence over major street improvement projects that enhance system capacity. Revised �9A9 2002 � � � � � � LJ � �J � � �.J � � � J � m-ao � �� u L: I 1 � � Functional TP14 Provide access between major development areas identified in the recommended alternative, while improving business access and protecting City neighborhoods. TP15 Specify an appropriate arterial LOS which balances the economic, ecological, � accessibility, and livability needs of City residents, consumers, employers, and employees. � � ' � � , TP16 The City's LOS standard shall be E. This is defined herein as a volume/capacity ratio less than 1.00 in accordance with Highway Capacity Manual (�9-94 2000) operational analysis procedures. At signalized intersections, the analysis shall be conducted using a 120-second cycle length and level of service E is defined as less than b9 80 seconds of �eg� delay per vehicle. Where transit or HOV facilities are provided, the LOS shall be measured by average delay and volume/ capacity ratio per person rather than per vehicle. This standard shall be used to identify concurrency needs and mitigation of development impacts. For long- range transportation planning and concurrency analysis, a volume%apacity ratio of 0.90 or greater will be used to identify locations for the more detailed operational analysis. TPl� Expand arterial capacity by constructing channelization improvements at intersections when they are an alternative to creating new lanes along a roadway corridor. TP18 Determine street classifications by balancing travel needs with changing right-of- way uses and neighborhood character. � TP19 Limit single-occupant vehicle capacity increases to those required to maintain the existing LOS, either by providing new streets or by widening existing streets. Maintain existing and preserve future street connections vital to system integrity. ' TP20 Take advantage of opportunities to open new road connections to create route alternatives, especially in areas with few access choices. � TPZ1 Enhance traffic circulation arid access with closer spacing of through streets, unless geographical constraints do not pertnit. °� ��s Limit the area to be served bv a single access point commensurate with planned density. � � � � Revised �899 2002 FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation �� n,.�o,.;.,i �,...00,-� .,* io.,�+ o ..,:�o - -�� � �.T * a +�, •+w ... �.�,.,.v .,o,.:.,.o:o,. „ �— ., _.,_.. , ill-41 �_ , � FWCP — Chapter Three, TranspoRation Safety TP22 Develop access management standards to minimize the number of curb cuts on arterials to improve pedestrian and vehicle safety. TP23 Minimize through traffic on residential streets by maximizing through travel opportunities on arterial and collector streets. TP24 Consider safety first in the design of intersection improvements. TP25 Allow improvements to traffic flow only where they contribute to traffic and pedestrian safety, high capacity transit and HOV system enhancements, and reduce air pollution. TP26 Employ traffic calming measures in neighborhoods (where feasible) where traffic volumes and speeds on local streets consistently exceed reasonable levels. TP27 Prohibit parking on arterial and collector streets, except on low volume business district streets in the City Center when neither safety nor transit operations would be compromised. TP28 Improve safety on residential streets by: a. Reducing street widths while maintaining on-street parking. b. Increasing separation between sidewalks and streets. c. Reducing design speeds to discourage speeding. d. Limitin� the len�th of strai�ht streets to discoura�e sueeding_ e. Discouragin� the use of four-le�ged intersections. Multimodal TP29 Reduce reliance on the single occupant auto by prioritizing and implementing supportive local-level transit, HOV, and non-motorized improvements. TP30 Identify and plan for multi-modal freeway, arterial, and collector street improvements which ensure more efficient use of existing roads and enhancement of HOV, transit, and related non-motorized operations. TP31 Integrate the traffic circulation network with high capacity transit, HOV, bicycle, and pedestrian networks with consideration to regional system needs, including air and port facilities. TP32 Structure the City's improvement program to strategically place increments-of public and private investrnent that complement the multi-modal vision of the plan. This should include "matching" improvements to supplement the efforts by other agencies to provide HOV and transit facilities. Revised �899 2002 , � � � � U � ' ' ' C l � � , �J �__J � � L_ � � III-42 � , � ' FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation � TP33 Acquire rights-of-way for high capacity transit whenever possible in advance of their need, and make accommodations for any improvements, whether public or private, to provide for future high capacity transit needs without major ' redevelopment (e.g., locate structures so they would not need to be altered to accommodate future high capacity transit facilities). r , � TP34 Design arterials to fit with the planned character of areas they pass through. Community/Aesthetic TP35 Minimize visual distraction to drivers on arterials. TP36 Make arterial travel a pleasing visual experience in order to reduce driver frustration and speed. TP37 Keep through traffic to state routes and arterials. Discourage the use of local or ' neighborhood streets for through movements (unless part of an overall process of creating a street grid). , ' � � L_J �� � � � TP38 Include sufficient area in rights-of-way for bike lanes, sidewalks, and landscaped medians to provide separation from motorized traffic as funds allow. Use landscaped medians to separate opposing traffic when safety and aesthetic purposes dictate the need. 3.2 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT (TSM) � Revised �998 2002 Transportation Systems Management (TS1Vn focuses on maximizing use of the existing systems travel capacity. The concept was first originated in the mid-1970s by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Since that time, it has been applied by a host of different ways in cities and metropolitan areas around the country. More recently, the 1991 Federal Transportation Act (ISTEA) expanded the vision of TSM introducing the term Congestion Management Systems (CMS). The terms CMS and TSM are synonymous in this document. Again, the focus of TSM is to identify ways to manage the transportation system (usually streets and highways, from a local agency perspective) to maximize the carrying capacity of existing facilities. TSM activities can include new construction, but they typically modify an existing facility. TSM options can be grouped into the following categories: ■ Geometric Improvements ■ Access Management ■ Signalization Improvements ■ Capacity Enhancements 111-43 � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation These groupings cover a host of alternative actions. Not all are appropriate for a ciTy to undertake. The more popular and successful ones are listed in Table III-8, TSMStrategies Applicable to Federal Way. Table III-8 TSM Strategies Applicable to Federal Way Strategy Low or None High Geometric Improvements -Channelization d -Bus Turnouts ✓ -Exclusive Turn Lanes ✓ -Intersection Widening � Signalization Improvements -New Signals • ✓ -Signal Removal ✓ -Coordination ✓ -Timing/Phasing Optimization ✓ -Monitoring � Access Management -Tum Prohibitions �/ -Access Management ✓ -Driveway Restrictions/Kemoval ✓ -Signing � Capacity Enhancements -Arterial Frontage Roads �/ -Railroad Over-Crossings ✓ -Intersection Grade Separation ✓ Geometric Improvements 'The term Geometric Improvements refers to projects intended to "re-shape" the physical layout of roads. Through reported problems and periodic monitoring (see section on Monitoring which follows), isolated improvements can be defined which will improve the operation of traffic and increase safety. Such improvements are under the City's control. While there are national and state level guidelines, the City's adopted design standards guide the design of these improvements. Sometimes called Spot Improvements, their low cost and net increase in efficiency make them particularly popular. Signalization Improvements Signalization improvements include traffic signal installation or removal, and operational strategies. Historically, the City has relied on other agencies to service its traffic signals. The county has maintained some signals under contract to the City, while the state has operated those on certain state routes. This has produced a fragmented approach to tr�c control. Recognizing this, the City recently initiated a central computer system to control Revised �999 2002 ' � � �J , �� I ' � ' ' `_ 1 ' , �J � I ,� 111�4 � , ' ' FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation key intersections in the City Center. This program consolidated all signals under King � County-contracted maintenance and operation. Only signals at I-5 off-ramps remain under WSDOT jurisdiction, although signal timing is maintained by the City to provide signal coordination. ' LJ � � CJ � ' ' Traffic along South 320`� Street, South 348`� Street, and SR 99 benefit from coordination and improvement to signal timing and phasing. A decrease in delay of up to 29 percent was measured in an earlier study. The cost of such improvements has been rapidly recovered by this reduction in delay to drivers. Air quality is also enhanced due to fewer unnecessary stops. In addition, transit reliability has increased. Coordinated signal systems require periodic attention to maintain their efficiency because traffic conditions change over time. While Federal Way is not directly operating the signal systems, it has focused on hiring traffic personnel in the Public Works Department who have experience in this area and can manage the contracted work Monitoring of the system is another activity � that the City controls directly. Whether or not the City operates the signals, a monitoring and reporting program should be set up. This would include the gathering of traffic information, its processing, and the reporting of the results in a systematic fashion. Changes in operating conditions should be reported to responsible officials on a regular basis and should be used as part of the prioritization process in making local improvements (see the section on Implementation Strategies). The City has developed a master plan to provide signal communications, coordination, and monitoring as shown in Map III-3. Access Management Access Management is another means to manage traffic flow efficiency. These measures ' can be instituted by the City on its facilities. Further, �axspe�e� W( SDOT) encourages the City to manage access to state routes in the City, often by use of controls and restrictions. (See the Roads and Streets section for ' access management category designations.) Controls and restrictions are often placed where recurrent safety problems have been noted. Signing, which is a form of traffic control, is important to the motoring public. One ' component often overlooked is directional or informational signing. Another reminds travelers of regulations. Since a number of jurisdictions operate roads in and about Federal Way, a comprehensive effort to coordinate signing would be useful in placing , street improvements. Such a system would route motorists and other travelers to the most appropriate route (see section on Intelligent Traveler Systems). , ' Capacity Enhancements , Revised �999 � Capacity enhancements typically include road widening. T'hey are construction oriented (as opposed to operational), and are often constructed to assure an existing road segment 111�45 L� , FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation operates as efficiently as nearby segments. For example, traffic monitoring might indicate a section of freeway carries more local, short trips than long distance, through trips. By adding a parallel frontage road, the freeway might operate more efficiently. Another example might consist of two heavily used streets being grade separated at their intersection point to accommodate flow. Intersections such as South 320`� Street at SR 99, South 348`� Street at SR 161, and South 348`" Street at SR 99 may be considered for such improvements in future planning cycles. Capacity enhancements typically are higher in cost than other TSM strategies. Funding from outside sources is limited. Therefore, such projects must be carefully justified. Advanced Technology and TSM Applications of new technology can also be categorized as TSM measures. Originally called Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems and now known as Intelligent Traveler Systems, they are being rapidly developed for all modes of travel. Key to many of them is improved traveler information. As described further below, their application holds great merit for managing congestion, improving safety, and informing travelers of multiple travel options. An Intelligent Traveler Systems Plan was recently prepared for the State of Washington. Directed by WSDOT, it established a framework for implementation of a variety of ITS options. Table III-9 lists the main categories of ITS application, their relative applicability in Federal Way, and the degree of impact each might have on the City's vision and plan. TSM Projects The following projects have been identified under the City's TSM program. Traffic Signal Coordination ■ Signal Coordination on SR 99 —South 288`" to South 356' Complete signal coordination along major arterial sections. Completed July 1996. Retimed 2001. ■ Signal Coordination on South 348'" —I-S to I South. Complete signal coordination along major arterial sections. Completed December 1995. Retimed 1998. ■ Signal Coordination on South 32d" —I-S to ls` South. Completed July 1996. Retimed 2002. ■ Signal Coordination on SW Campus Drive. Completed December 1998. ■ Signal Coordination on 21�'Avenue SW. Completed December 1998. ■ Signal Coordination on SR161 (Enchanted Parkway). Completed December 1998. Revised �988 2002 , � , , ' � , � ' , , � � J �J ' , ���-06 � , � U ' FWCP— Chaoter Three, Transportation lJ , ' , ' ' �I ' LJ L � ' ' ' C C Table III-9 Intelligent Traveler Systems (ITS) Applications in r'ederal Way ITS CATEGORY EXAMPLE APPLICATION AREA DEGREE OF CITY IMPACT TO CONTROL VISION Public Transit Monitoring of Transit Operations s-� :► Automatic Fare Payment �„ }► Dynamic Ridesharing �-► s� �/ HOV Lanes & Pazking �' �' �/ - Priority Treatment �' �' �/ HOV-Signal Priority �' �' HOV-Automated Highways �-► }► �/ Employer-Based TDM Initiatives s► �' Vehicle Guidance & Control +s, s-� Road Use Pricing t► :► Ferry Management NIA N!A Traveler Information Traveler Information Databases s+ �r�' Trip Planning (Pre-trip) � +�, �' Trip Guidance En Route �s, }* Vehicle Monitoring & Warning Systems +S, +y Traffic Management Incident Detection & Management s► s► �/ Traffic Network Monitoring �' �' Communication Systems H s� �/ Traffic Control Systems �' �i' Construction Management �+ }► Freight & Fleet Management Route Planning & Scheduling +y s► Vehicle & Cargo Monitoring +y +S, Regulatory Support �' s► Internodal Port Transfers N/A N!A Other Services Emergency Service System Mgt. �' }► Enforcement Services •�' s► Traveler Safety/Security }► s+ Air Quality Monitoring & Pricing +S, s+ �'- High/Positive H- Somewhat/Possibly +4- Low/Questionable ✓- Pursue ' Revised �A99 2002 ' Iil-47 FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation Traffic Signalization ■ South 312' @ 8' Avenue South. Place traffic signal to manage changing traffic conditions. ■ 21�'Avenue SW @ SW 32S` Place traffic signal to manage changing traffic conditions. Completed April 1998. ■ SW Dash Point Road @ 8` Avenue SW. Install left turn lane and traffic signal. ■ SW Dash Point Road @ 21 Avenue SW. Install right turn lane, traffic signal, illuminate intersection. Completed Apri11998. ■ SN'34d" Street @ 35'''Avenue SW. Signalization and school crossing illumination. Completed December 1996. ■ SR 99 @ South 33d Street. Signalize. Completed Januarv 2001. Intersection Improvements (Channelization, Geometrics, etc.) ■ South 336'�' Street: 13` Avenue South —18' Avenue South, Right Turn Lane @ SR 99. Construct eastbound right turn lane and westbound left-turn lane. ■ South 356`" Street Right Turn Lane @ SR 99. 150-foot right turn lane. Completed. ■ Continuing Minor Traffic Improvements. Place signal revisions and other traffic controls at various locations to manage the dynamics of short-term changes in traffic conditions. ■ SW Campus Drive @ 6` Avenue SW. Install new traffic signal and left turn storage lanes. Completed. ■ South 32d" @ SR 99. Redesign intersection to accommodate changing traffic patterns. Completed July 2001. ■ SW 34d @ Hoyt Road SW. Construct left turn lanes and signalize: Completed March 2000. ■ South 336` @ 20' Avenue South. Add left turn lanes to accommodate changing traffic demand. ■ South 288`" @ 2d South. Add left turn lanes to accommodate changing traffic demand. Revised �8A9 2002 m-as � , � ' C� ' � , ' ' , , ' � TP39 Continue to implement traffic signal coordination projects as the primary component of a TSM program. As funds permit, monitoring of traffic operations will be carried out to assure efficient timing of traffic signals. TP40 The Manual of Uniform Tra�c Control Devices, developed at the federal level, will be employed in the design and placement of traffic controls. TP41 Public comments and requests will supplement routine traffic monitoring to identify and correct traffic control needs, as well as other noted system deficiencies. TP42 Arterial HOV improvements will be constructed along key corridors to improve flow and encourage use of these more efficient modes. TP43 Minor capital projects, placing spot (localized) traffic irnprovements, will be carried out to extend the capacity of system components. TP44 Capacity enhancements will be made where other, lower cost improvements will not correct deficiencies. They will be carefully justified to compete for limited funds. TP45 Employers will be encouraged to institute complementing TSM actions to those ' under-taken by the City. This will create consistency and understanding, thereby improving travel conditions. ' ' TP46 Intelligent Traveler System options will be monitored by staff, who will periodically recommend additional ITS-TSM options. TP47 Access Management, placing restrictions on left turns across major arterial streets, will be used to reduce crash rates and extend capacity of major arterials. TP48 As technology permits, and the City's HOV system is implemented, ' opportunities will be sought to modify the signal coordination strategies to provide priority to HOVs. ' .' Revised �9 2002 ' FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Transportation Goais 8� Policies Goal TG3 Extend the functional life of the existing transportation system and increase its safe, e�cient operation through application of TSMstrategies. Policies TP49 Incident response timing plans should be developed for parallel arterials to accommodate diversion of traffic from freeways caused by lane closures. m�9 FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation 3.3 NON-MOTORIZED WIODES The two most popular modes of non-motorized transportation are walking and bicycling. Walking constitutes the greatest percentage of personal travel. Unfortunately, short trips (under one mile) are usually not counted in urban travel statistics. We make at least as many short trips as longer trips by motorized vehicles. When travel by younger generations is considered, the importance and magnitude of short trips can be better appreciated. As pointed out in a recent State Department of Community, Trade, and Economic Development report, the popularity of bicycling has increased in the US since the 19'70s. A 1991 survey found that 1.67 percent of Americans and 2.9 percent of people in the Western states commuted to work by bike in October 1990. The Census Work Trip data for Federal Way reported slightly less than one percent bicycle use and about two percent walking for work trips in 1990. The 2000 Census reports that in 1999, approximatelv 1.3 percent of workers 16 years and over walked to work. Table III-10 summarizes the trip purposes reported in 1990 as part of the National Personal Transportation Study. Table III-10 Purposes of Walking and Biking Trips PURPOSE WALK BIKE Work 11% 10% Shopping 18% 10% School/Chwch 20% 14% SociaURecreational 34% 55% Other 17% 11 % Table III-10 indicates that U.S. citizens may not have discovered the bicycle as a commute vehicle, and that opportunities for walking to work are limited. It is possible that the location of jobs relative to homes and the lack of connections between major travel points contribute to this. Can this change? One needs only look to other nations to find examples of bicycle use, especially to access other modes of transportation. In Germany, for example 43 percent of arrivals at rail stations are by bike. A 15 percent figure is common in Japan. ' Your Communify's Transportation Sysfem, Deparfment of Community Development, Stote of Washington, Olympio, WA, Aprii 1993. Revised �898 2002 III-50 ' , ' 1 ' ' , , ' ' , ' ' , ' ' , ' ' , ' FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation Nationally, 54 percent of the population lives within five miles of their work place. There , is a tremendous opportunity for people to walk or bike if we provide safe, direct pedestrian, and bicycle facilities. ' Safety is another area of concern for pedestrians and cyclists. The WSDOT reports that the vast majority of pedestrians killed or injured are struck while crossing the roadway, most often at intersections. Nearly half of all bicyclelautomobile accidents occur at , intersections. The state is monitoring pedestrian and bicycle accidents as performance measures of the service objectives. � 1 ' 1 , ' Funding is no less an issue with non-motorized facilities than road and transit services. The ability of the City of Federal Way to provide non-motorized facilities is limited by funding sources and competing program needs. The extent of this constraint becomes apparent when the estimated $300,000 cost to provide needed wheelchair ramps for transportation-disadvantaged persons in Federal Way is compared to the recent annual budget amount of $30,000. Walking and biking do not appear to play a major role in satisfying urban travel needs at present. T'his will not occur until we provide a safe network for pedestrians and bicyclists and develop a system that is oriented towards pedestrians and bicyclists. Walking and bicycle ways are a potential means of providing increased accessibility for the full range of citizens; including young, old, and transportation-disadvantaged. A safe network of non-motorized facilities will provide the opportunity for recreational and commuter users to reduce their dependence on automobiles. State & Regional Coordination Issues ' ' ' , ' � � _ � . Revised �899 2002 ' On the federal and state level, coordination, planning and implementation of non- motorized facilities has gained significant support as an alternative mode of transportation. The 1990 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) emphasizes the benefits of non-motorized modes of travel and provides a revenue resource for funding planning and implementation activities. The State of Washington has developed service objectives for bicycle and pedestrian transportation systems primarily to increase use and improve safety. The state has also defined the non- motorized systems in terms of state-owned and state-interest. The state-owned system refers to state highways, interstates, femes, and Amtrak. "State-interest facilities are local, regional, or statewide facilities that are vital to the statewide economy and the mobility of people and goods. " On a regional level, the Metropolitan Transportation Plan (�SRC 1995, MTP-3), identifies major issues to be addressed by the plan including: ■ Identify performance based strategies; ■ Develop criteria for identifying regionally significant projects; ■ Establish funding levels and financially constrained plans; Ilt-51 � FWCP - Chapter Three. Transportation ■ Develop better standards; ■ Ensure consistency in planning among local jurisdictions; ■ Establish priorities for funding; and, ■ Involve the public ��� and provid�ge coordination. To provide regional guidance and coordination, the MTP calls for a significant increase in facilities that support pedestrian and bicycle travel. The three components of the MTP strategy include development of a regional network of non-motorized transportation facilities, development of local networks for non-motorized travel, and development of a transit network that is fully accessible to pedestrians and bicyclists. These strategies are consistent with and incorporated into the non-motorized section of this a�e� chapter of �sae...,� �x��..�� �,,,,, ,.ot,o„�;.,o �t.,,, the FWCP. To develop a facility plan and strategies for non-motorized modes of travel, attention to the perceived needs of regional and local users will help create a viable system. Table III-11 lists common problems related to the use of non-motorized travel and options to improve these uses. Table Ill-11 Non-Motorized User Problems and Solutions Problem Solution Alternatives Lack of Facilities, Route Complete system elements and gaps. Discontinuities Review and condition new development. Trip Too Long Interconnect developments and cul-de-sacs with trails. Create closer opportunities (jobs housing balance). Bike Security Add storage facilities at destination and on transit. Clothing/Cleanliness Add showers, changing azeas, and restrooms. Personal Security Assure lighting, wider facilities, motorist compliance with laws. Re-time signals. Where appropriate, separate from vehicles. Unawaze of System Designate (sign) routes. Public education, advertising, provide maps. Pedestrian System Background Walking supports many trip purposes. Significant foot traffic occurs in areas with concentrations of children and high population densities, such as downtown and retail centers. Also, as the American population ages, higher numbers of elderly, who no longer can drive or who choose walking for exercise, are using walkways (sidewalks, paths, and trails). f2evised �898 2002 ' 1 � ' � ' � ' ' , ' , ' ' � � ill-52 � 1 � r � � � � � �� � n � Street lighting, handlguardrails, directional signing, wheelchair ramps, and traffic signal crossing indications are some of the amenities which may be required as part of a pedestrian system. Many existing facilities in Federal Way do not have these amenities and inhibit safe pedestrian improvement and access to transit. The actual provision of these amenities is usually assured through the adoption of design and construction standards, which are applied to new or significantly reconstructed facilities, such as streets, subdivisions, public, and commercial buildings. 'The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires designs that provide access for the mobility impaired, and that are required for all facilities affording public ac.cess. This act also requires the retrofitting of buildings and their access for the mobility impaired. This applies to the need to place ramps at all crosswalks and intersections on City streets. There are also many older areas of Federal Way that have no sidewalks and pedestrian amenities, the lack of which tends to impair safe pedestrian movement. An assessment of needed pedestrian amenities and the condition of existing sidewalks should be carried out to prioritize, fund, and construct a functional pedestrian system. Education and Training '� J � � � Revised �898 2002 � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation Planning for walkways requires an understanding of the patterns of foot traffic and a decision on which trips can be appropriately supported through investment by the public sector. For example, a community such as Federal Way, much of which has been built with neighborhood streets, may find it can only afford to place sidewalks along major streets. For financial reasons, it may be necessary to accommodate foot and bicycle traffic on residential streets within the neighborhood, but provides pedestrian separation from traffic on busier streets through the placement of sidewalks. T^ lm- °�Pedestrian facilities were inventoried and are shown in Map III-18. T'his inventory has recently been revised. ^°^^*°a �^ *��° -^°^, sSeveral arterial streets do not have sidewalks or have sidewalks that are substandard. In 1993, the city adopted a policy that makes the city responsible for maintaining sidewalks. A program to construct missing segments of sidewalk, or to construct sidewalks only within certain arterial classification, should be considered. Pedestrian Improvement Options The public, especially grade school children, should be educated on pedestrian safety. Programs such as "Ped-Bee" (Bellevue, Kirkland) teach children traffic and pedestrian safety. As the American public grows older, it will be increasingly necessary to consider their needs. A recent study by the Center for Applied Research reports that 20 to 40 percent of the elderly who do not drive depend upon walking for their travel needs. The report also points to the fact that traffic signals may fail to take the slow walking speed of these individuals into consideration. T'he Federal Highway Administration is presently considering the study's findings. While there is no immediate action required by the City, it is likely that municipalities such as Federal Way will be prompted to give more explicit consideration to the walking needs of the elderly in the future. � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation A strategic objective for Federal Way's pedestrian system should be as follows: ■ Short Term Strategy. Improve safety and complement the transit system, making it more accessible. It is necessary to attend to the safety needs of pedestrians, correcting locations having high crash rates, and making ADA required ramp improvements. Connections to the transit system can also be made to provide a missing link in what could be a"seamless" public transit system. In extending the pedestrian system to provide access to the transit system, transit amenities such as bus shelters should also be provided. ■ Mid Term Strategy. Provide extensions to the walkway system. Logical, safe, and convenient connections to parks, schools, neighborhoods, retail areas, transit, and other points of attraction should be considered. The major interim extension of the network should provide connections to and within neighborhood and business centers. This will support the neighborhood area and concepts imbedded in the plan vision. A network of walkways and trails on roadways should be integrated into the Parks Comprehensive Plan and its trail system to provide for the needs of both recreation and commuter uses. ■ Long Term Strate�. Focus public and private investment in the City Center. At present, the pedestrian system does not contribute to the identity of the downtown. The future system must link commercial establishments, public open space, and public buildings with transportation facilities. Pedestrian facility development is supported by zoning regulations and development review in the form of the City's design guidelines, to make sure pedestrian access is accounted for and is consistent with this plan. Through a collective vision for the denser core area, this can become an attractive feature for Federal Way. Without it, the resulting pedestrian environment will remain forbidding. Bicycle System Background The Federal Way Bicycle Advisory Committee (FWBAC), Federal Way's citizen advocacy group of bicycling enthusiasts, wishes to see Federal Way become one of the best cities for non-motorized modes of travel. Their goals are to make available to the citizens an interconnected network of bike facilities for commute, utilitarian, and recreational users. Incorporated by this reference to the �°a°•°' u'°� �'^m^�°'�°^°;- D�^^ FWCP is the "City of Federal Way Bicycle Plan," May 1994, which is intended to act as a guide for policy makers when making or planning for needed bicycle improvements in the greater Federal Way azea. The following summarizes key recommendations and gives some examples of possible programs: Revised �899 2002 � � � � �J � �� � � � � 111-54 � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation ■ Staffng. PSRC's MTF acknowledges that communities with dedicated bicycle planners are more likely to have extensive programs for pedestrians and bicyclists, a well-developed facility plan, and design standards for bicycle facilities. A Bike Planner is recommended to facilitate and implement non-motorized programs. This planner could also implement other components of the transportation plan such as TDM, grants, and the TIP. � � � ■ Education and Training. The public needs to be made aware of alternatives to the single occupancy vehicle (SOV) and that bicycles have equal rights to cars on the road. Volunteers and FWBAC members could assist with education programs promoting safety and rules of the road for bicyclists. Programs for grade school children would be beneficial. Users could learn from "Bicycle Buddies." Programs such as"Safety Town" and bicycle rodeos teach children traffic and bicycle safety. ■ Promotion. Bicycles should be promoted as an alternative means of transportation for commuting and for recreation. Publications could have bike-riding tips. Maps of bike routes need to be published. Nationally, 54 percent of all people work within five miles of work. Safe and direct bike rides on trails or routes could increase the use of bicycles as a commuting alternative. ■ Enforcement. Cars and bicyclists that disobey the rules of the road make the roads less safe for everyone. Greater enforcement would be beneficial. ■ Plan. The adoption of a Non-Motorized Facilities Plan developed with the FWCP will provide a classification of the types and locations of bike trails and routes to provide an interconnected network of facilities to meet the needs of Federal Way. �� ■ Standards. The adoption of design standards for bicycle facilities will ensure that the safeTy and quality standards of the community are met. This includes trail widths, pavement markings, signs, bike racks, and lighting for both public and private facilities. Safety can be enhanced by identifying how intersections and driveways are designed and what kinds of catch basin lids and pavement markings aze to be used. WSDOT and AASHTO have developed design standards for bicycle facilities. ■ Facilities. The TIP provides a prioritized listing of non-motorized improvements. These are shown in Table III-12. A small �� CIP category should be identified for improvements to non- motorized modes of travel, such as replacing catch basin grates that are not bike safe, �e constructi� small improvements such as minor discontinuities of bike facilities and to install signs and pavement markings. Major capital improvements for streets should incorporate non-motorized facilities. '� Revised 2A98 2002 III-55 � `J FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Additionally, prioritized projects just for bicyclists will also help provide continuity for the principal bike facilities shown on the Non-Motorized Facilities Plan and provide a basis to compete for available funding sources. Building owners and employers should be encouraged to provide bicycle parking, bicycle security, showers, and lockers. Transit agencies also should be encouraged to provide bicycle parking, security, and a means of transporting bicycles so they can be used at trip destinations. Table III-12 TIP Non-Motorized Im LOCATION BPA Trail Phase II: 1$` Ave S to SW Campus Dr (Completec� Military Road: I-5 North to I-5 South S 312�' St: Dash Pt Rd to l Ave S Weyerhaeuser Way S 320'" St to S 349�' St BPA Trail Phase III: SW Campus br to SW 356 BPA Trail Phase IV: SW 356�' St to City Limits l Ave S: S 292" St to S 312�' St Ave S: S 333` St to S 348`" St Shoulder Improvement Widen for Bike Lanes COST $0.631 Million $1.176 Million $0.308 Million $0.652 Million $1.947 Million $1.230 Million $0.282 Million $2. Million YEAR 1995 2006+ 2002 2002 2001 2004+ 2004+ 20(14+ � � l�J ■ Funding. Reliable on-going funding is needed to accommodate the state, regional, and local goals in providing and supporting non-motorized modes of transportation. Grants are one source to pursue. The following is a list of national grant sources that indicates the level of interest in bicycling as transportation. ■ National Highway System (NHS) ■ Surface Transportation Project (STP) ■ Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program ■ Federall,ands ■ Scenic Byways Program ■ National Recreational Trails ■ Federal Transit Title III Bicycle Improvement Options In competing for limited funding sources, it is essential that this section's recommendations, like the pedestrian/walkway system, be programmed for implementation in a logical fashion. The following are the criteria proposed for establishing the prioritized order of improvements. They are listed in their recommended order of precedence. l. Maintenance and operations. Maintenance of trails, signs, etc. Regular sweeping of trails. ftevised �9A9 2002 IMPROVEMENT Trail Development Shoulder Improvement Shoulder Improvement Shoulder Improvement St. (Completec� Trail Development Trail Development � � � � ►� III-56 � � I t � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation , � Safety Improvements: ■ Replace catch basin grates that are not bicycle safe. ■ Remove hazards and minor discontinuities of trails. ■ Striping and pavement markings for bike trail delineation. ■ Signs 2. Public and private development or redevelopment. ■ Off-road developments ■ Schools ■ Parks ■ Subdivisions 3. Roadway construction or reconstruction. Include bike facilities as a part of all projects as funding allows. 4. Bike facility construction projects that provide access to: ■ Transit ■ Parks ■ Neighborhood centers ■ Libraries ■ Work sites ■ Churches ■ Schools � 5. Completion of sections of the regional trail system (when identified by PSRC). , 6. Creation of a commuter biking system. 7. Creation of a recreational biking system. Non Facilities Plan To assist the City in identifying important facilities for non-motorized modes of travel, as � well as provide guidance for the location of improvements in the non-motorized plan, a facility plan has been developed. Consistency and coordination with regional and other ,. adjacent agency plans and projects will ensure a seamless system of pedestrian and � bicycle facilities. Pierce County, Tacoma, and King County have to some degree identified important facilities. The Pierce County and Tacoma plan identify important bicycle connections at SW Hoyt Road, SW Dash Point Road and SW 356'� Street. T'hese connections are also identified on the Federal Way Plan. The closest regionally significant non-motorized facility to Federal Way is the Interurban Trail. Access east! west to the Interurban Trail from Federal Way is provided on shared facilities on South � 320� Street, South 288�' Street, and South 272 Street. The Federal Way �ie�-�14e� Bicycle Facilit�ies Plan is shown in Map III-19. � � Revised 2889 2002 n�l � FVUCP — Chapter Three, Transportation � The state, region (PSRC), and King County have identified improvements to non- motorized facilities to enhance non-motorized transportation. The FWBAC also � identified improvements needed to accommodate non-motorized facilities. Improvements identified by FWBAC will be considered along with the Federal Way and Regional Transportation Improvement Programs. � This plan illustrates the proposed system of designated bicycle facilities for the City. The complete system will be composed of three types of non-motorized facilities, classified as � follows: Class 1 facilities are separate trails, operating in their own rights of way. Class 2 facilities are signed bike routes that operate jointly with roadways. Class 3 facilities are shared road facilities. Under this plan, the common element will be shared road facilities. Where there is sufficient right-of-way, cyclists can be allowed to share the road with motorized vehicles. No signing or striping will be placed on these facilities. Another common element of the bicycle system will be a network of bike routes and bike lanes. Routes will be established where there is sufficient on-street width to accommodate cyclists in traffic. To maintain continuity and guide travelers, the system will be designed with distinctive markers, possibly designed in a citywide competition. Where the needs of the cyclist warrant, Class 2 bike lanes can be installed using approved pavement marking techniques and signing. A limited number of Class 1 bike trails separated from vehicles will be provided through � the plan. Key among these facilities will be a cross-town trail along the BPA Power Line -, right-of-way, between 11�' Place South at South 324�' Street and SW 356�' Street at about 1� 16` Avenue SW. This facility will provide a non-motorized link between residential neighborhoods, the Aquatic Center, Panther Lake, and commercial/retail areas, including SeaTac Mall. � Transportation Goals & Policies Non-motorized transportation facilities will be increasingly important to the City in meeting the travel needs of its residents and workers and to reduce our dependence on automobiles. The pedestrian and bicycle systems can be implemented through a prioritized series of improvements to complement the transit, and HOV systems as well as create a key link to business, cultural, recreational, and residential elements that are a part of the �pe FWCP Vision. � Goal � , TG4 Enhance community livability and transportation by providing a connected system of pedestrian and bicycle ways that is integrated into a coordinated � regional networl� Revised �809 ?002 m—ss � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Policies TP50 Provide sidewalks on both sides of all arterial streets as funding allows. � � TP51 Provide a one-mile grid of bicycle facilities connecting major activity centers, recreational facilities, and schools. TP52 Incorporate pedestrian and bicycle features as design elements in the City Center as reflected in the �':�'�� FWCP Vision and City Center Street Design Guidelines. � TP53 Ensure that City facilities and amenities are ADA compatible. TP54 Work to extend the existing system of sidewalks, bikeways, and equestrian ways in the city to provide safe access to public transit, neighborhood and business centers, parks, schools, public facilities, and other recreational attractions. TP55 Work with other agencies, particularly relating to regionally significant facilities, to pursue funding for pedestrian and bicycle amenities. TP56 Inform and educate the public on safeiy and use of non-motorized facilities. TP57 Ensure non-motorized facilities are safe and well maintained. � Actions l. Work with high capacity transit agencies to ensure such non-motorized travel amenities as shelters, benches, bicycle racks, lighting, and information kiosks are incorporated in the design and improvement of transit facilities. 2. Establish a funding program that prioritizes the most critical non-motorized improvements first, while realizing opportunities for property owners, neighborhoods, or business groups to create portions of the system through public- private partnerships. 3. Facilitate the School District's designation of a system of safe school walking routes, and, where possible, make capital budget decisions that support such a system. 4. Emphasize the enforcement of laws that reduce pedestrian, cyclist, and vehicle conflict. � 5. Improve public awareness of the laws that protect pedestrians and cyclists and of non-motorized facility locations. 6. Include maintenance of non-motorized facilities in the City's on-going transportation services program. � Revised �999 2002 m-ss � � FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation 7. Acquire access paths between existing developments, cul-de-sacs, public facilities, business areas, and transit followed by trail construction to improve non-motorized circulation. Require the same for all new developments or redevelopments. 3.4 TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT (TDM) Several pieces of recent legislation have led the City into the realm of Transportation Demand Management (TDM). These include the State GMA, Commute Trip Reduction Act (CTRA), and federal level reyuirements under both TEA-21 and Clean Air Act Amendments as reflected in the State Implementation Plan. The GMA cites the need for a variety of "management actions;" including the requirement that the transportation chapter of each plan include an identification of system expansion needs and transportation system managernent (TSM) needs to meet current and future demands. The act goes on to note: After adoption of the Comprehensive Plan ... local jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a transportation facility to decline below the standards adopted in the transportation element of the comprehensive plan, unless transportation improvements or strategies to accommodate the impacts of development are made concurrent with the development. These strategies may include ...demand manaQement and other transportation systems management strategies (emphasis added). The purpose of the following section is to provide recommendations on the appropriate approach to TDM for a suburban city such as Federal Way. Since the preponderance of employment is currently outside the City, there can only be limited influence on traffic congestion within Federal Way by travel management through TDM. Options must be selected accordingly. Table III-13 stratifies various TDM alternatives by their functional grouping and potential effectiveness, implementation difficulties, and expected cost effectiveness. Fortunately, several of the more effective options are within the purview of the City. � '' PSRC'_}s- Vision 2020 identified five basic strategies that overlap with those presented in Table Ill-13. These strategies are: ■ Telecommuting ■ Parking Pricing and Subsidy Removal ■ Compressed Work Week ■ Employer-Based Management ■ Parking Supply Strategies Revised �999 2002 � � �� l� � � m-so `� � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation � � � . � � � � Table III-13 Evaluation of TDM Strategies Who P�ys � Evaluation Criteria for � � � Transportation Demand Potential Effectiveness Implementation Difficulties Incremental � o U Management (TD11� Strategies Cost � � � .� E.. � w � PUBLIC MODE SUPPORT MEASURES Public Education and Promotion Increases the effectiveness of None � Low-medium �/ �/ �/ other strategies up to 3% Area-wide Ride matching 0.1-3.6% VMT reduction None Low �/ �/ Services Transit Services Up to 2.5% VMT reduction Ongoing competition for Medium-high �/ �/ �/ public funds Up to 8.3% commute VMT High fares compared to Vanpool Service reduction transit; finding riders & Medium �/ �/ drivers Transit and Vanpool Fares Up to 2.5% regional VMT Competition for public funds; Medium �/ �/ �/ reduction equity concerns Non-Motorized Modes 0-2% regional VMT Minimal for low cost actions; Low-high �/ �/ �/ reduction great for high cost actions HOV Facilities Up to 1.5% VMT reduction & High cost; public acceptance Medium-high �/ .2% trip reduction Pazk and Ride Lots 0-0.5% VMT reduction None Medium-high �/ EMPLOYER BASED TDM MEASURES Monetary Incentives 8-18% trip reduction at site Tax implications for some Low-medium �/ subsidies Alternative Work Schedules As much as a I%regional Employee or management Low �/ VMT reduction reluctance Commute Support Programs 0.1-2.0% regional VMT None Low �/ reduction Guaranteed Ride Home Unknown Liability concerns of Low �/ �/ employers 20-30% site reduction in SOV Low to Parking Management � Employee opposition revenue �/ �/ producing Space; local zoning Low to Facility Amenities Minimal alone requirements revenue �/ producing Transportation Management 6-7% commute trip Funding and political support Low-medium �/ �/ Associations reduction* required *These results are from pre CTR experiences. A broader range of e„8''ectiveness would 6e expected in the presence of CTR legislation. PRICING STRATEGIES 4-10% regional VMT Public resistance; legislative Revenue Gasoline Tax Increases reduction action; travel alternatives producing � required � 11 1 Rev�sed �898 2002 I-6 � � FWCP - Chapter Three. Transportation Who Pays � Evaluation Criteria for N y � Transportation Demand Potential Effectiveness Implementation Difficulties Incremental T T�,, Management (TDI� Strategies Cost a � � .� H � w � 0.1-11%regional VMT Public resistance; legislative Revenue VMT Tax reduction action; travel alternatives producing � required Public and political Congestion Pricing Up to 5% regional VMT resistance; travel alternatives Revenue � reduction required; technical and producing enforcement difficulties 1-5%regional VMT and trip Legislative action; negative Revenue Parking Tax redaction public sentiment; opposition Producing �� from private sector TELECOMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES Telecommuting Up to 10% commute VMT prevailing corporate culture Low �/ reduction Advanced Telecommunications Moderate to high Untested, unproven concepts Low-high �/ �/ LAND USE STRATEGIES Development Impact Mitigation Varies with mitigation Landowner and developer Low to �� requirements resistance medium Mixed Land Use/Jobs Housing �T reductions up to 10% Pubiic resistance; slow rate of Low to �� � Balance effective change medium Transit-Oriented and Pedestrian Increase in transit, bike, and Requires design review; Medium to � �� Friendly Design pedestrian trips developer resistance high VMT reductions of up to 10% �blic and developer Medium to Residential Density Increases per household resistance to required h �� �/ densities Employment Center Density SOV work trip reductions of Large increase in density Medium to Increases u to 50% often required to realize �/ �/ p significant change h �� 1 to 5% region-wide VMT Local council action required; Parking Management reduction public/retailer resistance; Low �/ �/ enforcement issues Unknown; probably reflects Requires policy changes, Low to On-Site Amenities effectiveness of mixed use public, and private inertia are medium � development barriers POLICY & REGULATORY STRATEGIES .1 - 4% regional VMT Legislative action required; Trip Reduction Ordinances reduction resistance to expanded Low-medium �/ �/ �/ regulation Restrict Access to Facilities and 2 g_10% VMT reduction Pa�itical will to face public Low to high �/ Activity Centers opposition Support New Institutional Unknown Require strong advocacy, Low to high �/ Arrangements public, & private support Increase HOV lanes to 3+ Possible 1.5%reduction Legislative action needed; Low �/ public resistance Parking Restrictions 1-5% trip reduction Public, developer resistance Low �/ � � � i � � � Revised �AAB 2002 111-62 � � �� � LJ � �� � PSRC also recognizes that the folIowing issues must be addressed to support successful TDM implementation in the region: ■ Lack of data on effectiveness ■ Emerging technological and social shifts ■ Lack of regional coordination ■ Need for TDM strategies to address non-commute trips ■ Lack of funding flexibility to finance TDM investments ■ Lack of alternatives to single occupant vehicle (SOV) travel ■ Lack of public support While TDM actions are aimed at reducing travel demand or, at least, shifting it to more opportune travel times, several focus on consolidating person trips to fewer vehicles. The City views ' HOV� and transit use as key to reducing travel demand. As discussed in later sections, provision of on-street and off-street HOV facilities and controls will support this strategy. For example, arterial HOV lanes will complement the regional system. Similarly, traffic signal prioriTy and preferential parking, access, and egress for HOV will further bolster the program. Effectiveness of TDM Alternatives �� Recently, WSDOT conducted a study of the effectiveness of alternative TDM strategies. This work was carried out for the National Association of Regional Councils and provides interesting conclusions. The study looked into both the cost of TDM strategies and the potential reduction in vehicle miles traveled (and air pollution) resulting from the efforts. Interestingly, this work identifies the least and the most effective strategies, which are summarized in Table III-13. The researchers noted that land use planning and related strategies are also potentially highly cost-effective. Commute Trip Reduction Act � � � Revised �A88 2� FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation The Commute Trip Reduction Act was passed by the State Legislature in 1991 and revised in 1997. It is also a part of the State Clean Air Act. The intention of the law is to improve air quality, reduce traffic congestion, and decease fuel consumption. It focuses attention on larger employers with the intent of reaching concentrations of workers who might use shared-ride and non-motorized modes to travel to and from work. Working from 1992, or employer's survey year data, as the base year, employers are encouraged to reduce SOV use and vehicle miles oftravel (VMT) by'� ^°�^°^* �^'nns 15 percent in the first two vears, 20 percent in four vears 25 percent in six vears and 35 percent in 12 years. In 1992 the baseline characteristics were established for South King County (including Federal Way) at an 85 percent share to SOV's and an average trip length of 93 miles. , o V1�QT +.. �:., ,,,;to� III-63 � �J FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation In 1993, Federal Way adopted an ordinance consistent with the CTR guidelines. In adopting the ordinance, the City agreed to file an annual report on the program and to accept advice from METRO on alternative strategies that local employers might be encouraged to use in meeting the goals. The City also agreed to conduct a review of its parking requirements as part of the process and to play an active role in the regional process. It is the City's intent to also set an example for other employers through the establishment of CTR programs among its employees. In 1999, Federal Way revised the 1993 ordinance to be consistent with the state CTR �uidelines. Based on recent ("�^�^r.�.-'� 2001) surveys of Federal Way Employers, the '°°-�-�,�- n„�i ,.���,�c ..o e„+ .,,,,� *t,o �oac ��et,:,.to a,r;te� •r...,.,oto,�t r�n�,r� ,,,..,i „�� a, »,:�e� . actual . percentaQe of drive alone trips was 77.94 perce -r�,o ., o ,,,.v �;+o +..;.. �o,,,h�, , o�+:,,...,+oa „� , �.a ..,:�e� .,,,,� *ao „ .,o ,,.;,, �o,,,,.+�, .,,.,� o ..,;�o�, The round trip VMT in Federal Way was reduced bv 1,830,538 miles. The over-all mode split results from the 1995 and 2001 survey� are shown in Tabde III-14. Similar to the issues stated in the MTP, reasons for driving alone included convenience and a lack of alternatives. Table III-14 Federal Way Mode Split Survey Results MODE MODE SPLIT 199g 2001 SOV (Single Occupant Vehicle) $� 77.94% � Carpool Q� 12.70% �-�ee� Van ol Q1°/Q IJ8% BuslTransit ��15 0.96% Compressed Work Week r� 3.67% Bicvcle � 0.31% Walk 1Z 0.37% Telecommute 411s 1.24% ��e�� � � � Other 1 ° 1.0?% Recommendations Based upon the above, the following recommendations are made: 1. Encourage voluntary expansion of the CTR Program to employers of less than 100 employees. The encouragement by employers may be as diverse as subsidized bus passes, car pool space priority, bike racks, shower facilities, van pools, car pool information access, telecommuting, variable work hours, etc. Revised �899 2002 �� � � � � � m-sa � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation � 2. Encourage the formation and expansicn of area-wide ride-sharing programs. Such programs operate with little direct cost to the City and are highly cost- � effective. 3. Facilitate the creation of Park and Ride facilities and transit centers to � supplement the regional system, either directly through acquisition of property or indirectly through development conditions where employer vans are required to shuttle employees to Park and Ride facilities or transit centers. 4. Facilitate enhancements to the HOV System. This may include the acquisition of property for HOV lanes, construction of arterial HOV lanes on City arterials and State highways, and priority treatments for buses at traffic signals. At the very least, opportunities to support improved access to the State system of HOV lanes should be identified and supported. � 5. Increase density of land uses and encourage a mix of uses to locate near bus routes, park and ride lots, and transit centers through the adoption of the �� FWCP and its supporting zoning. This policy is vital to � the creation of a regional bus and rail system and will also be an effective way to reduce traffic congestion and air pollution. � 6. Encourage mini transit centers in the City Center, neighborhood shopping areas, and multifamily nodes, together with enhanced pedestrian and bicycle access and security. �; 7. Improve pedestrian and bicycle access to bus routes and transit centers. This can be a requirement of subdivision, development, and redevelopment. The City may need to acquire easements and construct trail connections. � Development incentives could be granted for providing such amenities that are pedestrian, bike, and transit friendly. � 8. While bicycle, pedestrian, and bus transit services and facilities may be desirable for other reasons; they should not be looked on as highly cost- effective strategies to the exclusion of those actions listed above. � � � Transportation Goais & Policies � Revised �9A9 2002 Through TDM options, the City can maximize the effectiveness of the public investment dollar. Many jurisdictions are finding non- construction, or management actions, critical to the overall achievement of congestion management and protection of neighborhoods. As such, the �1�a��ge�e� TDM goals for Federal Way can be expressed as follows. Iil-65 l� � FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation Goal � TG5- a. Employ and promote the application of non-construction, and transit/HOV � construction actions to preserve and enhance mobility and assist in achievement of the land use vision. b. Develop methods to successfully measure and achieve the following HOV & � Transit mode split-levels by the year 2010: � 1 S percent o, f'all daily trips over one mile in length; � 30 percent of all work trips; and ' � 40 percent of trips behveen major activity centers. c. Assist all Q��a�g CTR affected and voluntary employers in the Federal Way � planning area to achieve the Commute Trip Reduction Act travel reduction goals . , ,.,...�.� ,. ,.��. � d. Ensure that all members of the community, including those with transportation disadvantages, have viable travel options or alternatives. e. Use transportation demand management to help achieve an appropriate arterial Y level of service that balances the economic, ecological, accessibility, and livability needs of the City s residents, consumers, employers, and employees. � Policies TP58 Support the achievement of City and regional mode split goals through encouragement of local and regional work at home and transportation coordination programs such as ride matching services and vanpools. TP59 Support other transportation demand management progams that can be shown to be cost-effective in achieving plan goals, while allowing residents and employers discretion to choose the methods they wish to employ. TP60 Develop an arterial street HOV system and related enhancement, which complements the regional freeway HOV system, through the following actions: ■ Place emphasis on the development of HOV and transit priority improvements; especially those requiring minimal cost or construction. These improvements should pace the extension of the regional system and minimize the gap between traveler needs and system capacity. , ■ Esta.blish an urban traffic control system that gives priority to buses and HOVs. Revised 2898 2002 m-ss � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transporta6on � ■ Establish policy that when arterials require more than four through lanes to maintain the adopted LOS, additional travel lanes will be for HOVs. As HOV lanes reach the adopted LOS standard, increase the � vehicle occupancy requirements for their use (e.g. increase from two or rnore to three or more occupants). LOS will then be calculated by the average delay per person. � _� � � � TP61 Provide improved operational efficiency to the City's transportation system and support regional monitoring programs through regular, structured reporting, monitoring, and performance evaluation. TP62 Modify the development review process by: ■ Incorporating revised impact analysis procedures that comply with State GMA concurrency and other requirements. The revisions need to include revised Level of Service standards. Streamlining it to the extent possible to minimize private development costs. Where developments are consistent with this plan, they should be allowed to proceed by mitigating site impacts; developing appropriate components of the HOV, transit, non-motorized and motorized chapters; and participating in an equitable citywide improvement funding or mitigation payment program. ■ Incorporating requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. ■ Requiring explicit consideration of pedestrian and bicycle circulation, as well as parking and general circulation needs. � LJ :.� � Revised �898 2002 TP63 Adopt a flexible level of service standard which employs a measurement factor that accommodates demand management to help balance likely levels of growth, with opportunities to create a multi-modal transportation system. TP64 Encourage non-motorized improvements which minimize the need for residents to use motorized modes by providing: 1) access to activity centers; 2) linkage to transit, park & ride lots, and school bus networks; 3) completion of planned pedestrian/jogging or bicycle trails; and 4) designating a network of streets �#is� that can safely and efficiently accommodate bicycles. TP65 Enhance a non-motorized system by the following actions: ■ In instances where the citywide system of bike lanes, trails, and sidewalks crosses or abuts new development or redevelopment, consider requiring the developer to mitigate the impact of the development on the City's transportation system by constructing bike lanes, trails, and sidewalks that interface with the existing system. m-s� � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation ■ Coordinate development of the non-motorized system with surrounding jurisdictions and regional system extensions. ■ Extend the existing system of City sidewalks to all streets. TP66 Recognize that TDM requires coordination, and work with regional representative and other adjacent communities to develop coordinated TDM strategies. 3.5 LOCAL AND REGIONAL TRANSIT Public transit service is provided to area residents by a combination of fixed-route, express, dial-a-ride, and subscription bus services. King County METRO serves the City directly, while Pierce Transit buses provide connections from the Park and Ride lot on I-5 at South 320`�' to Tacoma and Puyallup. Sound Transit serves the Federal Wav and Star Lake Park and Ride lots with regional express buses between SeaTac and Tacoma, and between Federal Way and Bellevue. Amenities supporting transit patronage include Park and Ride lots and waiting-area shelters. The Federal Way School District and King County's Multi-Service Center also provide special, local area bus services. Locally and nationally, public transit services, ranging from local buses to regional rail, are witnessing increased attention. Despite declining transit ridership in the late 1980s and early 90s, these services are being viewed at the regional, state, and federal levels as essential to meet public travel needs. Many people with low incomes or special mobility needs depend on transit. The City of Federal Way supports the provision of viable transit services as a component in a multimodal transportation system. Coupled with car pooling and van pooling, improved transit service is viewed by the City of Federal Way as essential to providing area residents with mobility options in the future. Unlike road services however, the City is constrained by state law and federal re�ulations in its ability to provide these alternatives. The City's involvement with the provision of transit services is indirect through such efforts as supportive land use planning (to generate sufficient transit patronage) and roadway design features (to accommodate transit and other high occupancy vehicles). The City's planning process has focused on development of a transit-supportive environment, including improved pedestrian and bicycle access to transit. Public Works projects anticipate enhanced regular route, local bus service, and the possible implementation of a regional light rail system. Expansion of regional transit and HOV systems is critical to the achievement of Vision 2020, which guides the regional Metropolitan Transportation Plan. Federal Way's vision, which includes a City Center with surrounding commercial and residential land uses, is Revised �998 2002 � � � ! __] � � � � � III-68 � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three, TranspoRation enhanced by both an improved regional bus system and a rail system. Local circulation � routes will also be essential. The Federal Way plan has been structured with primary emphasis on locations that can become transit centers. In the interim, transit centers will be focused at Park and Ride lots. � Existing Conditions � An extensive inventory of existing transit services in and about Federal Way was reported in the City's 1993 Community Profrle. The following excerpts on existing r% conditions are taken from that document. Map III-20 indicates Federal Way's existing regular, express, and Dial-A-Ride route � locations, as well as its park and ride lot locations and planned bus routes. There are 24 regular and express service routes that provide nearly 250 bus trips to, within, and through Federal Way each day. In total, about 3,000 to 3,500 person trips are made by � regular, express, and Dial-A-Ride service each day. About one percent of all daily (and three percent of peak hour) Federal Way trips are made by transit, which is comparable to other suburban areas. The majority of service is provided to park and ride facilities where more than half of Federal Way's transit riders access transit. Routes into the neighborhoods of the City are oriented to the higher density areas where there is lower auto ownership and greater reliance on transit. Under a demonstration project, METRO instituted Dial-A-Ride Transit (DAR1� service � to portions of the City in 1992. Today, DART service follows a semi-fixed routing with service provided to patrons who do not live or work on fixed routes. � Is transit service available today? In a 1991 survey by Federal Way, the answer seemed to be a resounding "No." Distributed to approximately 30,000 residents, nearly 2,000 responded, many of who (87 percent) were auto drivers. When asked for reasons why � they did not use transit, the following responses were received: ■ Auto required for work/personal errands — 47% � ■ Buses do not go to destination — 33% ■ Auto saves time — 30% ■ Bus schedules are not convenient — 29% � ■ Bus stops too far away — 23% ■ Parking is free/low cost at work — 23% ■ Transfers are inconvenient — 20% However, in another survey, among 75 employers of varying size, nearly 75 percent indicated that service is available within one block of their establishment. � Revised 2899 2002 III-69 � � FWCP — Chaqter Three, Transportation Local Transit Service Development Most transit service to and from Federal Way is oriented toward downtown Seattle. Historic, radial expansion of the system from the downtown is one reason far this. More significant is that density, congestion, and parking costs have kept transit competitive in the downtown Seattle market. It was not prudent for METRO to expand service for the growing suburban market where there was little congestion and parking was abundantly available. However, suburban-to- suburban travel demand and local congestion have increased the need to reevaluate and begin planning for cross-town service. The potential for improvement was corroborated by comparing auto and transit travel times. The �+��epte� 1996-2001 METRO Six Year Plan �� accommodates these changes in customer needs by setting policies which would shift layout of the system to multiple Hubs and Spokes focused on transit centers with rapid service between centers. This �� provides radial local service to take customers to a city center. Thus, citizens would be able to catch express service to such destinations as Auburn, Puyallup, Tacoma, and Seattle. In addition, the 1996 voter approval of Sound Transit's Sound Move Initiative provides greater means to serve emerging travel patterns. Other Factors Affecting Transit Use While transit routes exist within Federal Way neighborhoods, the existing street layout, with its many cul-de-sacs and dead-end streets, is not always conducive to transit use. Buses cannot run along every residential street. They usually operate on collector and arterial streets, thus residents often have to walk several blocks to reach a route. Research has shown that when potential patrons have to walk over'/a miles, many will not use transit. Because of the distance between residences and bus stops, and frequent express-type service to Park and Ride lots, many transit users travel to the three � Federal Way lots near I-5. However, these lots are nearly always at capacity. Efforts to expand their capacity by both METRO and WSDOT have been hampered by the relatively high cost of land to provide for expansion. Despite high land costs, WSDOT rec� entl� �e constructed a new 600-space Park and Ride lot at 21�` SW at SW 344 Street� �r��s a�,�i�a�g and Metro plans to construct another Park and Ride lot at Pa cific Hi�hwav South and South 276'� Street. Sound Transit is proposing a Citv Center Transit Center with an up to 1200 stall parkin� structure, connecting to an HOV direct access ramp to I- 5 via South 312�' Street. In considering future land use and transportation alternatives for the City, a balance must be sought between creating transit compatible land uses and providing system access from park and ride facilities and stations. � � � � � � � � � �- � Revised � 2002 III-70 � � � � I , � � � FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation Dial-a-Ride Transit (DART) As noted above, this service was introduced by METRO in 1992 and is being evaluated for its potential as a component of future transit service in suburban communities such as Federal Way. Dial-A-Ride service is demand activated by the users. Users originally phoned in and van service was provided within two hours. Unlike regular route service, only the area being served was defined, not the routes. The service has since been modified to operate with semi-fixed routes, which due in part to greater schedule reliability, has dramatically increased ridership. Should ridership continue to improve, regular fixed route service may soon be attainable. Paratransit Service � � � � � � � � In addition to the service program for general-purpose travel, METRO has embarked on a significant program to improve services for persons who cannot use regular route bus service. This program has been developed to meet the requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. It provides high quality public transportation service to eligible customers. � +° �^ +��° ^ •�;'� ^^^+;"„° ;" ^"�°'° t° oo. ��,o ao.,ai;.,o� :,,. �oa a., .�,o n,.* �.., , na� People with limited resources who are either 65 or older or who have disabilities may qualify for Paratransit. Called ACCESS Transportation, Paratransit service cunently provides door-to-door transportation Monday through Friday for 25 cents. Monthly and annual pass stickers are available as well. Key elements to METRO's Paratransit Plan are the provision of: ■ Supplemental service in Western King County within �e 1'/2 miles on either side of regular route service; ■ Next-day reservations up to 14 days in advance, with trips scheduled seven days a week; ■ Fares held to the same level as one-zone regular bus fares; and ■ Scheduled service to be the same as the near-by, regular routes. Federal Way is within a METRO service area from 5 a.m. to 2 a.m. Regional Transit Improvements � Revised �898 2002 The METRO Six Year Plan is consistent with the regional public transportation concepts embodied in '' Sound Transit's plan for longer range rail and bus improvements. It provides a first step toward building an integrated system of expanded services and capital facilities. Now that a regional transportation system has been approved by voters, Federal Way's land use and transportation plans accommodate its impacts and implications. III-71 � �' FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation The City's Role Supporting activities by the City, either under the shorter range METRO Plan or the Regional Transit Plan (RTP), would include preferential traffic signal treahnent for regional (express) buses, and cooperation with WSDOT in improving access to the state highways in the area. ' The land use plan will support both the regional and local transit systems through configuration of land uses and allowable densities. Historically, most of Federal Way was developed at five units to the acre or less. The land use chapter of the �e�si�e � FWCP includes higher densities in the City Center and along the SR-99 corridor. A threshold in transit planning seeks 15 to 20 dwelling units per acre to support HCT systems. The results of such intensification are shown in Figure III-S, which depicts the ability of differing development densities to generate higher transit mode splits. The primary area supporting HCT will be concentrated along Highway 99 north and south of South 320�' Street. The City Center will be located northeast of the intersection of these two arterial roadways. Higher density residential areas will be located in the City Center core and frame, increasing in intensity in areas surrounding transit centers or major transfer points such as Park and Rides. Improvement Priorities Metro (King County Metropolitan Services) has identified transit service improvements in south King County in their draft six-year plan. These improvements are depicted in Table III-1 S. � � L� � � � j �� � � � � � Revised 2988 � III-72 � � Table Ili-1 S I�LTTTA 1 � Tl T • . • r � t itf � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FWCP — �hauter Three. Transportatbn Figure III-5 � � � I I �. O a N � � O � � w � Land Use Intensity vs. ZYansit Demand LEGEND * Note: This level of transit use only attainable with High Capacity �ansit Station in place �� � � �E�-'t1... DAILY RANGE OF TRANSIT USE LOW - HIGH 6% - 16%* 3% - 6% 1% - 3% Revised 2ppp � III-73 Zone Density � FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation To support expanded regional transit, a more extensive feeder bus system will be needed. METRO and Pierce Transit have worked with the City in developing concepts for improved transit service in and about the City in the future to support the �`'�a�e FWCP land use vision. Key features include: Expanded Bus Route Coverage — Existing Peak Hour Transit Service and potential new bus routes are depicted on Maps III-20 and 111-21 and 111-22 respectivelv. Improved Regular Route Bus Service — Buses would run every 15-30 minutes, linking neighborhoods, Green River Community College, Valley employers, and other south county cities. Transfers to Pierce County buses would also be made easier. Dial A-Ride Service — This on-call service would be modified as needed to complement regular route service. New technology would help provide a more flexible set of services, penetrating neighborhoods where regular buses are prohibited. Paratransit services would also expand door-to-door service for people with disabilities. Transit Main Streets — Selected travel conidors would be designed to combine frequent bus service with neighborhoods and City Center shops or services. Comfort, safety, as well as bicycle and pedestrian access would be emphasized along these corridors. Transit Priority — As with regional express routes, special lanes and signals could allow local buses, as well as vanpools and car pools, to by-pass congestion. Areas under consideration, through regionally funded studies, include SR 99, South 348` and South �� 320`� Streets. Diamond lanes for HOVs, including buses, would be completed along SR 99, and South 348`� Street. Traveler Information Systems — Through the application of high-tech communications systems, METRO has already begun installing devices to track the location of vehicles and to provide the traveling public with real-time information on system options. These systems will be enhanced under a comprehensive system of transit, HCT, HOV, and freeway monitoring. As described later in the plan, it is anticipated that a vastly improved traveler information system will make both the local and regional transit system more attractive to local residents. Six-Year Ptan Implementation — In 1996, METRO appointed several citizens in South King County to recommend improvements in transit service to implement the Six-Year Plan. This group met for over a year and has recommended the development of a grid pattern of local service routes and consolidating commuter routes to Seattle, and increasing the frequency of routes connecting to other communities. The first phase was implemented in September 1997, and modified the following routes: ■ Route 181 was rerouted to South 336�' Street, 20`� Avenue South and South 324�' Street, instead of Weyerhaeuser Way South and South 320`� Street. Frequencies were increased to 30 minutes midday. �J � � � � � �� �_1 � L1 L� � 1 � Revised �9 2002 ill-74 � � � � FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation � ■ Route 902 was replaced with a new Route 183 from the Federal Way Transit Center to the Kent Transit Center via the Star Lake Park & Ride. Overlapping portions of Route 192 were deleted. � � � � ■ Route 903 was rerouted to 1 S ` Avenue South and South 320`�' Street from South 356"' Street and 20` Avenue South between West Campus and the Federal Way Transit Center, providing all-day service to 1�` Avenue South. ■ Route 194 was rerouted to 9`� Avenue South from Pacific Highway South, providing all-day service to several CTR affected employers. The second phase of improvements would restructure routes in the remainder of Federal Way and ' was implemented in June 1998. A sample route structure is shown in Maps III-20 and 21. The ultimate conceptual plan is shown in Map III-22. � Sound Transit Improvements — Express bus service is provided between Tacoma and Seattle, and another route connects Federal Wav with Auburn, Kent, Renton, and Bellevue. The voter-approved Sound Move Initiative will also provide improvements to � the Federal Way Transit Center and the Star Lake Park & Ride. At both locations, direct access roadways will be constructed from the Park & Rides to the HOV lanes on I-5. , � •i� .� a .,i �xr., .•.�, n �, Tro.,* uo„�,,,, ��a uo»o..,,o. Plans for extending > > > light-rail between SeaTac and Tacoma will also be reviewed. � � � Federal Way Transit Center Location — The Federal Way Transit Center is currently located at the Federal Way Park & Ride. At the time of adoption, the City Center e�� cha ter of the FWCP proposed a new location at South 316�' Street and 20 Avenue South. The primary driver for this location was the assumption that light-rail between Seattle and Tacoma would follow SR 99. Since adoption of the plan, conditions have changed and discussion of alternate locations has emerged. Sound Transit's Sound Move Initiative allocated $4 Million for the construction of a new Transit Center, in coordination with the enhancement and/or relocation of the existing Transit Center and direct access ramps. � The Transit Center is considered by the City as a major anchor to the urban center designation in the Vision 2020 plan adopted by the PSRC. The location of the Transit Center should be surrounded by property that has potential to redevelop into transit- � supportive uses, thus assisting to ensure both the success of the Transit Center itself and the economic vitality of the City Center. � Based on thee considerations, the Transit Center and any associated capital facilities (such as park and ride facilities) should be located as closely as possible to the geographic center of the City Center. This �oint is located at the intersection of 20�' Avenue South and the proposed South 318 Street. In no case should the Transit Center � be located east of 23'� Avenue South, as the proximity to I-5 would limit redevelopment to transit-supportive land uses. � Revised 2A98 2002 ill-75 � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation As a result of analysis of 10 potential sites, the preferred site for this Transit Center was selected as the southwest corner of South 316' Street and 23` Avenue South, as it balanced proximity to I-5 and to the geographic center of the City Center. The Result of Transit Expansion The net result expected from placement of improved transit locally and in the region is meaningful improvement to mode split (the percentage use of each mode). The predicted (and present) values are as shown in Table Ill-16. While not large in magnitude, with only a 13 percent share of trips by transit and other HOVs in 2010, one must view the impacts during peak periods and along congested travel corridors in assessing the implications. It is possible, after the turn of the century, that: ■ One in every four Federal Way Work trips will be by HOV and transit modes; Mode Drive Alone CarNan Pool Transit Other ■ One in every three Regional Daily trips will be by these modes; and, ■ Over 50 percent of all work trips to urban centers such as Federal Way will be by HCT and HOV. Work Tri Current Federal Way Work Trips Daily Trips 79% 86% 14% 8% 3% 1% 4% 5% Table III-16 and Mode Split Estimates � 2010 Region Federal Way Daily Trips Work Trips Daily Trips 72% 70-74% 81-85% 15% 18-20% 8-10% 6% 4-5% 2-3% 7% 4-5% 5-6% Regi Daily Trips 62-68% 16-18°/a 8-10% 8-10% � � � �J � O � � � � � � Guiding the Process To strategically position itself in the regional transit funding process, Federal Way's plan has been prepared to integrate with the Metropolitan Transportation Plan, METRO's Six Year Plan and the RTP. Road improvements that have been identified will focus service to the transit centers or Park and Ride lots and support access to the regional system or provide an increment of capacity that would relieve congestion and air pollution. To foster achievement of the transit vision, a series of supportive actions are necessary. The land use distributions should take advantage of opportunities to increase densities in a transit friendly fashion. In the core area, street planning would, in many cases, provide exclusive access routes to transit centers as the area increases in density. Revised �999 2002 � � J� � m—�s � � � � FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation � A staged implementation of service in the City Center will be required. This can be accomplished by creating incentives for developers and through investment of public dollars to protect options and provide logical increments of service. The provision of I transit corridors, improved traffic circulation, and improved non-motorized access to transit will also be necessary. � � ' �i � � � � � � � Revised 2999 2002 Key interim and long-term improvements must continue to focus on transit service to transit centers and Park and Ride lots. As the City moves toward 2010, strategically located lots, with bus, bike, and pedestrian access will be necessary. Complementing this, the City can look to the land use development process and the rising interest of employers to provide "self-managed" travel options. The City will encourage transit-oriented land use patterns, especially along intensified corridors. The State's Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) legislation will also guide these efforts. Transit extension into many of the City's neighborhoods will not be possible due to the configuration of the existing street network. However, opportunities do exist to connect neighbarhood collector street� � ^°���b� ±� u�T �,::°°� �,,,� un���. Such extensions into neighborhoods will require strengthening of roads or their structural failure will be rapid. Most routes will remain on major streets where traffic flow improvements can be made to expedite service. Enhancements to transit (HCT and HOV) flow will become increasingly popular as signal preemption techniques are perfected. Several of these systems are being tested at present. The likely sequence of the longer-term development and travel events is shown in Section 3.6. Transportation Goals & Policies Goal Policies TG6- a. Prepare and provide for an enhanced, high capacity transit system, maintaining area residents' mobility and travel options. b. Foster phased improvements that expand transit services in tame to meet the demand for these services. TP67 Promote the creation and use of a regional transit system that provides a cost- effective alternative mode of travel to the single occupant auto, and assists the region in attaining air quality standards. This system should be extended to the City on a timely basis and be preceded by phased implementation of increased levels of local and regional bus and HOV services which maximize accessibility to regional jobs and maintains Federal Way as a regional activity center. m-n � FWCP — Cha�ter Three. Transportation TP68 Identify and promote development of a local level transit system �1� that complements the regional system while meeting the travel needs of City residents, consumers, employers, and employees. This system should provide convenient connections from city neighborhood activity centers to the regional transportation system. TP69 The target levels of mode split (share) to transit and HOV's for planning purposes should be: ■ 15 percent of all daily person trips; ■ 30 percent of all daily work trips; and ■ 40 percent of all work trips between major activity centers. TP70 The regional and local transit systems should be designed to meet the requirements of the elderly and disabled (as prescribed by the ADA) and should take advantage of technological advances in transportation reflected in Advanced Public Transit Systems (e.g., traveler information, system monitoring, performance monitoring, etc.). TP71 The City will continue to cooperate with regional and local transit providers to develop facilities that make transit a more attractive option (e.g., bus shelters, rapid intermodal connections, frequent all day service, safe and attractive facilities). TP72 The development of successful transit commuter options (e.g., subscription buses, special commuter services, local shuttles) should be supported by the City. TP73 Through subarea planning, with the cooperation of transit service providers, work to make transit part of each neighborhood through appropriate design, service types, and public involvement. TP74 Enhance the viability of regional and local transit service by establishing design standards for streets that move transit, pedestrian, and cyclists in the City Center TP75 Preserve right-of-way for transit facilities as development applications are reviewed and permitted. TP76 Create an incentive program that rewards development that establishes densities supportive of the adopted regional transit plan. TP77 Encourage the use of incentives to stimulate transit, car, and van pool use. Revised �998 2002 111-78 � � � � , A Regional Freeway High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) System Plan, or core HOV system, has been designated for the freeway system in the region. The HOV system includes using the middle lanes of I-5 south from Seattle through Federal Way to Tacoma, including possible direct access to the South 272 and South 320'�' Street transit centers along I-5. � HOV facilities are viewed at the regional, state, and federal levels as essential to meet public service needs. Also, HOV facilities may provide vital accessibility to developing urban centers in the Puget Sound Region. This core HOV system is cunently under study , (WSDOT Puget Sound Region Pre-Design Studies) to identify direct access locations that will enhance the HOV system and improve transit and non-transit HOV travel times. � � � �� � � � LJ �� FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation 3.6 HIGH-OCCUPANCY VEHICLE FACILITIES HOV System � Revised �A98 2002 The legislature has, in the past, committed to completing the WSDOT core freeway HOV lane system. The Puget Sound Regional Council's (PSRC) Vision 2020 (the Metropolitan Transportation Plan) includes completion of the Core HOV system as the cornerstone to promoting HOV travel in the region. Features will include ramp meters and queue bypass lanes, as well as integration of Intelligent Vehicle Highway System (IVHS) features such as dynamic signing, radio information, and advanced vehicle detection. Emphasis will be placed on providing improved access routes from large employers and where congestion exists today. Generally, HOV lanes will be added to existing facilities, but where there is sufficient capacity to allow conversion of general-purpose lanes, this will afford a cost effective alternative. At the regional level, the HOV system will be available to a mix of vehicles. The occupancy level will be varied to maintain at least an average peak hour operating speed of 45 mph. As demand increases and speed is lowered below this threshold, the level may be varied, for example, from two or more people per vehicle to three or more. WSDOT created the Office of Urban Mobility (now the Planning and Policy O�ce) to coordinate long range and emerging transportation planning issues between WSDOT, PSRC, and its member jurisdictions. Among its projects will be the evaluation of alternative HOV treatments to provide the most effective combination of facilities to maximize speeds and reliability of bus service. Regional planning has applied HOV planning on a local scale. The King County Arterial HOV plan, Au�ust 1993, identifies I-5, SR 99 (Pacific Highway), South/SW 320�' Street, and South 348 Street as potential corridors for implementation of HOV and transit priority treatments. The plan specifically identifies: ■ Proposed (median) HOV lanes on I-5 extended from SR 516 to Pierce County ■ Freeway Access study on SR 18 III-79 u � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation ■ HOV Corridor and Access Study at South 272" Street ■ HOV lanes on South 348"' and access improvements to I-5 ■ HOV Conidor Studies on South/SW 320`� Street and SR 99 ■ Intersection Improvements on South/SW 320`� at l Avenue South and 21�` Avenue SW ■ New or improved park and rides and a transit center within the City Sound Transit will construct direct access HOV connections at South 272" Street and South 320`� Street. ' ' ' ' ��ee�: WSDOT agrees to the need of HOV lanes with automatic vehicle identification (AVI) to provide priority to transit vehicles on SR 99 north of South 356`� Street and includes them in their system plan. The Future HOV System HOV enhancements within the Federal Way planning area will consist of signal priority treatments, exclusive lanes, increased park and ride opportunities, and other improvements to be identified as demand increases. These latter improvements can include separate (preferential) access lanes or roadways. This means utilizing HOV lanes on highways and arterial streets wherever practical, if transit and car pool movements can be enhanced, and optimizing the occupancy rate to move the most people possible. TIP Improvements Improvements in the City's Transportation Improvement Program (TTP) to support the HOV system are identified in Table III-17. Many of these HOV facility needs will need to be provided by outside agencies, including Sound Transit, WSDOT, and METRO. Federal Way is working closely with these agencies to implement these improvements over the next several years. Transportation Goals & Policies Goals TG7- a. Place high priority on development of HOV and transit priority lanes. b. Devedop arterial HOV lanes on bus routes with priority for transit at tra,�c signals. c. Work with the transit agencies, WSDOT and King County, in applying for funding for HOV improvements that complement transit and non-transit HOV facilities and park and rides within Federal Way. d. Work with WSDOT to complete the Core HOV system on 1-S as planned. � ' � � � � � � � � � , l , � Revised �8A9 2002 III-80 � LJ FWCP - Chapter Three, Transportation Table III-17 TIP HOV Improvements Federal Way Location Improvement Cost Year S 348�' I-5 to SR 99 HOV/Signal Coordination $6.9 Miliion 1995 Completed 2ls` and SW 344�' Park & Ride $8.8 Million 2001 Com,vleted Regional CIP SR 99/SW 336�' Transit Center Unknown 2010+ City Center, S 316�' @�A`� 23'� S Transit Center $� 38 Million �BAA* 2005 SR 99/S 272" ��� Park & Ride $12.7 Million �8�8* 2004 SR 161/S 356�' Transit Center Park & Ride $13.1 Million 2010+ �}��,i e�a-�:'�;^` �R� �8:8-�4�i�ePr -�939 SR 99, S 272" to Dash Pt HOV Lanes $20.2 Million 2006 SR 99, Dash Pt to 312`� HOV Lanes $13.9 Million 2008 SR 99, S 312`� to S 324�' HOV Lanes $7.2 Million �AB� 2003 SR 99, S 324`� to S 340�' HOV Lanes $24.0 Million 2004 SR 99, S 340`� to S 356` HOV Lanes $18.6 Million 2010+ S 272"� @ I-5 � In-Line � 25 Million �9 2007 Station S�A�' 317�' @ I-5 Direct HOV Access $27 Million �S 2005 �4��'-� I-3 x���� �n� S 320`" St: SR 99 - 1 Ave S HOV Lanes $ I S Million 2010+ S 348` St: SR 99 - 1 Ave S HOV Lanes $12 Million 2010+ S 272 St: SR 99 - Militarv Rd S HOV Lanes $7 Million 2007 3.7 AVIATION Another vital link in the fabric of area transportation is the aviation system. As pointed out in the Community Profile, this extends beyond regional aviation to local issues surrounding flights over portions of the City ("overflights") and local helicopter activity. At the regional level, there has been recurrent debate over the issue of maintaining SeaTac as the regional facility or establishing a new airport. The City recognizes the economic benefits of its proximity to the airport, as well as the liability to Federal Way's quality of life which air traffic can produce. The City will continue to insist upon maintaining the quality of life expected by area residents. � Revised 2899 2002 Ill-81 � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Local Level Opportunities Federal Way experiences a relatively high level of helicopter overflights today, due in part to its proximity to Boeing Field and also to the routine use of I-5 as a flight corridor in order to minimize noise. Map III-23 shows �� 12 landing areas in Federal Way currently used by helicopters. The City is the base for 12 helicopter operators. Together, these operators field a combined fleet of 38 rotorcraft. This fleet serves the following types of purposes: 1) Business Operations, associated with corporate activity and air taxi services; 2) Emergency Services, including activity associated with St. Francis Hospital, the Federal Way Fire Department, and King County Police; 3) Law Enforcement (primarily King County Police); 4) Government Flights, which are primarily military helicopters from Fort Lewis south of Tacoma; and 5) Disaster Mitigation. The planning and siting of helicopter facilities has been divided into emergency and commercial uses and facilities. Potential roles of heliports and a process for selecting prospective sites in Federal Way have been identified. Given potential roles and siting considerations, the discussion of possible courses of action can be pursued within the communiTy. Potential roles for heliports in Federal Way would add disaster mitigation to business, emergency service, and law enforcement activities. Planning efforts are currently underway between Seattle and King County to incorporate helicopters and designated landing facilities into the region's emergency preparedness planning. Public heliports in Federal Way would be a key link in a regional disaster mitigation system. Potential improvements to existing heliport operations were identified in the heliport planning process. They include improved safety, better utilization of emergency response resources, and increased reliability of helicopter operations. Safety can be improved: on the ground (through improved, properly designed surfaces and fencing of the landing area), and in the air (through proper identification and illumination). ReliabiliTy would be increased through placement of modern equipment that would improve the safety of poor weather operations. The practice of providing standby fire protection support, which now occurs for transfer of St. Francis Hospital patients, could be eliminated. The Heliport Master Plan (HMP) of June 1994, by Ketchum and Company, is used as a guide for goals and policies that decision makers may use in the implementation of heliport facilities in the City of Federal Way's Transportation Comprehensive Plan. This plan identifies key elements that should be considered as part of the next phase and the public discussion on options to pursue. It advocates that the following questions be evaluated in making the decision: Economic — When will the development for emergency and commercial uses of heliports be justified? Environmental — What will the noise effects be and will mitigation measures be sufficient to meet community interests? � � � � LJ � � � � � � r � '_J � Revised �898 2002 ill-82 � � � LJ �� u Operational — Does the facility work in terms of air operations and routine maintenance? And, does the area accommodate the physical needs of such flights? � Finally, in selecting candidate sites, a sequential process of narrowing alternatives would be employed. Fifteen large zones would be evaluated, initially using general criteria. Then, the "short listed" zones would be further screened for specific sites capable of sup- � porting a heliport facility. The u°'�^^�* "��°*°Y D'°^ HMP provides an in depth site selection matrix and is provided for use in this decision-making. The results of a preliminary evaluation in the HMP is shown in Map Ill-24. LJ The Heliport Master Plan recommends the following: ■ The City should appoint a representative to the Puget Sound Heliport ' System Plan (PSHSP) Advisory Committee, which is investigating a system of heliports. � � u � � � � TG8- a. Support the area's economy by assuring residents and area employers access to � a full range of travel modes, including intercity airport facilities, while maintaining the quality of life reflected in the pdan vision. l -� � Revised �A9B 2002 FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation ■ St. Francis Hospital should consider an emergency heliport on its property for a trial period. ■ The Federal Way Fire Department should eliminate its policy of attending each ambulance/helicopter transfer at Weyerhaeuser. ■ Appropriate agencies should establish an EMS-only heliport. ■ Identify primary medical helicopter transfer points by a Global Positioning System (GPS) points and on Airlift Northwest helicopter navigational computers. ■ The City should develop a heliport ordinance/code section consistent with the PSHSP and Puget Sound Helicopter Emergency Lifesaver Plan (PS/I�LP). ■ The City of Federal Way should participate in the PS/f�LP. Transportation Goals & Policies Goal b. Provide guided opportunities for the improvement of heliport facilities and services in and around the City. III-83 � � �� FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Policies TP78 Continue to represent the community in matters pertaining to the regional airport(s). TP79 Promote extension of fixed guide way facilities to the regional airport as an effective means of resolving congestion problems that afFect City residents and businesses. TP80 Finalize and adopt guidelines for short range, local area rotorcraft facility installation and use. These will be designed to minimize noise and safety risks and recognizing the jurisdiction of the Federal Aviation Administration. 3.8 FREIGHT AND GOODS Transportation related decisions sa� could have a significant impact on freight and goods movement, affecting the economic competitiveness of local and regional businesses. When freight and goods movement was confined mostly to rail on separate right-of-way, there was not a great need to include freight and goods in urban planning processes. That situation has changed. Today, even at the local level, our dependence on trucks for deliveries has been heightened. Industry's adoption of ` just-in-time" inventory systems and increasingly popular overnight small parcel services, as limited examples, have increased demand for limited roadway space. Combined with increased urban (commuter) congestion, trucks are not able to perform their role in the economy as efficiently as they did a decade ago. The general approach to transportation planning has failed to systematically consider freight and goods movement needs. Recent state and national legislation, encouraging such an approach, recognizes that local government has long played a role in mana�ing this component of our transportation system. At the local level, development standards assure the provision of adequate on-site facilities such as loading docks; the width, frequency, and location of driveways; the turning radius at intersections for curbs; and pavement standards to carry trucks and bus loads. Other government actions include restriction of over-sized vehicles on roads and bridges that cannot support their weight or size, and the designation of truck routes. Similar activities can be found at the regional and state levels. Revised �AAB 2002 ' � u � � � � � � � � � � , � � � ,�,� i � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation � Local Level Needs/Opportunities Federal Way displays a unique set of circumstances with respect to freight and goods � movement. An understanding of its history, as well as current issues and projects, can contribute to adoption of appropriate long term policies and action strategies. � While extensive truck and rail oriented development has not taken place in Federal Way, freight and goods movement, primazily by trucks passing through the City, has obviously had its impacts. Situated between the major urban centers of Tacoma and Seattle, the � Federal Way planning area has been influenced by four major arterials. Military Road, the original arterial through the area, still displays the benefits of a design aimed at accommodating heavier freight and goods vehicles. Its concrete road sections no longer ' carry large numbers of pass-through truck tra�c. It now provides local access for truck deliveries to established neighborhoods. Until the interstate system was developed in the 1960s and 70s, Highway 99 served as the � truck route through the area. Today SR 99 provides a distribution function, mostly for delivery purposes, but also affording access to such regional facilities as the US Postal facility just west of Pacific Highway near South 336�' Street. Along its southern sections, � crossing into Pierce County, truck drivers find an alternate route to a congested I-5. Today, the major roadways for freight and goods movement into and through the area are � provided by I-5 and, to a lesser extent, SR 18. As the regional economy has grown, the volume of truck traffic along these highways has increased. Today, the highest concentration of regional truck traffic passes through Federal Way's section of the I-5 � corridor. As pointed out in the following sections, the volume of this traffic influences congestion as well as economic competitiveness. Map III-25 depicts the City's truck route plan, including existing and proposed truck routes. � Regional Activities � Trucking centers in Federal Way include the Evergreen Center, which has SR 99, SR 18, and SR 161 on three of its sides, and Ernie's Center on SR 99 at South 330�' Street. These � facilities cater to this important segment of our economy, the movement of freight and goods. Looking toward the future, several regional road projects may affect freight and goods � movement through the area. Improvements along I-5, which will make truck traffic more efficient, include truck-climbing lanes in the Southcenter area. At present, there are major points of delay for peak hour traffic. Trucks arriving on I-5 and on SR 18 just east of I-5 ' from I-405 have problems, since they are not able to approach the hill climb at posted speed and delay other travelers, many of whom are headed to Federal Way. Perhaps one of the most significant improvements proposed in the region's Metropolitan � Transportation Plan (MTP), is the improved connection of SR 167 with I-5 at Fife and into the Port of Tacoma. The current industrial development in the area of the Port masks � Revised �A99 2002 111�85 i� � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation the growing importance of the Green River Valley, both as a transportation corridor and as a generator of freight and goods movement. Increasing accessibiliTy to the SR 167 corridor will provide an alternate route for truck based freight and goods movement. Hill climbs from the valley floor, either along I-5 or SR 18, might be avoided, relieving capacity problems along these facilities. SR 509 is being studied for consideration of an extension, tying back to I-5 at South 210` Street ^• �o�o. This route will open an alternate route to the Port of Seattle's international freight facilities, as well as to provide access to the airport industrial complex. To the extent that this new route's design considers impacts to I-5, SR 99, and local street system in Federal Way, it provides great benefit to Federal Way. Other long range actions that will affect freight and goods movement..in this north/south corridor include Intelligent Traveler Service (ITS}—with improved (truck) vehicle identification, and commuter rail service in the Green River Valley. ITS features (described in greater detail under Demand Management) will be incorporated into the "high tech," I-5 corridor being designed under the state DOT's Venture Program. Advanced communication systems will allow better detection of slow-downs, accidents, and even hazardous vehicles moving through Federal Way, which certainly affect the City's local residents traveling these regional facilities. To the extent that Commuter Rail service in the Valley can avoid impacting freight and goods movement, it is viewed as a positive step in the direction of providing high capacity transit to the south end of the region. Care must be taken to avoid forcing a shift in cargo carrying capacity from rail to truck in the south county corridor. Highway commuter needs warrant keeping this "traffic" on rails. Consistent with the requirements set at the federal level, PSRC and WSDOT are focusing increased efforts towards understanding freight and goods movement and identifying solutions to problems faced by local, regional, state, and international shippers. Using studies by the Port of Seattle and WSDOT, PSRC and the Economic Development Council have established a Freight Mobility Roundtable. The Roundtable brings together key carriers, producers, and consumers, as well as nationally recognized consultants on the topic. This effort is seen as setting the pace for other areas around the country. The Roundtable efforts will be linked with a series of other efforts by the Regional Council, including: ■ Building a commodities flow database; ■ Identifying current and future problem areas that inhibit or restrict the effective movement of freight and goods; ■ Recommending road, intermodal, and other system improvements to address these problems, while meeting federal and state Clean Air Act strictures; and ■ Developing planning guidelines for use at the local level. The benefits of supporting these regional activities will be maintenance of accessibility for City residents and businesses. � �l U � � � � � , � � � � � � � Revised �998 2002 III-86 � � a i � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation Local Needs Within the City, continued growth of local truck traffic can be anticipated. Densification � of the urban core, along SR 99 and South 320` as well as the South 348` corridor, will lead to increased numbers of trucks along primary arterials. �J Street design standards and road classifications adopted under this plan will assure that new and rehabilitated facilities are built to appropriate standards. ' Where pavement, bridge, and neighborhood traffic management systems, or planned land uses indicate that roadways cannot handle truck traffic, designated truck routes will be adopted to protect existing investments and assure continued quality of life. � , � � With the enhancement of neighborhood centers, truck deliveries may increase as consumer activity shifts to these areas. While localized neighborhood intrusion is unlikely, isalated cases can be managed using traffic calming techniques. To accomplish effective planning and management of freight and goods movement in the area, traffic monitoring (volume counts) will include vehicle classification, allowing the patterns of use to be better understood. Another techniyue that can be employed to assure adequate consideration of truck needs is the involvement of those industries and businesses generating the traffic in roundtable discussions, such as the regional activities described above. Transportation Goals and Objectives Freight and goods movement is recognized as a vital link in the chain of local and regional � economies. Yet, the characteristics of larger vehicles (trucks in the case of Federal Way) can produce significant impacts to area mobility, livability, and infrastructure. With these factors in mind, the City adopts the following goals and strategies. , Goal � TG9- Improve movement of freight and goods throughout the region and within the City, while maintaining quality of life, realizing the vision of our comprehensive plan, and minimizing undue impacts to City infrastructure. � Objectives and Strategies ' , � Revised �9A9 2002 � ■ Cooperate with state and regional agencies in identifying freight and goods movement needs of area employers. ■ Provide or encourage improvements that enhance the movement of goods and services to businesses in the greater Federal Way area. 111-87 � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation ■ Encourage interests to view Federal Way as a viable resource area for ancillary freight and goods activity, drawing upon its excellent location along the I-5 Corridor, other state routes, and proximity to air and port facilities. ■ Establish revised code requirements and a designated truck route system that accommodates the needs of both the private sector and residents. ■ Discourage the use of road facilities by vehicles carrying hazardous materials and those with weight, size, or other characteristics that would be injurious to people and property in the City. ■ Adopt revised code provisions which acknowledge the characteristics of modern trucks and provide a balance between movement needs and quality of life. ■ Support regional transportation projects that are appropriately designed and will preserve the capacity of I-5 and state routes. ■ Involve major generators of area freight and goods movement in discussions to identify their needs and priorities as part of improvement programming. 3.9 MARINE The City of Federal Way has no marine facilities to be addressed in the plan. However, its proximity to the Port of Tacoma and the support role it can provide to its facilities is recognized and the following goals and objectives are proposed. Transportation Goals and Objectives Goal TG10. To foster the development of the local economy for Federal Way residents and employers as may be possible through access to regional marine facilities. Objectives ■ Encourage the planning and construction of improved regional highway, rail, and marine facilities in the area of the Port of Tacoma. ■ Coordinate with local business organizations, and provide feedback on international and regional transportation issues and on transport needs and opportunities related to all modes of transportation. Revised �A99 2002 i , � � , � � � , � � �,� ' u � i � m-as � 1 � � � � � ' � , � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation ■ Encourage international relationships; such as our sister-city relationship with Hachinohe, to foster marine related trade. 3.10 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES Provision of transportation facilities and services requires the timing of new projects to meet the needs of the community. At the same time, existing facilities must be maintained and the public's invest�ent protected, maximizing the life of the infrastructure. The purpose of this section is to describe various strategies available to the City to implement the preferred transportation and land use plan. The preferred plan proposes a balanced investment among modes of travel, increasing the commitment to travel by transit, ridesharing, bicyclists, and pedestrians. This strategy may create somewhat higher levels of roadway congestion near transit centers, but will provide more travel options for those who choose to use other modes of travel. Growth management requires an implementation program which earmarks sufficient financial resources, while putting into place a Concurrency Management System to regulate the pace and scale of new growth within the community. The implementation plan for Federal Way focuses on the next six-year time period within ' which to forecast needs and to identify reliable options for transportation funding. In reality, the City's implementation program began in 1990 at incorporation. During the past � twelve years, several major transportation improvements have been completed ' or will soon be operational. While these improvements have occurred, the actual City growth rate has been lower than projected, thus creating fewer impacts on the transportation system. Since the City also has modest growth expectations over the next ' six years, the proposed transportation improvement program for '°°�� 2003-2008 is expected to maintain concurrency on the arterial system. � i � u �J � � At present, the City's transportation system is provided by a variety of agencies. The City operates, improves, and maintains most of the streets and roadways, although the State operates I-5 and SR 18, east of SR 161. Private development may construct various local street improvements, which then become the property of the public and must be maintained by the City. The City is also responsible for the management of the transportation system, which includes the setting of standards for design, maintenance and operations, and review and approval of modifications. Transportation Improvement Program � Revised 2990 2002 The TIP3 counts on strong coordination with other agencies to help finance needed improvements on the state highway system, facilities in adjacent jurisdictions, along with expanded transit services provided by Metro. III-89 � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Map III-26 shows, and Table III-181ists, the City's TIP for �3$-2�94 2003 to 2008, as of June -�99-'� 2002. Map III 27A, Map III-2�B, and Table III-19 depict the City's �A�-S- �A�S 2009-2020 CIP for r°^�^^�� ^r^��s�s-a� City ��s and regional projects that will be required beyond the six-year planning horizon in the TIP. Most of the projects listed in the table have been identified throughout the planning process and reflect differing degrees of evaluation. They provide a usable estimate of transportation needs for matching broad estimates of forecast revenues. For programming purposes, these projects have been prioritized using the methodology below. Project Prioritization Prioritization is part of the process associated with implementing projects in the order most needed. It is a tactical effort to determine the sequence of events to meet strategic goals, as summarized in the TIP3. To determine the sequence of improvements in the City's TIP, several factors had to be balanced. These included consideration as to when improvements would be needed, the City's ability to compete for funds, as well as providing improvements across motorized and non- motorized projects. Nine factors used to rank projects are shown as follows. Factors Used in Prioritization of Improvements Transportation Effectiveness 1. Concurrency requirement 2. Corridor Congestion relief (volume%apacity) 3. Enhanced Safety Alternative Modes 4. Transit HOV Supportive 5. Non-Motorized Supportive Environmental 6. Air quality improvement Implementation 7. Cost Effectiveness 8. Ease of Implementation 9. Community Support `_ � ' � � � � ' � ' � u A project was given a rating for each factor on a scale of 0 to 5. The ratings were then summed across all of the factors to produce a total "score" for each project. Projects were prioritized in order of highest to lowest score. Plan Highlights The projects and programs listed in Tables III-18 and III-19 represent a broad range of multi-modal transportation improvements. Key system investment features include the following: ■ Transportation System Management improvements along key arterials, including installation of new traffic signals at needed locations. Revised �A99 2002 � ' �J ' � u►-so , , � � � � � r � � � � � � � � � � � � r FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation k�+.'f:�/ � � ��� i�7. � ' __ , � ' � � 1 1 1 1 I I 1 1 1 1 1 1. • ! � �������� . . . � � � ' ' � _ • • � . . . .. . _ : _ 1 � . • _ � 1 1 ----- ' 1 1 � : _ ' . : ' ` - ' : � 1 1 ------ • " 1 1 � - m _ � , _ � . � � � ------ i . � i � � - - - n - - -- - _' " - _ - ' � � � � -----� : � � � 1 � -. � � . _• _ 1 1 1 1 1 i � � 1 1 --- 1 I 1 1 � - - ! � � " _ _ " " ' � 1 _ 1 1 1 1 1 ----- � . . 1 1 � ° .�' _ r' _ _ _ : .�� _ �� ----- -- i�i ._. . �� ��� ��� � ��� ii� � _ .. . . - - - - - - ' ���----� � ' ! . n. � ' . , _ . _ _ . .. .. _ , . : . .. :,. . _ . � � � ------ � � i � - `✓ � - _ ' 1 � 1 I -�--- : I I 1 I � - • � ♦ /.1 _ � � _ _ _ _ - 1 1 1 1 1 � � 1 1 1 ---- . 1 1 1 1 � �' " --- - 11 --- ' ' 1 1 � - m ' - - - --- t� ��� --- >i i�i � -. .. _ ' - - ,�' _ _°.-� -! �'" --- ' � ��� � __ ��� -- • ��i � : ' _ it . : . . : - - - - ----- = . : � � - ' . : � i . ,_,. .��� � � � -' _ m . . . . . . .. . : .. ..• -.. ' -_----� - � � � � -. .. _:,-' _ _• �. ,...�.. -� .•- ----- �:� ��� , : - ��� ,_ ��� � ° ' ' _ � �� � /1 111 -_ �=1 �11 --- 1_ 111 _ _ ' � _ _ 1 _ /71 1 _---- - ' � 1 1 1 - ' ' : 1 1 1 � 1'' /'' . .. - . .: . 1'' 11 /�� 111 111 " _ � - - - . � � - � .. : � : .: .. . _ . ,. ������� ;�a� _ . . _ _. . ..._. � - - � - - - _ �������■�� - , , . � , , � � - - - - - - - _ � ������ � ,,. � -, ,,, _ . . � - - - �� �������■ .., . . ,,, _ - - - . , , � i : _ � : i � , _ . . � i � � : ! .. i i i , , � i � i • : : ! ! , : : - : i � � - -------- � - - - ��: � iii i� ii ii_ ��. � � - - - � - - _ ��� ,. ��� - .�r ��� --- . ��� � - - � - ' - - - , , � � � � ------ . i � � � � � - - - - ----- ' - � � - ° i � _ - - - -- . _ ��� ,. ��� � .� .�� � - �� ... ��� � _i� - -_------ - -- - - - , i i �., , � � � ,. i i i, : i i i i i � , � i .:: � � � i, i � .. . - . - . . �iRLH�f!�i.T�2Z7!!!TT•.�_S:r�7Tf. .. . . .. . _ . _ . . . . , . . . . . _ . . �Tf!Tt.�11f�f.ttfT.RL .. Revised 28A9 0�02 II I-91 FW P— Chaoter Three. Transportation Table lil-18 Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) — 2003 to 2008 Map Capital Proiect List Previous ID" Location Description Years 2003 2004 1 SR99: S 312 St — S 324 St Add HOV lanes, install raised median 6�644 4�500 2 SR 99: S 324'" St— S 340 St Ad H V anes�left-tum tanes on 324 , 2 NB le - 4���0 4 65� 4 65� turn lane (a� 336 , install raised median 3 S 312 St Ca� 14 Ave S Install siQnal 30 150 4 S 336 St Ca� Weverhaeuser Wv S [nstall roundabout 125 524 5 S 288�' St Ca� SR 99 Add le -turn lanes on S 288 St SR 9& 18 Ave 250 1 S, interconnect to Militarv Rd 6 S 312 St na, 8 Ave S Install siQnal 35 195 7 SR 99: S 284'" St — SR 509 8 S 348'" St: 9'" Ave S— SR 99 9 SW 312 St: 1" Ave S— SR ! ] 0 S 320'" St Ca� 1 Ave S 11 S 356 St: 1 Ave S SR 99 12 S 320'" St: 8 Ave S— SR 99 13 SRIS c(�SR161 14 S 336 St Ca� 9 Ave S 10 Ave SW/SW 344 St: SV 15 21" Ave SW 16 S 348'" St (a� 1 Ave S 17 S 336'" St na. 1 Wv S *18 21�` Ave SW: SW 356 St—: 20 1" Ave S: S 320'" St — S 33 •21 S 336'" St: 18'" Ave S— I-5 22 S 3 t 2" St C�a I-S 2� SR 99• CR 509 _ C� 12 Ct Revised �A9B 2002 Widen to 5 Ianes, bike lanes, sidewalks, illumination Si�nal modification = Extend 3-Iane collectors, sidewalks, street li�hts 500 Add HOV lanes, install raised median Year 2001 Costs in $ Thousands 2OOS 2006 2007 2008 TOTAL 11,144 13,300 180 649 1�725 230 963 1�500 4�779 2_,390 9 1_ 2 096 3��96 750 2�010 2�760 202 8� 619 1�000 4 6�191 , 3�335 3�335 1�000 6�900 360 1�440 420 750 ��35$ 346 1�382 200 0�00 t 100 100 7�900 1�800 420 750 1�358 1 728 1 200 500 1 000 10,340 12,600 ill-92 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � i � � � i � FWCP — Chaater Th�ee. Transportation ` Delete from the TIP to derive Arterial Street Imarovement Plan (ASIP) � Map ID number does not correlate to anY prioritY ranking of proiects Revised 2966 � I I I-93 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECT COSTS 12,114 13,174 13,964 14,553 17,071 17,703 18,500 107,079 FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation T.,.�I� B � cnoo. en cno _ c zi� � en n�n,.�e c, � -gg.(e�ufH-laag � T�.i:l:ro... II.i C. C 7'17 �` ,�„�W . 4 S�-�4 �l-� . � 8 � � 5-324a� a3 5-�48 � �-3 S 329 -� t* R , n 5-33-3 � �1� -1-3 D -ri-v C -� d-�tl � -1- �µ A-a-r`.�-e.e C -1-9 ,],� A�,.�.e ( ti � -� �Q �—� -c 3k S-W-339� � �8�-S �� �� Cf• CA 00 _ CD i Gi • II/:dn„ rn G Innno ##-- sr � YSY6 ricY d�'T�O � � � � n,r'�:r� �38 5�344` �9. � A.z-�:vice C �tl d�lY� � i+1�2 ,1 "�. � � #�2] 11/u..n.�. J� Revised �9 2002 �seirs:�rnfr.s�r.r� �esige � A�xis�ies � GenetfuFiien �e�a1 �A9�est -1�-ggg„9gg � � ���� �n � �AAA �64 1-3 �f'�3 r� �8�99 ��A 3��9g�pgg z `"� -1$8 33R i n�gg � Q�� �� ��- �9AA 6 �BA �RA�831 4�9AA�A99 �4Z �� �3A — _ �TiT���T� 47eiZ . �� _ _ � 1 � 1 1 � _ �: 111 � _ ' ' 1 I 1 1 i��_ � � _ �11 � Gy1711R1 RY�TILP _1/ 1�1 �11 � 1 / � . � � i 1 �11 11� � 1 111 � 1 1 _ / � 1 1 � _ .�� ��� _. .�_ ��� ��� � � 1� 1 � 1 � 1 1 1 1 1 � 1 � _ 11 111 � 1 1./.1 � _' 1 �/� � �e�u�a�i-ve 29AS�est t� ��.� iz �zi �,z 1 �ro-v�r0O��8 3�1� �z �i��m� �z oz��nn i �c �cn ��� z4 n�� mz � �c_,_.� d� i z_,��onc �9�5 c� cz� Qzc � � "e : •♦ � : � •: � � � :1 � � � • i � � � � � �, •: . , .. _„ � _�� � � � � � — � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ' � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FW P- Cha�ter Three, Transpo�tation �ve �B �esign Acquisitien �eaetr-ustiea �eta1 ��est �-�� �4 S-� c� o e..e-,-�,-.�--.>_ �� 65g g3-3,4E};, i�n �Q� ncs �S �8�'�� -SE�S-394 -56--�3 -1 �-0 ��c �cn ��Q � �,�,K A.,o Cl7U��C117 1AA c� _���cv � �.ggg ��� i�Q n�� n�� *�z� �� c�«c A�.e�� 71a A .,e c�u _ c�v znn� . ��gg �g�g�.}� � n i n��a i�c 38 �`��xe c• _ �9AA b�g3g � n� z��i ouc �} S Ct. C4 00 _�A:1:��... n,� c. w:aa.. .,. c i.,.,e� �� � Qn�n .� i n i c i i��� �oc 4A 5-394 �Sg-0gq �g i c� i���� z�z 4-1- 4� ��8�AA9 �93 �3 42 ��lA . }�g�ggg �g�q§� i cn n��� c�4 43 S 348 -St-�-�e4 n..e c-�.4�-�naa �w �gq i cc i cc ��� ooi 44 -� �b-S�13 �58 I3A � 43 2.�� n.,e c�v-�.-�-o-.,-�-�cu� zi� -�E-S��3A �g n iz-.zr �n�i i�n ���o czo 4b �6 ���49�' 26 4�9AA �A �I� **�� �3A8 �$ -�-G-S�-.B k�3gg�ggg i ���n ,,�iz� i�� n�n ,�n �c� 4� �-�8��' ce �e:i:•.,.., ua c_ r_e. ur,ae., r,, e i�..o� �gg�.ggg � ez�� i�o o�,�n �oz ■�no S-39q c.. cn-m,-�--�o _ �4� . ��9�9A9 �g i n ���n c�z �A S�agus-BF:-�-"�---�9 . �3�899 �4 � QQ� c�� 3-� S-�Z�'�-4 e..e-n,-�--.T-'^'" . q 3;g�;ggg �Q� ona �m � 33 S�u--329 -5�.4�'" e.,o e�xr. c;....�r��r:,,.. 3AA 3�3�4 �R3�93�� �S� S-3A8'�-�t-8 3AA b-33�&S 'Q' 4'�'n� 34 S-33A � e.,o e�:�. e:.,..�i:.,.,.:,,,. �84 3�8 -1$3�H4�S �5 - �" u�°••���" �$A 33$$�1 � oz �o� �Qz � c�x���n �, - �BA�AA9 33$,$�S � 4 � c�� nm 3� SW 32A �-1-� -1$9 �3�A-ls3 ' Q' '� n" 38 -1$'" 4�Vg-S�i�4'"�:-Sig+�a4iaaEiAt} �gg�gpq �} a-Rz �4 5�4�-356 -St�,-13'��14 e..e cur. c:,...�i:.,.,.:,.., d$�AA9 22� -1-$4,�nn�nc 8 8 A �45,4�88 �84,284,438 ;�rr.��,�.�*aF�T � a-rs� ��Q "- -�. -- ��� ��� �,'- _� �enrrwatat�ve �995-�est yz•i�r�o � c�� � �� Revised 2898 � I II-95 FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation � 8 � 8( A � #9�8 ��S�,G39,� �, �. � - - - - - �� ' Q � � _'' � ., •• - - - ', _ , .. _. '_- -- ' : - ��� _ _� _. � _. � _ . .._.. - ' �' ••: ..• -- : �� ��� � _ , ��_ � "'- -_. _ . . . . .. . .. .. .... ... _ ��� ��.� ,�� ��� : .�� ��� �� ��� � � ., , W .. _ _ _ ,._ ., .., ._ ,, ,._ ,� ��� � .� ��� ,� ��� � � - ' - ` - -' - ,�� ��� , .� ��� � _.� ��� , ��� ��� :�� ,_� � i' - - - - _ - _ ---■ , , , � � � � � � - - " - - - - -- �� ��� � � - m - - _ ��� ��� . _�_ ��� _ _ ��� ! !_, ��� � � •' ^ • ---- � � � � � � _ �. � ��� ��� ��� ��� � - - ��.��� � - �- '�--�� . � _ „ -�� �' - - -� - _ _" . ..•e .. .. ' -- _ : ��� � � • � , ' _ - . . . . � . ' _ _ - - - � _ � 1 1 � � I � � ' ' _ ' ^ _ _ ' -- _ 1 1 � 1 � � - -� - � ' - - - - -�' _ . ��� . . ��� � --- �i� :; ��� . � � - - --�� - - -- _:� ��� . _� : � � - - - i` _ - _�� ��� . ��� ��� � �� ��� _: ��� � �. � ��� � ��� ��� ' ��� , _ ; ��� � � �� - - - '� _ -- ��� � � - - '� - - -- ; , ��� � � �, n -- � ��� � � - r' ' - -_ __ - -- ��� . , � � - _ �✓ _ - _ _ ' --_. 1 � 1 I � � � � ' ' �� _ ' _ _ 11 111 111 �111 _ : � 1�� �: _ � � — - � 1 1 1 1/ i 1 1/1 �� 1 1 1 ! � 1 1 1 �� . • � ' ' ' ' �. � _ — S _ I 1 � 1 � I � ' _ ' - 1 � -- 1 1 1 1 � / : � � 1 I I� ' - • '. ' " ' �':.. - _.. .. i . . -.. . . , .., -- . : /1 /�1 1 : �i ' _ Revised �9A9 2�? I I I-96 � � • � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � _ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �■ r FWCP — Chauter Three. Transportation ,.l. � er±!!] � � � �4 � � w -S � q3 � �A -�Axe-S�--4� �-4�Z � �B �8 �raqat�-s;-s-a�e -s�--�-� � I�.f Z1 �-,fAv�-�--� D�� 1 � �8 . •� - ��. � ��. 0 �sz.rrsi�,t�� ��r� � �'� r�� ��� ._� ��.� � �� ��� ��� ��� ��� --- �� ��� �� ��� ��� .. ��� � - �eta1 �-A �� �AAk 4 -1-1-�8A 4�-�A 4 �� � ii- —0- -- ��' -- '=' � � � � � � �� � .� i i �v� m=�;YZ�ii��m iz ri� iri�� 11. 1 • ����a�a�;,r � � . _ :. ;, ,,, ��''T� ��, �� ��, � _�� ��� ���.�� ��.� _�� ��� , ��; � ��� � � � � ��� � _ 1 1 1 I � 1 1 1 I 1 . 1 1 I I ;_ 1 1 I : I.11 � 111 . I11 f I I lt IIIII� 2�,8�,pA8 � �9,2ZT,99A � 86�2�,A98 � 3�2,4�4,�99 � 4a-�,R54 Revised 2989 � I I I-97 FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation Table III-19 Capital Improvement Pro�ram (CIP) — 2009 to 2020 Revised �A99 2002 III-98 _ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � _ � � � r� ra �s � r� � � � �r r■r � ��r � r � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation � � Rgy� �qqg � I II-99 FWCP — Cha�ter Three, Transportation Revised �9A8 2 2 III-100 � �■► � �r �r � �rs �r � j. � ,rs �r � � w w■ �r �, � �- � � � � � � � � � �; � � � � � � �� � Note: Proiects identified in the bond issue. These proiects were selected to address safetv and conaestion in various areas of the Citv for a total of $7.5 million. Delete from the TIP to derive Arterial Street Improvement Plan (ASIPZ. Note: 1) Pro'tects which are planned to be completed between 2003 to 2010 and beYOnd are estimated in 2003 dollazs. 2) Annual qroQrams are inflated at 3% per vear. Proiect cosu estimated in 2001 as follows: 1. W idenin� in Ciry Center or on state highways =$70/SF 2. Widenin� in other commercial zones or Kin� County = S60/SF 3. W idenin� elsewhere = $50/SF 4. Shoulder widening = $10/SF 5. Structures = $100/SF Revised 28Q8 � III-101 FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation ■ Several miles of roadway improvements. ■ New a�� collector extensions on new alignments. ■ Regional HOV lanes along I-5, SR 99, South 320` Street, and South 348 Street. ■ Transit centers at the City Center and on SR-99 at South 336�', South 272 and South 356`� Street. ■ Expansion of local and re�ional transit service, according to METRO's six- year plan and Sound Transit's Sound Move Initiative. ■ Non-motorized investments for pedestrians and bicycles along identified corridors. ■ Substantial funding for ongoing road maintenance and annual programs, including overlays, bridge replacements, minor capital improvements, and neighborhood safety. Maintenance and Operations � Planned expenditures of $�4,-�� $6,859,177 for the proposed transportation � investment program will be for 2002 maintenance, operations, and annual programs within the City. Maintenance of the existing system is critical to the success of the �'^m^r°'�°^°;"° D'°^ FWCP and the ability of the City to accommodate increases in jobs � and housing. The maintenance of the existing network, along with low-cost traffic management actions, will improve the system's ability to move people and goods without making significant changes to the overall travel patterns or physical dimension of the � streets. While several roadway capacity expansions are being proposed, most of the City's future street network is already in place. It will carry much higher volumes of traffic, which wiil contribute to increasing maintenance requirements, which are included in the � above total maintenance and operation costs. Financing The purpose of a transportation financing strategy is to develop an adequate and equitable � funding program to implement transportation improvements in a timely manner. Without adequate funding the transportation plan cannot be implemented in an efficient and cost- effective manner. Furthermore, the inability to fund transportation projects could result in � unacceptable levels of congestion and roadway safety. The financing program recognizes various user groups, including traffic from existing and future City of Federal Way development, and regional or sub-regional tra�c. � Revised � 2002 III-102 `� � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation � Funding sources are not fixed and require annual review and reprogramming. Where non- City funds are sought, the City's projects may be competing for limited funds. Without attention to financing requirements, the operation, maintenance, and expansion of the transportation system will not occur in a timely fashion. Funding Needs � Given that the City has only been incorporated since 1990, there is not a long history of financial expenditure that can be reviewed. The needs forecast through the planning � process call for e�o� c�a n�o $Zgg�900,000 in total funding needs, plus �2�� $595,162,000 for non-City projects, as listed in Table III-18. Funding Strategy Already implemented in Federal Way is a portion of its funding of long term transportation improvements under this plan. The following improvements, begun in 1990, have been or will be completed: ■ South 348�' Street, SR 161 to SR 99. Completed. � ■ SR 161, South 348'� to I-5 Overpass. Completed. ■ 16`� Avenue South, SR 99 to South 348�' Street. Completed. � ■ South 356' Street, 21 Avenue SW to l Avenue South. Completed. ■ South 320` Street Corridor Signal Interconnect, I-5 to 1�` Avenue. Completed. ■ SR 99 Corridor Signal Interconnect, 288 to 356�'. Completed. � ■ South 348`�' Corridor Signal Interconnect, SR 18 to 1�` Avenue South. Completed. ■ BPA Trail Phase 1, � 2, and 3, 11` Place South to r°m^„° T'r;.,e c�x� 356�' � Street. Completed. ■ Numerous traffic signal installations and upgrades. In addition, in 1995, the City passed a$7.5 million Street/Traffic Bond to �e construct 10 � improvement projects (see TIP list, Table III-18, for remainin� projects). The projects are funded by a utility t� in the amount of 1.37°% percent for construction and 0.28°4 ercent for maintenance and operations over the 10-year life of the bonds. These projects, when combined with the City's commitments over the next six years, will � help maintain an acceptable level of transportation mobility for residents and businesses. The City aggressively pursues federal and state funding sources for arterial street projects � in order to maximize the use of City funds to maintain City streets and fund improvements to streets that would not fare well in grant-funding selection criteria. For the purposes of identifying funding sources in compliance with GMA requirements, the � following strategies are used. � Revised �998 2002 It1-103 � � FWCP — Chaoter Three, Transportation ■ Surface Transportation Program grants would be used to fund 86.5 percent of the cost of projects that improve multi-modal mobility on arterial streets. State Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) funding would be used to provide the remaining 13.5 percent of the cost of projects. ■ Hazard Elimination Program grants would be used to fund safety improvement projects up to the maximum grant amount of $�8A,8A8 $400,000. The City would fund the remainder of the cost of the project, or ten percent, whichever is greater. ■ Transportation Enhancement Program grants would be used to fund 80 percent of the cost of non-motorized capital projects. The City would fund the remaining 20 percent. ■ State TIB grants would be used to fund 80 percent of the cost of the remaining arterial street projects. The City would fund the remaining 20 . percent. ■ Street projects on collectors would be funded by the City or adjacent development. ■ Local street improvements would be funded by development. Based on these criteria, the TIP would be funded as follows: ■ Surface Transportation Program (Statewide and Regional): $31,741,500 ■ Hazard Elimination Program: $600,000 ■ Transportation Enhancement Program: $1,648,500 ■ Transportation Improvement Board: $19,525,200 � ■ City funds: $1,751,900 The City would be able to fund this level of improvements over the six-year period. Funding Sources Funding sources for operation and expansion of the City's transportation system fall into several categories. Some sources consist of reliable annual funds, others are periodic, such as grants, and some are available options. The use, availability, and applicability of these various sources �is are not always at the discretion of the City. Most sources have limitations imposed by either the enabling legislation or City policy. The following two categories of funds are available to fund the TIP: 1. Existing Annuad Sources: 'The City has control over the establishment and programming of a variety of funding sources enabled by state legislation. Currently the City utilizes the following options: Rev'�sed 2998 2002 � � � � � � � � Ii1-104 � � � � � City General Funds: 'The general fund was established to provide services typically offered by local governments, and derives its funding primarily from local tax sources. The general fund provided ��-� $861,227 to the street fund in -�-9-� 2001 State Motor Fuel Tax: The Street Fund was established to account for the receipt � and disbursement of state levied unrestricted motor vehicle fuel taxes which must be accounted for in a separate fund: $-�A $1,190,457 was received in �99-'� 2001. � � � � � Revised �996 2002 FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation Restricted State Fuel Tax: The Arterial Street Fund was established by state law to account for the use of state shared fuel tax revenues dedicated for this purpose: $�49 $547,250 was received in �1� 2Q01. Motor Vehicle Excise Tax (MVET): m�f�+� vnl+in�nc. n4 4�n 4.mu �<s�r�n+�o r...+-nl..�nn 4�n.r vol+in�on �innr�ono (�i4ion �ro • , ' � 1 ll1.S revenue source was removed in the aftermath of Initiative 695. Vehicle Re�istration Fee: A vehicle registration fee was approved in 1993 by the State Legislature to address transportation needs within growing communities. The �� 2001 amount received was $64�� $690,231. Transportation Development Char�es (SEPA Mitigation): The City is assessing traffic impact mitigation for new development as a part of SEPA review. The mitigation amount is based upon the percentage of traffic, directly attributable to the new development that uses the facility that is the subject of each needed City improvement project. That percentage is then multiplied by the cost of that improvement project. The resulting amount is the portion of the cost of each improvement that is to be paid by the owner of the new development. The City collected $�-38,�9� $704,777 in �9-'� 2001. Other Minor Services: These include Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) revenues and street use permit fees. 2. Other Periodic or Available Sources: Additional funding will be generated through other sources. Some are currently utilized, others may be used in the future. Funding also is derived from outside sources (State, Federal, County, Metro) and often requires application. Transportation Equity Act (TEA-21): This is a federal program designed to improve the transportation system that helps air quality and relieves congestion. The City has been awarded Q',^� $6,564,000 towards projects in the current TIP. This equals an average of $�4�� $1,094,000 per year. 05 � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation State Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) Fund: This is a statewide transportation fund available to local agencies for roadway improvements. The City has been awarded $�4�4 $13,828,000 towards projects in the current TIP. This equals an average of Q', ,Q� $2,305,000 per year. Bond Issue: A written promise to pay a specified sum of money at a specified future date. Bonds are typically used for long-term debts and to pay for specific capital expenditures. The City has financed bond measures for transportation projects as well as increasing the City's overlay program by $800,000 for the next 10 years. Traffic Impact Fees: A traffic impact fee ordinance can be established to provide regulatory mitigation. T'he fee could take into account such elements as the benefits or impacts of developments in various subareas of the City, impacts at key locations, projects that promote alternative transportation, buses, car, and van pools, etc., and development incentives for increased public facilities investments, especially in areas such as the City Center. Traffic impact fees would be based upon actual direct impact of new development on the transportation system. In October 2001, the Citv hired a consultant to prepare a Traffic Impact Fee and Concurrencv Mana�ement Svstem. Recently, the City has been very successful at obtaining grant funding. The six-year TTP is fully funded through the year �A99 2004. A key reason for this success was the ability to provide more than the minimum requirement of local matching funds. Additional local revenues would help in assuring critical projects are funded. Concurrency The transportation chapter of the GMA (RCW 36.70A) requires each city and county planning under GMA requirements to incorporate a Concurrency Management System (CMS) into their comprehensive plan. A CMS is a policy to determine whether adequate public facilities are available to serve new developments. In this manner, concurrency balances the transportation investment program with land use changes envisioned by the City over the next several years. Legislative Requirement The transportation element section of the Washington State GMA reads: "Local jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a transportation facility to decline below standards adopted in the transportation element of the comprehensive plan, unless transportation improvements or strategies to accommodate the impacts of development are made concurrent with development (RCW 36. 70A.070). " Revised �898 2002 iti-�os � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation The phrase "concurrent with development" means that public infrastructure � improvements and strategies required to service land development be in place, or financially planned for, within six years of development. In Washington State, the transportation CMS's must include all arterials and transit routes; but may include other � transportation services and facilities. Highwavs of Statewide Significance (HSS) are exempt from concurrencv requirements, � but local agencies are required to identifv their comprehensive plan's impacts on the HSS network. In Federal Wav the HSS network consists of I-5 and SR 18 east of I-5. es imnacts are auantified in Table III-20 below: Table III-20 Federal Wav Comurehensive Plan's Im�acts to Highwavs of Statewide Si�nificance — 2000 to 2020 � However it should also be recoenized that Citv streets act as an overflow conduit for the � HSS network due to the failure of the state to nrovide adeauate ca�acitv on the HSS network A sample of these imnacts is auantified below: A comnarison of these tables indicates that the Citv's streets �enerallv would be more imbacted bv re�ional traffic than the nlanned growth would imnact the HSS network. Concurrency Management The application of concurrency for transportation assures that improvements and � programs for accommodating planned growth are provided as development permits are issued. The concurrency strategy balances three primary factors: available financial � Revised 2590 2002 III-107 � Table III-21 Imnacts to Citv Streets From State's F ailure to Provide Adeauate Capacitv on Hi�hwavs of Statewide Si�nificance in 2020 � � FWCP — Chaoter Three. Transportation resources, acceptable transportation system performance conditions, and the community's long-range vision for land use and transportation. The City has identified probable financial capabilities, anticipated system performance conditions (level-of-service), and has proposed a roster of transportation investments and programs that implement the � FWCP The � FWCP presents an alIocation of estimated available transportation resources matched to planned improvements, which are scheduled over the planning period. With the general estimates of costs, revenues, and timing for construction, as required by the GMA, the plan predicts the acceptance of development permits that are consistent with its policies. The GMA requires that a contingency plan be outlined in case the City should fail to obtain the resources anticipated to make the necessary transportation improvements to maintain the adopted LOS standards. This analysis is sometimes terc�ed "plan-level concurrency." Strategies for maintaining or rectifying adopted LOS standards in the event of a budget shortfall include the following: ■ Increase the level of funding commitments in subsequent years; ■ Review and adjust the City's overall land use vision to lower the overall transportation demand; ■ Reprioritize improvements to address system capacity needs as the highest priority; and ■ Modify (i.e., lower) the LOS standard to match available resources. Modifying the LOS standard cannot be recommended because safety problems usually result from increased congestion and adversely impact air quality and transit operations where HOV facilities do not exist. The adopted LOS standard accounts for HOVs and transit by basing it on average delay per person rather than delay per vehicle. Reprioritizing improvements to address capacity would result in a lack of funding for safety and non-motorized transportation. This would be inconsistent with adopted goals and policies to encourage non-motorized transportation and maintain roadway safety. Lowering transportation demand to match available capacity would restrict the City's ability to function as an urban center consistent with county and regional plans. Furthermore, the City has little ability'to reduce traffic through the City caused by growth in neighboring jurisdictions or overflow from congested freeways. Therefore, improvement in funding for transportation appears to be the most realistic alternative. Of the previously listed funding sources for transportation, there are some that the City can control and some that the City can influence. The City can control the general fund, SEPA mitigation, bond issues, and traffic impact fees. These local funding sources can be Revised �A98 0�02 � � � � � � � m-toa � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation used to leverage grants at the state (TIB) and federal (TEA-21) levels. State and federal I increases in funding are increasingly difficult to obtain; therefore, in order to be competitive for grant funding, local funding becomes increasingly important. � � � � � � �. Revised �089 2002 Bond issues can be successful but must have a funding source themselves, either property or utility taxes. In order to be successful, bond issues must have a list of projects to be funded, voter support, and a time line for completion. The projects to be funded must consider voters' concerns about who benefits from the projects and what impacts the projects may have. For example, if a project is perceived as benefiting residents of another city or the business community to the exclusion of C� Federal Way residents, the bond measure may fail. Finally, the impermanence of bond issue funding complicates the City's ability to effectively plan for large projects, which due to their size, may have to be phased. If a multi-year multi-phase project was not funded consistently, the full benefits of the project may not be realized. Under state law, counties may authorize a local option gas tax up to 10 percent of the state gas tax. In King County, it is estimated that if passed, a local gas tax of 23 cents per gallon would generate $836,000 per year for Federal Way, if distributed per capita under existing state law. However, until the county acts on such a proposal, it is unknown how funds would be distributed. General fund revenue is generally not used much for transportation purposes because many voters believe that gas tax °^a�l� revenues should be adequate for funding transportation needs. It is also generally unpopular to have street projects compete against human services, parks, police, etc. SEPA mitigation is used extensively and is effective for mitigation of incremental impacts, but is cumbersome to administer when addressing cumulative impacts. As currently practiced in Federal Way, it is unfair to large developments in that no mitigation is assessed for projects that generate less than 10 peak hour trips (e.g. a nine- lot single-family plat). It also funds a relatively small percentage of a total project's cost because existing traffic is included in the calculation of a development's "fair share" of the project, even if the project would not be necessary if there were no new developments. Hence, existing property owners and residents still subsidize projects to accommodate new growth, but only larger developments pay mitigation, so small developments are subsidized even more. A transportation impact fee (TIF) addresses the disadvantages of other local funding sources. It can be assessed to all developments based on new vehicular trips for roadway capacity, transit trips for transit improvements, and non-motorized trips for non- motorized improvements. It does not compete against other City services. It pays only for improvements needed to accommodate new development, and funding follows the pace of growth. It does not require City residents or property owners to subsidize projects for new growth. It treats new development fairly, regardless of size. It also lends simplicity and predictability to the development community because developers know what mitigation expenses will be. It would simplify development review because lengthy impact analyses would only be required for the largest developments, thus reducing costs for medium-sized developments. The increased cost to small developments, particularly m-�os � � ^ FWCP — Chaater Three, Transportation developments small enough to not trigger SEPA mitigation under the City's existing procedures, are easily o�atweighed by the afore-mentioned advantages of a TIF. Regular updating of the FWCP and Transportation chapter will afford opportunities for the City to modify the LOS standard or to secure other funding sources necessary to implement the capital improvements needed to maintain the adopted level of service standard. Concurrency Testing State law requires that a concurrency "test" be applied to all development proposals as a condition of granting a development permit. A concurrency test compares a proposed development's need for.public facilities and services to the "capacity" of the facilities and services that are available to meet demand. Other questions that need to be addressed are at what point in the development process does concurrency apply, what types of development permits are subject to the concurrency test, and should fees be charged for concurrency testing to cover staff and administrative costs associated with the testing. Federal Way's approach is to implement transportation improvements and programs that it can afford to finance. These improvements and programs are based upon the ' e�a� FWCP, which includes a level-of-service standard for the transportation system. The primary purpose of the Concurrency Management Program is to allocate available resources based on the timing and location of development, and to assess mitigation fees based upon each new development's share of the improvements that are planned in the subarea within which it is located. Level-of-Service measures the outcome of and progress toward the planned growth rate. Concurrency Management and SEPA While concunency requirements are similar in many ways to the requirements of the State Environmental Protection Act (SEPA), there are some important differences, as follows: ■ Concurrency requirements are more demanding; if they are not met, denial of the project is mandated. ■ Concunency is based on a Level-of Service (LOS) standard; SEPA has no specific standard as its basis. ■ Concurrency requirements only apply to capacity issues; SEPA requirements apply to all environmental impacts of a project, including transportation safety. ■ Concurrency has timing rights related to development; SEPA does not. Revised �999 2002 � �� � � � � � � i � il1-110 � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation � Therefore, concurrency does not replace SEPA, but rather becomes an integral part of a comprehensive program that relates private and public commitments to improving the entire transportation system. SEPA will focus primarily on site impacts that could result � in additional transportation requirements in specific instances (particularly access to the site or impacts in the immediate vicinity that could not have been anticipa�ed in the overall transportation investment strategy for the system). Concurrency conclusions in ' ' the FWCP do not excuse projects from SEPA review. However, � they do address major system infrastructure issues that must be properly administered under both SEPA and the GMA Monitoring � � r � � � � � Revised 2999 2002 The cycle of managing transportation facilities and services has recently been expanded. Emphasis is now being placed on monitoring the transportation system to assure that the community's vision, as reflected in the FWCP, is being met. In addition, all projects that are complex in nature or involve significant capital expenditures have a value engineering study performed in order to select the most cost effect alternative. As a part of the project implementation phase, all projects are required to be reviewed and approved by the City Council at the 30 percent, 85 percent, and 100 percent design phases. In the past, transportation planning merely forecasted expected growth in demand and sought ways to provide the needed capacity. Today, federal and state level legislation place requirements (and authority) on the D * c^..^,� n°^:^^°i r'^„^^;� rpSRC� to monitor aspects of the transportation land use process. For example, federal congestion management systems require a regional performance monitoring system. �e PSRC is currently developing such a monitoring system that is expected to provide key information on the achievement of plan goals and objectives. Within this context, Federal Way may be called upon to monitor local actions including: ■ Project Implementation (versus planned improvement program) ■ Program Status and Implementation (e.g., CTR programs) ■ Policy Adoption (versus those called for in the plan) ■ Motorized and Non-motorized Traffic Volumes and Vehicle Occupancy on local facilities (versus that forecast by the City plan) ■ Land Use Development Approvals or Density Patterns (vs. plan-anticipated growth) ■ Parking data such as pricing, policies, and management il1-111 � M FWCP — Chapter Three, Transportation Concurrency management requires the City to monitor the progress of transportation improvements against the impacts of growth occurring within the community. This test will be crucial in measuring the ongoing performance of the ����� FWCP over the coming years. Transportation Goals and Policies Goal TGl l Develop and implement funding mechanisms to: a. Leverage state and federal funds for transportation improvements. b. Meet GMA's concurrency requirements. � c. Provide consistent, fair, and predictable assessment of su�cient mitigation � fees for development consistent with SEPA. d. Assure that adequate transportation infrastructure is provided to accommodate forecast grawth. Policies � TP81 Prioritize transportation projects considering concurrency, safety, support for non-SOV modes, environmental impacts, and cost effectiveness. � TP82 Assure cost-effective maintenance of transportation facilities under the City's � jurisdiction. TP83 Utilize the City's traffic signal system for data collection to monitor consistency with concurrency requirements. TP84 Develop a concurrency ordinance by � 2002 as required by the GMA consistent with the City's adopted LOS standard. TP85 Develop a transportation impact fee by -1-�12002 to simplify development review, assess mitigation fees consistently and fairly, improve the City's ability � to leverage grant funding for transportation funding, and provide adequate infrastructure to accommodate new growth. TP86 Adopt interlocal agreements with neighboring jurisdictions to identify methods to � assure consistency between comprehensive plans, and adopt fair and consistent means of addressing the impacts of growth and development between jurisdictions without undue administrative burdens. � Revised �899 2002 III-112 � � � � FWCP — Chapter Three. Transportation Summary of Implementation Goals and Policies for Transportation Careful management is recognized as the key to fruition of the ' � - FWCP's vision. The transportation system has multiple users and multiple funding sources. The implementation plan for Federal Way focuses on the next six years within which to forecast needs and to identify reliable options for transportation funding. The 1 actions needed during this period take into account transportation investments the City has undertaken since incorporation, combined with realistic expectations of growth. The City currently conducts value engineering on large construction projects and should � continue to do so. All construction projects will be presented before the City Council at increments of 30 percent, 85 percent, and 100 percent for review and approval. � In emphasizing multiple modes of travel, it is recognized that resources will have to be spread and balanced among modes. In achieving this goal, the City should undertake various strategies to implement its transportation plan by �A-�-S 2020. The near tertn � efforts should focus on projects to: 1) mitigate safety problems; 2) preserve and protect the existing infrastructure; 3) expand multiple modes of travel and assure access for the transportation disadvantaged; 4) mitigate localized traffic congestion problems; and 5) expand the system for new growth. These actions are expected to maintain reasonable � levels of service on the arterial highway system during this period. � � Investment Focus � Revised �998 2002 ■ Emphasize early investment in lower cost Transportation Systems Management actions aimed at improving the performance of the existing street system. Actions will include intersection spot improvements, new and coordinated traffic signals, and neighborhood traffic management. ■ Identify and preserve necessary rights-of-way at the earliest opportunity. ■ Work with transit providers to promote expanded local and regional bus services and to encourage a transit supported land use pattern. ■ Expand current park and ride facilities and develop support programs to encourage use by Federal Way residents. ■ Create a street network within the City Center that includes a by-pass circulation route for through traffic and express transit. ■ Develop and apply clear development standards to obtain necessary infrastructure changes as property develops. ■ Improve the pedestrian environment citywide, with special focus along SR 99 and within the City Center. Focus on safe and efficient pedestrian facilities and improve the ability of pedestrians to safely travel throughout the community. il1-113 � � FWCP — Chaater Three. Transportation Implementation Process ■ Work closely with adjacent local agencies and preferably; prepare interlocal agreements (especially WSDOT and Metro) to formally establish commitrnents for coordinated transportation planning and implementation. ■ Develop a comprehensive Transportation Investment Strategy using a two-stage approach. The first stage should be an updated six-yeaz ��TIP�, the second sta.ge being a long-range comparison of transportation needs and revenues through �S 2020 and beyond. ■ Work towards obtaining new funding sources that: have the greatest local control for utilization on the most pressing local transportation needs; have the least strings . attached; minimize stafftime for obtaining and reporting on the use of the fund"s; are received on a regular (such as �}� uarterl basis; are predictable; inflation adjusted; and can be counted on for long term financial project planning. ■ Formally establish a process for prioritizing, designing, financing, and monitoring the completion of transportation system projects and programs. Identify clear departmental roles and responsibilities. ■ Monitor the status of the transportation system so that progress towards the plan's vision can be assured and improvements are in place in time to meet forecast demands. ■ Develop a Concurrency Management Strategy for the City that facilitates the full integration of the programming and administration of transportation improvements, services, and programs with the FWCP. ■ Assure that transportation system improvements are progammed to be available for use within six years of development permit approval if level of service is forecast to be exceeded within the subarea of the permit. ■ Monitor and make adjustments as needed to transportation level-of-service standards and approach based on growth rates, comprehensive plan amendments, and financing for projects. ■ Integrate a transportation impact program within the development mitigation structure. ■ Work with the regional bus providers to promote a transit-supported land use pattern. ■ Program projects to: 1) mitigate safety problems; 2) preserve and protect the existing infrastructure; 3) expand multiple modes of travel and assure access for the transportation disadvantaged; 4) mitigate localized traffic congestion problems; and 5) expand the system for new growth. '� Revised �999 2002 � �- � � � � l_ J � m-»a � � Map III-I TRAVEL PATTERNS FR�M RESIDENTIAL AREAS IN THE FEDERAL WAY PLANNING AREA SCALE� 1' = 5,000' D DECE 1995 i I' r _ _ ` � ' ` \ c—� `� LEGEND =- � ----- - - '' ' � � r _� i i !� . 1 � \ ' _ - ! �^il � ( /_�� —•—•—•—�—•—•—•— FEDERAL WAY CITY LIMITS •�" ,— � ! � :��: } �! . j � – �� �s��- ; ' � � � � � POTENTIAL ANNEXAT]ON AREA 1 :; `� � Y r ----- ' ;; � _�� , ,� 1 -`��-�' - TRAFFIC FROM RESIDENTIAL AREAS '�'�' l �l :: � � Y y t��� — _=__==--- --- ss= __ _:: –. –._—_,– ...____... 1 . .—� _ .. .. . '_ �.s�+......�r= : '.. w .......... ...... . � This n�p �s intended Fpr use ns c grnpYNCei representotion only The City of Federnl Wny nakes no warrnnty as to �ts nccurncy � ���� �•�� � ������ �m. � a �� N , - =-- zt� =-.�:_ }�.�::: ".`::�=_.::: - :� R E _ :-�' "_�� �a G GIS DIVISION �� i_-- �� r ; ` i � � '.- ' ��— _._\=:..r '_':.�::- `� _ :'`�::.. ':;�-� i ''? .. ` ���. .. _" _ .... }:k�:._'r' . . � � 7 �-► �:' � �'��-:'' . �.,� — • ' � � ���:- �;= - ' � - ' _�� � i ';:{:. ! �� � _ _ _�� _ , �� � � � � � � �' 'L� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ...��. Puget Sound t�� � � S �� r _ �� � ,\\ p�,�, ^� � W � � �� j , �, � ��; ' 1 �' f r-g} , .- . � �-� -� �_ � & � �Y i' ' � ��� d' / i' _" � „. � _ , �. �, - _ _ � _ �• � ; ,� . � I �� _� a,... '" _ - �e L -- _ � . . r ' ♦ °'y .. i �, , ( dD � �.� ? / �b � 0e. .�.. . . '— - � ' . . ', � ♦ �� �. � �� -- ' � - " � � ... � . .. . -.- -_ . ._ ... � , ������ � � —� -��. I � � � : �. ' � -�- -+�— `♦ 4 --- - - � $ i . - -+$ 72Pth � � I il � � tl! i _ ♦ ~ i . � � ..._ �' � . - 'y� �i '. . � .. -- � ♦ �� - .� � � t. _. _ .—. , � �� - - . . � -- ' � . $, �. �`—_ ; S �" � � ��,N� . ♦ � I , -� -- � � � I , —Q � ,' � � `� �� I � ��I � p � �'NSH�RE PK� Y ` l o <, �" 8W a�__h _�__ah 8 � � - - -T � � ,� � W�, _�. T h T — � � �' i � , �\ I �-- -`` ��"� ' � � �! �I- ' �� � ; . �- � °° � - . -, � � uvnvrow��ne � � �� � _ - ��a�h 8T � � �� � �d 87,i1E . i `� —� � �� Vi� � — �` �� � �'' . 7► i aW ase�h aT � � - �s- �— � � � - , _ : _� 1� - \- � , , r_ � � , � -�,�,�� - __' _ .� � ,,,,� � . �� ���� � � � � � ��F � a �� ��� ':.'� �°+�` y� � ♦ � �. '°�, � �- ' � o � X i� ��r ; � �. *� �,� � � �. .,� _ � , i i � R � � V . _ e i � �� -r-;� ,� �... l � ���� � � I � r� ; I � �� � �� � f - _' ---_ I i � I� ' �i-iD-�- � J �` �w � • �I � � 'f' � '� ; � � ' � . �` I �� � �-- °;� I \� ��.�.�� •r� �� < � � � ��— — �I - �f� �I --�--��----�-� — �� EXISTING SIGNIFICANT STREETS AND HIGHWAYS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`�� City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area -- SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm o� Federal Way MAP III-2 „� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN EXISTING AND PLANNED TRAFFIC SIGNALS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT �``•� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area �' Existing Traffic Signal Communication Line Proposed Traffic Signal Communication Line � Existing Traffic Signal Planned Traffic Signal � Fire Signal � Existing Pedestrian Signal — SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � Federal Way MAP III-3 2003 /data2Rabttham/cpmapsltrslg.aml � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN .�. PugetSound � �u g , Qo' -- . �I /.! � � •� ! � I � � �• ___ ` I •' � I I ,� �/f - � ' ,� I - I 1 ,' t P° 't— ' �.. '" � � F _ � � ���.� e.r , 1 ,Z; � �tll � .� , p � ��`" __ � -- ' � , � `� � ' ` , � , y .. ... �• .� - �' � � � ` "' �i � k __ . �� , , � '� � `�� � � �" _ . �- � _ •_ _ _ e '� _ I „ ,� _ . j-- , ♦ � - �` ,. T •` " � �_ _ ,., � „ � �� � � ��� ��; _,� ' �� - -; � � � ,-- � � � � _ � _� � ~ N � I ��� � � ' 1 �_ ., .��i ��_ fFLUDI � t-- � 7 �r � PK`N Y,.. =� lo�� �~ %�' ��-� ~ J �� � � � � - .... � �� ��� ��� �—� c� �— �� -�� —� �� � ��� � � �'' � �� , � �— .nr � � �� � �,� � - � � ��. � hBTj � f'i3rd 8T E ! �`� � � �I � ' u�' �_ �( _ � ' � � �� �ti� - � --- �-, - fC � �� �. ! r � �-Z I � . � � �F � � ��F� �, �''> �la � � — 1 - �_ L__, - -� --� — I f� � -�_ �� � � � - ���''� �,_ �a�..�,,�aT+- - � 'F �. _ � -- ii �,� . 7 ' � d ,Q� � � � — L__, a ' -- � � . _ �� �., K� � � / , � /' � � �; �` ' � ` � __ �-__.- �_ ._ i� �-� i� � i - -r t4 �� j � `�. � ., , � , � � -�-. - . � ,� r �r ,'� � --� � / � � 13,000; � : V 920��'�� )OB10 1,300 9,100 9,800 � -��-- �_ __ . p r oa . „ � � ? t i ___ �.�oo z.5�� 2000 TRAFFIC VOLUMES TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`•� City Limits / � ` Potential Annexation Area � � Average Weekday Traffic — SCALE — 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet --<.�o ' z�,000 5.600 2,800 � cm oF Federal Way MAP III-4 2003 � � � r � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUNCTIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF EXISTING AND PLANNED STREETS AND HIGHWAYS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`•� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area ^� Freeway '°��' Principal Arterial �� Minor Arterial �� Principal Collector Minor Collector � SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm oF Federal Way MAP III-5 2003 , � q � ,I �-�� ` i I �� � i � � , Puget Sound P , �' ; , r �- �� I �.� / l � � � � . � �� li � -r ��+�... � � � � ,. _.- �� �� � I .— � ` ,�• l I I I� , .� _ � • � � I � � \ L - r -- �� i I �' � � � _ —'- '� ' �� � .--- ' f _._-- ;! I � 1_ . �, ety � _ --- , � �' � —* - � . o � _- - - T r . � ' � � �i � .^��.+'� i -- ,,— ♦ � � � �� ��..� � 4 � . � ��� � ' r � , , , , - , �, , , � SW 320th S7'1 �` � - � � � � <, . � " ; ,` � - i �' �, ,: . , ` __ � ' I � �. . - �. x ♦� , � _-� � v ��` ___ � _ N - I � Np ��� . __ � a ; I-� Ar MSH�►RE PK� � � � � � SW ���36 ST ��_� � � • e� , � � _ �36 ,, � � � ` - _ � � �� ♦ ', � -- y- - � � ; ♦ �-� � �� ��� � t �����', �'� jl �b,menoemerrt �, � �� '- _. � . � ` 1 �S 348th ST i - , ��- --� . '� eay �, _33rd $T;NE ,� _ `` � _ u i ' ��_ _-- - �• � �+� ♦, � % �_. __i_ � /. I t , � , � ♦ ' i ` � __ b, 'r � .� � /� • �' �, 3 I ��� � �,r , � � ��� �� ��� ♦ � M � A �NF 4 �� `' ��L m,� � a � � -��� P `��. `, . � .� � � � , ., : �. . � � ;; � r ��,; I ���' � __ + � /� '" �' -.. r ' ��� u ';i �I�! �, � I I S 2�th ST I ; i i� � � -- _��_ I, __� > �I ` = i � e_ ' I � I' .�� -__ / 1 i� ��''� .` � , � �` + ,�, �� � �y � � ��I � ' � � - -_ . x � ao N � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PLANNED STREET SECTIONS �� _ ,.�.�:.,;� � — I I , p I � � �� , -�+ ( ? � �I � � � _ ,� _ �-_ _ � --�—__. '' 3 ( TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ♦'�.i� Federal Way City Limits / ♦ � Potemial Annexation Area Roadway Section: A - 4 lanes + HOV � B- 4 lanes + HOV (City Center) �� C - 4 lanas + Bike ♦�� D- 4 lanes + Bike (Ciry Certter) � E - 4 lanes \ � F - 4 lanes (City Center) �� G - 5 lanes + B1ke �� H- 5 lanes + Bike (Cfty Certter) I - 5 lanes %�� J - 5 lanes (City Center) %�^�/ K - 3 lanes + Bike � L- 3 lanes + Bike (City Center) �! M - 3 lanes N- 3 lanes + Parldng (Ciry Certter) ^� O - 2 lanes + Bike � P- 2 lanes + Ditch (Low Density) '`� <v��`" Q- 2 lanes + Parking (Ciry Certter) �/ R - 2 lanes + Parldng (Comme�ciaUlndustrial) S- 2 lanes + Parl�ng (Single Family) /�� T- 2 lanes + Ditch (Low Density) � `Federa� way MAP III-6 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a praphical representation ony. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map prirrted February 2003 /data2/tabithaMcpmapsrtrplst.aml � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � i CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN STATE ACCESS MANAGEMENT CLASSIFICATIONS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ���•� Federal Way City / � � Potential Annexation Area I�� Limited Access �` Class 4 � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � Federa� way MAP I II-7 r�t{ rr �r � r��r ���w r� � �,w r �r �r w� � w� rr� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY ACCESS MANAGEMENT CLASSIFICATIONS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`-� Federal Way City Limits / � � Potential Annexation Area ^/ Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 � Class 4 — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet �v Federal way MAP I II-8 Map p�lnted February 2003 ir � r� rr �r r � rr � r r� � � � � �r � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2002 CONGESTED STREETS & HIGHWAYS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`•� Federal Way City Limits / � � Potential Annexation Area � Congested Streets • Congested Intersections — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm oF Federal Way MAP 111-9 2003 r � rr �r � �r � � � � �r � a� � r s� r� w r� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN .�. � -- �� a , SW �_T 'v ♦ �, � � � ��_������� ' �= � � 2008 CONGESTION WITH EXISTING STREETS AND HIGHWAYS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT _ ' �'�,i _ - � �r • ; � � �� . • `�, � � a � — � ;� �� � � y ��M8MOrtE PK`M � `` � j J � _ --- _ ' � � �1 -�-: � i - -� �t��i', � � S _ Il�i ; _ . ,� —_ � _ ,. Puget Sound P� � „� � o � � `�� ' _ �- � •�+ � . � �� � � -� � � > , � 1-1 � ' _��� . �� � � , �-- '" _� -' � < �,, t�r ��� i ; _ � d _ � ,� „ � .. -- ,�. , -; � i �� , � � y �, � � , D �. � / � �� '( R '� � I�! � — � � ,�-���� � � �,i i- '° -- � _ ,� a,... �_� � � , o � � � J— . T _ ;�� _ � �„�•.�-�'� i _ - _ �T _ _���,�rar � _�i� � � F � , �. I � �, �aw �2otd sT_ � ,_�_ � s az�ben st �L'�� �t , � ♦ � ' � 3 � m �` '* - i '� � "` � � , � ' � y �r t = � � �, � . — � ) � ♦ __ Z --` g � `� ' _ _ , N � f 31M ST�fTE � i ;; ,�. ♦. -- t - + -� _ � . __ `" � ,, ,� r o ♦ <�� � t d , . &. !�a�n sr � r .•- . ■� y __`��� � 4 — � � , 4 � / r t '� w ass�n sT _ r ' � � -,� ,� , �, , , � , �� � ��� ` ib ,�� __• � � - �, I � �� �— r_ � � .� � � ! i --�`. F o �Q�i N I �, ' - a .�` .—.�m�"!► �1 � � , � �v� � �F h � �. ¢ ! �. � ��'� �• ; L I �; /��. '� i . „ ��.� -� � r � __ . r�_ T__. � ( �, �I � — �� � , �� � — � � � �\/ Federal Way City Limits Potential Annexation Area Congested Streets Congested Intersections — SCALE --- 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � Federal Way MAP III-10 r � r� �r � i � � �r � � � � �■r � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2008 CONGESTION WITH PROPOSED STREET AND HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��-� Federal Way City Limits / � ` Potential Annexation Area Congested Streets • Congested Intersections — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm aF Federal Way MAP �II-11 2003 � � � � � i � � � � � � � �rr � � r � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2020 CONGESTION WITH 2008 STREET & HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ���•� Federal Way City Limits � �► � Potential Annexation Area Congested Streets • Congested Intersections --- SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet CIT' OF Federal Way MAP III-12 Map printed February 2003 r � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � r � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2020 CONGESTION WITH 2020 IMPROVEMENTS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ���•� City Limits / �► � Potential Annexation Area Congested Streets • Congested Intersections � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet �v Federa� way MAP III-13 A Aap p rinted February 2003 /data2/tabltham/cpmnps/tr2020.am1 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HIGH COLLISION RATE INTERSECTIONS (1997 -1999) TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��.� Federal Way City Limits � �. ' Potential Annexation Area ■ 1.0-2.5/MEV"' 2.5-5.0/MEV • > 5.0/MEV * Millan errtering vehiclea --- SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � Federal way MAP III-14 2003 /data2ltabftham/cpmapsltnc�r.aml � � � � � r � � � � � � � � � � �■ � �w CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HIGH COLLISION RATE CORRIDORS (1997-1999) TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��•� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area � 5 - 10/mvm* 10 - 25/mvm /�/ 25 - 50/mvm > 50/mvm " million vehide milea � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet �v Federal way MAP III-15 printed February 2003 /data2/tablthaml�napaRraccld.aml � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HIGH COLLISION SEVERITY INTERSECTIONS (1997-1999) TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��.� Federal Way City Limits A r► � Potential Annexation Area ■ $25,000-50,000/MEV* $50,000-100,000/MEV • >$100,000/MEV ' Million entering vehicles � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet �v Federal way MAP I I I-16 printed February 2003 /data2ltabfthamlcpmnps/[nc�c.aml � �; ■� � � � w r� � � � r, � r � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HIGH COLLISION SEVERITY CORRIDORS TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��.� Federal Way City Limits 1 '� ' Potential Annexation Area -^�` $250,000-500,000/MVM'` '�`�'� $500,000-1,000,000/MVM �� >$1,000,000/MVM " Million Vehide Milea � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet �v Federal way MAP II I-17 2003 /data?Rebltham/cpmapsltnc�cc.aml � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SIDEWALK INVENTORY ON MAJOR STREETS (2002) TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��`�� Federal Way City Limits / � � Potential Annexation Area �� No Sidewalks Sidewalks on one side of street � Sidewalks on both sides of street � SCALE — 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � Feideral way MAP III-18 printed February 2003 /data2ltabRham/cpmeps/[raw.aml � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BICYCLE FACILITIES PLAN TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT �'.�� Federal Way City Limits /` / Potential Annexation Area �� Class 1 (Separate Trail) � Class 2 (Marked Bike Lanes) Class 3 (Bike Route) — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm oF Federal Way MAP III-19 2003 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � Pugei Sound � ,� �� � i � tj�� � • — •, _'� � � � �, � � � � _, � �� , I � ..•� r � � l �,.i''� �`— _ � . A � � I I ! �.. � �— l o�'� L --- �.� � • i,l /, r ` eiy ., ,t• ' mr'-I � - ,��,,�� � !� _ _ � . � ... ' , o i �° —�}- � . � ' � � �� soi .�, � . � �- �' � , � � , � � ' �' _ I ;�z__ � , is ie � �. � sw a�ou� �� � � _ � � ♦ � � � `_ = �7� � �� � _ ^ � � 1 - ; CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ALL DAY TRANSIT SERVICE Effective June 2002 TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i��•� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area �`' 4+ Buses/Hour � 2 to 3 Buses/Hour �� 1 Bus/Hour _ � � �, , � � � � � � �� �� �� �� � � SCALE �- 1 Inch equals 6,300 Feet cm of Federal Way MAP III-20 >rinted Feb�uary 2003 /data2ltabhham/cpmnpe/trapark.aml � � � � � � � r � � � � � � � � � � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN .-��. 5tar Lake ; �ias �� Park & Ride � 194 �� _��, 152.183.190. ' e 191.192,194, � iie �� i ST574 � "^ � 16 z: ` � ^ 7.: �� (�l N OD m i j ,`— , , , 'sa ; ';j I �� � - _ �� �em �.:� ^ PEAK HOUR TRANSIT SERVICE Effective June 2002 TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i�`�� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area 8+ BUSeS/HOUf �� 4 to 7 Buses/Hour 2 to 3 Buses/Hour �` 1 Bus/Hour Pugersound A'�"" � �'~� o ° ''m�� o. � < `- ' �1, r @ �� pwcoa.. ; /' �� r / � � '.� �h � ��r � j . . I • ' �" i � -' �� � ` � `\ � � '' ' " � � ��, , i n � ��� . i' �� i r 1 �- --� � � � ; � � �—. � ' �J — � � _ �. . — �.. -, - '�^�` gry � y r �. r �• a� � � 1 �`- Federal Wav � � � � � �• - �- \ \ 801 �s�� � Park 8� Ride �' \ J l � �I �7� L .i m.� � 77 I � �. � �- �� 1 �� ��� � ,� � ��� 174.175.176. � / ie7 l � } i �� � , ,� $ ��•j5 177.178.181. � � , ,. :..- ". , � � .is st ,�- 183.187.188. �. : i - � ' iie � 17 e � � ;� � 194.197.901. - � � ve I sq� � � � � 903.PT402.PT50U iei �. �_ z � � - � � �� ' �� tea �� ��� - � � I � � ! �' � � : � ST565,ST574 � ' d,� � m� ���. » � �� iee Jo ',e, � � m'-� �f' � � � � . 8 � yp3 ., gw � - '°�ti /� i � y � � � � , � t ,� , -, . � � . � ..,� � � , v�r,. � � _ ; � � et - _..� � ; , .. �., SW ST .. ���70fN8T a�_ -i t - � �, � � � ta� ,.. ��- ' g� ao m , �3 � _ � Q �J/�� � .. �I .._._. n�ro � � . , �y I ( � _ 178 _. . �. . � N � ��4.. �5 � w �� Twin Lakes ' �, Park & Ride '� - $�.nh ,` '� . � � �S I o < � I a � .,e � � .� vr .� ' t � `i1 �} ' ��' � � _ 179 i , � � A �� : 188,178, � sT � � _ 1 j � � --r- � � � S Federal Way � ,, � ; ! � � � Park 8� Ride � - � �' �� '^ -- �W -- — � / `� i � �' �t � I %� 194,196,197 � � - � � � ,--� _ ) �r,��; � � `.�, _� �-_��` -- ' •'� ;� 1 � �� � �°�,� I �� t ��-� � I w� � ° , � �a,� � � ,� — �� � �� I � I I � � � I, i � % �� � � , ,' � � � ���� ; , � . , � , � , �, � _ �.� '' �' � � � - ;, ', ,; ; i 1 — �� i � — - SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 6,300 Feet cm ar Federal Way MAP III-21 2003 � a�� �r ,� �• �r � ..� a� � �. � � ,�.� � � r ,� � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � . . f . �x�sea s• � �" ,i , � I:� % 't. Puget Sound P ,, � „� � �� ` •�': • �i a � tr" � t -'� ./ �� i ��I - ' � � �,,, . � �—� � . � � , � � � I • <I y ��,� r "_� '� � ��°' � i . � ' _s �i'� � ' �� � � �� i �'-- �.. � � _ o�S�° " , '. ' , � - � �°y ?._� (p p _�___ _I � � -� � : ` � ' I ' o e�- t - - � - _ _ ' � � �� . x � � . -- �t , - � �� .�'i �_ ' � � ' I i _ —�� ,1 , �� # 8W 330th ST �'� 8 92�8T �"-'�/ 1t � I� I ��� -� � a � �� � ' � � z� ; � ����� � I � � � � � � �� �j � � • � — � � ,J � � � � _ _� � — �� � o � � \ �� �� � � � i � �� � f O N H8� � � � � / r, �d • � ��• �� • �_ _ � �p� p� � I � � r -. � � �%�Gi _�� M REPK`i��—,`�� w`� i SW830thST - �BSAWST J_ �� ���i i' � � � � � � � � i � � O 1 � � � � � , �\ � �. � � ' — � ����, '" ♦ � � � � � �� _� � �� •� , � � O d .�...K i .' x s a�n sr ': f; � �( ; s I � �. � �`--&—� eo I ''�.#� • < �81rd 8T�E j •� ' �u �; � � i � � t � �� � t � � . __ , __� . r� � � � _ �_ ` 8W 86lfh 8T i I �� , � �� r—� �. � � _ �` � � ,�'� , �, � � p ��.' • � � �� , ����, � � _ ,- �. $S ����, ��`++�F y � � ��� ¢ � � � �. I . � '� �, a F_ . •, �i, �� , a �1 . .!'� I �'/ . ' � .�i' . � !� ' � i ` � � �__..�2 � � \ . I i 9 aea�n a I _�_ T � r ` o"'i � r.' I � � PROPOSED TRANSIT ROUTES TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT i�`�� Federal Way City Limits � �► Potential Annexation Area Proposed Transit Routes � SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm of Federal Way MAP III-22 � �� ��� Federal Way City Limits � 272nd St. Park 8 Ride (Emergency) � Green Gables Elementary School (Emergency) �' Potential Annexation Area � Thomas Jefferson High School (Emergency) � Fire Station #3 (Emergency) � Fly Wright Company Landing Area � Twin Lakes Golf Course (Emergency) � Fly Wright Company Landing Area � Federal Way High School (Emergency) � 336th St. Medical Transter Point � Woodmont Elementary School (Emergency) Q Fire Station #l8 (Emergency) � Weyerhauser Corporate Landing Area 0 1 Mile — /�1 N This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City ot Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy. � �Federal Way Idata2ttabitharNcpmaps�heli land.aml , � i r � i � � t r � � � � � � � , � I'�,' federal Way City Limits / ,/ Potential Annexation Area / ./ Most Compatible Region with Heliport Develapment 0_ __ 1 Mile _ __ Q N This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The Ciry ot Federal Way makes no warranry as to its accuracy. C111 OF �. Federal Way w �� �r �. r�� iw r��r w� r w� ��r � r� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � .�. PUgBt SOUII� P � / t � ,.� � ,, , _ — �.. � ; � �! ,�'� 1 �'��� �� � � �1:� ' � � i ' � J � o a.�.. `" - �0 � ! , . /, � � ` B �� T �� I � ._ I . . op,� � l 1_--- _ __�•� -- x� ; �; � � ! � � �` �___ __, ;; I� � � • ,�� �, I `�;��� � � r 1--g�-�-L j $ saa�n e. � } ;j I 1 'I- � ' - �� . _ � 1 �, , � � � --- - � .... _7_ T. ,�. _ . � �_ \ 'Ats;k.� � � i ,o, � i -� G +- �a � �� -- 1 .- �s��s� � r ►�'� 1 „, _� �_� � ; �* - ;-� , I , �� �._ . _ � ��� �� ; � t � _� �r`—'__ � � -� ' l � " /. / � - y � `� � � \ ; -�,,�� T= � -�� .; - b � � ' �� .� = �� �.. -� ��— �' � -- � �� �' - �' t , � � � �s a�aen r %� �� F u ' , .i"� r' ,33rd 8T�NE �� I �� � � - I'� ' �` � i i . - �-, � � � I /,—__ . � � �� �' ' x . aw a 5T �-- � � � �- _-- - : -1� - � I —y ' I _ � • � _ " i � � � r �°° - -- `� � , � � � ��u --( . , . � � , <� � . . � � r . __ - _� �. � ♦ V 4� � a � � �� ' �,�; � � � � � �°�y,ViF!tiF h _—� ��` I Q_ r o � � � — � � �_ , ., � �--�-.�� � '� r � � . !� 4 � �. i � i ` '�" .� . �. � Federal Way MAP III-25 I , ' I � \ I I Q' 1 < F� � � � � �, THROUGH TRUCK ROUTE PLAN TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ���.� Federal Way City Limits / �► � Potential Annexation Area Existing Truck Routes �^�� Proposed Additional Truck Route � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet � � � � ir. � �. � � � �■. w� �r � rr � rr �. r CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2003-2008 TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ��•�� Federal Way City Limits /� / Potential Annexation Area � Street Improvement Projec �'�`•'' Non Motorized Projects • Intersection Improvement �- , Project (18,' Map Identification Number �- SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm oF Federal Way MAP III-26 2003 � � .�r r � r �.. r � �r �. ,� r r �r � r r a� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN �' Puget Sound Pwvfy e.y .�i ���� ��� �.�_ � .�. - � fi .'.�,,,•?'' � '�� ^; ; � t � � C _ � �� ,'T �r � '�' 1. �,.. o � �' ��� : � � � 41 1 � � `�� � , � � � .-� �� � � .��'� � � — � "�, •� � � �-�� �'- , � I , ��� � ii � � � � ��3� ��I ♦ 1� — — ' j �,'�i � ,. ,,; �:? �a; ''�i _ �— � r, g � � � �� �.d � � � � `� �' I '17 `3�, -� 8'i'! � �. �� ,� . � � �� �'zz� ;- � �� '=; � � 4 � _� ��� � � x ���� � p 7 '�,�..... q � �: 1\ � ±. �N _%�� ,..`.�('._r �,d2:�� �` J_. �a � � � �O �; � p '- � � .- , o ��MBMORE PK`� Y .. � tlJ _� � � � T (� ( � -� - � '� ' . �� � 330th 8 � � , � +�`� i ... �j; � ' ) �I--� � ��"� � � '.:, , � �' � �? ro� (�� ��� f �. � �" �57; j ' �. . ' � s a�an s �� � a «�.,� � ( � � ��1 �a � }d�M BT�HE � _ � �� � +� � �j �* �� ! ����� I < -� � - I_�_'1 sw_ai � � � ��� \� � � i '�'' `� �"���� h *�.r �� F. � ir. � � � � �� . i � , / ♦ �, , ..1, 2009-2020 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT ---�- �'•�� Federal Way City Limits . �-� /� / Potential Annexation Area 3 � � Street Improvement Projec � � ������. j t � , Non Motorized Projects a �� ` i� � 1 �,� j' �� / ,-�.- � �• , ��— �s � � � �% �' i• •� ! �r ) � � ; i � I -- - � �� N � .__� ��, -- � � !< .�--- / � ''� �/ � - � a � � Q/ � � � � � � �; � •, n , � -� �- � .�� --�� ,� 1Q Q � �� - '� _ � -„ \ . � '� X /�Yr T.e � � � � I � �%' � � , , i i,�� �., �,.. , � �. � , � v . �% � ��� � �V / �� � ..,lL � � h , �— • II 18 T — �'; _ � j � � � � � ��I� Signal Communications Project Intersection Improvement Project Map Identification Number � SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm o� Federal Way MAP III-27A 2003 �r � r�� r� r � �� r w� � rr � r�� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2003-2020 REGIONAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN TRANSPORTATION ELEMENT �'•i� Federal Way City Limits •P /� Potential Annexation Area � Street Improvement Projects �"�r`A� Non Motorized Improvement Projects • Intersection Improvement Project Transit Station Project �,18�� Map Identification Number — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 5,800 Feet cm er Federal Way MAP III-27B 2003 C� i 1 1 1 , ' 1 CHAPTER FOU R- ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 4.0 INTRODUCTION The Growth Management Act (GMA) includes economic development as one of its basic goals and it is a theme that runs throughout the � GMA. It considers the need to stimulate economic development throughout the state, but requires that these activities be balanced with the need to protect the physical environment. It encourages the efficient use of land, the availability of urban services, and the financing strategies necessary to pay for infrastructure. Finally, the � GMA mandates that communities do their planning and then provide the zoning and regulatory environment so that appropriate development can occur. It recognizes that while the public sector can shape and influence development, it is the private sector that generates community growth. The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) has also adopted region-wide goals and , objectives to guide multi jurisdictional transportation and land use policies that will be implemented through local comprehensive plans. Economic development is implicit in many of the goals and objectives of VISION 2020. The VISION 2020 strategy emphasizes that continued economic stability and diversity is dependent upon public and � private sector collaboration to identify needs, such as infrastructure and land, and to invest in services that will promote economic activity. VISION 2020 also emphasizes that the stability of the regional economy increases when it develops and diversifies � through the retention and strengthening of existing businesses and the creation of new business. ' King County, through its growth management planning policies and process, re- emphasizes the economic development implications of growth management. The Countywide Planning Policies CWPPs promote the creation of a healthy and diverse ' economic climate. The �e�s�es CWPPs describe the need to strengthen, expand, and diversify the economy. They encourage protection of our natural resources and enhancement of our human resources through education and job training. The ' �v��e-�e�isi� CWPPs also speak to the need to make an adequate supply of land available for economic development by providing necessary infrastructure and a reasonable permitting process. � � L , � Within this policy framework, Federal Way has outlined a vision of its economic development future. Its vision is to transform itself from � lar�elv a bedroom- community of Seattle into a diversified, full-service, and self-contained city (Map IV-1� located at the end of the chapter). However, in doing so, it is important to �a remember that Federal Way is part of the larger Puget Sound economy, and therefore, this transformation will depend in larg�part on the market forces at work within the �ge� r� eater region. To achieve this vision, the City must diversify its employment base by adding more professional and managerial jobs, and by increasing the overall number of jobs in order to improv�ge the balance between jobs and households in the City. The potential is there. Federal Way's unique location between the two regional centers of � , FWCP — Chaeter Four, Economic Development Seattle and Tacoma, both with large concentrations of population and large, successful ports, and its relationship within the Central Puget Sound region represent significant opportunities. The City is also home to Weyerhaeuser's Corporate Headquarters, located within East Campus, and the West Campus Office Park, e� two of the premier office park areas in the region. In addition, the City holds unique regional attractions for entertainment and recreation, such as Celebration Park, King Countv Aquatic Center, and Six Fla�s Enchanted Parks/Wild Waves. The City's economic development vision is based on the following, ���'��^'� -„°° a^r� �� : 1) economic and demographic analysis; 2) market analysis of long-term real estate development in Federal Way; ; 4} 3� synthesis of real estate and development trends in the Central Puget Sound area; and �-} � review and comment from the Planning Commission. Section 4.1 "The Economic Development Vision For Federal Way" has been moved to Section 4.2 ' , � ' � , ' 4� 4.1 SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS AND TRENDS 1 1 � � ��1 J_111. � � � __ _ ' � ' � � � � � � r. - � ��� ��� - - - - - - - - 1 1 1 _ - - - - _ _ -� `�=ri� - Y. • I 1 • - _ • •. �. 1/ II! •�� ' - i Y. � � � � 1 � _ Revised �999 2002 � � , , ' � � J , N-2 � � � ' 1 , , , ' ' , ' � � ' ' ' ' � , � � FWCP - Chaater Four, Economic Development • - - - - - - '- .-. „ •�� ., �• - � . .�� •• � - , � � � Y- - �� � , Y'.T-�'S. SLS _ ��1 _ _ � � � _ _ 1 1 • � 1 r. - - - '• �1 1 11 i 1 �1 Y.- I 111 - • _ = 7 • ' � � • - . - ' 1�� � 111 �11 ��1 \ � ��� � � - 1 - � 1 .� ��1 \ •'� •�1 �� _ � � • _ � � - _ - r. ���- - ' � � r. • �ri _ . _ _ ��� . 1 - _ � � - • . � • • - Revised �989 2002 IV-3 ' FWCP - Chapter Four. Economic Development � � �'orlot�l \7U�., ;� ..1,�.-�..ro,-:�orl 1,.,• � i7;,.t,_.,,,�1;+., �;,,..lo_ �„a ,,,,,ir;,,lo f,,,;i,. ro�;ao *' 1.. e e .�Slf'.lSTS. �7:l:':*:!'t[!!t!�!_Z*: - a s . .. Y. � ,_ � ■_ •� 111 -- - r. ' - . RrS!'�Ef E!!f i:lST�t!T!�as!E!'S - - - - ' - r. � . - Y. � _ � � � � Revised �998 � ' ' ' ' ' ' � � � � � , , , ' , �V� ' ' � �� �J � , � � C_� � ' , ' ' , ' i FWCP — Cha�ter Four. Economic Development . _ . •• • � _ - - - _ ' � Y. I. 1. Y.- 111 • S � - 1 ' Y. _ - � � - • _ � � - - - - • - � � � � = - _ _ � _ ► •� _ •�1 _ _ - � � � � _ _ ' i� Y, � �• Overvfew Since the last update to this chapter of the Federal Wav Comprehensive Plan (FWCP), there have been si�nificant chanQes in the local, regional, national, and international economic conditions. Previouslv ridinQ a sustained stron� economic wave associated with extraordinary , �rowth in the high-tech industries stron� growth in the airline industry, and generally positive national and international perceptions of the Pacific Northwest, the Seattle- Tacoma metropolitan region, and the State of Washin�ton, Washin�ton be�an to show , Revised 2A98 2002 iv-s , � FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development early si�ns of an economic downturn by mid-2001. Riots in nearbv Seattle, first associated with the meetin� of the World Trade Or�anization in November 1999, and later with the 2001 Mardi Gras festivities, had begun a series of negative publicitv ima�es of Seattle and the Seattle area. This ne�ative publicity was exacerbated bv the Februarv 28, 2001, Nisqually Earthquake, and later in 2001 bv the Boein� Companv's announcement that it was movin� its corporate headquarters to Chicago. In addition, bv mid-2001, the national economy had begun to slow down, the "dot-com" industrv had suffered a�eneralized melt-down, and the Pacific Rim countries, upon which so much of this state's trade depends, continued to slide further into their own recessions. The effects of the September 1 l, 2001, terrorist attacks on this countrv jolted the economies of most of the world's countries and re�ions, but had a uarticularlv hard impact on the Puget Sound re�ion. As air-travel-related commerce plummeted worldwide, the Boein� Company, its affiliates, and related industries, saw sharp drops in orders, and Boein� announced its intentions to lav off tens of thousands of workers over the ensuing two years. By the beginnin� of 2002, lay-offs around the PuQet Sound region became a commonplace occurrence, stemming from cutbacks at Boeing, other companies related to the airline and travel industries, and numerous "dot-com" and hi�h-tech companies. However, according to the 2002 Kin� County Annual Growth Report, the Kin� County economv remains stron� despite severe shocks. Unemployment has risen to 62 percent as of June 2002, but that level is no worse than the historical average. Aerospace employment in the Puget Sound region now stands at 72,000, with about 47,000 of that in King Countv. Althout�h well below its record employment levels, the aerospace sector continues to provide hiQh wa�es to local workers. Hi�h tech continues to expand despite the shakeout of a few companies. Other services, wholesale, and retail lost employment before the recession hit aerospace, so they may be read�grow a�ain in the comin� year. The si�nificant overall income Qrowth in soflware and other sectors propelled Kin� Countv into ei�hth place among all 3,100 counties in the United States in total pavroll paid durin� 1998. Measured at $41 billion by the Census Bureau, King County's total business payroll exceeded that of 26 states, includin� Ore�on, which has twice as manv peovle as King County. Amon� other issues raised bv such large numbers is that of the disparity of wealth and income between King County and the other parts of WashinQton State outside the Pu�et Sound re�ion. In 1998, more than 52 percent of wages paid in the state were in King County, in contrast to our 29 percent share of the state's population. Some of that difference reflects hi�h tech iobs in Seattle and the Eastside, as well as high wage manufacturing,,iobs in South King County. Lon�-range prospects are mixed. Boein� forecasts production of around 250 airplanes this year and next. Sale of those planes will bring in billions of dollars, much of which will be reinvested in the Pu�et Sound economy. But with the move of Boein� headquarters to ChicaQo, long-term prospects for aerospace are less certain, although the company has continued to emphasize its investment in the Pu�et Sound re�ion. Sales tax and other government revenues are declining at a time when public investment is needed. The area is doin� remarkably well so far, but if these underlvin� issues are not addressed, there could be lastin� consequences to Kin� Countv and the Pu�et Sound region. Revised 2898 2002 � I � _ 1 , ' ' , ' ' , ' � � L� � , ' iv=s ' I��J � ' FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development , and secondarv market expenditures for general merchandise and food trade, a hi�h percentage of the local populace �oes elsewhere to shop for automobiles appareU accessories, miscellaneous retail purchase, building material, and furniture. Overall, the capture rate for retail sales as a function of the Citv's primarv and secondary trade area ' total retail expenditures is relativelv low, about 51 percent (Federal Way City Center Maricet Analysis, prepared bv ECO Northwest, July 2002). , PSRC's 2000 Covered Emplovment Estimates reported that in 2000, covered employment (those jobs covered bv the state's unemplovment insurance program) within Federal Way and throu�hout King Countv could be broken down as follows: , , � , ' , � , ' Table IV-1 2000 Covered Employment Estimates Federal Wa_y and King County Emplo_yment Category Federal Way Emplo_yees Countywide Employees (Percentage) (Percentage) Construction and Resources 1,029 3.3% 69,949 6.1% Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate 13,947 44.5% 440,364 383% ManufacturinQ 3,103 9.9% 147,933 12.9% Retail 8,158 26.1% 189,457 16.5% Wholesale, Transportation, 1,606 5.1% 158,307 1( 3•8%) Communications, and Utilities Education 2,042 6.5% 64,454 5.6% Government 1,431 4.6% 80,542 �� Total 31,315 1,151,006 As can be seen from this data, in 2000, Federal Wav's strongest emplovment sectors were Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate, and Retail, which exceed the countywide avera�;es considerablv. The Citv had noticeablv fewer iobs than avera�e in the Manufacturin� and Wholesale, Transportation Communications, and Utilities sectors. Based on recent events in the emplovment sector, these numbers may be lower today. Market Share Industrial and business park space available to rent in Federal Way is a minuscule share , of the Southend/Green River/Seattle market area. T'he South King County industrial area (including industrial parks business parks, and flex-tech hvbrid business/office parks) is currentiv the stron�est real estate market in Western Washin�ton. ' , , Revised �898 2002 ' The industrial areas of south Seattle, Green River Vallev, and Fife/Tacoma constitute one of the strongest markets for industrial, warehouse, wholesale, distributin�, etc., businesses in the Western United States. The Citv of Federal Way is in a strate�ic position to capitalize on these markets bv providing prime office space and room for new office development, as welI as qualitv housing_ iv-s � FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development Retail and Lodging Development Developed and opened in 1975, the SeaTac Mall was the primarY force behind the growth of retail in Federal Way durinQ the 1980s. After a period of some decline in recent years, SeaTac Mall is currently a prime candidate for updating, redevelopment and/or repositioning to acquire a stronger market position. In 1995, Pavilons Centre replaced the old Federal Way Shoppin� Center, and in 2001 the Pavilions Center Phase II came on line, with more development at that location yet to come. In 1998, SeaTac Villa�e was given a complete face-lift incorporatin� the City's commercial desi�n guidelines. In addition, in the late 1990s, a new Walmart store moved into the Citv Center Frame, and there have been several renovations and remodelin� of existin� retail structures, includin� the conversion of the old Safewav buildin� at the southwest corner of South 320�' and Pacific Hi�hway into Rite Aid and the old K-Mart into Safewav. Within the last two years, a 45,000 square foot Best Buy has onened in the Citv Center Frame and a 52,000 square foot Albertson's remodel has occurred in the Communitv Business zone alon� Pacific HiQhway South. Between 1995-2000, four hotels/motels have been constructed in and around the Citv Center. These include Holiday Inn, Courtyard Marriott, Extended Stay, and Comfort Inn. In addition, a Holiday Inn Express and Sunnyside Motel (Travel Lod�e) have been built south of the City Center alon� Pacific Hi�hway. Hawthorne Suites, a 65 unit Countrv Inn, has been recently constructed along Pacific Highway South in the Communitv Business zone south of the Citv Center. Office Development Federal Way's East and West Campus Developments set a standard in the region as two of the best examples of master-planned office campuses in the Pacific Northwest. The quality of development in this area is decidedly different than elsewhere in Federal Wav and Southwest Kin� County. Within the last two vears, the majority of new office development has been located within Federal Wav's East Campus which has seen the following development: Foss OfFice Buildin� at 108,000 square feet; Capital One Office Buildin� at 143,000 square feet; and Federal Way Office Building and Warehouse at 70,767 square feet. The West Campus area has seen little new office development. Althou�h permits have been issued for additional office development in the West Camuus, risin� vacancy rates there have stalled additional developrr►ent for the near term. In the City Center no new additional office development has occurred since the last comprehensive plan update, and office buildings continue to constitute a minoritv of the City Center's development. Other commercial areas within the Citv have seen limited amounts of office development, such as the recent Lloyd Enterprises buildin� at 34667 Pacific Hi�hwav South. • Revised �899 02 ' ' , ' ' ' � ' ' ' ' � ' ' , ' iv—�o ' � u ' �� � � ' , ' �I LJ , �J , u � FWCP — Chaater Four, Economic Development Business Park (liqht Industrial) Development There has been no substantive Business Park development since the City's incorporation. This lack of recent Business Park development sug�ests the influence of market forces outside of the Citv limits, where cheaper land and established industrial parks act as a draw for prospective business park development. Residential Development One of Federal Wav's stren�ths is the ran�e and qualitv of its housin� stock. The quality, guantitv, and ran�e of options for housin� are maior factors in business sitin� decisions. Accordin� to the 1990 US Census data, the median value of owner-occupied homes in Federal Wav was $118 800. In contrast, the average sales price of Federal Way owner- occupied homes in 2001 as reported bv the King Countv Office of Regional Policy and PlanninQ was $194 092 with sin�le-familv homes avera�in� $213,060 and condominiums averaging $112,135. These figures contrast with other Kin� County cities, as outlined below. Table IV-2 2001 Average Sales Prices of Owner-Occupied Homes in Kin� Count_y Place All Homes Sin�le-Family Condos Federal Wav $194,092 $213,060 $112,135 Auburn $197,965 $216,549 $124,089 Renton $215,341 $248,271 $149,608 Kent $198,844 5222,580 5142,577 Des Moines $206,379 $207,302 $202,142 Seattle $318,671 $342,922 $240.619 KinQ Countv $295,158 $321,700 198 822 As one can see from the above data, homes in Federal Wav are �enerally more affordable than in the immediately surroundin� communities and are far more affordable than homes in Seattle and the Eastside communities. While sin�le-familv houses remain Federal Wav's dominant housin� tvpe, the majoritv of ' housing�starts since the late 1980s were multiple-familv. Multiple-family units as a percentage of all housing units increased from less than 10 percent in 1970 to nearly 40 percent in 1990. Durin� the late 1980s, there were twice as manv multiple-family housin� units constructed in Federal Wav than single-family housing units. From 1990 to 1992, , permittin� of multiple-familv construction stopped, and sin�le-familv construction slowed to about one-third of late 1980 levels. ' Revised �998 2002 iv-» , � FWCP - Chapter Four, Economic Development It is interestin� t� note than in 1990 median monthlv rental rate for Federal Wav was $476, while the median monthly rental rate for Kin� County communities varied between $398 and $458. That is, Federal Wav's multifamilv housing stock was on the hi�her end of cost within the r�ion. Since then, Seattle and some Eastside locations have become particularly expensive, and Federal Way's multifamilv housing stock is substantiallv more affordable than those locations, while averaginQ competitively with nearby communities, as seen below. Table IV-3 Average Multi-Family Rents, Spring 2002 Place Two Bedroom/ All Units One Bath Federal Way $710 $749 Auburn $684 $716 Renton $811 $869 Kent $Tl2 $747 Des Moines $701 $686 North Seattle $852 $787 Queen Anne $1,104 $923 Bellevue-West $1,129 1 200 Kin� Countv $839 $869 Since 1996, the vast majority of multi-family housin� development has taken place in the senior/assisted livin� market. Durin� that time approximately 792 senior or assisted housing units have been added in the City, in addition to 240 skilled-care beds. This is compared with approximately 135 non-senior multifamily housinQ units. The lack of multi-family construction beyond this sub-market speaks to the recent market forces that appear to have discouraged investment in market rate multi-family development that commands lower rents than the Kin� County avera�e, as seen above. In order for the City to successfully encourage multi-family housing at a rate commensurate with the lon� ran�e housing targets established under the GMA, Ci policy must address the market factors unique to this type of development activity. Institutional, _�,. .. Cultural, and Recreational Develoament Federal Way eniovs a variety of affordable, high-quality health care. The Citv boasts three outstanding health care facilities, St. Francis Hospital, Virginia Mason Clinic, and Group Health. These facilities continue to �row and expand in the services thev oi�er the re�ion. In the last two vears, Virginia Mason has developed a 30,000 square foot building addition, and St. Francis Hospital is currently constructin� a 62,000 square foot addition. Revised �998 2002 L__l ' � ' � u , � � � � � ' � � � IV-12 ' � � ' FWCP — Chaater Four. Economic Development Built in 1998 the Knutzen Family provides a venue for professional theatre and the � symphonv. The Federal Way Parks Recreation, and Cultural Services Department offers a summer concert series at Steel Lake Park, which is also home to the annual Family Fest celebration. Each vear Federal Wav's July 4`�' Red, White, and Blues festival is held at , Celebration Park where the nationallv acclaimed tournament soccer and baseball facilities draw additional tourist activities. C ' L� � , ' � ' L� 1 � Federal Wav offers a number of colle�;iate and vocational opportunities. Hi line Communitv College operates a local branch campus in Federal Wav. The Eton Vocation Colle�e, located in the heart of Federal Wav, is a vocational college focused on iob trainin� for today's competitive market. In 2001, the DeVrv Institute of Technolo�y opened their first Northwest Campus in Federal Wav. This 100 000 square foot facilitv provides technologv training customized to increase employee workplace skills. Summarv In summary, Federal Way's �e�e� role in both the Central Puget Sound area and +l, ir f'+ + a'+ r,- r o+n;L a �;,7e.,s,�1 Southwest King County �,,-m��r�����-�ns����=� =o�a== �=a =o�........ �e�e has been defined bv its inventorv of prime office space in campus-like settin�s, wide varietv of retail and services, and large stock of qualitv housing. These basic sectors are enhanced bv Federal Wav's reg,ional role as a center for amateur athletics. Much of the ��� �x�,,,.ia .xr.,,. rT highway �� oriented commercial space that was developed in the 1970s and 80s in response to rapid population growth �s has been starting to undergo redevelopment «'°a°°°' �x�.,., c�,,,,.,,:,,,. �o„+o,.� co.,+.,,. �r,n�..o� �„� ��t��� and this trend will continue. The West Campus and East Campus areas � serve as a-models for the quality of modern commercial, office, and business park space Federal Way will need in order to attract its share of future regional growth. Urban design and infrastructure in other areas of Federal Way must be brought up to these standards. In addition, the existence of large parcels of land ownership in the 344�'l356� axea and 312`h/324�` area of the core corridor will give Federal Way a development advantage. Federal Wav will continue to foster the development of institutional and cultural amenities designed to enhance the Citv's regional image as a desirable communitv offerin� a high qualitv environment for livin� and workin� Federal Way's Competitive Position in Southwest King County Subregion ' ' ' Revised �909 � 1 While many of the development pattems are set in the Southwest King County subregion, si� Federal Wav and five other cities a�-}�e�s�d-�e� have seen, or will see, significant change. These si�� additional five cities are Auburn, �e���a�a3; Kent, Renton, SeaTac, and Tukwila. �r'' -- -- - ---� ------- -f -----,.�_• ,�, f_,. o.,,.�, „f.we�o ,.;.;o� ,.o��+o.� +� ---� - > > > • IV-13 �� FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development Table IV-4 (on the following page) encapsulates each of these cities' current market niches, as well as their opportunities and challenges, in order to help understand how Federal Way relates to its nei�hbors. As can be seen in the table, much of the area surroundinQ Federal Way is dedicated to industrial, li�ht manufacturin�, low-scale office parks, wholesale/warehouse, distribution, etc., especially in Auburn and Kent. Much of this is not in direct competition with Federal Way. Tukwila is the major retail center for South Kin� County and provides the region's stiffest competition for regional retailers and retail establishments, such as department and furniture stores, specialtv apparel, etc. While the trade area for Tukwila's retail sector is lar�e, Federal Way lies at the most distant point in South Kin� County from the Tukwila/Southcenter retail center, and its trade area overlaps or competes the least with Tukwila. The City of SeaTac provides little competition in the office, industrial, and retail sectors, but has successfully captured the airport-related lodgin� industry, with several higher_quality establishments, includin� � conference facilities. Renton has historically had a stron� economic base tied to the Boein� Company, with both healthy manufacturing and office sectors; however, both of these sectors have seen a substantiat weakening with the Boein� Company headquarters relocation, work force lay-offs, and space consolidation. Auburn and Kent have also experienced a substantial increase in vacant liQht-industrial building space due to Boeing Comuany reductions. Notwithstandin�: relative levels of competition from other communities in specific commercial sectors, Federal Way does experience a"competitive" relationship with several nearby municipal �overnments that must be taken into account. The Citv of Renton is a reco�nized leader in the county with respect to economic development, with a particular focus on downtown redevelopment and economic diversification. That citv has invested public funds in land assembly proiects that have attracted substantial residential, mixed-use, and auto dealership developments. Following Renton's lead are the communities of Kent and Tukwila, which have also targeted key redevelopment opportunities, acquirin�/assemblin� land and attracting desired mixed-use development. Similarlv, Renton and Kent provide tax incentives for certa.in residential development and provide other financial incentives to desired redevelopment projects. In addition, Tukwila, Renton, and Kent have made substantial personnel and facilities investments in improving customer service and turn-around times associated with development permits. In addition to these s�i� five cities in Southwest King County, Tacoma is an important competitor to Federal Way. Tacoma is an older city that has �-�g made manv efforts to improve its downtown and image for more than a quarter century. Tacoma citv government has an ag�ressive economic development mission and is reco�nized regionally and nationally as a leader in the field. It has continually devoted its own funds, as well as state and federal grants, to stimulate economic development. Tacoma has a strategic location on the highway system and a strong port with much unrealized potential. In addition, both the city and suburbs have vacant and redevelopable land, as well as relatively cheap accessible land for residential development. Revised 2A99 2002 , � �J ' � ' � , , � �l � , � ' C! IV-14 � 1 FWCP - Chaoter Four. Economic Development Table �� IV-4 Su�mary of ' Economic Conditions in Southwest King County Cities Auburn Federal Way Kent Renton SeaTac Tukwila Current -Industrial azeas -Regional mall -Industrial land -Business pazks -Airport related -Regional retail Niche -Vacant land -West Campus -Boeing -Mid-rise office -Redevelopable land -Boeing -Regional mall -East Campus -Business parks -Mid-rise office -Redevtlopable lig6t -Weyerhaeuser Hdq -Vacant land -Mid- and hieh-rise industrial -Vacant land & lodeins and -Mid-rise office redevelopable land conference centers -Mid-rise and hi¢h-. rise lod¢infe and conference centers Opportunities -P�ese��cae€�esing -Weyerhaeuser -Bceing facilities -Bceing & -Adjacent to SeaTac -Strong retail identify -Commuter rail -West Campus -Commuter rail PACCAR's mfg. & Airport & concentratia� -Established office, -East Campus -Established office, office complex -l�e�en�i� -Redevelopment business pazks, & -Large concentration business parks & -Mid-rise buildings -Major HCT p�ential industrial azeas of retail industrial areas -Potential Stations planned -FPeeway-ascsss -Cross-valley hwy -I.and assembied for -Cross-valiey hwy redevelopment -One large strategic = Uocation at cross- connector planned redevelopment connector planned areas pazcel assembled toads I-405lI-S ���1r6sa�NesaEien -Stren¢,thenins -Strenstheninz -Future hwy - cross- -Boeing office/mfg --��eAveen-gerise€ downtown downtown roads (I-5 & comple�ces _aFa�xa�Seatys -New Pem�it Center -StronA economic SR509) from -Proximity to SeaTac -Central location and investrnent in develoament focus Seattle will open Aitport 8t to YoR of between development -City partnershiv acres for office and Seattle Tacoma & Seattle review resources with vrivate secror business parks -Commuta rail -I-S/SR 18 -City nardiership in redevelooment unantie�pated , crossroads with urivate sector �s -HCT stations in redeveloument -��� � T..,..�:t i:..ef -PCf1)llt p(OCQS4ICC- OgiNZC� fOr S� Of WIl18fOUild -CiIY DBIUICIS}IID W12�1 W7V8IC SCC1q' � II! IEdCVC� CI1t Challenges -Distance &om I-5 8c -]Bi��se�a�er�e€ -Industrial image -Limited retail -Adjacent to SeaTac -Limited vacaat land major economic —SeaNle -No prospect for attractions Airport for business 1@ concentrations -Dispersed HCT -Limited land for -Massive office parks -Low-scale development -Off-center location business & office redevelopment -Freeway access not development pattern on SR 167 parks required easy or obvious -OfFcenter location -Not on commuter -Small land holdings -Sma�-beldings -Land assembly -Limited vacant laod -Wedands rail in CBD �^—..r�^ roquired -No obviws center or -Reduction in Bceine -]6iiqE��n�iq` -Wedands -Not anticipated to -Not on commuter focal point within nresence: vacant _-���inesse�se -Reduction in Bcein¢ be on �igA- rail Tukwila buildin¢s --paFk-s�asseutsi�s oresence; vacant �aagasi«•��T�^^si� -Limited quality -Limited quality ��ts buildinas HCT line -residen6al supply -residential su�lv -Weak downtown -Off-center cross- -No obvious center roads (I-405 & SR or focal noint 167) -Iteduction in Boeinrt wesence• vacant btildinss s � h +A 1 •� 4 *' f �F�' n..41� F Qo.+�+ln nr� ie enn�ncl �ril�� to nao c:xo xax� oo:xooxzaacxv=: vx vzxxoo opavv ovac:: vx vvaccxo axxa x , In summary, any program of economic development for Federal Way must monitor conditions and trends in Tacoma and Southwest King County, and act decisively and aggressively to increase the City's strategic position. Revised �898 2002 IV-15 � FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development Summarv of Achievements 4:1- 4.2 Althou�h the City of Federal Way's economic development efforts are relatively new, several important accomplishments in formulatin� the Citv's economic development strate�v have already been accomplished. ■ The City of Federal Way/Federal Way Chamber Economic Development Committee meets monthly to discuss and develop economic development strate�ies and maintain a close and cooperative workin� relationshiQ ■ In 2001 the City officially incorporated an Economic Development Division within the Community Development Services Department and hired a Director. ■ With increasin lg od�ing tax revenues, the Citv of Federal Wav Lodging Taac Advisory Committee has expanded its work plan to include more direct efforts to stimulate tourism and visitorship to the Citv. ■ The City has co-founded and co-ma.na�es the South Kin� County Technology Alliance, a workin� committee of vazious municipal entities and businesses within South King County dedicated to fosterin� further develoument of the technology sector within South King Countv. ■ The City has embarked on a concerted effort, led bv senior mana�ement, to improve permit processes and reduce re�ulatorv hurdles to development. In 2001, the City worked collaborativelv with the Federal Wav Chamber and other stakeholders to raise the thresholds that trig�er right-of-wav improvements associated with redevelopment, remodeling, and reuse of existin� buildings. In 2002, the City has embarked upon a permit-process improvement effort that includes a public stakeholder advisorv committee and study of best practices from around the re�ion, and is intended to place Federal Way at the forefront of regional municipalities in reQulating land use and construction effectively and efficiently. THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT VISION FOR FEDERAL WAY The vision for economic development in Federal Way � . a�-a-b�e�je�s Re�ised �998 2002 IV-16 ' � �� � I �� � � � � � 1 ' � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development an be encapsulated into four basic areas: 1) to retain existing � businesses and attract new businesses in order to build a diverse economic base; 2) to increase the number of jobs within the Citv relative to the population of City residents within the labor force; 3) to foster redevelopment of the Citv Center from a low-scale, � suburbanized commercial area to a full-service high-density, mixed-use, and more pedestrian-friendly urban core and communitv focal point; and 4) to build upon and expand the Citv's recreational and cultural assets to increase visitors to the City and � encoura�e greater visitor spendin� within the local economy. The strategy encourages or �p accelerates the trends and transformations that are already occurring in this community. The major objectives of the strategy include the following: ■ Provide a better balance between housing and jobs bv increasing the number of iobs within the Citv relative to the number of households. � � O � ■ Diversify the economic base by encouraging higher paying white collar and technical jobs while preserving and enhancing the strong retail base. ■ Generate more demand for hotel room-ni�hts throuQh growth in office and business part space. ■�� Foster horizontal mixed-use employment sector growth in the South 348`� Street area in the near term (2000-2005). ■�� Foster continued Corporate and Office Park employment sector growth in East and West Campus in the mid-term (2000-2010). It should be noted that East Campus �s �3� has recently been experiencing a high rate of growth and may reach build out during this time period. ■ Emphasize private redevelopment and land assemblv throu�h the I-5/SR-99 conidor, especiallv in the Citv Center, as well as the 348�' and 336 areas. ■ Redevelop and improve the quality of the mixed use development along Pacific Highway South from South 272 Street to South 356`�' Street (2000— 2010). � ■�� Foster mid-rise, mixed-use employment sector growth ir� the City Center (2000-2020). ■ Encourage quality development throughout the City to attract desirable economic development in Federal Way. ■ Maintain and improve the quality and character of the existing residential neighborhoods. � �■ Promote high quality, higher density residential neighborhoods in the City Center and Highway 99 corridor in close proximity to jobs and good public transportation. �� Revised �9A9 200 tV-17 � -� � FWCP — Cha�ter Four, Economic Development ■ Continue to work with the lod�ing providers to promote vear-round vistorship to the City to encourage visitor spendin� as an important component of a�rowin� local economy. ■ Work with other a�encies to provide services for education and training, as well as social services and other remedial programs for the underemploved and the unemployed. Future Regional Role for Federal Way ■ Encourage greater diversity in the economic base by aggressive pursuit of a broader range of the components of the regional economic activity, as well as greater participation in internationaUPacific Rim economic activity. ■�4�a� Increase its share of local resident-serving retail and services, and increase its share of regional, national, and international oriented business firms. ■ Increase its capture of region-serving office development. ■ Emphasize rip vate redevelopment and land assembly through the I-5/SR-99 corridor, especially in the City Center, as well as the 348�' and 336`� areas. ■�'�e�� Stren en the City Center � as the Citv's focal point for commercial and community activities Transform the Citv Center into a re�ional commercial destination, as well as a major transit hub. . :�*� . ■ Generate more demand for hotel room-nights through growth in business park and office space, as well as recreational and cultural amenities that draw visitors from throughout the Pacific Northwest and bevond. � n aa ,., o �.,,�:,,o��o� ..oi.,a.,o *„ +�,o .,,,�..�,o,. „f.,o.., a,,,,�:,,.. ,,,,:�� ■ Take advantage of its location with respect to the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, as well as the SeaTac International Airport. ■ Public and private sectors in the Federal Way area act cooperatively and aggressively to attract firms from throu�hout the region, the nation, and other countries ■ Actively pursue relationships with si�s areas in other parts of the Pacific Rim region for trade, commerce, and cultural advantage. . Rev�ed 2998 2002 � � � � � LJ I'i r.� � � �� fV-18 � i �� � �� � � � FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development ■ Activelv pursue cooperation and collaboration with other nearby municipalities, organizations and firms to market Federal Way and South King Countv for technolo�y-related enterprises. Retail Areas ■ SeaTac Mall and other regional retailers within the City e�a� redevelopJ reposition to meet �ka changing consumer demand and become more competitive with other regional retailers. ■ High-volume retail in Federal Way increases faster than population. 6es��e u . a�xxv - vo�vi -m'xi'v��i u a ..,.,:,..,� o .r,.,�o� „f.H;� ,•o�o.,+,.o+.,;� *..o.,a . ■ Growth in resident-serving retail occurs in the City Center, existing commercial nodes and in redevelopment areas along SR-99. ■ Neighborhood scale retail development keeps pace with population growth and to an increasin extent is accommodated within mixed-use buildings in more concentrated neighborhood villages. ■ Pedestrian-oriented retail development emerges gradually in the redeveloped City Center. ■ Small amounts of retail use occur on the ground floor of offices a� residential buildings, ° �°" ° ^'�•���^°°° ^°YU° and parkin� structures. ■ Neighborhood scale retail development in concentrated neig,hborhood villa�es � emerges in response to growth in multipie-family concentrations in the I-5/SR-99 corridor and new single-family development on the east side of I-5. ■ Old, outdated strip centers along the SR-99 corridor redevelop as a mix of retail, �i office, and dense residential uses. ■ T'he lar�e truck-stop facilitv at the � retail or mixed- � Office Development — � _ ■ Offices of regional, national, and/or international firms locate in West Campus, a� East Campus and the City Center. � r�•h r * �, v � ,a ,t ,.�r;,.o ., Revised �899 2002 IV-19 � � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development ■ Garden, high-rise, and mid-rise o�ce space, and modern light-industrial buildings increase rapidly in areas with land assembled for business parks and in redeveloped retail areas. ■ Office development is integrated with retail, residential, and business parks. ■ Federal Way attracts more corporate re�ional headquarters and re�ional offices. ■�d, Smaller, older, outdated offices structures are replaced with newer uses. ■ Integrated, campus-like hi�h amenity areas are encoura�ed for corporate headquarters and modern research/development of hi�h technolo�y uses east of I-5. ■ Development of technical and research space increases in East ' Campus. Business Park� (Liaht Industrial) Development ���:��� _ . - - - =�►� - - _ - - - - , �-� ea iQiev_oo+„�c� ■ Business parks contain a mix of uses in and among buildings as dictated by the market for high quality space. . . . . .. - . . .. - . �sr..r.�sr.�K _ . . . .. _ . . . _ . . . . - - - � � � � � . ■ , The City should explore potential chan�es to the Business Park zonin� designation to meet changing market conditions and make the development of Business Park-zoned land more economicallv viable. Revised �998 2002 iv-2o � � � � FWCP — Chapter Four. Economic Development Residential Areas ■ High quality residential areas are important for attracting and retaining businesses. ■ A range of housing types, densities, and prices allow the broad spectrum of employees to live near their work and recreation. ■ The City of Federal Way encourages integration of high density housing with retail and other uses, especially along SR-99 and in the City Center. Institutional, , }: `� Culturai, and Recreational Development � �� .� ■ The Citv of Federal Way will continue to work closelv with existing institutional entities (such as St. Francis Hospital, Federal Way School District, King County Librarv, etc.) as important components of a full-service local economy. ■ Federal Way's reputation as an important center for amateur sports competition and participation Qrows stronger, leading to potentiallv new facilities and venues, as well as increased visitorship and visitor spending in the local economy. ■ Federal Way's cultural assets increase in both scope and number, �ainin� greater patronage and attracting visitors from bevond the Citv limits. New cultural establishments are developed in Federal Wav, such as museums, exhibitions, and nerformance venues. Likewise, new cultural events become established in Federal Way, such as music festivals, art shows/festivals, etc. ■ Stimulate qualitv development of region-servin� institutional and technical facilities. � 4.3 FORECAST OF ECONOMIC GROWTH IN FEDERAL WAY �' The growth forecasts used in this chapter are derived from the 2000 Market Analvsis and 2002 Citv Center Market Analvsis, prepazed bv ECONorthwest, while t� other chapters � �la� are based on the PSRC regional forecasting model. Revised �999 2002 IV-21 � ■ Existin� recreational amusement facilities continue to develop as regional tourist attractions. � FWCP - Chaoter Four. Economic Development � - - - •• . r . Y. r. . - - r . �s!sss� etisr� � • � In summary, probably the strongest sector in the near-term (five years) will be the retail/ services sector. About 1.5 million additional square feet of retail tenant space may be expected durinQ the next 20 years, with commercial areas throu�hout the City and the City Center alike sharing in the development. One particular sector that appears under- represented is the quality restaurant sector, in which the City will likelv see additional development. Demand for new office development will likely be somewhat low in the neaz term, as office vacancies have risen substantially and rents have correspondingly fallen, re ig on_ wide. In addition, several office buildings, particularly in the West Campus area, exhibit substantial vacancies that can readily absorb near-term demand in the City. Nevertheless, the lon -tg erm picture looks �ood, with continued demand for and interest in office space in Federal Way, particulazly in the East and West Campus areas. City Center office development will likelv la� behind for most of the ulannin� horizon. However, Qenerous zonin�, panoramic views, and proximity to the freeways and transit may start to make the City Center a more attractive location for mid- to high-rise office development in the 10 to 20-year time frame. With re�ard to housing, only a small amount of land remains in the sin�le-familv zoning districts to accommodate new sinQle-family dwellings. As a consequence, the vast maiority of new residential development will have to take the form of townhouses, walk- up apartments, mid-rise aparhnents, and mixed-use buildin�s and/or high-rise residential buildin�s. As with the condition for sin�le-family development, the majoritv of the multi- family-zoned land is also already developed, leaving primarily the commercial zones and City Center as the potential location of a great deal of the future residential development. Revised �999 2002 IV-22 � L.� �� � � � � � �J � FWCP — Chaater Four, Economic Development Nevertheless, hi�her land values and construction costs, and lower relative rental rates � compared with other communities in the region, act as barriers to residential development within the Citv Center in the near term, unless public-sector actions create financial incentives, reduce development costs, or otherwise create conditions attractive to housing � developers. Therefore, in the short term, most multi-familv housin dg evelopments will continue to be seen in the remainin� multifamilv-zoned areas and in the neighborhood commercial areas or other commercial areas alon� Pacific Hi�hway South. While multi- � familv housing is �enerall ��permitted in the Business Park zones, this zone will continue to accommodate senior housing developments, as has been seen in recent years. In the longer term, assumin� no public-sector incentives, as rental rateS rise and demand � increases, housing developers will likelv respond to the opportunities for development within the City Center, and begin to add multi-familv housing there, as well. Substantial new lodging developmentin Federal Way is not anticipated in the near term, � unless actions are taken to increase demand substantiallv. With business travel somewhat cut back due to increasingly burdensome airline-travel procedures since September 1 l, 2001, the demand for hotel rooms has dropped. Business-related travel mav be slow to � return to earlier levels. Sports-related lodgin� demand during the late Sprin�, Summer, and earlv Fall has been solid over the past few years and is expected to increase, althou�h development of new lodging facilities will likeIv not follow increased demand during � onlv a few months of the vear. If sports- or event-related facilities are developed within the Citv that could accommodate off-season events, it is likely that more near-term demand for lodging would rise and could occasion development of new facilities within �' the five-year timeframe. Like all forecasts, these should be periodically monitored relative to the real estate market and economic conditions in South King County� ,a� the Central Puget Sound re�ion, and ' Federal Way. In addition, the economic development policies and � underlying assumptions related to local and regional decisions concerning infrastructure, � transportation systems, and land use regulation should be carefully monitored. �a� , 1 �7 1� 1 + 4 n 1 '41� 4 �n .�rl n v„li4i� in lnnul unr�nc�min_ o .' .�„ n �. r.o rotaxscrTcvarcrczvcsvc-vTVrrz-rrv7vurTarrorr�r�-rcnZio ....» ...,...�"'.,"., "' '.,�»' ��.."„""� � • � � 4 ' 1 �,. ,i ' 1 +' .a o ..i.. + + 1 t oe r�hwel-na *t,e A,..o+ xc i cs., . ... � » ,.� t,,,,. *_�a—i�v^�86�S�S: � ,�n^� �.�. .��.�-_f.' f . 5��� . ' ' ' 1 Y. . �� � . Revised 2A98 2002 IV-23 � � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development � � r ,....,t ,,,,1,1;.. �„rl .. ,�*o �o..r.,r� ;�,;,,rt�, �„�,,..o ��lo.,,,�to ;.,f .,�*.�.,,.+„ro � r . r . 4.4 IMPLEMENTATION Attributes of Successful Economic Development Programs Successful economic development programs typically have the following attributes. First, � they receive material support and leadership from the mayor, City Council, and senior City staff. Second, the municipal leadership is willing to work creatively and � cooperatively with private sector leaders and businesses to accomplish economic development goals. They have the ab�l�ty and find the resources to target infrastructure projects and programs to encourage development or redevelopment of specific areas. To � do this, they work aggressively to secure state and federal funds for local public and private assistance. Likewise, City staff is empathetic toward economic development goals and � knowledgeable about working within City legal constraints, budget constraints, and community tolerances to assist businesses and the real estate development process. The staff also has the ability to react and make decisions quickly and consistently to provide � assistance for private sector dealings with the public planning and regulatory processes. The staffls ability to link several programs, team up with other departments, and leverage limited funds allows them to take meaningful and effective action. In addition, the Ci � should be creative and open to explorinQ and adopting innovative �esl��es re lu� atory and incentive programs c °° T�^^°� r^f "�„�'^^^,�^* n:,.�,*� ��.,,,„0 T T„;+ , , ' to attract and retain businesses and � development proiects, such as SEPA planned actions and develouer a�reements. Kev amon sg uch programs should be any feasible efforts aimed at predictable and streamlined permitting processes . �' � The City's Role in the Economic Life of a Community In the State of Washington, the direct actions that cities can take to �as� encoura�e T economic development a�-s��r� have historically been more limited ���e-st�e � than in other states. > > , , , Revised 2A98 2002 IV-24 � � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development . , � �,.o.,.:..;.., .,,;+�, ,. o,.++„ i,,,..,� ,. .,;,�, o,,,,,,,,.,,;,. ;,,, o„+, Nevertheless, in the Qast few vears several new and important tools have been made available to local communities to help encoura�e redevelopment, retain/attract iobs, and foster "smart growth." These tools include: ■ Community redevelopment financing (similar to tax increment financin�) ■ Limited tax abatement for multifamily development � ■ Community empowerment zone desi ng ation ■ Communitv renewal act (updated and expanded version of former urban renewal ■ Tax deferrals and exemptions for hi�h technologv businesses and investment, as well as manufacturin� investment ■ Industrial revenue bonds � ' ' , ' Notwithstandin� these state programs, there are still substantial constraints on the scope of actions a city government can do with respect to economic development activities. However, o9ne of the most � significant direct actions a city can take is to provide the necessary infrastructure. This includes: 1) developing long term facilities expansion plans; 2) designing the specific systems and projects; 3) raising or bonowing local funds to finance the projects or act as � a conduit for state, federal, and intergovernmental funds; and, 4) forming public-private partnerships to jointly construct projects. � Second, a city can deliver high quality and cost effective urban services. These necessary services include police and fire protection; parks, recreation, and cultural services; social services and job training, and a well-run land use planning and regulatory process. In addition, a city can actively participate in public/private groups designed to help '� businesses and the development community as they work their way through the state and federal regulatory processes. � Third, a city can directly impact economic development by doing market research or by being a landowner and developer. For example, a city could develop, maintain, and disseminate data and analysis on local development conditions and trends, as well as � monitor important trends and assumptions upon which plans, programs, and strategies are based. In addition, a city can buy land, aggregate parcels, and make necessary improvement so that it is ready for new development or redevelopment. For some � projects, a city can issue industrial revenue bonds or other tax-free municipal bonds. This also allows a city to joint venture with a private sector partners ��s for appropriate development. � Revised �899 2002 IV-25 � � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development In terms of indirect roles, a city can act as a facilitator to convene public and private entities to work on issues of local importance and reach consensus. Preparation of a comprehensive plan is an example of this important indirect action. A city can act as a representative of local resident's and business's interests in resolving regional and countywide prablems such as traffic congestion, housing, and human service issues. A city can also mobilize local community support for important projects and problem solving; and work to improve the overall image of the community and in doing so, make the community more attractive for economic development. Lastly, a city's public investment in municipal facilities, such as city administrative offices, iudiciaUcourt facilities, community centers, and cultural and recreational venues can be a factor in inducing further economic development. By tar�eting a subarea for an infusion of redevelopment investment and daytime population, nearby businesses not only may see a greater captive market, �ut may also be encoura�ed to remodel, renovate, and/or improve their establishments. Cultural and recreational facilities can have a wide range of economic impact, from simply attractinQ residents to a particular part of the citv (e.�., city center) more frequently where they may patronize other businesses, to attracting visitors from around the region and country who will bring new revenue to the local economy through IodginQ, restaurant, and goods/services expenditures. General Approaches to an Economic Development Strategy There are basically � four local economic development strategies �� that impact the level of private business growth in a community. ■ First, studies of employment growth experience in local communities in the United States show that the large majority of new jobs are generated by expansion and retention of businesses that are already located in the community. A city's role in this strategy is to help businesses resolve problems so that they can expand locally rather than move to another community. Problem resolution includes helping a business find a larger more suitable site, work through a land use or zoning regulation problem, or access necessary infrastructure. This strategy typically has low to moderate cost implications and a high probability of success. ■ Second, the relocation of firms from other parts of the country or new plant locations are rare and do not account for a significant shaze of local employment growth relative to overall employment growth in the United States. However, when new firms do relocate to the community, the boost in the local economy can be �reat and the "press" can attract the attention of other firms. �3�isa�y,-�Local governments can attracts new business to their community �es� through aggressive marketing strategies (websites, brochures, etc.), close collaboration with regional economic development councils and chambers of commerce, and through financial incentives. This strategy has high risk for the number of successes and has a high cost. Revised �A99 2002 � � � � � � il.J `� iv—� � � r � � � :J � � � � � ■ Third, new businesses that are the result of new business start-ups, spin-offs from existing local firms, and new business ideas and technologies are another effective way that communities increase employment and businesses within a local area. Local government encourages new business formation usually through indirect methods. �s These strateg3�i�s �as can have moderate-to-high costs depending on the specific actions and low-to-moderate degree of success. ■ Fourth tourism and visitorship can be verv important components of a local economv. A city with recreational or cultural assets that draw visitors can build upon these assets to increase the numbers of visitors, the len�th of their stays, and the amount of monev thev spend in the local economv. Local government can work to market the communitv and its assets beyond the immediate re�ion to bring in new economic activitv and can invest in recreational or cultural infrastructure to attract more events and/or visitors. « ,� + � a *�, t . '� t .,*• � a t �x� �„ �„��+ �+� ,.* +t,;� �;+e rv�vrrvrvcucv�c[xvn �vvrrxvavvcrc?vir. z rr u� x:v.,. »��..... ......, ....� tG ff . � 7 �•�� �ii'i��i-���►�-ri �-��—�-���=�=��=�iir� � � � � Revised �808 2002 � FWCP — Chapter Four, Economic Development - - �• - - Y. i ' _ ' • "„��_ � _ ��-2� � FWCP — Chaqter Four. Economic Development Human Resource Programs In addition to the economic development strategies discussed in the previous section, �� �� , human resource : programs are another general way whereby cities can "' ' economic development. These programs are often not included as part of an economic development program because they focus on assisting peopl '' ''' °' ' �'' '�' '' . However, improving and remediating human resources is an important long run approach. The previous general approaches to economic development strategies try to raise revenues, reduce costs, or reduce risks for business location, facility investment decisions, and operating decisions of businesses. Human resource programs make a community attractive to new and existing businesses by improving the local labor force. Components of a human resources program include: 1) providing temporary support for underemployed workers, unemployed workers, and their families; 2) providing job training and retraining to improve an individual's ability to enter or remain in the work force; 3) creating referral and other programs that allow labor resources to become more mobile and to respond to information about job openings; and, 4) by providing social service programs that meet the needs of community residents who are temporarily not able to participate in the economy. Economic Development Strategy For Federal Way As with many cities, Federal Way will have limited funds with which to pursue its economic development goals. The City will have to use its resources in a focused and prioritized manner to have a positive impact on the local economic base. Table � IV-S summarizes how Federal Way will implement an appropriate economic development strategy. r. - - r. - Y. � A ��oml.li,,.. 1�,..i f . ,-o.io.,ol.,....,e„� Revised � 2002 � � I� � � � � � IV-28 � � � � �LJ � FWCP — Chapter Four, Economic Development Table �-1L3 IV-5 Economic Development Areas and Actions Snb Area of Who Initis�tes What Land Uses Are How Are They Federal W�y AcHon Encouraged Encouraged Reasons Timing PRIMARY ECONOMIC AREAS City Center , � 344'" to 356`"/SR99 � Public w/ private support. Public w/ private support. � West Campus Current landowners. � � i I� � Mid/high-rise office. High-densitv MF residential. Civic%ultural� recreational: Pedestrian-oriented retail. Mix of low-rise office & light industry. "bBig box" retail. Buildout 8t maintain quality. East Campus Weyerhaeuser High-qualiry corporate Corp. & office pazks. 336'" linkage: Public w/ High density MF. four primary private support. Low rise office. economic dvpt Supportive retail. areas. Public amenides. � Sound Transit Station. In-fill infrastructure. +�sa�i;•� Public amenities. Market amenities and assets Potential tax incentives. SEPA Planned Action. Regulations that encourage high- quality design. Aggressive infrasWcture investment. Lazge land assemblv. Facilitate buildout throu predictable, efficient permitting rp ocess. Assist maintenance of infrastructure and public areas. !`......e..,r:,.e n:'., nl�....:.... P. Predictable, efficient permittin� rop cess• Assist maintenance of infraswcture and public areas. Land use & capital improvements for gradual redevelopmentlin-fill. �le� Transoortation infrasWcture. To increase capture of regional gmwth. To Drovide communiri focal poindcore. To obtain more full- range of ¢oods/ services in City. �a�t�s Large parcels allow this subarea to respond to the curfepE market st�g�H-in for business & industrial park uses in Southwest King Counry. �as One of the Citv's orime commercial amenities as one of the highest quality master planned developments in the Pacific Northwest. One of Citv's prime commercial amenities. Large landownership with vision, resources, & track record can amact maior investors 6�B-8s-basifles�s � Provide housing & support services for economic areas. Emphasis 5-10 (20) years. Emphasis 0-5 (10) years. Ongoing in response to market In response to market 8t corporate actions. As appropriate for market. Old Hwy 99 Public w/ High capacity & Land use & capital Provide a range of ha As appropriate � outside of main private support. business related. improvements for gradual using & support for market. economic areas. High density MF redevelopment & in-fill. services & retail for residential. . economic & Low rise office. Aesthetic improvements throuQh residential areas. � Auto-oriented retail. si�r► code and urban desi� Neighborhood �uidelines. commercial. � Revised � 2002 fV-29 � LJ FWCP — Chaater Four. Economic Development r . :EfE'l:T�l:7:'i5"�'�S!!l:fl�EOi �� • 5 - - �'iil�7' - _ t 1►d.,l�.;l;�;.,.. ......,,,,,,,,;+., �,,,....,,.t 1�.., .,,.,..L;.,.. .:.;+i, H,e ,,r;.,�+o �o..*�,r f., �..+;.,el., � � ceeL;,,.. ., .,.,,a,,.,;r;o� t., „r�,,,,.,te rl,o .. ,,;*., i,<, .,,.,�L;.,.. ,.,;+1, +l,o .. ...te o..��... ��, h,,:l.i .. ,,;s., .,..«..,.a,..,:+:o� �,,.� .....,1� - _ -�_ � � � � ��ii' _ - - - - � 1}�S��S. _�_ t�Ri'.Cl�'ZT.�: f RS. c,,,,,,�,,,.:,,�. ,.,.,.:o,.+� .,a .,,.+:,,,. ., �;t�ie ,,.,..,�, +„ ,. .,:�.,t,�e �� o 0 r'I!�!T�!T.�"".E�:TSlTf . 0:l�i�►S'Sfli:iLlTi!'l�iR'!*7!'�'i*R'-.�5'!!!!".f _ � 1 1' � - - - - �� - -- - Y. - Y. Economic Development Goals The City of Federal Way will not wait for market forces to create the future, but will act to shape and accelerate the evolving mazket trends in the direction of its vision. The City will pursue the following goals to implement economic development. Revised �989 2002 � � � � �� � � � iv—�o � � � � r � � � � � FWCP — Chapter Four. Economic Devebpment Goals EDGl The City will emphasize redevelopment that transforms the City from a suburban bedroom community to a full-service community with an urban a�ea core. EDG2 The City will encourage concentration of non-residential development into four primary areas: ■ High-density �14mixed-use development in the City Center (312`� and 320` SR-99 to I-5) ■ Mixed-use development in the area around 348�' and SR-99 ■ High-quality �ss office park development, including corporate headquarters, continued in and around West Campus ■ High-quality office development, including corporate headquarters in a park-like campus setting east of I-5 EDG3 The City will help facilitate redevelopment of existing neighborhood commercial centers in the SR-99 corridor and the 336�` area between West and East Campus. EDG4 The Citv will channel further residential growth into existin� multi-family and � commercial-zoned areas with a particular �oal of encouraging residential development in the Citv Center. � EDGS The Citv will encoura�e and support the development of recreational and cultural facilities and/or events that will bring additional visitors to Federal Way, and/or increase visitor spending. � EDG6 The Citv will encoura�e and support existin� businesses to remain and/or expand their facilities within Federal Way. fconomic Development Policies � � � � Revised �888 2002 � EDPl Redevelopment of �the City Center will receive special attention in the FWCP EDP2 The City will �e explore the feasibilitv and utility of a process to master plan the City Center, jointly funded by public and private entities, to encourage appropriate redevelopment. EDP3 The City will '' continue to seek high-quality urban design and infrastructure standards for these areas. IV-31 � FWCP — Chaoter Four, Economic Development EDP4 The City will � *�,.,+ � ,.;�,. „ o,.+� +�,.,+ ., :�+o„* .,,;+�, .�,o �„�..,,.o� „i.,,, .., „�.. ' prepare a SEPA Planned Action for the City Center so that compliant development proposals may receive permit approvals with a minimum of environmental review. EDPS The City will complete designs for public infrastructure to be jointly funded by the City and private landowners. EDP6 The City will work actively to formulate ways for joint public/private funding of infrastructure. EDP7 The City will develop zoning �s�rg permitting and potential financial incentives that encourage prioritized development consistent with comprehensive and subarea plans and orderly, phased growth. EDP8 In order to encoura�e efficient and desired development and redevelopment of existing land designated and zoned for various types of commercial uses, when considerin� proposals for comprehensive plan amendments and rezones tQ commercial desienations and from one commercial designation to another, the City will consider development trends in commercially zoned areas, market demand for various types of commercial land, and amount of vacant commercial land. �� EDP9 The City will utilize innovative planning techniques such as ��-e� , Planned Unit Developments and E�►�� developer ��eements to aid in efficient and redicable permittin� for large developments. �8�1 EDP10 The City will �$ explore innovative fmancing techniques such as Local Improvement Districts, a� Industrial Revenue Bonds, and other innovative financin� tools to encourage desired redevelopment. ��8 . EDPl l T'he City will work�g with the private sector to actively encourage the retention and expansion of existing businesses as well as bring�g in new development, businesses, and jobs to the community. �� EDP12 The City will promote the community by working with the Federal Wav Chamber and the private sector to a�d-gea�s develop marketing tools that ariract new businesses, visitors, and investments EDP13 The Citv will develop and mana�e an economic development web page that promotes business and development within the communit�provides an interactive Revised �998 ZQ02 IV-32 � i � I� � � � � � � � � � L_J � � �I � r � � LJ � � � FWCP — Chapter Four, Economic Development database of information of value to businesses and developers, and involves the participation of the Federal Wav Chamber and other stakeholder �roups. �� EDP14 The City will fund its portion of the public/private groups to allow them to do an effective job in marketing the community. �3 EDP15 T'he City will continue to utilize design guidelines to enhance the urban environment to retain and attract businesses and residents. � EDP16 The City will adopt streamlined permitting processes consistent with state and federal regulations to reduce the upfront costs of locating businesses in the City. �� EDP17 The City will � continue to pursue aggressive public safety programs designed to protect residents � businesses and their investments. �� EDP18 The City will encourage strong public and private leadership to solicit community support for internal and external funding assistance. �� EDP19 The City will periodically monitor local and regional trends to be able to adjust plans, policies, and programs. �� EDP20 The City will actively work with representative groups of business and property owners, including the Federal Way Chamber and other local business associations, to enhance citywide and subarea improvements and planning. �BP-� EDP21 The City, in conjunction with the local business community, will actively pursue ties to Pacific Rim nations and businesses to stimulate related business activitv. � � � r. - � � � � EDP22 The City recognizes the importance of cultural and recreational activity to its economy and through the Arts Commission and Parks Department will pursue joint ventures with private groups and individuals in developing cultural and recreational opportunities. �� EDP23 The City will encourage the expansion of existing and development of new multi-purpose facilities to host cultural and recreational activities in order to increase the number of visitors to Federal Wav and resultant visitor spendinQ. Revised �A99 2002 IV�33 � � FWCP — Chaoter Four. Economic Development EDP24 The City will continue to rnarket the communitv for, and encourage development of, businesses in the high-tech sector. This effort will include The foregoing policies will assist the City of Federal Way to pursue an accelerated transformation toward the community's vision of its future. Table �K-3IY-6 describes the four major employment, economic activity areas of the City that will receive the bulk of future commercial and industrial development. The table summarizes the characteristics, location, and planning process required as well as the major transformation required. The major public and private actions required for each area are listed. The Land Use and City Center chapters of the C-�e��te�e�}s�e-g-�a� FWCP describe these four areas in more detail. Table �3IV-6 describes the current ownership pattern and major activities where the City will act affirmatively to transform these azeas so that an increased share of regional growth will be attracted to the City. In the areas of multiple ownership, control and implementation of the community's vision will require more explicit effort and resources from the City government. Both West and East Campus have, or will develop, their own high standards for quality of the new development. The type of development expected to occur in each of the four major economic �e�as sectors important to Federal Way's vision is related in Table �K41V-7. Also related in the table are who the main competitors will be for each of these four areas. The land use policies and regulations for each area should accommodate and encourage these activities. T'hese policies and regulations are discussed in the Land Use, City Center, and Transportation chapters of the �p FWCP. � Revised �A99 2002 ' � � � � � �J � � � � � � � iv-�a � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FW P- Cha�ter Four. Economic Development Area Ownersh PlanninE Major Transformation Activity Pubiic Actions ;hensive Plans Subarea Plans Design Standards Environmental Irr Infrastructure Pla� Infrastructure De; Examples Table �3 IV-6 Develo nment Zones: De: Verticai Mixed City Center 312�'/320�' Diverse Joint Public/Private �s�ad�s-I�ei€ls: Increase office and residential C C C C C C Joint Seattle CBD �r-F�g�a� Burnaby BC Bellevue �ase�+a �� Vancouver, WA Walnut Creek, CA Campu W � Diverse Private � East of I-5 Private Infill and continue trend Vacant to high quality corporate since 1974. headquarters & high tech. C Private C C C Private Private West Campus High Tech Corridor C Private C C C Private Private Redmond Willows Road Harbor Pointe Business Parks 344` Diverse Joint Public/Private Use Scattered industrial retail to quality mixed used. C C C C C C Joint High Tech Corridor Renton Tukwila Kent Auburn Lynwood Revised 2A99 � IV-35 FW� — Chaoter Four. E�nomic Development Table �K4 IV-7 ient Zones and Land Use ent Competitive Vertical Mixed �ples City Center n�gn �une rreeway access nnoaera�e amenuies 34ifUl K JKIb High Volume Cheap land/space Locates retail or light industrial azeas Festiv High density popu ation & emp oyment Pike Place Market Regional draw Beilevue Square Retail & restaurants Westlake Center Mall stores Edmonds LaConner Employment & Resident High auto or pedestrian tr ic Southcenter Supporting Tacoma Mall Auburn Mall Rapidly growing population Southcenter Mall-like Freeway access Tacoma Mall Hotel Serves employment centers SeaTac Tacoma Provides meeting space Tukwila OFFIC Garden •Heavy landscape •Low pedestrian levels Older Bellevue •Low/moderate in/out Vaffic Redmond •Small business/professional & business services, FIRES Renton & Tukwila •Serves local & regional business along arterials •Auto oriented •Residential areas close Mi -rise •Larger tenants, sub-regionai & regional Bellevue Tukwila •Moderate landscape •Moderate in & out Renton Lynnwood •SmalUmedium business services, Queen Anne Factoria medial/dental FIRES Lake Union Tacoma •Branch offices •Some transit Elliott Way • Surface parking or on deck Freeway interchanges High �Lise/Hig er •Pedestrian traffic •High amenities Seattle , •Public transit •Larger businesses Bellevue •Moderate tr�c •Professionai services Sea�as •Headquarters, branch offices Re� •Regional serving F.I.R.E.S. Tacoma •Underground or deck parking BUSINESS PARKS •Auto/truck oriented • Wazehouse/retail High Tech Corridor •Cheap land •Government offices Eastside •Employment density Renton •Manufacduing assembly Tukwila •Office locai/regional Kent •Professional & business service Lynnwood •DisUibution & service X X X X X X Mixed X / � rate Pxrk � Use Business Parks X X X Only at freeway intersection X �i� X Occasionaliy if part of Master Plan � Re�ed 2ppp � IV-36 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � - � , � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SOUTHWEST KING COUNTY AND NORTH PIERCE C4UNTY SUB-REGION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ELEMENT State Boundary County Boundary /�/ State Highways /�/ Federal Way City Limits � ��.,��, -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 21,000 Feet � `Federal Way MAP IV -1 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a qraphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy =ebruary 2003 data2ltabitham/cpmaps/subrep.aml � � CHAPTER FIVE 1 � u � � � i ' � - HOUSING 5.0 INTRODUCTION � 5.1 ' � ' � , � This chapter was prepared in conjunction with the Land Use chapter of �s the Federal � Comprehensive Plan WCP . Together they provide a holistic view of how housing stock may be expanded and improved to meet the City's housing needs over the next 20 years. The emphasis of this chapter is on preserving the high quality of existing residential neighborhoods while improving housing opportunities for low-income families and persons with special housing needs. These housing needs were identified in a Housing Needs Assessment, which the City completed in the Fall of 1993, and are summarized in this chapter. The Growth Management Act (GMA) requires that housing issues be addressed in both the Land Use and Housing chapters. To gain a full picture of how new housing will be provided in Federal Way, both chapters should be read. As a general rule, the Land Use chapter describes what densities will be permitted in the various neighborhoods of the City and makes recommendations for how new residential neighborhoods should be designed so that they are a positive addition to the community. The Housing chapter focuses on the demand for new housing, the availability of a range of housing types and styles, and on the housing needs of low and moderate income families, special needs populations, and the homeless. LEGAL CONTEXT Washington State Growth Management Act The GMA requires cities to, "...encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population and to promote a variety of residential densities and housing types." It also encourages "preservation of existing housing stock." The � GMA discourages conversion of undeveloped land, "...into sprawling, low-density developments." (RCW 36.70A.020, 1990 Supp.) T'he GMA requires that the Housing chapter include: ■ An inventory and analysis of existing and projected housing needs. ■ A statement of goals and policies for housing preservation, improvement, and development. � [_J FWCC — Chaoter Five, Housing ■ Identification of sufficient land area for the number of needed housing units, including government assisted housing, housing for low income families, mobile/manufactured housir,g, ��''*:� multiple family housing, and special needs housing. This defines the amount of land that the City must designate for housing in the Land Use chapter. ■ A strategy and policy for meeting the housing needs of all economic segments of the community. ■ Encouragement for innovative land use management techniques to enhance affordable housing opportunities, including density bonuses, cluster housing, planned unit developments, and transfer of development rights. Affordable Housing inventory A 1993 legislative amendment requires that all cities and public agencies develop an inventory of public properties no longer needed for use and which may be available for affordable housing. The inventory is to identify individual property locations, size, and current zoning category. Public agencies include all school districts and the state departments of Natural Resources, Transportation, Social and Health Services, Corrections, and General Administration. The inventory is provided to the Washington � , , Office of Community Development (�� OCD) and is to be updated annually by November 1. The inventory is available from C�B OCD upon written request (RCW 35.21.687). Accessory Dwelling Units T'he City is required by the state Housing Act of 1993 to include provisions for accessory housing. To allow local flexibility, the provisions are subject to such regulations, conditions, and limitations as determined by the City Council (RCW A.63.230). Consistent with the adoption of ' the FWCP in 1995, the City prepared and adopted accessory dwelling unit provisions consistent with the state's mandate. Multi-County Policies In response to the GMA, the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) adopted regional housing policies. These policies promote fair housing access to all persons regardless of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, family status, source of income, or disability. Policies seek to strengthen interjurisdictional efForts for fair distribution of low and moderate income, and special needs housing. PSRC policies seek to provide a diversity of housing types to meet the needs of all economic segments of the population. Jurisdictions should promote cooperative efforts to ensure that an adequate supply of housing is available throughout the region. Each jurisdiction should work at preserving existing affordable housing stock and providing Revised �A89 2002 L_.J , � ' � , � � � � � L� � J � � v-2 � J C� � FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing access to public transit for the residents in such housing. Policies promote development ' of institutional and financial mechanisms to provide housing near community centers. They also encourage consideration of the economic impact of regulations and development of regulations that do not burden the cost of housing development and � maintenance. � Countywide Policies In 1994, King County adopted Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) for affordable ' housing that promote a"rational and equitable" distribution of affordable housing. The policies establish numerical housing targets that each city should accommodate and specific targets for housing affordable to households earning less than 80 percent of the � County's median family income. Local actions to encourage development of affordable housing may include, but are not limited to, providing sufficient land zoned for higher housing densities, revision of development standards and permitting procedures, ' reviewing codes for redundancies and inconsistencies, and providing opportunities for a range of housing types. Additionally, all jurisdictions should participate in a cooperative, countywide effort to address current low income housing needs. Initially, this efFort will include identifying a countywide funding source and countywide programs to address ' housing needs that cross jurisdictional boundaries and benefit from countywide application. � Other countywide housing policies require jurisdictions to evaluate existing subsidized and low cost housing resources, and identify such housing that may be lost due to redevelopment, deteriorating housing conditions, or public policies or actions. � Jurisdictions should develop strategies to preserve existing low-income housing and provide relocation assistance to households that may be displaced due to public action. For jurisdictions such as Federal Way, which have elected to have an urban center, the � �'^��^*�^= „'°^^;^^ ^^';^;°° CWPPs provide that the center be planned to accommodate a minimum of 15 dwelling units per acre. � All jurisdictions should monitor and report on various aspects of residential development within their communities. They should define annual targets for housing development and preservation, and track progress in achieving countywide and local goals for housing all economic segments of the population. The county's Growth Management Planning � Council (GMPC) is charged with determining whether development of housing for all economic segments of the population is satisfying housing needs. If new housing falls short of ineeting the countywide need for housing, and particularly affordable housing, , the GMPC may recommend additional actions. ' Implications for the Housing Chapter In summary, based upon the foregoing laws and policies, Federal Way's Housing chapter ' should include an inventory of existing housing stock; identify housing needs, and set minimum housing targets for each economic segment of the population; provide for sufficient, appropriately zoned land to meet these needs; and identify appropriate goals, , Revised �9A9 2002 V-3 , [_� FWCC - Cha�ter Five. Housing policies, and strategies for achieving these housing targets. Tools for achieving these goals may include amendments to the zoning chapter se�� of the Federal Way City Code FWCC to encourage a more diversified housing stock, promote imaginative design, and encourage development of affordable housing. Strategies may also include provisions for interjurisdictional efforts to provide and finance affordable housing. The primary objective should be to create residential neighborhoods which are of high quality, provide social and community support and meet the needs of all segments of society. 5.2 HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT Extsting Conditions Introduction Federal Way has grown rapidly in the past. The area doubled in population during the 1960s and again in the 1980s. Since its incorporation in 1990, the City has grown by �4 23 percent. Based on PSRC forecasts, °�°Y *"° �•^� ^f *'�° ^°��•^�, when the inventory of vacant land is consumed, growth will slow down considerably. so r. _�-- = _ - - -- �'- � :_ •�� , _ � . ., . _ ��� - - ' - - .. _ • • � • �_ ,,. .- �. . ....- . - .. -_. . - . - -. - . . . ...- . - .- . � ��� Y. 1 �I. • /11 1�'' ��� i .i . � � _ � _ • 1 i _ � Although households are generally more affluent in Federal Way than in nearbv communities, home prices are fairly even throu�hout South King County. The King County Office of Re�,ional Policy and Planning reports that in the first three quarters of 2001, the average sin�le-family house price in Federal Way was $213,060, compared to $222 580 in Kent $216 549 in Auburn and $207 302 in Des Moines. The Seattle-Everett Real Estate Research Report reports that in the Fall of 2001, the median rent for a twabedroom/one-bath apartment was $703 in Federal Wav, $714 in Kent, $676 in Auburn, and $689 in Des Moines. In comparison, the median rent for a two- Revised �989 2002 � , � � � � � � � , � � � � , ' v-4 � ' � � FWCC — Chapter Five, Housing � bedroom/one-bath apartment was $1 400 in Seattle $1 182 in Bellevue, $886 in Redmond ($986), and $977 in Issa�uah. This demonstrates that South Kin� County has more affordable rental housin� available than the rest of the county. � Population The Tn� �: „�� �-,,,,,, ,� r,v,. za, r„ r„ „z, . D u,��A��, 2000 Census � shows that compared to King County, Federal Way had a larger percentage of children under 17 years old �r-�-999 (� 28 percent compared to � 22 percent in the County). �e �'^.� *t,,, t.t,,.,, , 't.,�. ,..oa .t,.,, fY� - Y g9(,��irE6-�ir`�crxu� - -&m�xvu�-S�G�Ei-�TE �9r@C-drs�S � L' ,] .-.,1\I1.,.,..,:11 .,r: or,.L.., o .,+o o„r.-.,t: �f'�.l�;l�lr ..,1 ,rl, .,,7�,_1? i� � , ' On the other hand, only s� eight percent of the Federal Way population was 65 or older in ��}99 2000, compared to -�--� 10 percent in King County. However, it is expected that the number of elderly will increase in Federa] Way due to the natural aging of the population, seniors tending to relocate to Federal Way in search of affordable housing, and the large number of senior housing units being built in Federal Way. Senior citizens require such services as home delivered meals, respite care services, recreation services, in-home care, congregate and nursing care facilities, and transportation. Figure V-1 describes the 1498 2000 distribution of Federal Way's population. F:.�...,. V 1 ' � � • 30000 � 25000 20000 ' 15000 10000 5000 , 0 , � � � ' Revised �908 2002 � Source: 1990 Census Household Income 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 F:.... r r V_ 1 '�°`rc---rT 6o.lor�1 \�'�.� .4r,o Il:�rr:l�..f:�,., F.., ��-�g Source: 2000 Cen�u� Understanding the distribution of Federal Way's household income is also critical in planning for future housing needs. The King County Benchrnark Program defines income groups as follows: Extremely Low Income: 30% of county median income Very Low Income: 31-50% of county median income Low Income: 51-80% of county median income Median Income: 100% of county median income Upper Income: 120% of county median income V-5 Under 19-29 30-5-1 5�-64 65-74 O��er 75 18 � Under 20-34 35-54 �$-64 65-74 Over 75 20 � FWCC — Chaoter Five, Housing LJ King County's 1999 median income for all households was $�9A $53,157 �4 � ' ' . compared to Federal Way's median income of $c�9,278. More specifically, the '°°° Y�^^ r,,,,,,�, n,,,,,,.,� �.,,.,,.,,e , �s 2000 H.U.D. Income Levels bv Household Size for various income groups are shown by household size in Table V-1. While Federal Way households are generally more affluent than elsewhere in South King � County, about 1,390 households in the City of Federal Way aze currently receiving housing assistance from the King County Housing Authority, or living in subsidized , private housing. ��T� ��� � o ' , � � ' � � � �. �� �.'��� �.�.:.t�fi:ss.e� _Y-T. T1 �� �L'S�)! rtT�ET:iVT_T .RT.fYTTT� TnT[!T'f �] ET.T. RY .R-TJ.T.!l:YTl. C1 \ . . - . . . : Y.T.! Ci � . . . . . .. . . .. .. . . ..' _ _'_'_ _ " "_ _... .. . ."_ _. ' . . _ . . . .. . . . . .. . ..... . . .. ... . . .. .. . . . '1� . ..-. .. .....- _ _ . . .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . _ . .. - - .._ . . _ . . . _ . . _ . . _ . . . _ _ _ . .. . . . ... . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. - Y. . . - � . . . .. . . . . . „ � • . . . . . .. . .. . . ... . . ... . . . .. ... . . � ' .' ..' ' ' -. : : :: "- : . . : : . .. . : • _ • .' � � � . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . .' . . _ . . -.... ' • . . - . . . � � 1 . 1 . � � • . . . . .. . . . . ` . Revised 2999 0�2 ' ' V-6 ' � 0 0 . :� � ' FWCC — Chapter Five, Housing � , �J , , � ' ' ' Table Y-1 2000 Ii.U.D. Income Levels bv Household Size , Source: The 2001 Kina Counri Benchmark Report nublished bv the Kin� Counri Office of Regional Policv and Plannin�. Notes• •Since the average KC Household is about 2 4 persons this column avvroximates the median for all households in the countY. ' **Because of the wav HUD calculates this income level it is actuallv 76% of the Median Income rather than 80%, althouvJ� it is called L80. **'An affordable housin� pavment is 25% of monthlv income. Affordable rent is 30% of monthlv income. •*'•The affordable home price is based on a 30 veaz fixed mortaa�e ai 7.25% interest with 5% down. ' I) The 1999 Citv ofFederal Wav Human Services Comprehensive Plan defines an affordable housinn opportuniri as rents affordable to households earnin� Iess than 50% of inedian income. �) For rentats an affordable monthlv aavment is defined as a housin� cosdpavment that is no more than 30% of a household's monthlv income This does not include a deduction for u6lities• it assumes that the entire pavment �ces toward the rent. , Example• 50% of inedian income for a three-person household was $29 600 in 2000. At this income, the familv could afford $740 in rent. 3) The 1999 Citv ofFedera! Wav Human Services Comvrehensive Plan defines an affordable ownership oDnortuniri as Drices affordable to households eaming less than 80% of inedian income. 4) For homeownership an aft'ordable monthiv pavment is defined as a housin� cosduavment that is no more than 25% of a ' household's monthlv income. This leaves 5% of income for taxes and insurance. 5) An affordable home price is aparoximatelv three times the annual household income. An 80% of inedian income for a three- . _ _ •__ _�_ •_ "__ __ __ c___�f__ ____fJ _�C__J a_ "'��L��� � L....�........� :..............r�L.... , , Revised �A89 2QQ2 , V 'I � ' FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing Employment During the 1980s, Federal Way's employment base grew faster than any other suburban area of King County. This growth was primarily in retail and service jobs and by 1994, more than one-third of Federal Way's employment base was in retail sales, followed closely by service employment: The 1999 Central Puget Sound Regional Economic Report Employment Pattern and Trends, 1995-1998 reports that in Federal Way, jobs covered by Social Security grew from 23,800 in 1995 to 27,820 in 1998, an increase of 17 percent. T'his study also reports that there were less than 400 high technology jobs in 1998. However, between 1995 and 1998, retail sector jobs increased from 6,650 to 7,710, a 16 percent increase , , . But between 1998 and 2000, retail iobs increased onlv by six percent while all covered employment increased by 13 percent from 27,820 to 31,315. Jobs in retail sales and service employment typically pay low wages and as a result, these workers have difficulty finding housing they can afford despite working full time jobs. Accordingly, there may be an imbalance between jobs available in Federal Way and the earnings needed to afford local housing. Ironically, this may result in employees working in the City commuting from other communities where cheaper housing is available and higher wage earners who live in Federal Way commuting to other cities for higher paying jobs. To illustrate some of these points, Table V-2 provides examples of �9�3 2001 Housing Prices in King County, the income required to purchase these houses, and examples of typical occupations with required earning power. Even though these examples are not specific to Federal Way, they demonstrate it would be difficult for an employee in the service or retail sector to purchase an average priced home in Federal Way�e�te� „.t,e n,.+„�.e,. � o0o rr;�.,, �,,,,.....,, �,,,,,,,,� �u ,..a x�,. u.,�;,,,, u,.n,,.;u� According to the Kin� County Office of Re�ional Policv and Plannin�, the average price for a Federal Way home was approximately � $213,060 in the f r°* ^„°�*°• ^� , O°o first three quarters of 2001). During this same period, the median single-family house price in Federal Way was $�S $188,000. In the more extreme cases, these individuals and families may need some type of government subsidy to access even rental housing. If these employment trends continue, the City may be under increased pressure to provide housing assistance to those employed locally in low wage jobs. ' � � , , ' l� � , , �J , ��,7 �� s_�7.'_�'.�'.T�7 °�6�eiYN �6F�e-�9W$ 2�F-�°�r�@N�H � � . ��6Wi3 • �.�.� • . Revised 2898 2002 � ' �, V� � � FWCC — Chapter Five, Housing Table V-2 Affordable Housin for Various Income Se ments 2001 HousinL Prices in Kina Income ReUUirements for Tvoical Occupations with Required Earnine Po��er Count this Housin Tv e � 174.000 Median Priced Condo S50,000 Income Required � full timc En lish Qrofessor (�55.300) or I full-time re�istered nurse Attached Townhome after 5% down (S53 300) or 1 full-time USPS mail can (�37,000) and I half-time medical recordstechnician (�14,100) S56,000 Income Required i full-time firefighter (S43 000) and I halt=time insurance claims processor S 195.000 Home S 13 7000) or I full-time machinist (540.300) and I half-time librarv technician after 5% down I 5 400 . $75,500 Income Required � full-time market research analvst (�75,000) or computer sottware en �g�neer 5264,000 Median Priced Home a (574 0001 or I Yull-time microbiologist (S48,000) and i full-time travel a�ent aRer 10 /o down 30 400 �92.000 Income Required � full-time human resources manaeer �69,300) and 1 full-time retail sales S322,000 Average Priced Home o worker (S23 300) or I full-time construction manager (564,000) and i full- after 10 /o down time customer service re resentative 30 000 �839 Average rent month average I full-time administrative assistant (533,8001 or corrections ofticer 1533,840) rent for a 2 bedroom/1 bath Unit �33.600 income required or I full-time restaurant cook (�24,600) and I half-time cashier f$10,300) Jource: The November 2001 Annual Housin,� Affordable Bulletin published by the Kine County Otlice of Rcgional Policv and Plannin� Note: Salaries are estimated based on averaees for entry to mid-career eamers, unless otherwi;e speciticd. Housing Inventory For the most part, the housing stock in Federal Way is in good condition. �r o.,+:..,. �.,,,.�:„,. . � �,,.:�+ „�.o.- i n�n .,.,a � o.. �n ..o o..+ „�+o.- i o�n The City has very little concentration of substandard housing typically found in older urban areas. However, houses in poor condition do exist in isolated cases around the City and in small pockets. As depicted in Figz�re V-2 presently, � 50 percent of Federal Way's housing stock is constructed as single-family homes. The remaining supply is ee�se� composed of 4� 45 percent multiple-family units and €e� five percent mobile homes, ��� v� ° ° �, „�',,,t,o.-.,...o� ,.ct�,,,,�:..,. z�:�,,,.,� v � z -• � Multiple Family 42% Single- Family �3% Multiple Family 45% Fin��r� V_7 nb-°"�� .� u�nuc� $% Single- Family � U% Revised 2999 2002 V-9 1 % nuines 4% FWCC - Chaoter Five. Housing The 1999 City of Federal Way Human Services Comprehensive Plan reports that several programs exist to assist individuals with housing costs to help them with maintenance of existing housing. The most common subsidies include reduced cost units for rent, vouchers or certificates to assist with tenant-located housing, grants to help with down payments, reduced interest rate loans, and cash supplements for utilities or home maintenance. Another resource is public housing. The King County Housing Authority owns 443 units of public housing in Federal Way. In addition, Section 8 certificates provide subsidy of the rental cost of privately owned housing. Within King County, outside of Seattle, a�es�89 81 percent of Section 8 certificates are used in South King County, where housing is more affordable. I , o0o December 2001, � 961 (16 percent of total administered by the King County Housing Authority) Section 8 certificates and/or vouchers were being used in Federal Way. There are presently seven organizations that offer emergency shelter and transitional housing to residents of Federal Way. The 1999-2000 Seattle-King County Homeless Response Report states that there are approximately 148 emergency shelter beds and 157 transitional housing units in South King County. None of these organizations, by themselves, have the capacity to adequately meet the demand for service. Even with close cooperation and coordination, they have had difficulty meeting the growing demand for services and providing case management for clients. Another important way to provide affordable housing is to prevent the existing affordable housing stock from being redeveloped or deteriorating to the point that it is no longer useable. Although the City can generate maps of property with high redevelopment potential, there is no data that specifically describes how much property is actually redeveloped and how many affordable housing units are actually lost. To address these situations, the e�s�es CWPPs promote development of strategies to preserve existing low-income housing. Toward that end, Federal Way currently allocates .,,.,+o�., Q��c nnn ..o � � Community Development Block Grant (CDBG� , funds to housing rehabilitation programs subject to funds availability. Future Housing Needs r„ � non +t,e r_r,r�r� „�1,.,..o DCD!` 1, ,,,,�;.,.. ., o,..;,,.,� .,.t,:,.t, o�*;,,,.,roa *t,.,* .t,e t,. � , :,o e oe., tz ��c .,,,a �� c�� �, t, u � a i�x� �. +t, �ni� �ir•*t, o , , , r�se� a��e��t�e�s, t�is �e�se�e��ge�s-��asec��e�,T� � �,8�4. ��g�r�-TT'-z , �oao,..,i �x��., �,.. +tie o.,a ,.�+�,;� ,.�,,,, a •r�, a• +• *• *�, + �. •* � � During their September 25, 2002 meeting, the GMPC adopted a motion to add targets for new households and iobs for the ueriod 2001 - 2022. These targets were based on a methodolo�v developed over a two-vear period bv the Kin� Countv Planning Directors. The adopted 2001 - 2022 housin�get for Federal Wav is 6,188 new residential units. Revised �999 22�2 V-10 ' � � � � , , ' � , , , i � � , , ' , � ' � ' C ' �J ' ' � ' u C' lJ , FWCC – Cha�ter Five, Housing ' ' Revised 2A99 2002 , �ig�e�e-�� o SOOOU ' � 40000 0 � 30000 0 20000 � 10000 E z ° 1 �a� ,�`'� 1 �b� ,q �� 1 ��� 1 �� 1 �A� ry° �p ry° 1ti � �—Actual Housing Units tProjected Households .:. .. - - _ _ _ ' The number of housing units always exceeds the number of households, and is dependent on vacancy rates. The '�tPPs suggest that Federal Way plan for an additional , , .1,238 units, the equivalent of 20 percent of projected net household growth, that are affordable to very low income families (less than 50 percent of inedian) and , , 1,D52 housing units, the equivalent of 17 percent of projected net household growth, that are affordable to low income families (between 50 and 80 percent of inedian) by the year 2fri� 2D22. Housing is considered affordable when a family is spending not more than 30 percent of their monthly income if renting, and 25 percent if purchasing, or three times their annual income if purchasing a home. For a three-person very low-income family in Federal Way (see Table V-1), it means that the monthly rent excluding utilities must be less than �`78� $24Q, or if they are buying a home; it must cost less than $�8#,�`s@ $95,2QQ at � 2QQQ prices. � � - ' demonstrating that Federal Way has affordable rental opportunities. However, to build homes that are available for �@ $95,ZQII would require significant public subsidies. To ensure that new housing units are a positive addition to the community, the City adopted residential design guidelines in 1998 in order to encourage more variety in the types of units available and more innovative and aesthetically pleasing design. Requests for help by Federal Way residents for homeless shelters, transitional housing, and special needs housing exceed supply. V-11 FWCC — Chaoter Five, Housing ■ In 1999, the Crisis Clinic Community Information line received 495 calls from Federal Way residents seeking emergency shelter and from 188 residents seeking permanent housing. ■ The October 19, 1999, United Way of King County Health and Human Services Community Assessment reports that in 1989, less than 16 percent of people requesting emergency or transitional shelter in South King County were able to be sheltered due to lack of available space. ■ The domestic abuse shelter provided 192 nights of shelter to domestic violence victims, and turned away many more women and children due to lack of space. ■ There is a need for more supported living units (apartments and shared single- family homes) for the mentally ill. ■ In the fall of 1999, there were approximately 65 homeless children in the Federal Way School District. ■ There may presently be a need for 96 units of housing for persons with AIDS in southwest King County. Federal Way works with the King County Consortium and neighboring cities to implement effective housing goals and policies to meet future housing needs. A comprehensive strategy ensures that safe and suitable housing is available to residents of all income levels and special needs, as required by GMA. Housing Capacity As is described in the Land Use chapter, based on the most recent capacity analysis, there is a remaining capacity for �15,538 new residential units-including �4-� 3,265 detached single-family homes, and up to ��4 2,273 multiple-family units. In general terms, the primary component of the City's housing strategy is to promote in- fill while protecting the character and quality of its existing single-family residential neighborhoods. New detached units will be constructed on vacant lots in existing neighborhoods but they will be compatible with the existing homes. Planned Unit Developments and other special development techniques may be added to the �g-sed� FWCC to encourage compatible development on difficult sites and near environmentally sensitive areas. However, in-fill development will not be permitted at the expense of the quality of life in existing neighborhoods. A secondary component of the housing strategy is to encourage higher density residential uses in the I-5/Highway 99 corridor, including the City Center Core and City Center Frame. Row houses, townhouses, condominiums, and mid-rise residential are appropriate in this area subject to the availability of utilities and other infrastructure, access to public transportation, jobs, shopping, entertainment, and social and human services. This plan ' Revised �899 2002 V-12 r , ' , ' ' ' , , , ' ' ' ' ' , , 1 � � ' FWCC — Chapter Five. Housing anticipates that during the next 20 years, the City Center and the Highway 99 corridor will ' redevelop and accommodate the majority of the new housing units, particularly multiple- family housing units, added to the City's inventory. The area will gradually become a denser, mixed use, pedestrian friendly, high amenity, high quality, vital part of Federal Way. ' ' ' , ' � , � � The third part of the strategy is to ensure that there is sufficient land available for other housing needs such as government assisted housing, manufactured housing, group homes, and foster care facilities. The Land Use chapter and �e�rg�e�e FWCC provide support for this type of housing. In 2002, �the City � �� � adopted a code amendment to eliminate the separation requirements for social services transitional housing within multiple family residential zones rov vided that no less than one unit and no more than five percent of the housing within the multiple familv complex mav be social services transitional housing. ��e Together, the Land Use and Housing chapters and the associated development regulations provide sufficient capacity to accommodate projected housing growth for all economic segments of the population. It is important that the City implement a housing program that will assist private developers and private non-profit organizations in meeting the identified housing needs. Such action is not only required by GMA, but it is also prudent public policy and will ensure a safe and supportive housing environment for future generations. 5.3 KEY HOUSING ISSUES Preserving Neighborhood Character As the population of the area in and around Federal Way doubled during the 1980s, residents feazed that existing neighborhood character and values were threatened. , Approximately 7,000 new multifamily units were built in Federal Way between 1980 and 1990. Many of these units were not well designed and were haphazardly sited across the entire City. This resulted in substantial changes to the character of neighborhoods, or , created new neighborhoods along major arterial streets. Preservation of existing neighborhoods has been cited as an important community value in Federal Way. T'his value played a large role in the community's decision to incorporate. ' LJ LJ ' ' ' The FWCP recognizes that neighborhoods are special places and are valuable and important to the quality of life for many citizens. New development in established neighborhoods must be sensitively designed and constructed. New development within existing single-family neighborhoods should be limited to small scale, well-designed in-fill, and accessory housing. Likewise, new multiple-family or mixed use development located along arterials running through or adjacent to existing residential neighborhoods should be designed to minimize adverse impacts and with sufficient buffers. Revised �808 2002 V-13 t__J � FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing Development Review There are several actions the City may take to make housing more affordable. Time is money to a housing developer. Thus, whatever the City can do to reduce permit- processing time will make housing more affordable. Accordingly, as part of the HB 1724 code revisions, the City revised the ��a FWCC so that more land use decisions are administrative decisions, thereby avoiding time consuming public hearings. Second, the City has in place a preapplication process that allows the developer to meet with City representatives at an early stage in the review process to ensure that the applicant understands City development regulations. Such early meetings allow the City and housing developer to agree on the best method to achieve a code compliant and mutually beneficial site plan prior to having spent significant sums on costly design and engineering work. A significant portion of the cost of building housing is the cost of providing the necessary infrastructure. If the City is interested in providing housing that is affordable to very low income citizens, it could, to the extent economically practicable, provide the necessary � infrastructure, or possibly subsidize the cost of providing public facilities such as streets, parks, utilities, transit facilities, public amenities, and social services. CDBG funds and other grants are available for this purpose and should be used where appropriate. Citizen Participatjon Moderate scale housing development that is consistent with City policy and regulations should be reviewed and approved through a prescribed, efficient, and consistent administrative process, which minimizes review time and the subsequent increases in project costs. Larger scale development plans, or those which will have significant impacts on surrounding neighborhoods, should have full public review as defined in the �'^-' M^' A'^�. r';� r'�a° FWCC. The public and the developer should have a clear understanding of the process, the types of issues that are open to discussion, and the time frame for completion of the review process. Housing Design and innovation The challenge in this plan and subsequent code revision work is to be flexible when presented with creative and high quality design proposals. Of course, this flexibility must be balanced with the need to provide a degree of certainty to the developer and to give clear guidance to policy makers, staff, and public. The following paragraphs describe several regulatory mechanisms which the City could include in its zoning code that would encourage superior design, a greater variety of housing types, and reduce costs. Incentives For Good Practice — Many jurisdictions include incentives in their zoning code that encourage developers to build projects in a way that produces some identified public benefits. The public benefits might include creative designs that are sensitive to community and neighborhood values, dedication of land or right-of-way for public use, Revised 2A09 2002 ' ' � _J � � ' u ' C ' ' � ' � 1 ' V-14 , ' � ' ' , � � ' 1 , and construction of urban amenities, community facilities, and other public spaces. � ;,,,.o„+;.,o� .,,;,,h� ;,,,.�,,,�o ao„�:h, �,,,.,,,� . ,� i o„+,,,,+o„+;.,i ,,,. a.,,,o,�;�o,� ���es�ssi�g. The Citv of Federal Wav has adopted a densitv bonus provision in the Citv Center, wherebv builciin� height can be increased from 35 feet to a ma�cimum of 85 feet and from 48 to 80 dwellinQ units per acre for multiple familv and senior housin�, in exchange for providin� public open space or paving a fee-in-lieu of. In addition, new multiple fam ilv or mixed-use projects in anv zone involving 25 dwellinQ units or more are required to provide affordable dwelling units. Projects providin� affordable dwellinl� units mav exceed the maximum number of allowed dwelling units up to ten nercent above the maximum. In single-familv subdivisions, those lots that are proposed to contain affordable dwelling units can be reduced in area bv up to 20 percent of the minimum lot size of the underlving zonin� district• provided that the overall dwellin� units in the subdivision mav not exceed ten percent of the maximum number of units allowed in the underlying zoning district. Inclusionary Zoning — In certain zones, development might be required to meet certain City goals, such as providing affordable housing, as set out in the �ex�g-sed� FWCC. It is becoming more commonplace for jurisdictions to require major developers to provide a portion of low income housing in developments over a certain scale. T'he City amended the �ex�xgsed� FWCC in 1997 to require multiple-family development, or mixed use projects involving 25 dwelling units or more, to provide at least two units, or 25 percent, whichever is greater, as affordable housing to those at 80 percent or below median county income. , Planned Unit Development — A Planned Unit Development (PUD) ordinance allows developers flexibility to achieve design, layout, or density that is suited to a specific site. As an example, a PUD allows clustering of housing density in more developable portions of a site while protecting important open space and environmentally sensitive areas. A � PUD ordinance gives the City and the development community flexibility to provide a variety of housing types and costs in new residential areas or smaller, older, mixed-use neighborhoods. In 1998, the City revised its Cluster Provisions in the Subdivision Code � to allow reduction in minimum lot sizes and to allow zero-lot line development for no more than two units. ' Transfer of Development Rights - This technique allows a developer to transfer permitted density from one part of a site to another, or from one site to another. It is a useful technique for protecting parts of sites that are environmentally sensitive without loss of , land value. It also allows for more dense forms of housing development, thereby reducing housing costs. ' ' ' ' Revised 2899 2002 ' FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing Diversifying Housing Choice The majority of the housing available in Federal Way today is fairly homogenous. Housing primarily consists of single-family detached units, constructed in the sixties and eighties, laid out in isolated subdivisions disconnected from the urban fabric. There are some mobile home parks and a few duplexes located in the City. However, in the last six vears 792 senior or assisted housin� units and 24U convalescent units (skilled-care beds) have been built. The rest of the housing stock tends to be two and three story apartment buildings. _ • • V-15 FWCC — Chaater Five, Housing This provides only a narrow range of choices and does not fully reflect the range of housing options that could be built. It creates a situation where an increasing number of families find it difficult to obtain suitable housing in the community. T"' ' a '*' ��- a a l;.,o.i ;,, +l,e;r 1,.,.w,o� f r ,,,�,,., .,o„-� �,,.1 e;*l,e,. ..�.,,,.,+ �+� ,-.i ., ., t.,�,..e,. .,1.10 +�. � � ', . It affects empty nesters and couples who have raised their families who, for life-style reasons, no longer need or want a large single-family house and the associated maintenance. Young adults, students, young married couples, and low income workers would like to live in the community where they grew up or currently work, but cannot find a house that fits their housing needs or cannot afford the available housing. New housing should be more diverse, contributing to community character and relating better to the neighborhood environment. It should reassure residents that they will be able to afford to live close to their jobs, friends, and families. It will also help preserve and maintain neighborhoods that include a healthy mix of ages and incomes. Housing Affordability and Special Needs Housing T.'oae.�.�l \7V.�i� l�.�o � �f fl�o l�;Rl�oo+ L.�„o;.�R ....o+o /f r 1��1�M .�. ro�l .�ra re«1�.�1 l�n„o;��l ,. c,,,,�a.,,o�+ rr;,,,. �,,,,,,h. ,.�,,,,,,,,.,;*:e�� �,,,..,o.,o,.� ,,., On a countywide basis, Federal Way is a very affordable community. The population of Federal Way tends to be younger than other communities, creating a strong demand for moderately priced housing. There were approximately 9,SOO low-income households in 1996 in Federal Way in need of housing assistance ' . The increasing number of low-income households can be attributed in part to a growing number of senior citizens who are likely to need both housing assistance and related services. PSRC also projected a strong demand for affordable multiple-family units through the year 2000 to serve low- and very low-income families who work in Federal Way. The GMA and ' CWPPs require that municipal jurisdictions adopt strategies for providing a"fair share" of identified regional housing needs. The �����s CWPPs set a target of ^,°�'' *^ �,"� 2,290 new affordable housing units in the City by the year �8-1-� 2022. Of that number, �A �,� 1,238 must be affordable to very low-income c:itizens. The need for homeless shelters, transitional housing, and special needs housing exceeds the available supply. The City has funded several special needs projects in the past few years to help address this need. ��e�is�es The CWPPs as well as GMA require provisions for special needs housing. Special needs housing, also called "supportive housing," brings together housing and support services for community residents who need special services in order to live independently or with minimum assistance. This includes services in housing operated by public and private agencies. According to the 2000-2003 King County Consolidated Housing & Community_Development Plan, there is a need for an additiona1500 beds countywide. Revised �899 2002 V-16 ' � � ' I� � � � � � � � � �� � FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing � � � Revised �898 2002 � "'*� According to the 2000 census, the proportion of elderly at 7.7 vercent is smaller in Federal Way than in neighboring South County cities, except for Kent. ��s c o/f.G `l l 4�11 !. ') 4 F41� r�»l otir�r� .v� 100/1 �vitl+ n.��41.0.� l. G"7 !. e ,.o„,. �,o..,,00., +�,o .,,,o� „� cc .,,,a �n, Average life expectancy continues to climb, and we should expect an increasing percentage of Federal Way's population will be 65 and over in the next 10 to 20 years. As discussed earlier in this chapter under Population, there are three reasons the number of elderly can be expected to increase: 1) natural aging of the population; 2) they are relocating to find affordable housing; and 3) a large number of senior housing units *'� ' �'*� ~ '"' +� '"°°° " �°`'°"" � ccan�vixocz avcioix � have been recently constructed. Because women tend to live longer than men, this population will be predominantly female. Elderly people are often reluctant to give up the comfort and security provided by their own homes. With this in mind, federal and state policy has shifted from one of providing institutionalized care for seniors to a more home based or "aging in place" policy. Many seniors, and most of those over 75, need some level of in-home services. As elderly people become more frail, their supportive service needs increase. They may be better served in congregate care facilities, or eventually, long-term care facilities. Federal Way should begin planning for a continuum of care that minimizes family stress and public costs. In-home services should be available Citywide, while congregate care facilities and long-term care facilities should be located near to community services and shopping areas, and away from busy traffic corridors. According to the 200�-2003 King County Consolidated Housing & Community Development Plan, in 1997, an average of 9,421 adults with chronic or severe mental illness were served by the King County Regional Support Network. Safe and affordable housing, a key element in a long-term therapy program for these people, is not available for a majority of the low-income mentally ill in King County or Federal Way. There are no domestic shelters located in Federal Way. However, Federal Way is currently served by several programs for victims of domestic violence. The Domestic Abuse Women's Network (DAWN) provides 21 shelter beds, as well as crisis intervention and support services. The South King County Branch of the YWCA also serves Federal Way area residents. There is clearly a large unmet need for emergency housing in South King County for victims of domestic abuse. King County jurisdictions receive Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS rental assistance funding from HiJD. Federal Way participates in the oversight of this program with Seattle acting as the lead authority. According to the 2000-2003 King County Consolidated Housing & Community Development Plan, in mid-1998 in King County, there were an estimated 2,164 persons living with AIDS, while between 6,000 and 9,000 persons were infected with HIV. At the time of diagnosis, 19 percent, or 412 people, diagnosed with AIDS lived outside the City of Seattle. Historically, housing services have been requested by 50 percent of the total AIDS population and actual housing units are required by 33 percent of people living with AIDS. If these trends continue, 163 housing units would be required to serve this population. v-n � FWCC — Chaater Five. Housing Several organizations in South King County offer emergency shelter and transitional housing to residents of the City of Federal Way. Existing data concludes that current facilities are inadequate when compared to requests for hel�. The South King County Multi-Service Center staff estimates that for every family served in their emergency shelter program, nine families are turned away. In addition, the October 1999 United Way Report states than in 1998, due to lack of space in South King County, less than 16 percent of people seeking shelter received it. There aze many reasons that people and families end up homeless. In 1997, data from shelters on the Housing Consortium (outside the City of Seattle) revealed that the most common reason for homelessness was domestic violence, followed by eviction and family crisis. According to established service providers, suburban homelessness is also increasing. Data from the South King County Multi Service Center indicates that the proportion of women, children, and two parent working families seeking shelter is growing rapidly in this community. It is difficult to estimate the number of homeless children there actually are in Federal Way, but the Federal Way School District reports that in their District alone, in the fall of 1999, there were 65 homeless children. Federal Way Youth and Family Services reports that many homeless children come from abusive homes or suffer from emotional neglect. Homelessness and domestic instability may cause deep emotional scars that impact a child's ability to focus his or her full attention on education. There is also a need for transitional housing for homeless individuals and families. State and federal rules restrict the length of stay in emergency shelters to 60 days. So, after many families have e�austed their time in an emergency shelter, they need access to longer-term transitional housing, where they can live for one or two years, obtain necessary support services, and stabilize their lives. Data is scarce so it is very difficult to estimate the number of beds that are needed to house the special needs population. However, there is unmet need in this service area. The City is committed to fostering programs and supporting service providers to assist in meeting this need subject to economic limitations, City revenues, and the need to balance housing against all other public needs. Policy Coordination and Regional Participation The GMA and good planning practice require that each chapter of the Gex}pFe�ie�si�e � FWCP be coordinated and consistent with goals and policies set forth in the other � chapters. This is especially true of the Housing chapter, particularly as it relates to the Land Use and Transportation chapters. The GMA also requires that City policies for affordable housing be consistent with ' CWPPs. PSRC, King County, and Federal Way have jointly adopted regional planning goals that estimate fair share housing targets, including low and very low-income housing targets that promote an equitable distribution of affordable housing. This type of housing is most appropriate in urban centers that contain jobs and good public transit access. � Revised �894 2002 V-18 ' � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FWCC — Chaoter Five, Housing Consistent with these requirements, the City's Land Use chapter proposes multiple- family housing and mixed-use development in the City Center, (comprised of the City Center Core and City Center Frame), the Communitv Business zone along the SR-99 and I-5 corridor, and to a limited extent in the neighborhood retail centers. In addition, senior � housin� is allowed in the Business Park and Office Park zones. All of these locations are or will be well served by public transit. The City has also determined that housmg, and in � particular multiple-family housing, will be designed so that it provides a quality place to live and is an asset to the community. In addition, the City is committed to fair housing access to all persons without discrimination. � This Housing chapter must also be coordinated and consistent with the County's and the City's funding programs for housing. This is particularly true for programs such as the CDBG, Home, and other Countywide funding � initiatives as recommended by the GMPC's Housing Finance Task Force. The City also recognizes that most of the housing issues found in Federal Way are � common to the County, Seattle, and the other suburban jurisdictions. In order to insure quality in the City's provision of housing services, and to help eliminate duplications of effort, the City should continue to coordinate with the King County Consortium and other I� South King County cities when designing and implementing housing and housing related services. � 5.4 HOUSING CHAPTER GOALS AND POLICIES � The following section provides goals and policies for providing, preserving, and � improving housing conditions in Federal Way. These goals and policies provide a framework from which to develop implementing strategies and work programs for the community. The purpose of these goals and policies is to provide housing opportunities � to all segments of the population. Consistent with GMA, these goals and policies should promote a variety of densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of the City's existing housing stock. Overall Goal � Preserve and protect Federal Way's existing high quality residential neighborhoods and promote a variety of opportunities to meet the housing needs of all residents of the community and region. � � � Revrsed �998 2002 � v-�9 � FWCC — Cha�ter Five. Housing Preserving Neighborhood Character Goal HG1 Preserve and protect the quality of existing residential neighborhoods and require new development to be of a scale and design that is compatible with existing neighborhood character. Policies HPl High-density housing projects, with the exception of senior housing, will not be permitted in existing single-family residential neighborhoods. HP2 Design guidelines should be adopted potentially in subarea plans that will specify in detail neighborhood character and require that new housing be consistent with these design guidelines. HP3 Amend development regulations to accommodate a diverse range of housing forms that are compatible with neighborhood character and create an effective transition between the City Center, business areas, and residential neighborhoods. I�P4 Continue to �4allow accessory housing units within single-family neighborhoods that protect residential character, ensure proper access, maintain , specific design standards, and comply with all applicable laws. � � � � HPS Maintain a strong code enforcement program to protect residential areas from illegal land use activities. � HP6 Conduct periodic surveys of housing conditions and create programs, including housing rehabilitation, to ensure that older neighborhoods are not allowed to � deteriorate, subject to availability of funding for such surveys and programs. HP7 If allowed by applicable law, development inside and outside the City should � be required to provide their fair share of onsite and offsite improvements. Community Involvement And Development Review Goal HG2 Involve the community in the development of new housing to a degree that is consistent with the scale of impact on the surrounding neighborhoods. Revised �A98 2002 . . __ V-20 � � 1 � � FWCC — Chaater Five. Housing Policies � HP8 Encourage public input into development of planning and regulatory documents through a formal public process characterized by broad, thorough, r, and timely public notice of pending action. HP9 Consider the economic impact of all development regulations on the cost of housing. HP10 Maximize efficiency in the City's development review process and ensure that unnecessary time delays and expenses are eliminated. Provide streamlined permitting processes for development that is consistent with the P-� FWCP and FWCC, and that has no adverse impacts. HPll Encourage community input, where appropriate, into the development permit process by providing thorough and timely information to the public. HP12 Assist developers with housing proposals at the earliest possible opportunity, including preapplication meetings to produce projects that can be reviewed quickly and maacimize their ability to receive permits. � Diversifying Housing Choice And Design Goal �� HG3 Develop a Comprehensive Plan and zoning code that provide flexibility to produce innovative housing solutions, do not burden the cost of housing development and maintenance, and divers� the range of housing types � available in the City. Policies HP13 The '' FWCC and Land Use chapter of the ��l�e�� FWCP will be coordinated to allow housing affordable to the low income and very low-income and special needs housing around the City Center and other areas providing proximity to low wage employment, safe and convenient access to transportation and human services, arid adequate infrastructure to support housing development. HP14 Amend development regulations to encourage superior design and greater diversiTy of housing types and costs through such techniques as incentives, inclusionary zoning, planned unit developments, density bonuses, and transfer of development rights. '�` HP15 Consider zero lot line standards within planned unit developments to create higher density single-family neighborhoods with large open space areas. � Revised �999 2002 V-21 � LJ FWCC — Chapter Five, Housing HP16 Consider reducing minimum lot sizes to allow construction of smaller, detached single-family houses on smaller lots. HP17 Continue to permit mixed-use residentiaUcommercial development in designated commercial areas throughout the City. Include developer incentives and design standards. � � HP18 Establish administrative procedures to permit innovative housing designs, provided they are of high standard and consistent with the Ge FWCP. HP19 HP20 � Continue to provide incentives, such as density bonuses, for providing a portion of affordable housing in new developments. � Periodically review and update development regulations to incorporate opportunities for new housing types. Housing Affordability Goal HG4 Develop a range of affordable housing opportunities for low-income groups consistent with ' the CWPPs and tk� needs of the community. Policies HP21 Promote fair housing access to all persons without discrimination. HP22 As estimated by ' CWPPs, maintain sufficient land supply within the City to accommodate 17 percent of the City's projected net household growth for those making 50 to 80 percent of King County's median income and �4 20 percent making less than 50 percent of inedian income. HP23 Require a portion of new housing on sites of significant size to be affordable to low-income households. Ensure that affordable housing is not concentrated in particular neighborhoods by setting a percentage limit to the number of affordable housing units that can be included in new housing developments. HP24 Ensure that any new affordable housing remains affordable. HP25 Allow and encourage use of manufactured housing in residential zones, provided it conforms to all applicable federal, state, and local requirements and is compatible with the character of the surrounding neighborhood. Revised �998 2002 V-22 � � � �� j � � � � �' � FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing HP26 In order to maintain existing affordable housing, the City should continue to allow manufactured home parks in existing locations. However, new manufactured home parks will not be permitted, nor will expansion of existing parks be allowed. HP27 Encourage new residential development to achieve maximum allowable density based on ^°*�� gross area. HP28 Explore federal, state, and local resources to assist in financing affordable housing. Encourage expansion of home ownership options through such means as first time home buyer programs, housing cooperatives, lease-purchase ownership, and other housing models. HP29 Consider delaying, deferring, or exempting affordable housing from development fees, concurrency requirements, payment of impact fees, ofFsite mitigation, and other development expenses that do not compromise environmental protection or public health, safety, and welfare concerns, or constitute a nuisance. HP30 Support taaL law amendments that provide relief to affordable and special needs housing. HP31 Identify low-income and very low-income housing resources that may be lost due to redevelopment or deteriorating housing conditions. Develop strategies that seek to preserve this existing housing, and that seek to provide relocation assistance to households that are displaced as a result of such activities. IiP32 Annually monitor residential development to determine the total number of new and redeveloped units receiving permits and units constructed, housing types, developed densities, and remaining capacity for residential growth for all income levels and needs. HP33 Integrate and coordinate construction of public infrastructure with private development to minimize housing costs wherever possible or practicable. Special Needs Housing Goal HGS Develop a range of housing opportunities that meet the requirements of people with special housing needs, including the elderly, mentaldy ill, victims of domestic abuse, and persons with debilitative conditions or injuries. Policies � � Revised �899 � � HP34 Remove existing regulatory barriers to siting special needs housing to avoid concentration and to ensure uniform distribution throughout all residential and v-2� � FWCC — Chaoter Five. Housing HP35 HP36 HP37 Goal HG6 Policies mixed-use zones, subject to performance standards that protect residential amenity, ensure proper access, and maintain design standards. Review permit applications for special needs housing in close coordination with service providers and the City's Human Services program. Assist local service organizations and self help groups to obtain funding and support. Ensure that access to special needs housing is provided without discrimination. Develop emergency shelter and transitional housing facilities for the homeless. HP38 Foster and support services that are not concentrated in particular neighborhoods by setting a percentage limit to the number of affordable housing units that can be included in new housing developments. HP39 HP40 Coordinate City actions related to homelessness with the City's Human Services Program and other shelter providers. Continue to permit emergency and transitional homeless facilities within the City. HP41 Emergency shelters and transitional housing should be regulated to avoid concentration of facilities, mitigate impact on surrounding uses, ensure that such housing is properly managed, and avoid significant impacts on existing residential neighborhoods. Regional Participation Goal HG8 Policies HP42 HP43 Revised �989 2002 Coordinate and integrate the City's program with other area housing and service providers. Policies and regulations related to affordable housing should be consistent with �i�e CWPPs and multi-county policies. Establish effective links with King County and other area cities to assess need and create housing opportunities for low income and special needs households, V-24 � � CJ � � � � � � � � � and develop a housing program that addresses issues common throughout the entire region. HP44 Subject to availability of funds, participate in the production and periodic � update of a housing needs assessment for the City and region to ensure that policy is based upon a rational evaluation of housing needs and priorities. � HP45 Ensure equitable and rational distribution of affordable housing throughout the region that is compatible with land use, transportation, and employment � locations. � � � � � Implementation of policies contained in the chapter will occur over a number of years and is dependent on resources available to the City and the community. The following implementation strategy lists actions that the City may take in the ^°°* �.�° .�°°�° future. 1. Develop an inventory of public properties no longer needed for use and which may be available for affordable housing. Evaluate use of such property for affordable housing against all other competing public uses. 2. Inventory and report on the estimated number of units for each income segment for purposes of Countywide monitoring of capacity for housing development. 3. �►�� Continue to monitor residential development on an annual basis � and determine the total number of new and redeveloped units receiving permits, units constructed, housing types, developed densities, and remaining capacity for residential growth based on income categories. � �' Revised �998 � FWCC — Chapter Five. Housing 5.5 IMPLEMENTATION ACTIONS 4. Conduct periodic surveys of housing conditions to direct the housing rehabilitation programs. 5. Develop strategies for protecting low-income and very low-income housing that may be lost due to redevelopment or deteriorating housing conditions. 6. Develop guidelines, potentially as subarea plans, that require consistency with specified neighborhood character and design requirements. 7. Assign a City representative to participate with other agencies to create a comprehensive housing program that addresses issues common throughout the entire region, and to seek and develop funding opportunities and strategies. 8.. Prepare and periodically update a housing needs assessment. V-25 � FWCC — Chapter Five. Housing 9. The following is a menu of potential development regulation amendments that should be considered: ■ Diversify housing forms and encourage superior design through techniques such as incentives, planned unit developments, density bonuses, and transfer of development rights. ■ Create effective transitions between the City Center, businesses, and residential areas. ■ Maximize efficiency of development processes. ■ Streamline processes for development consistent with the Ge��p�r��si�e� FWCP �e�e and FWCC, and ensure they hav�ge no significant adverse impacts. ■ Encourage affordable and special needs housing around the City Center. ■ Adopt Zero lot line standards. ■ Reduc�xge minimum residential lot sizes. ■ Establish maximum and minimum requirements for affordable housing on sites of significant size. ■ Eliminate barriers to uniformly siting special needs housing throughout all residential areas. ■ Preclude concentration of homeless facilities. `� Revised 2898 � V-26 � � FWCP — Chaoter Six, Capital Facilities CHAPTER SIX - CAPITAL FACILITIES � 6.0 INTRODUCTION � The City of Federal Way is expected to add'�°*�•�°°^ ' 2 ,'" �°^a '�, 6,188 housing units and ��, .,„ i��n nn � ,481 jobs between the years � 2001 and �l� 2022. � This growth will stimulate the local economy and maintain a diverse and vibrant community. Unfortunately, it will also generate a corresponding demand for new public services and facilities, such as schools, parks, and streets. These new facilities, and the � financial implications they will have for Federal Way and its citizens, are the subject of this chapter. �1 The Growth Management Act The Growth Management Act iGMA� refers to capital facilities planning in two of the 13 statewide planning goals. The two relevant goals are: l. Urban growth. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. 2. Public facilities and services. Ensure that those public facilities and services � necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. �� More specifically, the GMA mandates that the City prepare a capital facilities plan which contains the following components: ■ An inventory of existing facilities owned by public entities, showing the locations and capacities of the facilities. ■ A forecast of the future needs for such facilities. ■ The proposed locations and capacities of expanded or new facilities. ■ At least a six-year financing plan that will finance such facilities and clearly identify sources of public money for such purposes. ■ A requirement to reassess the Land Use chapter if probable funding falls short. In the pages that follow, this chapter complies with the GMA requirements for a capital facilities plan. � Revised �998 2002 � � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities Level of Service To prepare a Capital Facilities chapter, one of the first decisions a jurisdiction must make involves establishing a level of service (LOS) standard. The level of service standard refers to the amount and quality of services and facilities that a community wants €eF �� For example, the LOS for a parks system is usually described in terms of the number of acres of pazkland per 1,000 population. If a community has a strong desire for a good parks system, it will establish a high LOS standard for itself, maybe something on the order of 20 acres of park per 1,000 residents. On the other hand, 20 acres of developed parkland is expensive to acquir�, develop, operate, and maintain. As a result, the community may be forced, for financial reasons, to accept a lower LOS standard. In any event, *�° r'��� adopti� LOS standards for all the services and facilities � the C� provides se-#�a��sa� would help it: 1) evaluate how well it is serving �s existing residents, and 2) determine how many new facilities will have to be constructed to service new growth and development. Concurrency In addition to mandating that a Capital Facilities chapter be included in comprehensive plans, the GMA also introduced the concept of concurrency. In general terms, concunence describes the situation where adequate and necessary public services and facilities are available "concurrent" with the impacts of new development, or within a specified time thereafter. Concunency has two levels of applicability. The first is at the planning level and refers to all services and facilities, over the long term, and at the citywide scale. Planning level concurrency is what this chapter is all about. It inventories all existing facilities and services, establishes a LOS standazd for each, estimates new facility requirements to accommodate projected growth, and develops a financing plan that identifies the revenues necessary to pay for all the new facilities. If the necessary revenues are not available, then the jurisdiction fails the planning level concurrency test and must take appropriate action. Those actions include lowering the LOS standard, raising taxes, restricting growth, or a combination of these actions. This chapter satisfies the planning level concurrency requirement as outlined in the GMA. The second level of concurrency analysis is project specific and only required for transportation facilities. Specifically, the GMA (RCW 36.70A. 070[6e]) states: "...local jurisdictions must adopt and enforce ordinances which prohibit development approval if the development causes the level of service on a transportation facility to decline below the standards adopted in the transportation element of the comprehensive plan, unless transportation improvements or strategies to accommodate the impacts of development are made concurrent with the development." Revised �998 2UO2 �_2 � � ��� � :� � � � � � � � � � � That same section goes on say that "concurrent with the development" shall mean that improvements or strategies are in place at the time of development, or that a financial commitment is in place to complete the improvements or strategies within six years. To satisfy the project level concurrency requirement, the last section of t� chapter three, Transportation , , contains a concurrency management discussion. � As mentioned previously, project level concurrency is only required for transportation system facilities. However, the � ' ' � WashinQton State Office of Communitv Development's interpretation (WAC 365-195- 86A{�}070 3 states that, "...concurrence should be sought with respect to public facilities � in addition to transportation facilities. The list of such additional facilities should be locally defined." This section goes on to say that � local iurisdictions may fashion their own regulatory responses. "* *��° ^^�^*,''�° �'�*�� ^� , � ^�� *�� �';*�, -��•, �_,�^* *^ ^ �;a�r ;^ *�� �.�,�°, In 2001, the Citv hired a consultant to � prepare a Traffic Impact Fee and Concurrencv Mana�ement Svstem. The study is expected to be completed'--• �'°�"� in the Sprins of 2003. � � � 'T""� �="�^ °"^���°'Local jurisdictions plannin� under the GMA are authorized to assess impact fees for development activitv as part of financin� for public facilities, such as parks, transportation, and schools. T* ' ', *'� ' * * ��+''° �°^ + nr�+<srfl� r�ov :4a nl�nrn .+ftl+n irn nn4 �n r»}�lin f ni�i4ino_ - o Impact fees must be based on an adopted capital facilities plan. In addition, the collected fees must be used for projects that are reasonablv related to and will reasonably benefit the development paying the fees. The fees must also be used within a specified time from the date they were collected or returned to the payee. ,'Impact fees sax-e�}� �. ,� + •.• + +�, ,. � ,� � + �-�, + �, o,� ±,. .. ::s : n v 'cs „ j . +' + .i � 41, ,.L,o �.lin4i., ie_��t,.�ll. .;.7;,, a � � . .. mav be imposed for svstem improvement costs previouslv incurred to the extent that new �rowth and development will be served by the previouslv constructed improvements provided thev not be imposed to make up for any svstem improvement deficiencies. To impose an impact fee program, the City must have a plan in place to make up any existing system deficiencies. � Countywide Planning Policies � � Revised �9A9 � � FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities Impact Fees The Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) originally adopted in 1992, and amended in 1994, contain a number of goals and policies regarding capital facilities and the provision of urban services. Those relevant CWPPs are the following: vi� � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities COl Jurisdictions shall identify the full range of urban services and how they plan to provide them. CO2 Jurisdictions and other urban service providers shall provide services and manage natural resources efficiently, through regional coordination, conjunctive use of resources, and sharing of facilities. Interjurisdictional planning efforts shall evaluate approaches to share and conserve resources. CO3 Service provision shall be coordinated to ensure the protection and preservation of resources in both �Rural aAreas and in areas that are developing, while addressing service needs within areas currently identified for growth. C04 All jurisdictions acknowledge the need to develop a regional surface water management system fi� which crosses jurisdictional boundaries and identifies and prioritizes program elements and capital improvements necessary to accommodate growth and protect the natural and built environment. The GMPC shall develop and recommend a financing and implementation strategy to meet this need. COS Water supply shall be regionally coordinated to provide a reliable economic source of water and to provide mutual aid to and between all agencies and purveyors. The region should work toward a mechanism to address long-term regional water demand needs of agencies and water purveyors. C07 Water reuse and reclamation shall be encouraged, especially for large commercial and residential developments and for high water users such as parks, schools, golf courses, and locks. CO10 In the �Urban aArea identified for growth within the next ten years, urban water and sewer systems are preferred for new construction on existing lots and shall be required for new subdivisions. However, existing septic systems, private wells, and/or small water systems may continue to serve the developments so long as densities and physical conditions are appropriate, the systems are allowed by the relevant jurisdictions, and management keeps the systems operating properly and safely. C013 Urban sewer system extensions in unincorporated King County shall be permitted consistent with the provisions of the King County Sewerage General Plan, Countywide �g Policies, and the policies of the jurisdiction in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. FW13 Cities are the appropriate provider of local urban services to �Urban aAreas, either directly or by contract. Counties are the appropriate provider of most countywide services. Urban services shall not be extended through the use of special purpose districts without approval of Revised �998 2002 � L.J � � � � � � � � vi-a � � � � FWCP — Chaater Six, Capital Facilities the city in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. � Within the �tUrban aArea, as time and conditions warrant, cities should assume local urban services provided by special purpose districts. L� � � FW32 Public capital facilities of a Countywide or Statewide nature shall be sited to support the Countywide land use pattern, support economic activities, mitigate environmental impacts, provide amenities or incentives, and minimize public costs. Amenities or incentives shall be provided to neighborhoods/jurisdictions in which facilities are sited. Facilities must be prioritized, coordinated, planned, and sited through an interjurisdictional process established by the GMPC, or its successor. LU29 All jurisdictions shall develop growth-phasing plans consistent with applicable capital facilities plans to maintain an �Urban aArea served with adequate public facilities and services to meet at least the six-year intermediate household and employment target ranges consistent with LU67 and LU68. These growth phasing plans shall be based on locally adopted definitions, service levels, and financing commitments, consistent with State GMA requirements. T'he phasing plans for cities shall not extend beyond their potential annexation areas. Interlocal agreements shall be developed that specify the applicable minimum zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation for the potential annexation areas. LU30 Where urban services cannot be provided within the next 10 years, jurisdictions should develop policies and regulations to: � ■ Phase and limit development such that planning, siting, ��e� densi and infrastructure decisions will support future urban development when urban services become available. ■ Establish a process for converting land to urban densities and uses once services are available. Funding/Financing � Typically, cities and the residents they service would like to have higher LOS standards than they can afford. Federal Way has worked hard to provide the highest LOS possible without raising taxes. It is a difficult balance to maintain and the City is currently at a ��, point where it may have to consider raising additional revenues to pay for capital facilities and the associated maintenance and operations costs. If the City decides to generate additional revenues, there are several sources available. Some of these revenues are "on-going" in the sense that the City levies the tax and the revenues are added to the City's general fund on an annual basis. On-going revenues include property t�es, sales taxes, utility taxes, impact fees, and business and occupation t�es. The other category of funds a�s is called "one time" funds because the City cannot � Revised �990 2002 VI-5 � � FWCP — Chaater Six, Capital Facilities count on having these funds available on an annual basis. These funds include bond sales and grants such as, T'EA-21, IAC, and Urban Arterial Fund money. On-going funds can be used for either capital facil;ties or maintenance and operations. 'riowever, it is prudent financial management and adopted City policy that one-time funds be used only for capital improvements. As is discussed later in this chapter, the City proposed two bond issues to finance capital facilities in the Fall of 1995. As part of that bond issue, voters were asked to approve a permanent utility t� to pay for the maintenance and operations costs associated with the new capital facilities. 6.1 SURFACE WATER Inventory of Existing Facilities Natural Systems The Federal Way area consists of two major drainage basins, the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound. T'he Hylebos Creek Basin consists of the West Branch Hylebos Creek, East Branch Hylebos Creek, and the Lower Hylebos Creek Sub-Basins. The Lower Puget Sound Basin consists of the North Lower, Central Lower, and South Lower Puget Sound Sub-Basins. Map VI-1(maps are located at the end of the chapter) dess�b�s shows the planning area boundary, and ', ' boundaries. Map YI-2 shows the major features of the natural system. The natural systems have been reviewed on a sub-basin level. This sub-basin information is contained in the City's Comprehensive Surface Water Facility Plan. Man-Made System As part of its 1994 Surface Water Facilities Plan, the City completed an inventory of the stormwater drainage trunk system. There are ten major trunk lines in the system, and one can find more details about their capacity and location in the Surface Water Plan. The City has made a significant number of improvements to the manmade system since incorporation in 1990. Most of the projects completed to date corrected existing localized flooding problems. As a result of resolving these "spot" problems, the City and its surface water utility have significantly improved the LOS on a system-wide basis. The City has gone to a regional system for detention/retention of surface water. Several regional detention/retention facilities have been, or will be, constructed to handle stormwater runoff. However, individual developments must treat stormwater on site prior to releasing it to the regional system. System Capacity As part of the Surface Water Facilities Plan, the City developed a model of its surface water facilities, including the natural part of the system, the various lalces, streams, and wetlands. This model uses the following design or LOS standards: Revised �999 2002 � � � � !� � � �� �- � � � � � � � � Based on model results, utility engineers annually update a detailed �8 10-yeaz capital facilities plan. The plan identifies projects, prioritizes them, estimates the cost, and re- examines the utility rate structure to ensure that there is sufficient funding available over the next �8 1.0 years to construct these projects (Table VI-1, at the end of the chapter). Locations and Capacities of Future Facilities � Table VI-1 includes the surface water facilities project list. For more complete discussion of this list, and maps describing project locations, please refer to Chapter IV of the City's Comprehensive Surface Water Plan. As noted earlier, these projects address existing system deficiencies as well �as the new facilities that will be needed to accommodate projected growth. Finance Pian � �' � � Revised �998 2002 FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities ■ 25-year storm conveyance capacity on lateral systems; ■ 25-year storm conveyance capacity on major trunk systems; ■ 25-year storm storage capaciTy in local retention/ detention facilities; and ■ 100-year storm storage capability in regional retention/detention facilities. Based on these LOS standards and the data on existing facilities, the model helps utility engineers identify deficiencies in the existing system and the most cost effective way to resolve them. The model also allows engineers to describe the new facilities that will be needed in the future to accommodate new growth and development as outlined in the Land Use chapter. Forecast of Future Needs The City has created a surface water utility to manage stormwater drainage, prevent flooding, and improve water quality. The City charges property owners an annual surface water fee, which is based upon the amount of impervious surface on the property. These fees, along with any outside grant monies and low interest loans, provide the revenues that pay for capital facilities projects, and operation and maintenance of its surface water system. As outlined in Table VI-1, projects are scheduled based on anticipated revenues. The capital facilities spreadsheet indicates project scheduling based on available funding and priority ranking. The City annually updates the capital facilities plan for surFace water. The Comprehensive Surface Water Plan, which includes the capital facilities plan, is adopted by reference in this plan, including changes made during the City's annual update. vi-i � � FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities 6.2 TRANSPORTATION The GMA requires that local jurisdictions prepare a transportation chapter as part of the Federal Wav Comprehensive Plan F( WCP). 'The GMA also authorizes jurisdictions to assess impact fees for transportation system improvements that are necessary to accommodate the traffic created by the new development. In order to assess impact fees, the capital facilities plan must include the list of transportation improvements and associated costs that necessitate the impact fees. Discussion related to Transportation- related capital facilities can be found in FWCP Chapter 3, Transportation. . „. r . . . � !TR'1�r'�':T[ � 3*�� 3�'T_"�3'TS i F� ��T� `��-r.�r���i►_��-i-�i���i-ri Y. - - • ��1 _ � • _ � � � � � Y. • - _ = - ' _ - " _ ' - -- C�rei+r�� �f C� ��� �re Aleei+l� • • - . �1� ,1_ 'r,- ' _ _ _ _ _ - = - - - •. • � - - . .. ... Y. Y � - �� I li Y. - - - - _ - ' ' ' �""'�.....�ii�/ Revised �9 12�02 � � � � � � � V�� � � TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities C.t�1MM/►�N/'7 DIf'�M � � � Y � 6.3 PARKS AND RECREATION Inventory of Existing Facilities The City of Federal Way adopted the first Park, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan in December of 1991. The City updated the Plan in 1995 (�isl� .,,�� .,a,,,,+va w., ,.o� ,. „.t,;� ,.i.,,,� and 2000 'r�,o �nnn n�.,., .,,;» �.e .o.,;o.,,ea ., ,..,,+ ' This plan, which is now called the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Services Plan is incorporated by reference. The planning area of the 1991 and 1995 Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan included both the Federal Way City limits and the Potential Annexation Area (PAA). The boundaries changed in the 2000 Parks Plan and are based only on the City limits of Federal Way. As in previous plans, the � Parks Plan has been subdivided into subareas, referred to as Park Plannin� Areas, (Map -T� YI-3 for purposes of long-range planning. The -�-�I-S 2002 Parks Plan update�s the inventory to include new parks added to the City's system. In addition to City-owned parks and open space, the �888 Parks Plan also lists school district, state, and county facilities, as well as private recreation facilities. Map VI-4 d�ssr�s depicts the location of major parks and open space within the Federal Way planning area. Table �3 VI-2 summarizes this inventory as of January �A89 2002. Table � VI-2 of Eaisting City Parks-and Recreation Areas Land 4�:9 rk Land �-S�:A 'ederal Wav 836.8 Revised �999 2002 � � � � i � � � � � � VI-10 �� � , � FWCP — Cha�ter Six. Capital Facilities � � � � When the City incorporated in 1990, there were approximately eight acres of parkland available per 1,000 population in Federal Way. Since that time, the City has purchased additional property and developed new facilities. These include the Lake Killarney Open Space Park Heritage Woods Neighborhood Park Wedgewood Nei�hborhood Park, BPA Trail I, II, and III, purchase of the Armstron� property, Lake Klahanee Community Senior Center, Dumas Bay Centre , Celebration Park, and Steel Lake Annex facilities. These parks and facilities are described in greater detail in the �''� Parks, ' , Plan. 'r"° , °o, °�a � ooc n� t, a t� •a • t t f o „f � � i., ,.o,. � nnn_,,,,..,,:.,r;,,,. :,, T> »��� c r � r r +i,o �;,�. „„,� � n n, As of -�9-9-9 2002, the City is s�� providing � 10.1 acres of parks land per 1,000 population. The City's goal is to achieve a level of service of 10.9 as Federal Way grows in population and size. - � In addition to acquiring and developing new facilities, the City has taken administrative actions to take advantage of other available public recreational facilities. The City enacted interlocal agreements with the School District to jointly operate and maintain school recreational facilities. As a result, the City jointly operates and maintains a major � community park in conjunction with Saghalie Junior High School. Also, the City has agreements to provide recreational programs and schedule play fields at several elementary schools, in addition to junior high schools. These facilities are now formally ` available nights and weekends, year around for use by local residents. As referenced above, City residents now have access to � 10.1 acres of parks and open � space per 1,000 population. This inventory includes City owned parks and open space within the City limits. The City currentiv provides 846 acres of park land, which the City maintains and operates. Of the tota1846 acres, 493.5 acres is developed for recreational � use areas and 352.5 acres is still undeveloped. Note: Washington State Parks has a regional park facilitv within the Citv limits which residents often use. Dash Point State Park is 230 acres of state land which provides a regional (statewide) recreation use for camping swimming picnicking, walking trails, and beachfront. The state park land is not � included in the Citv's LOS simplv because the state owns, operates, and maintains this facili . For the purposes of parks planning, the recommended LOS standard in the City's Parks Plan and this Capital Facilities chapter is 10.9 acres of City owned parkland per � 1,000 population. � Revised �998 2002 VI-11 � � FWCP — Chapter Six, Capital Facilities Forecast of Future Needs T'he 2000 Parks, Plan states that when future annexations occur, the inventory of public open space land will maintain the City's current level of service until the year 2010. In addition, the City completed a cultural arts survey in 1994. The survey evaluated several alternatives for a performing arts center and concluded that at some time in the near future, the City would need such a facility with a capacity of about �89 1,000 seats. The City has converted a portion of Dumas Bay Centre into the Knutzen Family Theatre, a 250-seat civic theater facility. This facility will begin to fulfill the identified community need for a performing arts center. locations & Capacities of Future Facilities Map �S VI-4 indicates the location of the parks, recreation facilities, and open space subareas the City will need to maintain the adopted LOS. The Parks Plan breaks the planning area into subareas and addresses future facilities at the subarea level. For more details about the type, size, and cost of these new facilities, please refer to the �8A8 2002 Park , ' , ' Plan. Finance Plan Table -u�4 VI-3 (Parks Six-Year Capital Improvements Plan, 2002-2007) describes the proposed parks projects that will be needed between now and the year 2012, together with cost estimates programmed by year. Table -Tr�4 VI-3 also identifies the revenues that will be available during the same time period to finance these new facilities. Please refer to Section VII (Capital Improvement Plan) of the �89A 2002 City of Federal Way Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan for detailed information on the finance plan. T'he City annually updates its Parks & Recreation capital improvements program. T'hese updates reflect new project priorities, eliminate projects that have been completed, and add new projects to the program. 6.4 Community Facilities Significant community investments have been made in the last 10 years to implement the community's vision for Federal Way. In addition to the investments in the surface water transportation, and parks areas, the City also acquired and improved a basic set of community facilities to house City overations and�rovide space for communitv atg herings and recreation. Revised 2899 2002 � � � � � � � � �� � �� `� vi—t2 � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Sa, Capital Facili6es The City acquired the current City Hall, Klahanee Communitv/Seniar Center, and Dumas � Bav Center (a conference and retreat facilitv) in 1993. Strong local support in community recreation and arts activities translated into the co,,;,,,. �o„+o,- ;,, , ooz +�.o City Council's adoption of a 2% For the Arts ordinance to � � provide funding for arts in public places in 1994, and the construction of a the 254-seat Knutzen Family Theatre in 1998. I - - - _ - - - = r ? - - - •�. •�� � � � � � � � � Revised 2899 2002 � VI-13 CAPITAL FACILITIES � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities Table T�I-3 � � � � � Revised �g0g � VI-15 � FWCP — Chapter Six, Capital Facilities r;,�,�� ;,,,.,,,.,,,,,..,*;,,,, :,, � oon. Since 1995, the City brou�ht a number of contracted services in-house to meet public demand for more responsive and responsible �overnment services. Among these services �vere the formation of the Federal Wav Police Department (1996), street maintenance operations (1998), and the municipal court 2( 000)• These changes brought different levels of demand on public facilities and the need for a comprehensive community facilities plan. Inventory of Existing Facilities As of January 2000, the City owns or occupies a number of facilities, as shown in Table -TLI-3 YI-4 and Map ��rVl-S. Projected Community Needs • - - Y. - � � � � T'he City has identified a number of facilities to help deliver services more efficiently and adjust to the chan�in� demo�raphics of this communitv in the future. These proiected needs are beyond the City's ability to fund within the six-year plannin� horizon. However, in order to keep the community's vision alive, we purposelv did not exclude any of these community proiects. The City Council will periodicallv review and prioritize these projects and provide funding when available. A description of these facilities with a summary list is provided in Table VI-5. Table �-S VI-4 Summary of Existing Community Facilities Building Name Own/Leased Use Sg. ft/Occupancy � � �� � �.J � � � � � � City Hall Own City operations not otherwise 27,180/�8110 FTE and Public Safety (3 locations) Municipal Court listed Leased Police Operations Leased Court Operations Council Chamber �5-08A�148 23,000/150 FT'E �588 6.700/11.75 FTE and 2 courtrooms Revised �098 2002 � VI-16 � � � LJ � FWCP — Chaater Six, Capital Facilities Building Name Own/Leased Use Sq. ft/Occupancy � Kiahanee Own Community recreation and Rec. 11,200/13 FT'E, gym, kitchen, Community/ Senior operations etc. Center � � �� J � LJ � � � � � � � . - Revised 28AB 2002 Steel Lake Annex Own Steel Lake Own Maintenance Shop Dumas Bay Center Own DBC Knutzen Family Own Theater at DBC Miscellaneous Leased Outdoor Storage Daycare, arts and crafts programs 1,161/program only Maintenance operarions, outdoor �8-59 1,060 officel�-S 32 FTE equipment and material storage 61,000 storage yard Public park, meeting/banquet/ overnight lodging 6 meeting rooms, 70 overnight rooms, 12 acre park ground 254 seats performing arts theatre and rehearsal hall Street maintenance material and pazk equipment storage 10,000 material storage 2,000 equipment storage Miscellaneous Indoor Leased Spare office equipment/facility 260 sf. ft. Storage parts/records �8 2,160 cubic ft boxes stored offsite in a document stora�e facility Table �6 VI-S Projected Community Facility Needs 2001— 2010 -r;,..,, ,.��,,,.;�;.., �� � Gss€ �f f��ens} . �AA� �9 �9 _. �,r.,;,,*e,,.,.,,.o �,,;.arh, �AA4' �Z � �� �� �. r•,,,,,,,,,,,,;«.. �o,,.o,. �A9-� 45-AA8 $s1 . �88-'� �3A8 � . �88� �5�589 $�3 -�-ttrb �� Type of Facility Ye�. Size Cost s�f millions 1. Municipal Facility: Public Safety and 2�4 109,000 $28.5 General Gov't Operations 2. Senior Center " ` ' `6 20,000 $4.5 3. Community Center ` 6 45,000 $17.5 4. Indoor Competitive Sports Facility 2009 75,000 $10.0 5. Performin� Arts Centre 2010 50,000 $25.0 6. Maintenance Facility 2010 90,000 vard � 5 3,500 office 7. Other Misc. Improvements $250k per year $1.2 TOTAL $91.2 VI-17 � � FWCP — Chaoter Sa. Capital Facilities . .. , Municipal Fqcility (General Government. Police, and Court Operations) The '�''�'� Federal Way Police Department was formed and began full service on November 16, 1996. The department ,,,�,,,,*eo,.� .,* *�,o o„a „f � o00 „a ; e..+�.. .. � grew from 110 full time equivalent (FTE) employees in 1996 to 150 FTE emplovees and over 90 volunteers in 2002. The department occupies 23,000 square feet of leased space in three separate buildings, i: iix^oia��i3�Sl��S�&��6�35 �� w�S� W&��6E4�tk' 6�ii� AT...+1, D .o..:....+� .�,..i .+., ' ' ' ' . in an office/warehouse comvlex near City Hall. The current spatial requirement for the department is believed to be approximately 26,000 square feet. The Municipal Court s��-i�s began operations on January 4� 2000. �V1t �,>„ ,.,.,,,a-..,,.,..,� .,,,a ,.e,.,,,-a� �+,,,..,,.o �,,....o„+��, .�,e ae.,.,..►.Y, . ti �n ��> > + a • � .. ..............> � ..... .... �...w.� . � The department has 13 FTE employees operatin� two courtrooms. Currentiv, the department occupies 6,700 square feet of modified office space adjacent to the police facility. ' ' . The court caseload in 2002 indicated that a third courtroom, lar�er lobbv, and small meetin� rooms are needed. The current spatial requirement is estimated to be around 9,000 square feet. � • - �. - � - - - , � � r. - - _ - - - - - �� Additional space will also be needed for general government operations to accommodate the increased services and overall �rowth of the City. A preliminarv program-level assessment indicates that the current Citv Hall will need around 35,000 square feet, versus the 27,000 square feet available. The City has $7.5 million set aside for the police and court facility. Currently, $4.5 million in �eneral obli�ation bonds are financed bv a 0.5 percent utilitv tax, interest earnin�s from bond proceeds, and additional contributions from �eneral fund savings. Both police and court leases will expire in June 2004 without an extension. The Citv Council has appointed a citizen committee to review the current and projected spatial needs and developmenbfinancin� options. Based on a preliminarv analvsis, it appears that the additional cost can be financed by extending the 0.5 percent utilitv tax after the initial $4.5 million bonds are paid off. Revised �A99 2002 � � i�3 � lJ � � � � � � �J � VI-18 � � � � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities � Municipal Facility Need Assessments • 40,000 — 45,000 square �^^*�� feet additional space in the near term, and � 80 000 to 85,000 square feet bv 2020 in addition to the existin� City Hall • ��g� Four to five-acre site �� � . T, � + � +• „ „� eu n +,, e, n n ,,,;tu� Preliminarv development cost for a facilitv to accommodate the Citv's lon�-term needs is proiected to be approximatelv $20 million to $30 million � Maintenance Facility � The Parks and Public Works maintenance facility is located at 31132 28�' Avenue South. The entire site is approximately � 1.4 acres, with 1060 square feet of office space and a 61,000 square foot fenced stora�e yard. The site was �exs� formerly a fire station � and was transferred to the City after incorporation. Today, the old fire station office and meeting room areas house the operations and the fire truck maintenance bay_ a� �The yard provides materials, supplies, vehicles, and equipment storage for � departmental operations. Parks Maintenance operates seven days a week, two shifts per day. T'he space needed for � the maintenance operations includes a front counter/reception area, crew quarters �including an area for daily time cards, breaks, and crew meetings/training, etc.�, as well as a locker room Public Works streets and surface � water maintenance operations have simiIar needs for office space; ' ' '� rvrit-envovnxPi= 1� .1 '+1. �' 1.7 TI� D 1�1' UU 4 �.+tor.�++..o �++�+o+�.�tinrL..l�..� 1��.�00 r aa •.• � ,� , • t ,� +�, ,,,,��;� n„�,�;�_�x�,,,.v° operatesing ^:o: ,^;o„ uvo -r � ------ r --- ------ "------ ------ --- -------- - - .._ _ ..., ___ .. ..-'- Monday through Friday, year round �# one shift eQ r day Both Parks and Public Works ;� maintenance operations tend to intensifv during the summer months and require up to 15 part-time, seasonal workers at any �iven time. � T„ �nnn +�,o �,.;r,h, �,.,� .,..,,,.,,�;,,,.,+a�.. �n nQn �e 61,000 square feet of ses�e� storage a� yard space is needed to accommodate�25 vehicles and 45 various types of mobile equipment. , The limited space provides only � minimum storage s�ace and restrict�s the turning radius �e of the large equipment and vehicles used for these operations. To meet this challenge, the City }s leas�ges off-site indoor and outdoor storage space for � equipment a� emergency supplies, and materials for snow and ice operations. Although there are existing drawbacks and constraints �, the site ��s�ie� � � is adequate for existing purposes when supplemented b3� with leased storage spaces. Future expansion e�e--s�t� is possible t#�eagl� with the acquisition of adjacent properties �s�ss� to the north. However, this facility is located in a residential neighborhood and the compatibility of a larger maintenance facility should be evaluated � before making any additional long-term investments on the site. � Revised �899 2(1�0 VI-19 � � FWCP — Cha�ter Six. Capital Facilities A larger facility � would improve operation efficiencies by increasing storage capacity for vehicles, equipment, and materials. A maintenance yard space of approximately �AAB 90,000 square feet is recommended . Maintenance Facility Recommendation • 3,500 square feet for office space, accompanied bv a�BAA 90,000 square foot storage �as� yard •�--3 Three to five acre site • Development cost is estimated at $2 million Community Center Based on current trends in community center construction and �#e increased participation "� in the City's recreational programs, a larger, multi-purpose facility would better meet the needs of the community. A number of community centers that have been s���� built throughout the region � recent� ��have �se a variety of uses and spasetial arrangements. These facilities attract a large customer base a� projectin� community pride and quality of life images that distinguish them from the surrounding communities. Some of the more notable examples are the Gcenters at Norpointe, Kent, Tukwila, and Renton. r. , ��� ��� . r. While Klahanee Lake Community/Senior Center serves existing community and senior services needs, the limited parking and the size of the facility continue to restrain the nature and type of uses possible. A larger communitvi center similar to those listed above would cost approximately $17.5 million; includin� land acquisition, site work, parking lot, desi�n and en in� eerin�, permit, utility connection, construction, building furnishings, and equipment. Community Center Facility Recommendation • 45,000 square foot facility •�-S Three to five acre site • Development cost assumption � $17.5 million Revised �999 2002 �] � � � u � � � � �J � vi-2o � l� � � 4� FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities Senior Center The general population continues to age as the "baby boomer" generation moves toward � the senior citizen category. Population projections indicate that the senior (55+) age group will be the fastest growing segment of our citizenry for the foreseeable future. Keeping this in mind, the City � recognizes �l�ii�a� the need to increase its � focus on provideing facilities and services geared to the needs and interests of e�ie� �sid�s this segment of the population. LJ � The existing facility could be transformed into a very functional senior center with only minor modifications. The growth demand for senior facilities could be met if it is used exclusive� for this the purpose. The gym could be fitted with a divider that would provide increased flexibility for programming and then be retracted for large events such as bazaars and dances. While keeping and turnin� KLCSC ���g-� into a senior-only facility is achievable � at a minimum cost, the facility's restrictive parking se�� and lack of public transportation service remains an issue . There is considerable interest from the communitv in a larger, more accessible senior center that � could be developed as part of a future communitvi center or other public facility(s). Proiected cost includes equipment, fixtures, and furniture. u � � LJ � � Senior Center Facility Recommendation • -��89 20,000 square foot facility � �;*e =-_--�-�� . vo ..,+;,,,, ,.,,�++,. ;��;,,,. � ,.;�;�.. • Collocate with community center or other public facility • $4.5 million, construction only Conference/Performing Arts Center In 1994, the City of Federal Way, through the Arts Commission, asked AMS Planning and Research to conduct a feasibility study of a cultural arts facility to serve the City. Under the guidance of a 27-member steering committee, AMS conducted a survey of local arts organizations, analysis of existing cultural and meeting facilities, market research with residents of the City and surrounding communities, interviews with key community leaders representing government and business, and meetings and workshops with the steering committee, all of iv#is�� whom provided base information. T'he study recommended a performing arts center to seat 1,000 patrons and a visual arts gallery. The �89A-s�a� performing arts center proposed in this study included design criteria that � incorporated multi-level seating to accommodate a�-€ev� as 500 — 600 people on an orchestra level a� while still achiev�ing intimacy for audiences. � Revised �999 2002 v�-2� l__.1 � FWCP — Chaoter Sa. Capital Facilities The construction cost for a performing arts theater was estimated in the 1994 report to be between $190 –$240 per square foot, or approximately $23 million for construction on1y. Site requirements called for a minimum of five acres; two acres for the facility and three acres to provide for surface parking and to meet additional code requirements. The full developmental cost is expected to be $25 to $30 million. Maintenance and operation costs for fi�s-s��e-e€ a facility of this size were estimated to be $705,000 per year. �1��� Proiected revenues �ej�st��� usin a 171 event day schedule� was $390,200, leaving a net operating cost of $314,800 to be generated through fundraising or an operating endowment. Conference/Performing Arts Facility Recommendation • �9 5�000 square foot facility • � Two-acre site • $�3 $25 – $30 million Multi�urpose Competitive Sports Center � � � � �� � � � � The City of Federal Way enacted a 1% lodging tax and formed the Lodging Tax Advisorv Committee (LTAC) in 1999 to promote and enhance the local tourism industrv. The committee has commissioned a feasibilitv studv for an indoor competitive sports facility that will increase visitors' stav in local hotels and comvlement the Aquatic Center and Celebration Park, two other re�ionaUnational amateur snorts facilities in the Citv. A number of development concepts have been considered, one of which is a facilitv for basketball and volleyball tournaments with an athletic club for training/conditioning to generate on-�oin� usa�e and revenue. One of the considerations for such a facility would be its abilitv to be financiallv self-sustainin�. It would also ideallv be developed and operated by the private sector, with minimum or no public participation. Conference/Performin� Arts Facilitv Recommendation -__ 75,000 square foot facility • Five-acre site •$8 –$10 million development and construction onlv, to be funded bv private developer Financing Plan `x� �It is desirable to have all theses facilities in the community , as soon as possible. However, unless they are funded with et�g� private or voter-approved funding sources, the City's projected revenues will not support either the development or the required operating and on-going maintenance of these facilities. Therefore, other than Revised 2AA9 2002 � � � � � � � � vi—z2 � � � � FWCP — Chaater Six, Capitaf Facilities i� a permanent �public �Ssafety �facility, �which is substantially fur�ded�, � ��� additional space for �eneral City operations is subject to resource availability includin� a potential continuation of the 0.5 percent utility tax, °�� r°m°;^;^^ f^:';+;°° °�° � l_ _� � � � � , i � � � � r. - • - The CiTy updates its capital improvements program every other year in conjunction with its biennial budget process. These updates will reflect new project priorities and funding availability. 6.4.1 SCHOOL FACILITIES This section summarizes information in the Federal Way School District No. 210, , °T °°� 2001/02 Capital Facilities Plan (School Plan) and adopts the School Plan by reference. This plan covers the entire Federal Way School District which includes the City of Federal Way, portions of the incorporated City of Kent, City of Des Moines, and unincorporated areas of King County to the east of Interstate 5. The District provides educational programs to all students who live in the School District service area, whether they live in Federal Way, Kent, Des Moines, or unincorporated King County. A school outside the Federal Way City limits may provide service to students who live within the City limits and vice versa. Inventory of Existing Facilities Map VI-6 shows the location of every school in the District. Table -i� YI-6 summarizes the District's student capacity. The District has sufficient capacity in the existing schools and portable buildings to house all of the students in the District. Program Capacity The School District has established a Standard of Service, similar to LOS, for itself, � which it calls "program capacity." The District's program capacity is based on: 1) the number of students per classroom; 2) the number of classrooms per school; 3) the number of classes that can be held in each classroom per day; and 4) other operational conditions. � � J Revised �999 2002 VI-23 � � FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities Table -T�--� VI-6 Summary of Existing Facilities Capacities* � 2000 �eea �eA� �ee� �ee� �eea �ees CAPACITY Actual 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 „� „� „� „� ,,� Elementary School 11,131 11,105 11,079 11,053 11,027 I1,001 I1,001 Junior High 4,721 4,'721 4,721 4,721 4,721 4,721 5,521 A ��-ii� ^,-,-'� 4�48 4 b g g Senior High 4,325 4,325 4,625 6,095 6,095 6,095 6.095 ' °�°°"r , °-.�° : �A �A �� 3� �8 TOTAL 20,177 20,151 20,425 21,869 21,843 21.817 22,617 'NOTE: These capacities are for buildings only and do not include portable classrooms. These capacities aze based on the maximum use oF the buildings. Program Capacity assumes that the average class will serve the following numbers of students: Grade K 24 Students per classroom Grades 1-6 26 Students per classroom Grades 7-12 25 Students per classroom GATE* 25 Students per classroom Special Education 12 Students per classroom Portables 25 Students per classroom IEP* * 15 Students per classroom ' GA1'E is the Gifted and Talented Education program •s IEP are the Individual Education Programs The School District uses portables at many school sites as an interim measure to house new students until permanent facilities can be built. There are other administrative measures that the School District could use to increase school capacity. These measures may include double shifting, modified school calendar, and year-round schooling. These measures have been used in the District on a limited basis, but not District wide. Forecast of Future Needs - Student Forecasts The School District's . Revised 2889 2002 � � iJ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � VI-24 � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities � � � ' � � � � � � � � � � � Revised �A99 2002 � Business Services Department prepares a forecast of student enrollment annually. Projections are detailed at various levels� district total, school-building totals, and Qrade level totals Special populations such as vocational students special education students, and English as Second Lan�uage students are also included in the forecast. The basis for proiections has been cohort survival analvsis. Cohort survival is the analysis of a�roup that has a common statistical value (�rade level) as it progresses through time. In a stable population the cohort would be 1.00 for all grades. This analysis uses historical information to develop avera�es and project the averages forward. The District uses this method with varying of historv and wei�hting factors to study several proiections Because transfers in and out of school svstem are common, student migration is factored into the analvsis as it increases or decreases survival rates. Entry grades (kindergarten) are a unique problem in cohort analvsis. T'he District collects information on birth rates within the District's census tracts and treats these statistics as a cohort of kinder�arten for the appropriate enrollment years. Long-rang proiections that establish the need for facilities are a modification of the cohort survival method. The cohort method becomes less reliable the farther out the proiections are made. The School District studv of lon�-range projections includes information from jurisdictional planners and demo�raphers as thev proiect future housin� and population in the re�ion. Table -T� VI-7 describes increased enrollment through the year �&S 2006. It shows that the School District's student population will grow steadily every yeaz with the highest growth in junior high/middle schools. The District has compared existing school capacity with growth forecasts. New construction, modernization and expansion, and additional portable purchases will mitigate the deficit in permanent capacity for the next six years. As an outcome of recommendations from a Study and Survey Committee, the Board of Directors has approved moving to a middle school grade configuration as additional high school space allows. The District is planning to add one middle school, one high school, increase capacity at three high schools, and replace the existing Harry S. Truman High SchooL VI-25 Table � VI-7 Federal Way School District Student Forecast � FWCP — Chaoter Six, Capital Facilities Location and Capacity of New and Improved Schoo! Facilities One new middle school, one new high school, and one senior high school replacement are planned for the District over the next six years. Scheduled improvements are: ■ Harry S. Truman High School (Replacement) 31455 28�' Avenue South ■ Middle School on site to be determined ■ High School #4, site #85, 16`� Avenue South and South 364�' Way Existing schools are identified in Map -V� VI-6. Finance Plan Table � VI-8 describes the School District's six-year finance plan to support the school construction. The table identifies Q''',''��- $25,996,153 available from secure funding sources and an additional $$�3A8 $58,885,000 anticipated from other funding sources between �A88 2001 and �A85 2006 These funds will cover the Q $82,601,092 in planned project costs to the year �S 2006. The School Plan states that state matching funds and impact mitigation fees, if realized, will be used to decrease the need for future bonds or will be used on additional capital fund projects. The School Plan currently covers the years �88A-�99� 2001-2006. The School Plan and accompanying six-year finance plan will be updated annually by the School District. This will bring the plan into full compliance with GMA reyuirements. 6.4.2 WATER SYSTEMS This section summarizes the Lakehaven Utility District's 1998 Comprehensive Water System Plan (Water Plan, incorporated by reference) while providing up-to-date information where warranted. Map -K�� YI-7 shows fi�e Lakehaven Utilitv District's (hereinafter referred to as "the District" in this section) water service area boundary. Other purveyors provide water to portions of the District's corporate area. The Tacoma Public Utilities, for example, serves an area on the west side of the District corporate area. Highline Water District serves a small portion of the north side of the District's corporate area Ma VI-8 . The City of Milton serves a small area on the south side of the District's corporate area that is within the City of Milton limits. Areas on the east side of I-5 within the City limits of Auburn and Pacific �es�i�� are provided water service bv � the District by agreement with the cities. These areas are at a higher elevation than the valley cities can cost effectively serve. Revised �999 2002 � C � � � L � � � � ' � � � �J � � vi—zs � � CHAPTER SIX CAPITAL FACILITIES FWCP — Chapter Six, Capital Facilities Table VI-8 � LJ � L J� , `J � �_J � ' � �� � � � 1. Ihese fees are currendv beina held in a Kin¢ Countv. Citv of Federal Wav, and Citv of Kent impact fee account, and will be available for use bv the District for ' svstem imorovements. 2. These funds come from various sales of land and aze set aside f� estimated exoenditures. 3. These funds will be used for tuture oroiects. 4. These are uroiected fees based uoon lmown residrntial developments in �e District over ibe next six veazs. 5. 7lrcse funds are nroiected state matchina funds. 6. These funds are oroiected land sale income. � 7. These fees represent t6e cost of movin¢ and sitinx existinQ oortables and purchasinQ new portables. The District mav choose to vurchase new pottables in the yeazs shown. This estimate mav also include the cost of purchasins these vortables. 8a ?hese oroiects have been anproved bv the Board of Directors and cover most schools 7'hese aroiects do not increase cauacitv These oroiects include oarldn¢ and vedestrian safetv imvrovements at IS dementarv schools. 8b._These proiects have been aooroved bv t6e Board of Directors and cover most schools. These oroiects do not increase canacitv.l9tese woiects include: school � networks infonnation and libraty systems• new classroom start un• elementarv ulavarounds and hish school saorts fields• music equiomenh and emtreencv communication. 9. New secondarv canacity is t6e middle school comoonent of the bond. This is shown as middle school in the imnact fee calculations. The District is roseazchin¢ small sc600l solutions that will increau caoacitv for studeats in the secondarv arades. 10. Site_purchase for the hivJ� sc600l of 53.2 M was com�lete in the 2000 calendaz year. � 11. Site uurchase for the middle schooUnew secondarv caaacitv, site or sites to be determined. 12. Total exoenditures throu¢6 the 12/31/2000 for the senior hi¢h school is 5752.33I. Revised �998 2002 VI � , � � � The District's we11s, storage, and major components of the distribution system are located on Map VI-9. Other facilities are described in the following sections. Interties Control Facilities � � , Interties connect Lakehaven's system with adjoining systems of other utilities. Interties allow the District to buy or sell water with adjoining utilities and are an essential back up that provides enhanced system reliability. The first of three planned flow control facilities has been constructed where the District will receive water from and send water to the Second Supplv Project (aka Tacoma's Pipeline No. 5). Interties/flow control facilities have been installed at �gk� nine difFerent locations with � four of the adjacent water purveyors. Not all interties allow two-way flow. Details of these interties are described below: ■ An intertie is installed on SW 325�' Street near 35`� Avenue SW between the � District and Tacoma Public Utilities system and serves as an emergency supply to a limited area served by Tacoma in the Twin Lakes nei�hborhood. , ■ An intertie has been installed on SW 349�' Street near 30'�' Avenue SW between the District and Tacoma Public Utilities system. This intertie was enhanced in 1991 by the construction of a control valve station to allow full- ' time supply by Tacoma to the District's system when the District desires water supply supplementation. � , � �, �_ J ' ■ A third intertie with Tacoma Public Utilities was added in 1995 at 15� Avenue SW and SW 356` Street to provide an additional full-time supply by Tacoma to the District's system when water supplv supplementation is desired by the District. ■ A fourth connection with Tacoma's Second Supplv Pipeline at l�` Wav South and South 333'� Street will provide large amounts of water to Lakehaven through its Second Supplv Proiect partnership Lakehaven is planning for an additional connection to the Second Supplv Pipeline east of I-5 near Military Road. ■ One intertie, located on Pacific Highway South at South 276`� Street extended, has been installed between the Lakehaven and Highline Water District s sy tems. This intertie can provide emergency water su 1 to the Highline District. , ■ An intertie between the systems of Highline Water District and #� Lakehaven ��r is installed at Pacific Highway South at about South 274� Street EmerQencv water supply throu�h t�his intertie can flow in either � direction since the systems on both sides of the intertie operate at a 490-foot system head. � Revised �999 2002 FWCP - Chapter Six, Capital Facilities Inventory of Existing Facilities VI-29 ' � FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities ■ An intertie is installed on Marine View Drive near the boundary between Highline Water District and the Lakehaven system at South 252° Street. This intertie can provide emergency water flow in either direction. ■ An intertie has also been constructed with the City of Milton's water system (Pacific Highway South and 377�' Street), but due to significant differences in head between the two systems (450 feet, LUD vs. 330 feet, Milton), water is only provided to Milton on an emergency basis. ■ An intertie is located at `-`R" sStreet NW and Aaby Drive for emergency fire protection to Auburn's Aaby Drive pressure zone. The intertie consists of a six-inch service meter from Lakehaven's 345-pressure zone. The first of three planned flow control facilities (named SSP #2) has been constructed at 1�` Way South and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) power transmission line corridor crossin� at about South 332" Street, at the current easterlv terminus of the Second Supply Project (aka Tacoma's Pipeline No. 5). These facilities are the points at which the District will receive water from and send water to the Second Supply Project. These facilities are somewhat different from "interties," in that the District has different ri�hts to the water that will flow in the pipeline as implied bv the District's financial interest in the Second Supply Project. Forecast of Future Needs The 1998 Comprehensive Water System Plan estimates future need by analyzing existing water consumption patterns on a daily, seasonal, and yearly basis. The District converts gross water consumption values into per capita consumption in gallons per day. Average per capita water consumption in the District was projected to be approximately 106 gallons per day in 1999. This figure, multiplied by projected population growth, provides a rough estimate of the future demand for water. These numbers were reduced slightly to account for the reduction in water consumption associated with the District's water conservation program. Between 1997 and 2017, the water service area population is expected to increase by 41,600 people, for a total water service population of 138,300. Location of Expanded and Improved Facilities The District has programmed a number of system improvements to maintain the existing system, conserve water, develop water sources, drill wells, a��-s�e�ag� and expand the distribution system. These improvements are summarized below. � � �� � i ' � � � � � , � 0 ' � Revised � 2002 VI-30 � , � ' , FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities Second Supply Pipeline The District is currently involved in developing other sources of water. The most � significant effort is the Second Supply ��a Project ( � aka Tacoma's Pipeline No. 5). Based on cunent plans, the District �eu�� will access the pipeline at three locations. ' T'he first , flow control facilitv (to be named SSP #1) is proposed near Military Road and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) �power transmission �line Gcorridor at about South 317�' Street. The second se��st�e� flow control facility (named SSP #2) ��e � has been constructed at the cunent easterlv terminus of the Second Supply Proiect located at First Way South and the BPA corridor crossing at about South 332" Street. �The third se�s�� flow control facility (to be named SSP #3) will be constructed and �d-b� located at SW 356`�' Street and the BPA corridor crossing at 15�' Avenue ' SW (currently named Tacoma Intertie No. 3). These facilities together would add on average, 4.6 million gallons per day (MGD) to the District's supply depending �n the availability of water. Water available from the Second Supply ��a Proiect is � conditioned upon adequate in-stream flows in the Green River. The expansion of storage behind Howard Hans�on Dam will help mitigate the seasonal variation in available water. , � ' � i� ' ' � II u The City should carefully monitor this project's progress to ensure that water will be available to meet future needs as identified in �la� the FWCP. Water Resources � Revised 2890 2002 The District's water service area is located in the southwest ser�� op rtion of King County. As of ^^r:' � n, , °O'' the end of 2001, the District was serving a residential population of approximately �A88 100,000 through �8 26,967 ��±�� connections. The water system includes approximately 458 400 miles of water main, 20 active wells, and 12 storage tanks. The average daily �s demand in 2001 was about � 10.1 MGD. The District's existing water sources are predominately groundwater supplies that originate from four aquifer systems: the Redondo-Milton Channel Aquifer; Minor Lake Aquifer; Eastern Upland Aquifer; and the Federal Way Deep Aquifer. The Water Plan estimates that the combined production limit for these aquifers on an average-annual basis is 10.1 MGD during average precipitation and 9.0 MGD during a simulated 10-year drought. The current peak-day combined pumping capacity is �1-8 30.5 MGD, assumin� the District's lar�est production well, Well 10A, is out of service Since 1991, the District has'�°°^�.g bou ht surface water from Tacoma Public Utilities from time to time to supplement and conserve groundwater supplies. However, since October 2000, the District has not purchased water from the Tacoma Public Utilities because aquifer water levels have sufficientiv recovered. The District will be increasin� its water supply by over 5O nercent when Tacnma's Sec�nd Sunnlv Pineline is comnleted at the erid Of 2004 a.ild the ect water. VI31 ' � FWCP — Chapter Six, Capital Facilities Water Quality Historically, the District has not had to treat its water supplies before distribution. Groundwater quality has generally been sufficient. However, the District be�an a cGhlorination e€�e and conosion control ireatment program in Julv 2001 for all of its groundwater and other sources of supply (for regulatory purposes)_ ' , , • ,,,a.,,��o,. .,,:��, ;...,,,.,+oa .�..,+o,. �.,,,,, �r.,,.,, -ri, e ,.� �x� + •r ,�.., . u � c+vnl�om « •i� n .�4n The District's status with respect to regulated drinking water contaminants covered by the WAC 246-290 and anticipated water quality regulations is summarized in Chapterl0 of the Water Plan. Regulations that are prompting €�e treatment of the District's ground- water supplies are the Lead and Copper Rule, the anticipated Ground Water Rule, and Surface Water Treatment Rule due to the potential for increased distribution of surface water obtained from Tacoma's (or other utilities') svstem(s) throughout the District's distribution system. Storage Improvements According to the Water Plan, storage is adequate at this time. For storage analysis, extended-period simulation modeling was conducted to evaluate the storage draw down during fire flow events and to evaluate storage equalization during multiple-day periods of maximum-day demand conditions. The storage a�a�s�s analysis model was conducted using the "Backup Power Approach," which is summarized in Chapter 9 of the Water Plan. Improvement requirements based on the storage analyses include: installation of backup power at certain wells; seismic upgrades of the 312�' Street tank; and installation of additional boosting capacity to the 578 system (presumably near the intersection of 23`� Avenue South and South 320�' Street). Water Conservation Measures The District is committed to implementing aggressive water conservation measures to reduce per capita water consumption. These include progams such as public information campaigns, rate adjustrnents to reduce summer and peak day consumption, and every third-day lawn watering calendars. At present, the conservation program is voluntary, but certain mandatory curtailment measure may be implemented in the future if extreme conditions wanant such measures. The District will also work with the City to introduce water conservation measures by amending the zoning and building codes. These measures could include a requirement for low flow showerheads and toilets, utilizing species for landscaping with reduced irrigation needs, and use of reclaimed water for inigation. �_� �J � ' ' C 1 �� ' � � � � , ' � , Revised 2A99 2002 VI-3z � � � � � '�i U LJ , ' � FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities Finance Pian A utility undertakes a capital program for many different reasons, including: expanding the capacity of its systems, maintaining the integrity of existing systems, and addressing regulatory requirements. The District is required to comply with its own Water Plan and to support regional decisions on population growth and land use. The District has identified several significant capital improvement projects in its Water Plan. The scheduling of these projects is included in the Lakehaven Utility District's �A98 2001/02 Adopted Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) (Table -T�9 VI-9, and Map VI-10, °•,a a,r „ rn_ > >� The District has access to sufficient funds that can be utilized for Capital Projects and Operations. In addition , the District has depreciation, interest income, assessment income, and connection charge monies that it can utilize for funding the CIP. Additionally, the District can borrow money or increase rates, if necessary, to best meet the needs of its customers. The District has utilized a very conservative approach in budgeting for the CIP by , utilizing the growth projections �z� developed by each of the land use jurisdictions located within the District *� � �*" +�° ^'°+ °. °"'° �"° �'==== ;-c,-vrrcxxvu�x�rv:rcm7:c a=v-pa... ., � ; _.,... ...�., � i. + + 1 Tf .. ...,,rl. ..�,,,*;,,,,o� .,� ;r 1,�� .,.,or_tho .,��+ �;., .,o�r� ��,,,_ .� � �....,, ., *•a �•� a•+�, rrD + a+ �.� �.,,:�+ �� ���.�a The District will provide facilities as required to support growth within its service area. The schedule and ' project costs will be updated annually through the District's budget and capital improvement program process. C ' , LJ 1 ' As part of the 2000 budget process, the Board of Commissioners authorized consultants to prepare a rate study, which incorporated all phases of Capital and Operations expenditures. Based on this study, subsequent discussion, and input from a public hearing, the Board raised water rates by eight percent. A portion of the rate increase provides for the additional operating costs that are anticipated upon completion of the budgeted CIP. The rate-related revenue increase is intended to cover anticipated operating and capital costs over the next three years. 6.4.3 SEWER SYSTEMS ' Revised 28A9 2002 �#e Lakehaven Utility District's Comprehensive Wastewater System Plan was updated in 1999. The Wastewater Plan and any future amendments are incorporated into this Plan by reference. VI33 ' � � � > � ' ' '� C l � �. � � � ' � N N '_.�-� .� � .Y_�'- d f0 U N .� N C U I � � , ' � ' � � ' � � � ' � ' ' , ' , ' � ' ' ' ' ' � � ' ' , LJ � � � � m � FWCP — Cha ter ix Capital Fadlities Table VI-9 Lakehaven UHlity District 2001/2002 Capital Improvement Pro_iects — Water Department Pro.iect Description/ 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 — 2010 Total . No Proiect Title Budget Bud et Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs Source of Suaalv 5198831 ASR Testing/ Test Well 30T 15 15 135 260 Test We1131T 15 65 I 15 Test Well 32T 15 145 • 175 Production Well 32 550 790 1,340 5196020 OASIS Pro�ram 50 50 10 10 187 OASIS Treat Plant (Well 17/17Al17B/20A/23A) 20 580 800 400 t,800 5195011 Balance of Second Sunply Proiect 0 10,000 10,720 519060 Aubum Intertie No. 1 S 5 50 5199149 Wells 10/l0A Uar:rades 400 440 5199150 Wells 15/15A Ua�rades 100 121 5199153 Well 16 UpQrades 75 175 294 5199214 Corrosion Control —14 Wells 90 370 5199054 Disinfections — 19 Wells 49 639 5199104 Iron & Manganese SequesterinQ —19 Wells 80 465 5100102 Central Chemical Stora¢e Faciliri 40 475 515 StandbY Power — Wells 25 & 17B 20 25 445 5196304 Filt Of Green R Water at Well 19/19A 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 4197361 We119 Treatrnent/Iron & Man Removal 80 125 205 5196261 Well 29 Site Develoument incl Treatment 350 1,085 1,530 Undefined Well Uvgrades 30 30 100 100 100 500 860 Well lOC Pilot Treatment 20 50 70 Deen Aquifer We1133 535 930 1,525 Tacoma's SW 356` St Pump Station (25+/-%) 5 45 50 We1122 UnQrade 100 150 250 Subtotal Source of Suaply 1,149 11,870 910 780 1,930 3.300 22,462 Mains Gen Pre-Desi�n for Road Proiects 25 25 25 25 25 125 250 Revised �999 2�2 VI-36 � _ � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Six, Capital FaciliGes � � � � � r� � � r Proiect Description/ 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 — 2010 Total No Pro_iect Title Budget Bud�et Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs 23 Ave S Water Main Relocation 140 40 190 5198865 SR 161 WM Reloc-Stg 2: 360-384 (Ph 1) 10 122 SR 161 WM Reloc-StQ 2: 360-384 (Ph II) 388 410 848 S 356 St Water Main Relocation (Ph II) 700 700 5100121 S 320 St/Pac Hwy S Intersection Reloc 120 220 5300129 SeaTac Ma1U320 St WM Relocation 9 91 Pac Hwy S WM Relocation: 312 -324 10 415 t00 525 Pac Hwv S WM Relocation: 324 -340 3 100 483 586 5198965 WD 56 ULID 3/Mar View Dr Replacement 137 1,094 5199255 Sacajawea JH Distribution Main 14 69 5199245 Grand View Loop Closure 1 13 90 123 5198925 SeaTac Mall Tie 23 135 2000 Distribution System Improvements (314"') 9 40 69 Undef Dist Impr/AQing Pipe Replace 100 500 500 1,000 5,000 7,100 Undefined Road/Street Relocations 200 600 650 700 4,000 6,150 490 Press Zone Trans Reliability Impr 19 165 184 Serv Connection Replace Pro�ram 492 492 492 100 100 1,300 2,976 Adelaide/Lake Grove Transmission Main 85 245 245 205 200 980 S 286` St Water Main Replace 10 110 137 OASIS Treat Plant TM (Well 17/17A/17B/20A/23A) 50 250 300 Webstone Intertie/Trans Main 1,000 750 Military Rd & 32" Ave S WM 10 40 20` Pl S(S 344'" to S 341°) 10 70 PRV # 12 8 42 53` Ave S WM 10 60 Water OversizinQ Payments 200 50 50 50 50 250 690 Subtotal Mains 1,240 2,951 3,750 1,958 2,490 11,575 23,538 Pumping New Booster Pump Sta — 23` Ave S 58 477 535 Standby Power — 320 Booster Sta 155 155 Undef Pumv Station Ua�rades 50 50 50 50 50 250 500 Subtotai Pumping SO 50 50 50 108 882 1,190 Revised �999 (�2 VI-37 � — Chaoter Six. Capital Faalides Prolect Description/ 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 - 2010 Total No Project Title Bud et Budget Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs Other Intangibies 5100107 Panther Lake Infil Svstem Telemetrv 80 111 Enhanced Natural Aquifer RecharQe Plan 100 ] 00 200 200 200 600 1,400 5197090 Water Telemetrv Svstem Ungrade 210 746 Future Comn Water Sys Plan Undates 10 280 290 MIS Proiects (50%) 13 20 33 Meter Replacement Pro�ram 547 547 547 1,641 Lakehaven Center Remodel (50%) 5 25 70 Franchises 3 3 6 Miscellaneous Easement Acquisition 2 2 2 2 2 10 20 312 Street Tank Seismic Un�rade 60 140 200 TelemeW Room Remodel 12 12 Surplus Bay 2 Floor for Water Oas 10 20 GeoQraphic Info Svstem Develop (50%) 70 72 142 GPS (50°/a) 42 42 Computer Maint Mana�ement Svstem (50%) 20 112 132 Maintenance Buildin� Modification (50%) 25 25 ' Repeaters (50°/a) 18 18 � Dump Truck (50%) 32 32 Kubota Tractor (50%) 14 14 Pazkinf� Lot Cleaner (50%) 5 5 Infrared Scope (50%) 10 10 Document Mana�ement Project (50%) 75 250 325 Vehicle Allocation (50%) 340 68 220 225 485 1,338 Subtotal Other Intaneibles 1,576 1,382 969 427 697 973 6,641 Emer¢ency Capital Emer Capital (Water-Capital) 100 100 100 100 100 500 1,000 Subtotal Emereencv Capitai 100 100 100 100 100 500 1,000 Total Water CIP 4,115 16,353 5,779 3,315 5,325 17,230 54,831 Revised �999 � VI-38 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � — � � � � � � ' The Lakehaven Utility District (hereinafter referred to as "the District" in this section) serves an area that includes the unincorporated areas east and north of the existing City limits of Federal Way. Map �-� VI-11 shows the District's sewer service area. Inventory of Existing Facilities The sanitary sewer system is comprised of three major components: the trunk collection � system, the pump station system, and the wastewater treatment plants. The trunk system collects wastewater from drainage basins and conveys it to the treatment plant primarily by gravity flow. In areas where �g use of gravity flow is not possible, pump stations � and force mains are used to pump the sewage to a location where gravity flow can be used. Map -I4�� VI-12 d�ss�b�s shows the location of these components of the District's sanitary sewer system. . I ' I � The existing collection system consists of approximately 275 miles of sanitary sewer pipe�, 6,400 manholes, 27 pump stations, 6 siphons, and 2 secondary wastewater treatment plants. The system has been constructed over a number of years, as dictated by development trends in the area. The system is divided into 7 primary basins and 40 smaller sub-basins. The wastewater �enerated within the two largest basins, Lakota and Redondo, flow to the District's wastewater treatment plants. The remaining basins currently discharge to other utilities for treatment and disposal. The District currently has the capacity in all the major components of the system to accommodate the existing demand for sanitary sewer service. Forecast of Future Needs � I � � Population forecasts are based on the adopted land use plans of the various jurisdictions within which the District operates. They are presented by drainage basin to allow for evaluation of the system and consideration of future improvement alternatives. As of 1997, there were approximately 109,000 residents within the District's corporate boundary. The population is projected to increase to nearly 121,000 by 2003, and almost 150,000 by 2017. An estimated 7,500 on-site wastewater disposal systems are in operation within the District's corporate boundary. It is anticipated that service will be extended to these "unsewered" areas as on-site systems become less viable to maintain and/or when new development requires public sewers. The average daily flow from the District is currently "� estimated at 11 MGD and is � expected to increase to nearly 13 MGD by 2007, 15 MGD by 2017, and nearly 25 MGD at full development. Peak flows, including infiltration and inflow (I&I) are estimated at 21 MGD in 1997, 33 MGD by 2017, and 48 MGD at full development. � r R�,���2 FWCP — Chaater Six, Capital Facilities V��9 � FWCP — Chauter Six, Capital Facilities Hydraulic capacity at both �� wastewater treatment plants is estimated to be available up to the original design peak hour capacities of 22.2 MGD for Lakota and 13.8 MGD for Redondo. Location and Capacities of Future Facilities The District develops a capital improvement projects (CIP) summary as a part of the annual district budget process. This CIP lists individual capital projects for the succeeding 10-year time frame. The CIP prioritizes the projects according to the system needs. Also included in this list of projects are the ones that are continued from previous years. A list of these cagital projects can be found in the District's �AAB 2001/02 Adopted Capital Improvement Projects (Map �� VI-13 and Table -T�� VI-10). Finance Plan A utility undertakes a capital program for many different reasons, including: expanding the capacity of its systems, maintaining the integrity of existing systems, and addressing regulatory requirements. In addition, the utility is required to comply with its own Comprehensive Wastewater System Plan and to support regional decisions on population growth and land use. The District updates its capital improvement program annually as part of the District's budget process. For specific information on the Finance Plan, please refer to the District's most recent capital improvements program for revenue and cost information related to the District's proposed capital projects. The District has �e access to sufficient funds that can be utilized for Capital Projects and Operations. In addition f^ *'��° m^�°��, the District has depreciation, interest income, assessment income, and connection charge monies that it can utilize for funding the� CIP. Additionally, the District can borrow money or increase rates, if necessary, to best meet the needs of its customers. As part of the 2000 budget process, the Board of Commissioners authorized consultants to prepare a rate study, which incorporated all phases of Capital and Operations. Based on this study, subsequent discussion, and input from a public hearing, the Board raised wastewater rates by eight percent. A portion of the rate increase provides for the additional operating costs that are anticipated upon completion of the budgeted CIP. The rate related revenue increase is intended to cover anticipated operating and capital costs over the ne� three years. Revised �999.2002 �.�o � l 1� CHAPTER SIX CAPITAL FACILITIES CHAPTER SIX CAPITAL FACILITIES � � � � � � � � �� � � � � �' � � � � � FWCP — Cha r Six Capitai Faalities Table VI-10 Lakehaven Utility District 2001/2002 Capital Improvement Projects — Wastewater Department Pro_iect Description/ 2001 2002 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 — 2010 Total No Pro_iect Title Budget Bud�et Optional Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs Mains 5296213 Auburn/Redondo Siphon — Update 765 925 5299130 N Beach Line Repl — Lower Woodmont 40 928 1,049 Pump Sta 24 Force Main Relocation 294 294 Pump sta 33 FM to Panther Lk Trunk 20 943 963 5299442 So End Diver (Hvlebos/Brook Lk Sta's) I50 3,700 6,000 9,950 Brook Lk Trunk (Extn of Pnthr Lk Trk) 2,929 2,929 Pump Station Eliminations (10 Stations) 5,078 5,078 Meredith Siphon 1 Elimination 25 25 5300129 SeaTac Mall/320 St Sewer Relocation 35 85 Metro Turn-Around 1000 1,000 1,900 Sewer Oversizin� Payments 50 50 50 50 300 500 Lakota Beach ULID 50 Subtotal Mains 1,060 4,678 1,093 1,050 1,950 0 14,626 21,798 Pumping 5296203 Pumq Station No 6 Rehabilitation 150 650 1,039 5299141 Pump Station No 22 Rehabilitation 10 453 583 Pumn Station 12 EmerQency Generator 120 120 Pump Station 31 Emergencv Generator 90 50 120 260 5298511 Pump Station 35 Emergency Generator 27 50 5298501 Pump Station No 45 — 27 Ave/351°` SW 50 850 960 5298360 Pump Station No 7 Control Panel Replace 120 120 Pump Station 32 Pump Replacements 20 20 Pump Station 36 Install Generator 120 120 Pumn Station 37 Install Generator 120 120 Flow Monitors for I& I 40 40 Station 11 & 34 Control Panel 130 130 Midway Diversion Pump Station 875 875 Peaslev Canyon Pumv Station (Pre-Desiun) 25 25 Undefined Pump Station Uu�rades 25 25 50 Revised 2990 � VI-43 FWCP — ha ter Six Capital Facilities Pro_iect Description/ 2001 2002 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 - 2010 Total No Pro_iect Title Budget BudSet Optional Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs Subtotai Pumain¢ 392 1,223 1,075 360 120 0 900 4,512 Treatment 5299150 Lakota Headwords Modifications 436 508 Lakota Anaerobic Selector Install Desi�n 50 50 100 Lak Second Clar Center Wall Enlar�2e 654 654 Lakota DAFT"s Replacement 75 75 575 725 Lakota S1udQe Grinders for Thick Slud�e 30 30 60 5200105 Lakota Odor Control & Ventilation Svstem 15 20 49 Lakota Blower VFDs 50 50 100 Lakota Creek Fish Ladder Rehab 22 65 87 Lakota Optimization 40 40 Lak/Red NPDES Permit Req Studv SO 50 Lak/Red Odor Scrubber Evaluation 25 25 Lakota Process Area Floor Resurface 20 20 Lakota SludQe Treatabilitv Studv 30 30 Redondo Obiectionable Noise Reduction 30 45 Red Prim Scum Collection Svstem Mod 10 10 20 Red Gravitv Belt Thick for Sec SludQe 175 175 350 Red Secondarv Clarifier Add 1,850 1,850 Redondo Truck Scales 25 25 Redondo Biotower Puma Motors 10 10 10 30 Redondo Clarifier Drives 50 50 100 200 Redondo Communitors 40 40 80 Redondo Di�ester Hot Water Boiler 100 100 Redondo Enoxv Floor Coatin�2s 10 10 Redondo Fiber�lass Roof Rehab 30 40 70 Redondo Grit Collector Guards 15 15 Redondo Headworks Air HandlinQ Unit 15 15 Redondo Heat Exchan�er 0 Redondo Plant Roof Renair 70 70 Redondo Max Month Studv 36 36 Redondo Scada Svstem SO 50 50 150 Revised �AA9 22� VI-44 � � � � � � � � � � � � � �' � � �' � � � � � � � � � � � � � �%` � �1 � � � i i FWCP — Cha t r a Capital Facilities Pro_iect Description/ 2001 2002 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 — 2010 Total No Pro_iect Title Budget Budget Optional Estimate Estimate Estimate Estimate Costs Redondo Scum Piping 20 20 Redondo Slud�e Grinders 25 25 Redondo Slud�e Piston Pumps 45 45 160 250 Redondo Biotower Media 250 250 Subtotal Treatment 679 380 0 355 485 370 4,689 7,059 Other Intan¢ibles 5290073 Comp Sewer Plan Amend — Basin Studies 15 5 405 Water Reclamation Program 30 30 60 Future Comp Sewer Plan Updates 10 260 270 Sludge Dryer/Co-Gen Eng Study/DesiAn 150 MIS Proiects (50%) 13 20 33 5300110 Lakehaven Center Remodel (50%) 30 70 Franchises 3 3 3 3 12 Miscellaneous Easement Acquisition 2 2 2 2 12 20 Geographic Info System Develop (50%) 70 72 142 Infrared Scope (50%) 10 10 Comvuter Maint Mana�ement Svstem 20 113 133 50% — — — Maintenance Building Modification (50%) 25 25 GPS 50% 43 43 Repeaters (50%) 17 17 Dump Truck (50%) 33 33 Document Management Proiect (50%) 75 250 325 Water Ovs/Enaineering Dept Misc (50%) 6 4 10 Kubota Tractor (SO%) 14 14 Parking Lot Cleaner (50%) 5 5 Vehicle Allocation (50%) 340 68 220 225 485 1,338 Subtotal Other Intangibles 721 497 250 222 240 0 760 2,964 Emergenc_y Capital Emer Capital (Sewer-Cavital) 100 100 100 100 100 100 500 1,000 Subtotal Emergency Capital 100 100 100 100 100 100 500 1,000 Total Sewer CIP 2,952 6,878 2,518 2,087 2,895 470 21,475 37,433 Revised 2699 � VI-45 � FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities 6.4.4 FIRE FACILITIES T'his section summarizes the Federal Way Fire Department, Long Range Plan (�a Fire Plan) adopted in 1991, and the Department's subsequent Strate�ic Plans. T'he Fire Department provides service to the entire CiTy and surrounding unincorporated area. Services include fire suppression, fire prevention (building inspection and public information), emergency medical, hazardous materials responses, and rescue emer�encies (special operations). The Federal Way Fire Department has a contract with the City and Valley Communications for the provision of emergency 911 communications, wherein thev act to�ether with the Citv as a part owner of Valley Communications. The Fire Plan identifies and programs improvements that are necessary to maintain existing service standards and to meet the needs of future residents and businesses. The Department's Fire Plan and future updates are adopted by reference into � the FWCP. The Fire Department provides fire suppression service to the entire City. In order to do this, the Department has adopted the following LOS standards: ■ An emergency response time of less than seven minutes, 80 percent of the time (response time is measured from the time that the call is answered � Valley Communications until the first apparatus in on the scene). ■ Each emergency fire response should include a minimum of two fire fighting vehicles and four fully equipped and fully trained crewmembers. ■ Each emergency medical response should include a minimum of one response vehicle and two fully-equipped and fully-trained crew members. ■ The Fire Department provides a full building inspection service for fire code compliance. The Department is currently providing service that is generally consistent with its adopted LOS standards. The Fire Department also depends on having adequate water pressure available in fire hydrants to extinguish fires. The Deparhnent works with the Lakehaven Utility District, and other water utilities within its corporate limits, to ensure that adequate "fire flow" is always available. �s Lakehaven Utility District's Water System Plan analyzes "fire flow" rates�available at different points in its water svstem, and programs improvements to the water system to ensure that sufficient water is available for fire suppression. 1 � � � � � , Revised 2A99 2002 VI-06 � � � � � � � FWCP — Chapter Six. Capital Facilities Emergency Medical Services Emergency Medical Services (EMS) responds to 911 calls and provides field services. This service is paid for by ro e taxes. Emergency Medical Services are provided as a marginal cost to the fire department as fire facilities are utilized to provide this service to the community. Although there are no dedicated facilities planned for provision of EMS, three aid cars are scheduled for replacement in the year 2003 at a projected cost of $336,000. The section on funding (Funding Plan) addresses how purchase of these aid cars will be funded. Inventory and Capacity of Existing Facilities � The Department has two major types of capital facilities. One is fire stations and the other is capital investment in equipment and, in particular, fire engines. The Department's fire stations are shown on Map �� YI-14. Forecast of Future Needs � � �� � � � � From 1986 through 1992, emergency responses increased at an average annual rate of over eight percent. In 1990, public education efforts included 911-use/abuse training. T'he increases in call volume during 1993 and 1994 leveled off with 1994 volume increasing only 1.5 percent from the 1992 level. It is unknown, however, how much, if any, effect the 911 public education effort had on actual call volumes. In 1995 and 1996, calls for service again increased at an average rate of 8.1 percent. Although calls actually decreased slightly in 1997, call volumes increased by 14 percent in 1998. The call data indicates a fairly steady increase of approximately six percent per year. Emergency medical incidents have increased more rapidly than non-medical incidents. During the 1990s, structure fires have declined. The challenge for the Fire Department will be to manage fixed-cost investments, such as new stations, and to be flexible in its ability to meet fluctuating call volumes. Location and Capacity of Expanded or New Facilities � Revised �999 2002 During 1996, an annexation by the City of Des Moines impacted the Federal Way Fire Department. The Des Moines annexation (Woodmont/Redondo) could cost the Department an estimated $500,000 annually, although a contract for services between the Department and Fire District #26 provides continued funding to the Department in exchange for continued fire protection from the Department for those areas. It is unclear how long this relationship will remain in existence. If either party should give the required 12-month notice to eliminate the contract, District #26 would take ownership of Station #6 (27010 15�' Avenue South). The Department has purchased VI-47 � � FWCP — Chauter Six. Capitai Facilities properiy at South 288"' and Interstate 5 as a contingency against that possibility. This would accommodate the building of a new station that is more centrally located in the north end of the City. This realignment of stations, response areas, and revenues would require closure of Station #5 (4966 South 298`''). Second, the Department may have need for an additional station in the south end of the City in the vicinity of 356�' and Pacific Highway. If this area continues to experience significant commercial growth, the Department anticipates that the calls for service will also continue to grow. In this eventuality, an additional station may be needed to maintain acceptable response times. The Department has acquired property in this area through a swap of properties with Lakehaven Utility District to assure future availability of a station site. Any new station should be able to accommodate an on-duty crew of three fire fighters, with appropriate living and sleeping quarters. In addition, the structure should be able to house two engines and an aid car, with room for growth dictated by LOS demands. It may also be appropriate to provide a public meeting room and an office for community policing in new facilities. 'The cost of these facilities is approximately $1,500,000. Equipment would be in the range of $500,000 for a new station in the south end. Equipment for a new station in the north end would be provided from the closures of Stations 5 & 6. � Funding Plan The Fire Department has established a capital reserve fund for the systematic replacement of all capital equipment. These reserves are funded from the annual revenues of the Department. The Deparhnent also has established a goal of a minimum of three paid fire fighters on each fire apparatus. Additional staffthat is hired in support of that goal will be funded from either new construction levies or additional voter-approved levies. The Department has not established any funds for purchase of new stations or associated equipment. These purchases would require voter-approved bonds. fn the Department's annually adopted budget, capital projects are identified. This capital projects list is up-dated based on completed projects and changing priorities. � The FWCP adopts by reference the Department's Fire Master Plan as well as the annual capital improvements program update. 6.5 GOALS AND POLICIES The goals and policies in this section implement the e�.,+o�� �,.�.,,��, �,r.,,,.,..o,,,e„,. n,.* GMA requirements and the CWPP. The City of Federal Way takes responsibility for implementing only those goals and policies for services provided by the City. � � � � � �� � � � � !_ Revised 2�8 2002 VI-48 � � � � � � � �� � � � CFPl Provide needed public facilities and services to implement the 6�'-s FWCP CFP2 Support and encourage joint development and use of community facilities with other governmenta} or community organizations in areas of mutual concern and benefit. CFP3 Emphasize capital improvement projects that promote the conservation, � preservation, redevelopment, or revitalization of commercial, industrial, and residential areas in Federal Way. � CFP4 Adopt by reference all facilities plans and future amendments prepared by other special districts that provide services within the City. These plans must be consistent with the �^-^^r°'�°^°;"° D'°^ FWCP �� � CFPS Adopt by reference the annual update of the Federal Way Capital Improvement Program for parks/recreation, surface water management, and the Transportation Improvement Program. CFP6 Protect investments in existing facilities through an appropriate level of maintenance and operation funding. CFP7 Maximize the use of existing public facilities and promote orderly compact urban growth. Goal � Revised �899 2�2 FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities Special service districts, such as the school, utility, and fire districts, must implement goals and policies that are consistent with their respective plans. 'The City does intend, however, to closely coordinate the City's plan with these service districts so that the citizens of Federal Way receive the highest level of service possible. Goal CFGl Annualdy update the Capital Facilities Plan to implement the �� . r'^- "�^N FWCP by coordinating urban services, land use decisions, level of service standards, and financial resources with a fully funded schedule of capital improvements. Policies CFG2 To meet current needs for capital facidities in Federal Way, correct deficiencies in existing systems, and replace or improve obsolete facilities. Balancing existing capital facilities needs with the need to provide additional facilities to serve growth is a major challenge for Federal Way. It is important to maintain our prior VI�9 ' � FWCP — Cha�ter Six. Capital Facilifies investments as well as serve new growth. Clearly, tough priority decisions are facing Federal Way policy-makers. � Policies CFP8 Give priority consideration to projects mandated by law, and those by �state and �federal agencies. � CFP9 Give priority consideration to subsequent phases of phased projects when phase one is fully funded and under construction. CFP10 Give priority consideration to projects that renovate existing facilities and preserve the community's prior investment or reduce maintenance and operating costs. CFPll Give priority consideration to projects that correct existing capital facilities deficiencies, encourage full utilization of existing facilities, or replace worn out or obsolete facilities. CFP12 Give priority to projects where leveraged monies such as grants and low interest loans can be used. Goal CFG3 Provide capital facilities to serve and direct future growth within Federal Way and its Potential Annexation Area as they urbanize. It is crucial to identify, in advance of development, sites for schools, parks, fire and police stations, major stormwater facilities, greenbelts, open space, and road connections. Acquisition of sites for these facilities must occur in a timely manner and as early as possible in the overall development of the area. Otherwise, acquisition opportunities will be missed, with long-term functional or financial implications. Policies CFP13 Provide the capital facilities needed to serve the future growth anticipated by the �e�si�e�la� FWCP. CFP14 Coordinate efforts between the Public Works and � Parks Departments in the acquisition of and plannin� for public open space, recreation, public education, and stream preservation within the Hylebos Basin. Departments mav combine resources as appropriate to increase project efficiencies and success rates in pursuit of ��ant opportunities. �1� CFP15 Give priority consideration to projects needed to meet concurrency requirements for growth management. � �J � �� � � � � Revised �A89 2002 VI-50 � � �� � � � � � u � � FWCP — Chaater Sa, Capital Facilities �� CFP16 Plan and coordinate the location of public facilities and utilities in advance of need. �� CFP17 Implement a concurrency management system €e� which permits project approval only after a finding is made that there is capacity available in the transportation system sufficient to maintain the adopted level of service standard. �� CFP18 The provision of urban services shall be coordinated to ensure that areas identified for urban expansion are accompanied with the maximum possible use of existing facilities and cost effective service provisions and extensions while ensuring the protection and preservation of resources. � CFP19 �� CFP20 Coordinate future economic activity with planning for public facilities and services. Purchase property in the Potential Annexation Area and keep it in reserve for future City parks and surface water facilities. Goal � � ,� ' CFPG4 Provide adequate funding for capital facilities in Federal Way to ensure the r^�^Y°�°N°; ° FWCP vision and goals are implemented. The GMA requires that the Land Use chapter be reassessed if funding for capital facilities falls short of needs. The intent is to ensure that necessary capital facilities are available prior to, or concurrently with new growth and development. Capital facilities plans must show a balance between costs and revenues. There are essentially five options available for balancing the capital facilities budget: increase revenues, decrease level of service standards, decrease the cost of the facilities, decrease the demand for the public service, or reduce the rate of growth and new development. Policies , Revised �8 2002 G�g39 CFP21 Manage the City of Federal Way's fiscal resources to support providing needed capital improvements. Ensure a balanced approach to allocating financial resources between: 1) major maintenance of existing facilities; 2) eliminating existing capital facility deficiencies; and 3) providing new or expanding existing facilities to serve new growth. VI51 � � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities �� CFP22 Use the Capital Facilities Plan to integrate all of the community's capital project resources including grants, bonds, general funds, donations, impact fees, and any other available funding. �a CFP23 Ensure that long-term capital financing strategies and policies are consistent with all the other �l�e�� FWCP �s chapters. � CFP24 Pursue funding strategies that require new growth and development to pay its fair share of the cost of facilities that are required to maintain adopted level of service standards. One such strategy that should be implemented in the near term is an impact fee program for parks and transportation. �� � � � � � � G��4 � CFP25 Promote a more efficient use of all public facilities by enacting interlocal agreements which facilitate joint maintenance and operations of those facilities. ��� CFP26 Use the following available contingency strategies should the City be faced with capital facility funding shortfalls: ■ Increase revenues by selling general obligation bonds, enacting utility taxes, imposing impact fees, and raising property t� levy rates. ■ Decrease level of service standards to a level that is more affordable. ■ Decrease the cost of the facility by changing or modifying the scope of the project. ■ Decrease the demand for the service or facilities by establishing a moratorium on development, focusing development into areas where facility capacity is available, or changing project timing and/or phasing. �� CFP27 Aggressively pursue grants or private funds when available to finance capital facility projects. � CFP28 Maximize the usefulness of bond funds by using these monies to the greatest extent possible as matching funds for grants. Revised �988 2002 VI52 � � � � � � � � ' � � � � � L� � � � , � r ��� CFP29 Monitor the progress of the Capital Facilities Plan on an ongoing basis, including the completion of major maintenance projects, the expansion of existing facilities, and the addition of new facilities. Evaluate this progess with respect to trends in the rate and distribution of growth, impacts upon service quality, and ���� FWCP direction. �� CFP30 Review, update, and amend the Capital Facilities Plan annually. Respond to changes in the rates of growth, new development trends, and changing City priorities, budget, and financial considerations. Make provisions to reassess the G ' FWCP periodically in light of the evolving Capital Facilities Plan. Take appropriate action to ensure internal consistency of the chapters in the plan. � CFP31 Continue to coordinate with other capital facility and service providers to ensure that all necessary services and facilities are provided prior to or concurrent with new growth and development. Goal � CFPG6 Manage the Surface Water Utility in a manner that makes efficient use of limited resources to address the most critical problems first, and which expresses community values and priorities. � ' Revised 2899 2002 FWCP — Chaoter Six. Capital Facilities Goal CFPGS Ensure that the Federal N'ay Capital Facilities Plan is current and responsive to the community vision and goals. The role of monitoring and evaluation is vital to the effectiveness of any planning program and particularly for the Capital Facilities chapter. The City's revenues and expenditures are subject to economic fluctuations and are used to predict fiscal trends in order to maintain the City's adopted level of service for public facilities. This Capital Facilities Plan will be annually reviewed and amended to verify that fiscal resources are available to provide public facilities needed to support adopted LOS standards. Policies VI-53 � � FWCP — Chaater Six. Capital Facilities Policies �-� CFP32 The Utility shall continue to have a role in developing and implementing regional, state, and federal surface water policies and programs and, in doing so, shall seek to: ■ Achieve the City's environmental goals. ■ Contain Utility ratepayer costs. ■ Ensure state and federal requirements are achievable. ■ Maintain local control and flexibility in policy/program implementation. ■ Provide consistency with CWPP. The Utility's role in developing and implementing regional, state, and federal surface water policies and programs will include: ■ Influencing legislation through lobbying and written and verbal testimony during formal comment periods ■ Participating in rule making ■ Reviewing technical documents . ■ Serving on advisory committees and work groups ■ Participating in multi jurisdictional studies and basin planning ■ Entering into cooperative agreements with neighboring and regional agencies to accomplish common goals as appropriate and necessary � CFP33 The Utility's funds and resources shall be managed in a professional manner in accordance with applicable laws, standards, and City financial policies. � CFP34 The Utility shall remain a self-supporting enterprise fund. �4 CFP35 The Utility Capital Improvement Program (CIP) will provide funding for the following types of projects: 1) Projects addressing flood control problems. 2) Projects needed to meet water quality policies. 3) Projects needed for renewal/replacement or additions to current infrastructure and facilities. 4) Projects necessary for resource protection and stewardship. Revised 2989 2002 � � � � r� �J � ' � � � � � VI-54 , � r � ' � � �� �' � , � ' L� , � �� � � � FWCP — Cha�ter Six. Capital Facilities ' Revised 2998 200 �� CFP36 To the extent of funding limitations, the CIP shall be sustained at a level of service necessary to implement cost effective flood control mitigation; meet water quality policies; maintain system integrity; provide required resource stewardship and protecti�n; and meet federal, state, and local regulations. �F�36 CFP37 The Utility will continue to strive to minimize the use of loans to fund necessary capital improvements, and will generally operate on a"pay-as-you-go basis." However, low interest loans (i.e. Public Works Trust Fund) and/or grants will be used to leverage local funds when feasible. � CFP38 Rates shall be set at the lowest level necessary to cover Utility program expenses, meet levels of service identified in the "Comprehensive �ise Surface Water Management Plan," meet debt coverage requirements, and sustain a reserve, balance consistent with these policies on a long-term basis. �� CFP39 Utility rates shall be evaluated annually and adjusted as necessary to achieve Utility financial policy objectives. �9 CFP40 Utility rates will allocate costs between different customer classes on an equitable basis. �48 CFP41 The Utility rate structure will be based on a financial analysis considering cost- of-service and other policy objectives, and will provide adjustments for actions taken under approved City standards to reduce related service impacts. �4� CFP42 Rates shall be uniform for all Utility customers of the same class throughout the service area. �4Z CFP43 Rate assistance programs may be provided for specific low-income customers. F,�4� CFP44 The Utility's annual budget and rate recommendations shall provide funding for the following reserve components: 1. A working capital component based on 45 days of the current year's budgeted operating and maintenance expenses. Under no circumstances shall a budget be submitted for a planned drop in reserves below this level. VI-55 � FWCP — Chapter Six, Capital Facilities 2. An emergency/contingency component to cover excessive costs resulting from unexpected catastrophic events or system failures. Based on historical Utility experience, this amount will be set at $500,000, which is the estimate of the net cost of emergency services to be paid from rate resources, excluding any potential reimbursements that may be received from Federal Emergency Management Act grants, the City's General Liability Fund, or other external revenue sources. `� Revised 2899 2002 VI-56 SWM SOURCES , , ' � � , � LJ i i Table VI-1 City of Federal Way Facilities Plan Surface W�ter Mana�ement Component ! , ' � C� � � � � � � i L J � u �I LJ L� �J � � ---- ------ -- — -- —7--- ---- w ' CITY OF FEDERAL WA � �, ' g� ���� �� COMPREHENSIVE PLAN , � �, M - � �I _ I W � ( �- ! 6 F h , ,- ' SURFACE WATER � TRUNK SYSTEMS �I, Puget Sound P��. �� a g, � ���,, � _�,=�'� �, r� r-�� � -�=`' ` (INCLUDES NATURAL & MANMADE FEATURES) �• t.� =I � - _ - _ �?$$cn �T. __ �,.> I , � � � � _♦ � �l ���,, CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT ! � � � ,�� ,�`�,� � � - . ��� , �_ _ i '� �, / � � ao : - _ .: _, ,_ o ,,,,,� , o`�� � � ��� 5 ' �- i�� Federal Way City Limits ear - �Q y � +� _ _ _ II � : �� � �� �� P`' � >�� �� � ���� ��,�'� �� �� / �' Potential Annexation Area ' _ v \, ° � � �,� ; __ _ . < ._, _- _ � �, : � ... .�___. _.. _ . I �. r ;; /'�- � � + t — __ ,� � �� /� Basin Boundary — / ' � � �� � ` . � ' , , � _ ; � � � . : . � • � St e s ,- � : � �� � r am ,_ „ `; ; SW 3 ��h sf�� - �•L ,: -� _ i � ��� � � , � � � � 3 — v, �-- -�- /�' Trunk Drainage , ' -���� W` � '' � �/6 � i � �i �I System (Piped) ; i ♦ �� x _ r r; : ; �� _ --- � I �� �= � � � � � � Lakes ,. � , w O I , � � - . . r' �' ` _ __ - N ` 'S� � - � � a � � _ j�] Wetlands ., —�A� � .` o ' 1 ' � _==� _ Source: 1999 Wetland Inventory I- - �-- �i1RE PK �� . � I , ` N� T �'� � 6t _ ' s � °l' � � . � � , _� ; � - � . , ,, � � � � � � � �� , � - ; � � �. , . � '��- = �,�� o I ��� •� �, � � , d ' �i��e�� � � � � S 348th� _ � �� � � >- � � . . „ � eay i � ��- „~�,.�"•s•" L /' p� "'� 33_ rd ST NE • i�� � t � � , � I ` �� , ,� 1. -� � I I i __ _, � ; — � .z � _—, �__ ___- W 356th ST _ � �` , �� � � ,, I . � � I :u ., y� , � '. � � � %- � %' `` t- s � — — ' � � . '� � i� E , � � �� � �� � � �; / W � �,Q . � 3 . / � M '� �� � r -�.i � , -- SCALE -- �'� ,� � '4q� ��� Q Q' �• O �' 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet ca � F y I 4��� �� �I `'�� ` � . � I/ I ` d I �v ''�� �����a �'' L — � ��, ,-: _ - '. Q� 1 �� � �� �� � � � �Q�' CITY OR �� � �� ; �, � % � �, � �� � FederalWay MAP VI-2 y a��, , ♦ ; { ' 4.'�' � '; NOTE: This map Is intended for use as a qraphical representation onry. : l � � � The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy .------ ' _ ___ _ _ -- --- ___ . - _ -- - ;!- -- — — _ : � _ _ __ _ —_ � _ . Map prirrted February 2003 /data2rtabitham/cpmaps/swtaaml N w � , PugetSound �,"`� - --- --- , , ,. � W J � F- N W 3J CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN i '� PARKS PLAN PLANNING AREAS CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �'`��'� Federal Way City Limits �' `� �' Potential Annexation Area ,� � _ .� ��� �'� � �, —�9t/�8H RE PK`�'� Y -- �— �� �'��� '�... ti ' � `\ , $ � � Duma� � O `�� a N a � .� .` ,` . � .` . . y ��� `��� ;a , ��� �� �; � x �i d' + � � � ,� �� �� y�.� �: � — : z��' � �� � � // � , � � „ � --' = , . —� - - ,; � 1 �� ; � ,' ��;, ,-� � . ,;�' i � . � �� �`�� � � � � � f t. _ , � �• �_� , �� �� � � ; ��� � � �. � ; F � �,1 I �/ ;N H O r o� < ?/ / i / 1 � . _-.._ _�.,,. ,� � _ > > 3 � �� ; , ___�I Planning Area A ! Planning Area B �I�:.� Planning Area C � _ _I Planning Area D __ __! Planning Area E i� '' Planning Area F �__ Planning Area G ___ �' Planning Area H �___ Planning Area I � Planning Area J �' Planning Area K -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,700 Feet � `Federa� way MAP VI-3 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a praphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy rirrted February 2UO3 Poata2ltabithaMcpmaps/parkspa.aml M I w� � 6 � � � _ _—' W3: 31 > �. �' - � �— I :$_312th ° �_- _ __ _ _ _ - ,--�t' , I : '� � s �I L �; ��,�: o \`� �� r ,� • f � ''� �� _$�$flLh_�__ � 7, -- �' r � I ' ?`�' �1 r � �� . I � � I � ` I ----�1 I� � I i� � W . a �i � � a �; ,;�� � -- , ;.ur f ,� fi � ' � �� � /r - fi - � G � ! , ` 7 ' \ ' ' ` ♦ I p � �� V / . " . N I � � � , _ I C) � � I�� � ' N � �: � i , '� � , �� � -7 �a � a � � .,L. _ _ / , � �Y�(+L���� -�/ - - - �RTHSHQRE PK`N Y _ �� u+° �� SW � � � �� � �� �� � �� �w , __ / - , h T ' � . �� � -� \ � 6th ST ; '—� C _ , , • � � � , � � _I , • , � � � � \ t ��- _ � �� � r I ' � '� � ' ♦ i � � , \ '�. y n-' / � �' � I •� : � �� , � � - M � _� , � � � ; �� � � ` '♦ <� �; �`� ' � �� ,. i d � � • � , c� ��M �. � R�' �N � S 348th ST '_ r�. —. , � c�c � N 1 _3� ST� '� �. ui ' �f � �' � � , ', �. � _; � � 'a t _ f I � , � — � — -- � � S W 356th ST _ . _ �. �� � - = ��_ � / �� �� ` - _ � �t � o � ' � � �� h ;�'I, �� � _� � �.�� i� � � � ' — — ;`' � v � �j� � = W � ' ♦ V Q� � ! a�o 3 .� a � ?,��, � ,N � ��� � � �,� y� , M�49��� ���` Q Q �.�–. Z�� � � i . ��� ���� ��� �` , � — `� — � � ';� � � � � � �� � ' � � � '�� h� ' � � � � � , � -� � I R � ' • , �� - -,; �' ;� / , � - _ _ � �, _ __ _ MIL ON �W � i � �° �----� � I Puget Sound P�,m � L �� ' �: '•` '— �. � � �,�� z ., /'� � �._ __ . i • .�'��` �"� < i'' t�1 a ►•�' ' i' ,� � i' . � �; _ _ 1 0 ��, -� '�.,__ � �, � �,.� Q '��'--� eBr v� • � � ��.� ?g� > %�— � � ' � ' �i � � �, --- _ - - -- CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN MAJOR PARKS AND OPEN SPACE CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT i�� Federal Way City Limits / � "' Potential Annexation Area � Parks �� Open Space -- SCALE � 1 Inch equsls 4,300 Feet �. � `Feclerai Way MAP VI -4 � 1\ NOTE: This map Is intended for use as a qraphical representatfon onry. \ The Ciry of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy L. Map prirtted February 2003 /data2rtabi[hartUcpmaps/parks.aml ��� Federal Way City Limits � Steel Lake Maintenance � Westway Center Police Shop Substation � Potential Annexation Area � Dumas Bay Center/ � Seatac Mall Police City Owned Facilities: Knutzen Family Theater Substation � Ciry Hall Leased Facilities: � Municipal Court � Klahanee Communiry/Senior � Police Department Center � North Center Police � Steel Lake Annex Substation 0 1 Mile � N This map is intended tor use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy. urr oF � Federal Way ,���,��,��, C� �� 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 � 1 n � f 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' � � � � ' 1 � � ' � ' � � � � ' � - fi, W �' E , ,, \ � � � J,.� , � � � �� °�' %'p � � / , , - — . f �. �_n _-. Puget Sound � � g% � � ra.� . aa y J. a' \\ , ,�'1 � �' ��; >� � �' j � �� � 8?ABtIL_8T_— ,� � --°��__—_ , � . -- - � } � �I ;1 .— . • / ,' ' n'' 1 1 . . - � �� �� �� � � .•� i o Y .• � � ������ . � P � i �.. � o�� 'j ��.��� e.y �Q' g W - ,r fA. � T ,y ; �/ a� ��,� �I � � y� �� . �, . � - ��' _ -- - -_ __-� -- -- s a�2en sT � <� ��+ � ' ;,� �� -- _ a� , , � �� � -- 3 I�Y 320th ST � ;�� -/ � • � � � - -�-�20th � � � , � -- ti _ t . � . �-� __ � � � � � � � ♦ ���� x ; �� J �`• _ » � � - ♦ ° N � - \ � � � Noi�. ♦ � . ysH4RE PK'N Y__ �� a S 33atfi T � d� tA SW__3�6th ST i ��� - j�v � � ♦ ,—, __ � _ , . � ` � �` '�:,-�" �' <,-- T i �, � � �• • ; / � � �� a, i ,� - � '�_ � 1 ♦�� — � � ' +�� �'��' � 1 � � comm«w«o«,e .. •` p _s 3aesn sT : -- � � � a� � �� � `,, 33rd 8T�l�-� .� "', � � � � �`"1 % t � WI � � � •� � � �� 1 � � — � « n _ _--�- �TSW 350th ST _ � n ' � —_ � �� � ��� . !,. `, � I — � � � � �, ti i W ,:._ — ,' {� r '�,` r� , �/ `` � 1 y ; � � _ �� ��� / u � Q" � , b �' �� ��., ��,�, � � � �� " I ;'. �,� � �� � M,��� �� Q � � �� � , �.� �'� F ' Fi� � `'�� `,� . r-� �a.. �' � � � O , � ^ r 4 � � �� � �"� a j 1 ! �. �. , • � � � � � �� ,,_ , �� � �� � � � - - ������, _ _ _ rn� oN wAY �, , � � t � - „ -- 1 � _ .-- ---- �� � 3 �P �i i L � , �- � .;'. il ;Y > , 3 W : I 4! � ��� P� _J � ����'�. s`./ CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN HIGHLINE WATER SERVICE AREA CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT Federal Way City Limits Potential Annexation Area Highline Water Service Area — SCALE — 1 Inch equals 4,775 Feet Source: Highline Water Distrlct � `Federa�way MAP VI-8 NOTE: This map is intended far use as a qraphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as ta its accuracy �ruarv 2003 /data2rtsbi[haMa CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN N w E 5 carrxn.norn,�nr B.y PRV Puget Sound Pw�rry e.y ,, 1 j pRV � �• PRV AH2 � PRV A�'11 ` ' �Iid #30 PRV � ��, PRV x28 PRV #25 i PRV PRV A�24 S�� � \ / % :w� � �� PRV v� �. �� � � PRV af�2 �.� `���� ` .�� p� ��� �. r f T� . u°' � �' � �I A � RV a91 ----.�r_.1—_ __ � S 288th SS , � � . � WELL fi8 iHAVES. � ! • Bry �� � WELL #�27M���� y �� ���� R"�� > �I �� � � �/ Q TaHK �n � � �_ -- ^ ANK # � �LL #26 �� � � � . - — J � ! �1— `r � 312TH 8T� I � I ��� I yyE` L�r �3 n LL #F20 BOOSTER,� � PRV #r'1 ' WELL �23A �' L� , PUMP � I = � _ �3�� ��L��� �S7 ;�� L ,\ _ I I � PRV X2 � MVELL �Y'17 ,-" `��- � � TACOMA � � WELL x7 INTERTIE � pqy � � BOO �� � � °� PUMP � PRV �3 'J 1 Q � a�v �a � i u. W :'�`.., y I l R � � WELL A�'18 � �,'t� Y �1 q � � � ��us � S 6th ST S 338th S7 � \'� I / ! ',� .� � / �' —� L �-��� WELL �19 ' �"' � ; � �. � � i _ _� �' �LL #t'10 � I I TACO � WELL S2�T `- �LL I119A �, '�� 348#J�T iH�ari • �� � - --�— - 33rd 8T � TA A�I uJ WELL Jl1SA � j > VYELL N15 / � ppy��1 -- � ,:� WELL #21 , �&W3 hSa m � � � TACO�" �� � PRV #6 � PRV �Ir8 � � INTERTIE lf3 � � � / �; � � PRV #21 �'' ��� '�/ ��� 'W � � � ������ ������ � � ��, �`�!�� � �� � � � � � / - — -- — _ __ _ _ � _— _ — __ � X7 MIl7�ON INTERTIE S. ❑ � � -w i r 1 v ' S�_ e � _ � ` 1 �� � • EAT��ANK i � I �/ ��1 -\� � i � �� v+ � /�j�� � ��wiq��� _ �- � ,,. . , , NOR'i�'1 LAKE �� �� � BOO}�I'EH PUMP I j % i� ��� �� � �� � � ��� � � � � � ' �CHECK VAWE y / ' � i � �.STATION N1 �y � f' �-1-� � � � � � 6♦ .�t CHECK VALVE �/ � �LL X18 STATION A�2 � � -0 i � � TANK A�2 ; � � > � a � � �� � � � � ' � ::'%f,•� PRV Ar32 � �� � l _ �' � ,, WELL A�22 WELL �22 AY � PRV +M2Z � I -- FRy {t23 ( S. 305TH 3T. r � TANK B I & 305TH TANK A � .. ..._, � . J , t '��I ' I ( i � > w � r- � � 3 1 ' } � I ter ��� �, WATER UTILITY MAJOR COMPONENTS CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �'��•'� Federal Way City Limits � � � Potential Annexation Area �\ ' Lakehaven District Boundary - � V � '� Water Service Boundary WATER FEATURES Pressure Reducing Valve Stations �'� Booster Pump Stations �!� Wells 0 Tan ks Check Valve Stations 0° Intertie Vault -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,775 Feet Source: Lakehaven Utility District '' � `Federa�way MAP VI-9 I NOTE: This map is intended for use as a qraphical representation only. The City af Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map prirrted February 2003 //cfwQis2kldata2rtabitham/cpmaps/wtrteat N W E $ Puget Sound , ; - ;� . . '-; � , . , _ ,.; ; � � � i . i . , . ._.� .:. r � '� � � . { . _... ..___ --. _i , � , � . I .. . , . .. ,. . .._. , . " - _ ( - ' '_'_". �� . � � ' ... � _i � . I j �k ,� i� , . ' ` .__.� .. _'. .�� . � _� � , �, _ � �� �: 5 - 2�i�2d y I', � � � .r }. � `) — ' "� f �-- �. 3 " ' ;. � �1 ~ LaKe 1 1 { i t� � . - - �� � `� _► - � I � -- � � ' � `'' � ��-, �� ., ^r . . , : _ _, J * � -Z� I S t1- � � 8 298Yf� ST � ; _, . : �} � � i � � . _ : � � � ; _ , . , I _ ; w-� � iNBLL Jt8 ,�,� �� -22 . ��� , , �,a � ; � � � � , ��, � o r--�r � �tu � E33f+9I -$ 1 j� DMtof Lake N� �' .� k � w _1g �111.R )�,�ake Lake`'J � �, s � �- w��� #z :� �� � �' � ' , �_ � � �, � i - � -� � � � -� _ - I we��xza ��� W-15 ,� r W-2 > � > ` , � � „ � ' . I - �w aaoc� s w��s _ n W-1�z+��� r- ' 1 � - _ ; � ; � , _�."a e�n w�.� x�� � we�� x� -7 4 W-11� j 1 �;-- J � �.�'w� ��? -� _ ; � o w-� � , � - . . � - e �. O �vy25 , _ ��' , � a ��; NOrth � � . z • ; �`: � 0 1 a N u. Lake '� � _ � -�� ' �� b L' . : ; : ` / /� . VYELLNIB u ' �� �� -$ �Y+( `g � � � � .� � � � _ tl� 5�13$4th ST $ � f�iI1I�L #10C I ,� � __ . 33�t9eST � ,. � r . � � �. � _ '"t �, ma � .1_ � v� � � ; J _ ' '; 1 � . o -26 � ,�� � �, � ; '. � - f '2 LL �90 `�° � -, P � � (�A��� #10A � I �l d ' ' c«nm.no«n.m � � �� � � 1 � C . . � � � .. . e� , �, , v�ake a �3rd NE ' ; ' u�i we�� rnga '�� - � - �' � � . G8R6v8 `q: _ . � WELL X76 J �� , �� j � � ..._. . Q. n . � °�� � -4 ' v� a6eta; s� - � vvE�� xz� ! ' � I � WELL p18 � I L•� _ � i �, _.� �� � � � .,r � � � b � �:� �i � ��R��Y� � �� �� � v � . � _ �� ♦ � � �. � '� Flve / . �,�� � � � n�t��e : .� � Leke � � �,�'��.�2 �t`� �' � � � t / � -'t 7 �`' . ; — — / ��-' _ �/ � � ..r,� � '�1---_� w-� � �ZZ ' • WE6L J�12A _ � � � � _ . __, �_ IA4L70N WAY CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2001 /2002 WAT E R C I P LOCATION MAP CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �'��•'� Federal Way City Limits / � � Potential Annexation Area �'`d`' Lakehaven Water Service Area � Lakehaven Utility District Approximate Extent of Pipe Construction W-# Map Reference Number �°� Wells -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,775 Feet Source: Lakehaven Utility District �`�edera�way MAP VI-10 NOTE: Thls map Is intended far use as a praphical representation only, The Ctty of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy ruary 2003 /data2ftabitham/cpmaps/wwcip2.aml CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ' LAKEHAVEN SEWER SERVICE ��� AREA AND BASINS CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �.. camm.nownon ' Bq , �4 I �� I �.� � I � Puget Sound s- T �� j , I � � ____ �_SW3: \ < Mq � ��� � .�F ���` � � � �'o,, C �:� I � �l 1 I � ' > 3 � �� �'���'� Federal Way City Limits / '� / Potential Annexation Area ��O' Lakehaven District Boundary Lakehaven Sewer Service Area SEWER BASINS �� _—� Pierce Basin ' �' Tacoma Basin � Lakota Basin '�---� Metro Basin � � Redondo Basin --�' Midway Basin --- SCALE --- , 1 Inch equals 4,700 Feet � Source: Lakehaven Utility District ''�, � `Federa� way MAP VI-11 NOTE: This map Is intended for use as a qraphical representation anly. �, The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy ., _ _ _ _ Map prirrted February 2003 //cfwpis2kldata2/tabitham i , � L� i ' ' � , C ' I ' � ' � � � � � � w�� I � E s # PUMP i STATION 1t39 � � _ L 5 2��d 3 ! ' i � �� � . � uFr � • . STATION '' Puget Sound � �� y � �, � � PUMP ` �STATION pUMP J ,�� O� � PUMP 41 LIFT �A y.. QpUMP � BATION ,�,/ �.l �7 � 3 y �7ATION � ��nON � = f a �- j � V Q J�26 �� 288th 5T �,,.i �. �REDONDO � F= STATION � TREATMENT U - �' «.+-� "` PLANT � g e #6 � „� �• `�j PUMP � � .,,.,- ^ " STATION ' . " k36 � pUMP �PUMP � �STATION i ' STATION .� KiQ � #6 PUMP �� �,,��', � I PUMP °, .••.� • #34TION LAKOTA ,fi tn ,� ��STATION � /°, i�� OfREATMENT �'i is.[ ' #12 � ° I PLANT �¢ Q � � �, . PUMP � pn �� f s° - STATION S 312ii'i 5T t � PUMP `_� �-.�"'•° °'� �11 � STATION � iq� j � PUMP � +Y35 ; �a 3TATION 1t38 �� ,� � ` a : PUMP SNf 32Uth 'S7 rh.. � 1 � �:�:�- � � � > u1 _t > v� � 3 a � + ��_ ��. �: � � ,- � ,_.�-- _ W """_ . �"'S a ; +t i� > I `' b 3'TATION S 32E9th ST � J ' w 1 lt'10 n � y ` �. _ 1 �,� -� u� �. � � "� > � i 'o a r � a �� � � U � � LL � � � PUMP V ' r � Ad�y �� � �STATION � I �' �Nt Y i B �, _ if }��`?i)tit F `,.: . '2d Y t Q ft24 � _ : �� PuMV ��� sw aas�n sr s a�ert, sr d� i �' � , � 3TATION � #32 � � - r ` . J t � PUMP / r � � � � �Ji �� > ;� o a , �—� � c� '� S ��8th �', WMP ' T � �y �. l=i STATION ^ f I ' �� � • P � J:�re �T PdE � • y� �ZZ O � , y�' y ! � � a ��� PUMP � �* *W 356th ST ;'! STATION I � STATION �� ' A�42 A � 0 � " 0 °� L � :�-� � _ `+.� PUMP ,`� � I -�. STATION �Q� � K � • � ���� �a ���� � � �/ c�� ��,q,�� ��`, Q Q ,�� /' � �y� � �A ioN/ / �` .�c L�fi a i �� / <,.��� � '� '� v `�Q,,., . c; ` '. — ^ r . � � e. x � , ' � . � .� �� . �, . .� � , : ; :- r�s�roty wav 1} , � �_< iL '�� �K ,�;� y U1 � �; � �. , G a .`;�, CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SEWER UTILITY MAJOR COMPONENTS � �� , , f o , ,, C� ��._. O CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT Federal Way City Limits Potential Annexation Area Lakehaven Sewer Service Area Lakehaven Utility District SEWER FEATURES Pump Station Lift Station Treatment Plant -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,775 Feet Source: Lakehaven Utility District � `Federa� way MAP VI-12 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a praphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy 2�3 N W E _ Puget Sound ,.��- -. LAKOTA �``s A WWTP PUMP 13 STAlION y` � � . � � •: N34 -� f PU • STATION r _-�11 ���PUMP � STATION M3e ��`� �K'� �u,uP STATION +Y32 PUMP SFATION � ,r�o � � x �a �s r:+ � ��G .� . 33fii $T NE ' � �� ,r �.^ � ,� �': � � PUMP �? � STATIO(� [ Ak?9 �, � y � w � � I I .-.. � ?73�2d � �,_ � � Y / ' �� N I � ! S_ ' r i �.,.� t � ,� �, �. ��I �f �_ , SlATlON PUMP � '� I [�� e . �i srano�, TATI ' 'q PUMP M41 �_ � ..�+_-�?_- ►"'.� �k'PUMP I a SlAT/ON i ' .I ++Y � > STATION � �p REDOND , -j �I � <"� u� z��x� s-� • u.: � WWT�-.._,;'') � � � � STATION I ~ ,, q � � NB . � PUMP �1 �' I S I ' srarioN � A�36 _ _ ' , i QSTATlONMS I � ,�� R � � ' � � PUMP �.;.. � J --.- � � �STATIONNI2 � Y C> � �' �"- � �� � �� $ � Q y � S SW 32Dth &7 � o � > �o w � S�N 336th ST � � _ _ ;� > a � N _ SW 356th ST Rl �� l �' c e 4��� `�C � � ^ � � � �� "'" S 3'2'"t: a'!` .�. PUMP '"� y ��j \� � �5T/ON � � ' � � i � Q > �� '� 1 i� ' �� � $� h S7 � � � u.t w rkr S-4 i j � ' ``� ' � J �;° u��. � a`�'� PUMP � �� � �STATION 2 "" � ��Y t8 xza � �-� �I S ��6tS� 57 �' ��v- � ' � ��. r � � 3 J � f� PUMP / � �`�I S� STATI�AI - • "� ' S _ �'� � d� , � Q, � �`� � i � �4�dh PUMP � �`��"� � � � � 0 STAlION �' �t ' � � M22 �� � � ��- PUMO r � �� `` M37TION" I � STA !0 '! y :[ � , � �. ', � ,,� � S PUMP ,��f � � � �, STAlION ��.. • '� ' . Y� ,�s �� , � � � � • N �. �i�� '� ��+ PUMP �„"',� /,: tt � �' � � � 2�� � �OT� � � , i �� � � �L "" • —' � 1—C� � , I� fi ; - fuFlLTQN 1+VAY CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 2001 �2002 WAST EWAT E R C I P LOCATION MAP CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �'��•'� Federal Way City Limits i � � Potential Annexation Area '� Lakehaven Sewer Service Area '�/� Lakehaven Utility District � S'# SEWER FEATURES Pump Station Map Reference Number -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,775 Feet Source: Lakehaven Utility District �.`Federa�way MAP VI-13 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a qraphical representation only. The City af Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map prirrted february 2003 /data7Jtabitham/cpmaps/wwcip3.aml N W �� � .��_ E 5 Puget Sound Dumes Bay x � � v � N� NoRT ySHORE PK`�'� Y ;ommencamant Bay '�� m� �� �� � � 5 A 33rd ST NE B � d� �d 1 O� � �� P � I ', / / / �� % � �� ao�e,ry ea y w � � , . I 0 e / ' �' � � Y , t�l g ' � n :�.� Q.� 4 � > /� ` � C.� Q (� j� _ S 288th $T a �A ��� � i a � � I o � I � 1 � 1 � � y d � W > s systn sr a � �� �� S 320th ST �-_' � � � } w� .,... � � � ,i �°� � I y LL u V r ' � �, Q a ; ,�WY 18 ..�. , 3 _ � W J J � F— N 3 � � W J ...1 � � W � � SW 320th ST 2 � > N T N SV�h ST 3 N � a M w N 3W 358th ST ���' M19R ��F ��� ` � F � d� �`a O � y J P S 336th ST !� � �I � 1 ^�� u ` I !� y'�� A a � � 'l' Y �d S 348th ST ° >- N .. � �., � ° t "', � Q ��. z. � a ¢ �� J y O � � " * / 0 1 B `' ,°° y �,,,, � � W i..i 1� /�� �� Q � � G ���'� ?,���� ` �� � `�' � 3 � QQ' ��./�°•' � " H i� 9 y�, � 1 ,�"� �o . � � � �a .._� .0 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FEDERAL WAY FIRE DEPARTMENT #39 CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT �''os� Federal Way City Limits �` ���, = Potential Annexation Area � Fire Department Boundary � O Existing Fire Station Locations � Proposed Fire Station Locations Training & Maintenace Facility � Federa� way MAP VI-14 NOTE This map is intended for use as a graphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map printetl February 2003 Idata2ftabithamlcpmaps/firedist.aml ' ' CHAPTER SEVEN - CITY CENTER � ' 7.0 INTRODUCTION ' Federal Way's City Center � cha ter resents concepts and strategies for creating a —� P definable and vibrant "City Center" for Federal Way and an "urban center" for Southwest ' King County in the Federal Wav City Center plannin� area. The � chapter integrates the community's vision for a City Center with the Puget Sound Regional Council's (PSRC) adopted VISION 2020 plan, and King County's countywide strategy for ' developing a network of centers. In this � chapter, the term "urban center" is used consistent with the VISION ' 2020/King County defmition, or to refer to the general characteristics of a sub-regional center. The term "City Center" applies specifically to Federal Way's proposed center, which includes a City Center core area and frame area. Only the City Center core area is ' intended to meet the requirements of an urban center, in accordance with the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs). ' Purposes The princip�al purposes of the Federal Way City Center � cha ter are to. , ■ Create an identifiable downtown that is the social and economic focus of the City; ■ Strengthen the City as a whole by providing for long-term growth in 1 employment and housing; ■ Promote housing opportunities close to employment; ■ Support development of an extensive regional transportation system; ' ■ Reduce dependency on automobiles; ■ Consume less land with urban development; ■ M�imize the benefit of public investment in infrastructure and services; ' ■ Reduce costs of and time required for permitting; ■ Provide a central gathering place for the community; and ■ Improve the quality of urban design for all developments. ' Background ' The VISION 2020 Plan (1995 update), Regional Goal #1 states, "Locate development in urban growth areas to conserve nahual resources and enable efficient provision of services and facilities. Within urban growth areas, focus growth in compact communities and centers in a manner that uses land efficiently, provides parks and recreation areas, is ' pedestrian-oriented, and helps strengthen communities. Connect and serve urban communities with an efficient, transit oriented, multi-modal transportation system." King County's CWPPs� support this goal by encouraging: ' . ' ' FWCP — Chaoter Seven, City Center ■ Establishment of an urban center that is a vibrant, unique, and attractive place to live and work; ■ Efficient public services including transit; and ■ Responding to local needs and markets for jobs and housing. The CWPPs define urban centers as concentrated, mixed-use areas, a maximum size of 1�/2 square miles (960 acres), and oriented around a high capacity transit station. At build- out, the policies envision that the center would contain a minimum of 15,000 jobs within '/z miles of the transit center, 50 employees per gross acre, and an average of 15 households per acre. The urban center policies also call for: ■ Adopting regulations which encourage transit use and discourage the use of single-occupant vehicles; ■ Emphasizing the pedestrian features and promoting superior urban design; ■ Providing sufficient public open spaces and recreational opportunities; and ■ Uses that provide daytime and nighttime activities. The CWPPs recognize that with this growth will come an increased need for infrastructure. The policies, therefore, indicate that priority will be given to ensure the development of additional transportation and other infrastructure improvements necessary to support new, concentrated growth in urban centers. During a series of community workshops held in 1992 and 1993; �which are described in chapter one�, participants helped to develop a"vision" for Federal Way's future. This vision includesd the creation of a City Center. With the support of the residential and business community, Federal Way nominated itself to contain an urban center. Nominations were reviewed by the Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC), which confirmed the Federal Way City Center core area as an urban center in 1994. The urban center designation � should help Federal Way continue to gain access to County funds needed to provide infrastructure as the City Center grows. The Role of the City Center in Federal Way's Future There are several reasons why a definable, vital City Center is an important part of Federal Way's future. These include: Community Support — The Federal Way community has made the City Center a significant part of its vision. Participants in community workshops helped to develop a vision for Federal Way's future. A keystone of that plan is an attractive, multi-faceted City Center providing the setting for civic features and commercial activities. Economic Development — Federal Way's economic development strategy relies on a strong urban center. As discussed in the Economic Development chapter, Federal Way has the opporlunity to transform itself from an essentially residential and retail based economy to an emerging, sub-regional economic center with an expanded, more diversified employment base. Revised �998 2002 ' ' , ' ' � ' i '�_J ' �, � 0 ' � , , vu-2 , C� � � � � ' ' , ' ' , Natural Evolution — The development of a more intensive, multi-use urban center is a natural step in Federal Way's evolution. Most new centers start out as bedroom communities. Retail businesses develop first; office and industrial activities next begin to locate at key transportation crossroads, adding jobs and strengthening the employment base. Federal Way has experienced all evolutionary phases, with the exception of one. The final step is achieving a sufficient critical mass in the City Center to produce lively street activity; support specialty business, cultural/entertainment facilities; justify the investment for public parks, amenities, and improved transportation systems; and create the interactive "synergy" of a true urban center. Federal Way's economic development strategy will add this final essential step in this evolution. Growth Management — Developing a City Center is part of a regional strategy to address Western Washington's growth management. Public policy makers have focused increased attention on issues affecting our quality of life, including urban sprawl and the accompanying reduction of open space, declining housing affordability, and increasing traffic congestion. As stated previously, concentrating future growth within the four county region into a number of centers (rather than a continued pattern of dispersion), linked by an efficient high capacity transit system, is one of the principal goals to manage this growth. , � 7. � EXISTING CONDITIONS j2n.qinal Section 7.1 Vision Statement, has been moved to Section 7.21 L� City Center Planning Area � The City Center planning area, consisting of the City Center Core and Frame zones, is approximately 414 acres in size and is bounded by South 312`� Street, South 324�' Street, Interstate 5, 11�' Place South, and 13�' Avenue South (see Maps VII-1 and VII-Z, maps are ' located at the end of the chapter). The City Center Core and Frame areas are 209 and 205 acres, respectively. � ' �J 1� ' Revised �A98 2002 FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center General Image The City Center }s does not currently rp esent an identifiable sense of a downtown or urban center. The existing commercial development within the study area is typical of suburban strip retail and mall development. The dominance of mass retailing has largely shaped the commercial core. The SeaTac Mall and spin-off retail centers are a local and regional destination and generate ��e�s great amounts of physical and economic activity. However, as is the case with most older suburban mall areas, there is little, if anything, distinctive or unique about the existing City Center. a�a Essentially, it could be anyplace. It is similar to hundreds of other commercial centers across the country. The businesses do not connect to each other, or to public and private spaces, residential neighborhoods, or civic uses, except by automobile. V143 � � FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. Cihr Center �st-�g D�evelopments essentially reflects one pattern: a single story of "light" construction, sunounded by an apron of asphalt. Buildings feature concrete or concrete block walls, creating austere and "generic" images. Another prevalent image of the area is the vast amount of surface parking. The availability of parking is essential to the current type of retail found in Federal Way. City Center businesses serve regional as well as local markets, and are heavily oriented to access by automobile. Actual building footprints relative to total parcel areas are quite small; the majority of most parcels are used to provide surface parking. This parking is often underutilized, except during the peak holiday season. The current network of collectors and arterials, and the disjointed over-sized block grids within the existing commercial area, contributes to significant traffic congestion. The character of the street environment is also unfriendly to pedestrian .' �e�-�9'� �i�a� �Fe-ac nrwminwrt � thc� h�.rta;� +� .+ tt *+ +• + -rt, t, a --�-- — - --- r- ----------- __ ---- -------•a., ....,� r ». r ,.,... . slaanai»a rin�tn *hrs C; �,'� �:� ,,,�r' .,+• � � Y s .�=r in manv locations, with few amenities such as landscauin�, li�htin� benches etc. In addition in manv locations the pedestrian exnerience is rnade even less aftractive as little more than pazkin� lots or blank walls line the sidewalks. Recent improvements throughout the City Center most notably along South 320`� Street, have imnroved the character of some streetscapes with handsome streetli�hts and trees. Continuation of these improvements alon� Pacific Hi�hwav South and elsewhere throu�hout the Citv Center will do much to improve the overall character of the Citv Center streetscapes. Similarlv the extensive abatement of unattractive, out-of-scale si�na�e achieved over the past five vears has also led to a more attractive, human-scale streetscape. The City Center does not contain a significant residential population. Pockets of residential housing exist between South 312�' and 316�' Streets, and SR-99 and I-5. Figure Vll-1 depicts an aerial view of the City Center area looking south from the northwest corner of the City Center boundaries. Physical Conditions Land Use Most of the study azea is cunently developed and consequently, most new development in this area will displace existing low intensity uses. Buildings are dispersed throughout the area and lack pedestrian connections to each other and public rights-of-way. Cwrent land use patterns favor autaoriented commercial activity. The primary use in the City Center area is retaiUservice, followed by lod in office, �as�g;�� and residential. SeaTac Mall is the "signature" development in the area. Revised �899 2002 � C _J , L_ J , L _J � , ' ' ' ' , C� , ' vu� ' I� FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center Figure VII-1 Aerial� View of City Center �i�—�"rti � ----»—.-�_�-- � _. ---- — — --tii �r---•. ---- -- _ .--- -- — ' � . r --'�rt�''�''�� `.�+�✓+1�.t�'+�'i� � �� "'W'�`.IL."1�,�,.A�..h++�,'�.v .�1. � � Jl- �� Jlr i �'�', t •' ; � e� �t �' � _b f4 rt _..s �C'„ _ .nrl�hiF' S sia.a I � !ca _ _ a I � ti � �� 7 �C� � R .r�. � / / � � � � L O • O • oe / � ��! m- � Table VII-1 lists the amount of land use development by gross floor area within the City Center planning area as of �-39�4 �anuarv 2002. Public and civic uses are scarce, with only four publicly owned non-park sites (the Federal Way School District's bus barn site north of I 1`� Place South and South 320�' Street; Truman High School, northwest of South 317`� Street and 28� Avenue South; King County Library, 848 South 320'" Street; and �d�� the School District's Administrative Offices, 31405 Pacific Highway South). 0 Revised �999 20(12 VIIS � �J FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center Parks and Open Spac There are no trulv public spaces within the City Center. Private green spaces, plazas and ublic meeting spaces are few. Steel Lake Park to the northeast and Celebration Park to the southwest are on the perimeter of the City Center. Even though these parks are within walking distance of the City Center, they also serve��a as regional facilities in addition to serving local needs. Civic Buildings and Municipal Facilities Similarlv, �the City Center '. ., lacks si�nificant civic or municipal facilities, with onlv the Public Library near the eri he of the Ci Center. The next closest facility is the City of Federal Way Parks Deparhnent's Steel Lake Annex and Maintenance Facility near South 312`� Street and 28`� Avenue South. Klahanee Senior/ Community Center and City Hall are located a few miles southwest of the City Center at 33901 9�' Avenue South and 33530 1�` Way South, respectively. Circulation Roadways — A key element defining mobility within the City Center planning area is the enormous size of its blocks. Most U.S. downtowns have blocks ranging from 250 to 500 feet on a side; block lengths in Federal Way are several times that. Because of the "superblock" configuration, motorists drive between and within parking areas serving City Center developments to avoid congestion along City streets and pedestrian circulation is discouraged. Access to the area is provided by two principal arterial routes: South 320�' Street (which runs east/west and connects to I-5), and SR-99 (which runs north/south). An inefficient hierarchy of streets feed these arterial roadways. The azea lacks a system of minor arterial and smaller collector streets that could difFuse traffic efficiently away from these two principal arterials. The irregulaz spacing of traffic signals also adds to congestion. As such, the accessibility provided by the juncture of these routes, initially attractive to area residents, has been lost due to growth in traffic. Revised 2A99 2002 ' � �J , � L.. J ' 1 ' ' L� � � � , ' vn-s ' � Table VII-1 Gross Floor Area of Land Uses r �_ ' �� �' � ' ' i ' 1 ' ' ' CI ' , Transit Service — Eighteen transit and dial-a-ride routes radiate from the City Center. However, service to the entire City Center is not the primary focus, especially during the peak periods of the day as there are only 12 all-day routes. A regional park and ride lot, located southwest of I-5 and south of South 320`" Street, generates most of the area's transit ridership during peak periods of the day. �et# King County/METRO, Sound Transit, and Pierce Transit serve this site. Congestion on I-5, South 320`" Street, and SR-99 demonstrates the need for an enhanced transit system. However, the existing low intensity and dispersed land use patterns will not support significant increases in transit service. The area also lacks transit facilities such as bus pullouts and waiting areas, and a pedestrian network to safe and direct access from transit stops. The proposed 317�' direct access ramp for Sound Transit's Federal be able to access the citvi center without also benefit carpools and vanpools. the It will Pedestrian Environment and Bicycle Facilities — A 1992 inventory of existing sidewalks within the City (see page V-22 of the Community Profile, Feb. 1993) revealed a deficiency of pedestrian facilities Citywide. The central core was highlighted as one of the areas �s� that lacked an adequate pedestrian network. For example, most of SR 99 and portions of 324`�' Street� and 23`� Avenue South lacked sidewalks. A majority of walking that does take place in the study area occurs within malls and along storefronts of shopping center strips. Sidewalks connecting storefronts to public walkways are lacking. The few sidewalks that �e did exist ,a�e were narrow, devoid of trees, and interrupted by numerous curb cuts. Crossing wide, busy streets such as South 320�' Street and SR-99 can also be intimidating. There are few places to sit and enjoy pleasant weather, meet friends, or have lunch outside. The current pedestrian environment is unfriendly and unappealing. The division �is� that exists between pedestrians and auto areas is not conducive to establishing the active street life desired in a City Center. Bicyclists have even fewer facilities to choose from. City streets lack striping or signage for bike riders who must share the road with heavy volumes of tra�c. Once bicyclists reach the area, they become frustrated by the lack of safe storage facilities for their vehicles. Covered bike parkin� will be provided at Sound TransiYs Federal Way Transit Center. Residential ' The CiTy Center contains approximately 892 units of housing (listed in Table VII-l�age �-6), located primarily in the area east of SR-99, south of South 312�' Street, north of South 316'� Street, and west of 28�' Avenue South. Other residential neighborhoods � sunound the City Center area.-, such as the pockets of multi-family housing �west of South 11�' Place and south of South 320�' Street °^�'� �ase-a��esl�e�e� . There are also single-family neighborhoods west of Highway 99 � Revised �990 2002 FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center VII-7 � FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center and north of the South 312�' Street corridor. While these neighborhoods are not located immediately within the �e�e� City Center, they are located conveniently within walking, bicycling, or vehicular distance. They differ greatly in character and type. In 1997, two senior housing projects were constructed in the City Center Frame area. These projects aze located south of South 312`� Street and east of 23'� Avenue South, adjacent to the southern portion of Steel Lake Park. The two projects, Meridia�/ Willamette Court and Woodmazk at Steel Lake, consist of 300 and 85 living units respectively. The residents of these developments have easy access to several shopping opportunities and services in the City Center area. It is important to note that no new residential construction has occurred in the Citv Center since that time Infrastructure �.a- 7.2 Most of the existing facilities and infrastructure were inherited from King County. �ee � . , , In 1998, the City adopted new streetscape guidelines related to roadway profiles, streetlights, sidewalk widths, and street trees. In a�� 1999, South 312�' Street between Pacific Highway South and 23`� Avenue South was widened to five lanes, and new sidewalks, street lighting, and street trees were added "* *��o ��, as well as a�das�ia�-s�e�g traffic signals �ra�se-a�de� at �e�-�-�'�-�a� at 20 Avenue South and 23'� Avenue South. ����*�^^°��•� *�� �'�*-� ;� � � � �' •�' + + � „ � 5 ����*•�• in tha !`itv l`�a +„ , 1 t�+ ,tl, '+i,' +l, T r t. n-. � ..,.,.. ._-� ----`-- .., » ..................�.....� --- .._ - -- ---, VISION STATEMENT �� °r�o By the end of the comprehensive plan planninQ horizon the Federal Way City Center �as will have evolved into the cultural, social, and economic center of the City and �as fulfilled its role as one of Puget Sound's regional network of urban centers. This role �s will be reinforced by pedestrian-oriented streetscapes; an efficient multi-modal transportation system; livable and affordable housing; increased retail, service, and office development in a compact area; a network of public spaces and parks; superior urban design; and a safe, essential, and vibrant street life. Revised 2899 2002 �I$ � ' � � ' ' i , ' � t ' ' 1 1 ' � � i Streets were installed. In 2003, construction will begin on widening Pacific Hi�hwav South to add hi�h-occupancv vehicle (HOV) lanes sidewalks and streetscape elements � ' 1 � ' � � � � � The City Center is responsive to the needs of �'-s the Ci 's residents. In addition to general services that draw people from ou►side the region, such as retail, office, and hotel uses, the City Center is the primary commercial area providing local goods and services to the surrounding neighborhoods, and to residents and employees within the center area. Private development and City initiated actions will have resulted in a balanced transportation network � that accommodates automobiles, public transportation, high occupancy vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, and integrated parking. Pedestrian and bicycle circulation is emphasized along with other travel modes. The downtown urban fabric includes smaller blocks, lending itself to efficient and pleasant travel. Concentrated development allows a significant number of jobs and residences to be located within close proximity to transit and a High Capacity Transit Station (HC'1�, thus, reducing dependency on the automobile and improving pedestrian mobility. The regional HCT system may begin with re�ional express bus service that would evolve to fixed guide-wav systems, such as light rail or monorail, as ridership dictates and fundin� allows. Direct access to a regional transit system links the City Center to Seattle, Everett, Tacoma, Bellevue, SeaTac International Airport, and other regional and local destinations. The diversity of housing opportunities now includes � high-rise residential buildings, which help to meet a significant portion of the community's housing needs. City Center #residents walk or take transit to shop, work, and recreate. Community facilities and services, public spaces, parks, and trails complement the variety of housing and provide places for residents to come together as a community. A central gathering place for the community, the City Center is where the whole � community can congregate and celebrate. Civic and cultural facilities, in addition to a park and open-space system, meet the needs of residents, employees, and visitors. These amenities connect to the Citywide and regional system of open spaces, parks, and trails. Public and private projects contain such design elements as fountains, sculptures, and � unique landscaping. � The quality of urban design for all developments, including streets, buildings, and landscaping, is high and contributes to an improved quality of life. Public buildings and spaces also set a high standard for design and compatibility with adjoining uses. r FWCP — Chaoter Seven. Ciry Center Goals for the City Center �Rls� Chapter � ' � ' Revised 2A98 2002 � The goals and policies of the City Center � chapter are derived from those of the �a Federal Wav Comprehensive Plan FWCP . The ��e��a� FWCP addresses in greater detail the framework of regional plans and legislation which direct planning in Federal Way. It also discusses the basic policies addressing housing, parks, recreation, and commercial development. This � chapter builds on these policies, and provides specific recommendations and actions necessary to facilitate the development of the City Center. VII-9 � FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center The following goals provide overall direction to policy makers and community members when making choices about growth and development within Federal Way's City Center. Additional goals and policies are located throughout this chapter, providing specific direction on other matters discussed. No set of goals or policies can address all potential issues that may arise in the course of implementing � the FWCP. Therefore, while these are fundamental to the � FWCP, they are not sas�� immutable and may need to be revised as situations warrant. Goals CCGl Create an identifiable Ciry Center that serves as the social, cultural, and economic focus of the City. Define a City Center with distinct boundaries, unique building types, and special features. CCG2 Attract a regional market for high quality o�ce and retail uses which increases employment opportunities, adds to the City s tax base, and establishes Federal Way's City Center as an economic leader in the Sot�th King County region. CCG3 Connect the City Center to a convenient regional transit system. Provide service between centers and nearby areas by an e�cient, transit-oriented, and multi-modal transportation system. CCG4 �� Foster distinct districts within the City Center, defining the roles and characteristics of each such district. CCGS Encourage a miz of compatible uses to maintain a lively, attractive, and safe place to live, worl� and visit. CCG6 Focus on improving the existing character and image of the City Center. CCG7 Encourage housing opportunities in mized residential/commercial settings. Promote housing opportunities close to employment. CCG8 Develop land use patterns that will encourage less dependency on the single occupant automobile. CCG9 Create an environment oriented to pedestrians and bicyclists. CCG10 Create an environment that attracts high quality housing, commercial, and office uses. �e�e� orce requirements for guality design in buildings, streetscape, and site � planninQ CCGll Create policies and regulations to encouraQe more e�cient use ofparkingfacilities and to foster new innovative and creative parkinQ solutions. CCG12 Protect and enhance natural features of the area. Revised 2A99 2002 VII-10 , � � � ��� �J � � � EJ � � � � ' � ' � ' � � FWCP — Chapter Seven. City Center 7.3 THE LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION CONCEPT FOR THE CITY CENTER The Concept Plan The concept is to redevelop the City Center and create a compact urban community and � vibrant center of activity. The crux of the strategy is to promote a compact urban center �� with connections between where we live, work, and recreate, and create an urban environment that is amenable to walking, bicycling, and transit. The concept, a result of � the citizen participation process called CityShape (held in 1992-93), implements the community's goals outlined in Section �-�- 7.2. In summary, the concept is to: � �� L, �� � ■ Establish a City Center to support ' ' ' HC'T3 by locating residents and workers within convenient walking distance of HCT. ■ Make efficient use of existing capital improvements by concentrating higher intensity land uses in the CiTy Center. ■ Encourage a mix of compatible uses where housing coexists adjacent to, above, or near commercial developments. ■ Create a dense residential community within walking and bicycling distance of the core. ■ Improve auto circulation in the City Center by completing the proposed street grid, creating smaller blocks, and ��g providing opportunities for through traffic to travel around rather than through the core, thus minimizing the impact of future growth on Citywide traffic patterns and congestion. ■ Reduce impact of parking by encowaging structured parking, allowinQ � reduc�ged parking ����:�s ratios, a� shared parking, and other innovative and creative parking solutions, as well as implementing guidelines that enhance appearance. � � � Revised �8A9 2002 � ■ Create pedestrian and bicycle connections throughout the City Center and to surrounding neighborhoods. Provide a safe and inviting environment for pedestrians and bicyclists with direct connections between activities and transit facilities. Continue to �develop and/or reconstruct streets to include sidewalks, street trees, benches, garbage receptacles, screening of parking areas, eta VI!-11 r FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center ■ Create a high amenity pedestrian �a� -friendly corridors through the core, linked to a transit center and providing an attractive civic focus to SeaTac Mall. ■ Provide a civic focus to create a sense of identity for all residents. Develop municipal and cultural facilities within the City Center core area. ■ Develop public spaces in the City Center, particularly the core area. Enhance the City Center with a network of public spaces and pazks connected to the Citywide and regional system of open spaces, parks, and trails. Encourage gathering spaces in private development. Map VII-3 applies the principles described above. The � fi�ure depicts the City Center core area between SR-99 and I-5 and South 316�'/317�' and South 320�' and 324�' Streets. The City Center core area contains a concentration of higher-density, commercial, residential, and mixed-use development, as well as civic, social and cultural uses. The City Center frame area surrounds the core along the west and north edges and provides � , ' a full complement of commercial, residential, and mixed-use development at somewhat lower densities to support the core. It also provides a transition to surrounding single-family neighborhoods. High capacity transit runs through the middle of the City Center, and pedestrian pathways connect the HCT station with residential areas, future civic spaces, and the SeaTac Mall. land Use Designations This section expands on the land use concepts described previously. The City Center � ch apter �e�es�s contains two different land use designations, each with its own distinctive characteristics, intended to guide the evolution of the City Center, see Map YII-4. The City Center core and frame area designations give form to the concepts summarized in section 7.3. These land use designations direct the location and extent of gowth, and will reshape the nature of development, transforming the area into a compact, vibrant City Center. City Center Core Area For the last 20 years or so, lower-density shopping mall areas at the edge of the nation's larger cities have gradually been redeveloped and transformed into more dense urban centers, emulating the development patterns and sense of place of more traditional downtowns. This transformation, to an area with a unique chazacter and improved image, is proposed for the core area. The intent of the core area land use designation is to create a higher-density mixed-use "center" for Federal Way, and become an urban center as envisioned in VISION 2020 and the CWPP. The CityShape vision calls for concentrating growth Revised �A98 2002 Vlt-12 � � � � � � � � � � � � :� ' � FWCP — Chapter Seven. Ciry Center in an area where sufficient infrastructure capacity exists, or where such � capacity can be provided efficiently. The infrastructure within the City Center, specifically the core area, is designed to handle the highest levels of demand within Federal Way. By orienting new gowth around this investment, the existing capacity can be utilized to its � fullest extent. The core area designation also encourages the concentration of new development to help reduce development pressure in other areas of Federal Way. � The core area land use designation encourages a greater diversiTy of uses within mixed- use types of development. Traditional �city �centers are places where diverse office, retail, and government uses aze concentrated, as well as cultural and civic facilities, � community services, and housing. Many cities are advocating mixed-use development for a number of reasons. These include: � ■ Providing new housing, increasing the range of housing choices, and cutting down on automobile dependency by bringing work places and residences into close proximity, �/ ■ Providing retail and service needs in close proximity to residential and � employment areas; and, � ■ Improving feasibility of a development project. The proximity of urban services makes housing projects more desirable and a nearby source of consumers help make a commercial project more profitable. � Residents choose to live in hiQher-densitv housin� for a varietv of reasons. First, hi er- density is frequently less expensive than single-familv housing. Second, the convenience � and proximity to work, needed services, and cultural activities is verv desirable for manv people. Finally, many people find that they do not need a large, sin�le-family detached house. Given their lifestyle, thev appreciate the low maintenance and securitv of higher- � density livin�. There is a mutuallv supportive relationship between higher-density residential uses and commercial activities. The presence of housing also activates Citv Center streets, day and night. Concentrating growth in a specific area also supports �e investment in transit, including a regional HCT system. Existing low-density development does not generate sufficient levels of demand to �•�°*��• u�'T °°^,;^° optimize the return on investment in transit. Promoting higher-density uses within walking distance of transit facilities will improve the viability of this si�nificant infrastructure investment. Additionally, concentrating the highest density of development in the core, where a significant number of jobs and residences will be within walking distance of a transit station, helps reduce dependency on the automobile and improve pedestrian mobility. The core area emphasizes pedestrian, bicycle, and transit mobility. The core area will be less autaoriented than the frame area, but it will not be unfriendly to the use of automobiles. The City Center core area will also be the central gathering place for the community—a place where the whole community can congregate and celebrate. Accordingly, the core � Revised 29A9 2002 VII-13 � FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center should include an outdoor square, park, or commons, with public amenities such as fountains, sculptures, and unique landscaping. Other civic am�enities or buildings, including and/or a performing arts center, could be grouped around this City Center square (Figure VII-2). Figure VII-2 Potential Core Area Development Goals & Policies That Promote the Concentration of New Development in the City Center Core Area Goal CCG13 Focus new growth with #Fg#� resultant increasinQ demands for infrastructure and transportation in the City Center, spec�cally the core area. Allow for higher intensity uses for efficient use of land. Policies CCPl CCP2 CCP3 Revised �998 2(l02 Support the concentration of uses within the core area to create a financial, retail, a� business, civic, and cultural hub of Federal Way. Develop an attractive City Center that will attract quality development. �e�ise Continue to support land use regulations as-x�sas.s�s that allow the higher intensity development expected over the next 15 to 30 yeazs. VII-14 r � � u �� � �J � CCP4 �e Continue to develop a City Center that is the primary commercial area providing Iocal goods and services to the sunounding neighborhoods and re�io� and to residents and employees within the center. CCPS Complete an area-wide environmental imvact statement and SEPA Planned Action and �provide streamlined permit review in the City Center to accelerate changes to the core area. CCP6 Work with urban service providers to ensure sufficient capacity is available for development. CCP7 Allow for a variety of uses and mixed-use development within buildings, or complexes. Ensure that mixed-use development complements and enhances the character of the surrounding residential and commercial areas. C�'�8 ��*��,�;��, ,,, :a r *�, + i• . *•�.i �P9 CCP8 Provide incentives to encourage residential development in CiTy Center, core �€r-�e areas. CCP9 Promote the sitin� of cultural and civic uses within the Citv Center core. '�h Citv should alwavs consider Citv Center Core sites in sitin� analv_ses and decisions regardine potential civic and cultural uses that it develovs. In addition incentives should be exnlored that could attract cultural and civic uses over which the Citv does not have direct control. City Center Frame Area � � , , , • , , . , ,�o �;+., r.. . Establishing a City Center frame area provides a zone for dense mixed-use development that sunounds and supports the core. It also provides a transition between high-activity areas in the core area and less dense neighborhoods outside of the frame. �ri,o .,,.e�o..,.o ,.f�,,,,,�:,,,, .,��,. .,,..;.,�+o� a,...,.,+,.,,,., �+,.00.� a�.. .,,,a ,,;,.�,.. , The frame area allows uses that are similar to those in the core area, but are of lower- � density and intensity. � . Together, the core and frame areas aze � . Revised �899 2002 FWCP — Chaoter Seven• City Center VII-15 � � , FWCP — Cha�ter Seven, City Center complementary. Encouraging multiple unit housing mixed with business and commercial use will help Federal Way mee± regional land use goals. This is accomplished by encouraging the development of housing close to employment and transportation centers. To help transform the character of this land use designation, �be�s�s reQUlatorv and/or financial incentives should be a-�e�� explored in exchange for amenities �#is� that contribute to a more pedestrian oriented environment (Figure VII-3). Figure VII-3 Potential Frame Area Development Goals & Policies That Promote New Commercial, Residential, and Mized-Use Development in the Cit_y Center Frame Area Goal CCG14 Allow increased development of commercial uses while �increas�ing housing opportunities and diversity of housing types ' ,' Policies CCP10 Continue to develop land use regulations �e� that encoura�e the frame area to accommodate higher-density residential uses accompanied by residentially oriented retail and service uses. Revised 2899 � � � � � ,� � � � � vi�-� � 6 � �' � � FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center � CCPll Continue to �provide amenities such as community services, parks, and public spaces to meet residential needs. CCP12 Continue to ensure effective transitions between ' frame area development and nearby lower-intensitv development. Circulation � Federal Way's City Center � chapter is designed in accordance with VISION 2020 and CWPP related to mobility. Although regional travel trends continue to show more � cars on the road, more trips per person, and increases in the number of people driving alone, the emphasis of �a� the FWCP is to promote a variety of travel options. The City will focus both on transportation improvements as well as influencing individual travel choices by increasing the attractiveness of alternatives to the automobile. Encouraging growth in a compact, well defined City Center will help promote bicycling, walking, and transit use, as well as encouragin� shorter automobile trips. The City Center � will be connected to other regional urban centers and areas of the City by a multimodal transportation system, including a fast and convenient regional transit system. In order to function efficiently, mobility in the City Center must be enhanced by a�tg continuin� to make transportation improvements. The City should focus transportation investments in the City Center to support transit and pedestrian-oriented land use patterns. These improvements should include: a smaller street grid, bicycle routes, public sidewalks and pedestrian pathways, and clear and identifiable transit routes. These transportation improvements will also help meet City Center mobility needs in the event a HCT system is not developed. � Goal to Improve Overall Circulation � Goal � CCG15 Provide a balanced transportation network that accommodates public transportation, high occupancy vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, automobiles, and integrated parking. Automobile Circulation �; The current network of collector roads and arterials, the disjointed grid, and lazge block sizes contribute to significant traffic congestion within the City Center. The solution is not necessarilv to construct wider roads. Streets become less efficient as the numbers of � lanes increases. Building new streets •�•�*.'� �°•��°r'°�eFs versus widening existing streets is more cost effective, yields greater capacity, and will have less impact on the City Center. � Revised �998 2002 VII-17 � L_J FWCP - Chaoter Seven, City Center Automobiles are likely to continue as a dominant mode of transportation. A comprehensive network of collector arterials and other streets must be developed to distribute this traffic and create more driving choices. To the extent possible, the City should connect streets to form a tighter grid within the City Center, especially in the core, by negotiating new public rights-of-way and building new streets. This "interconnectivity" serves to shorten and disperse trips, and consequently reduce travel on existing congested arterials. Map VII-S indicates the proposed street network changes. Additionally, alternatives to auto travel such as van and car pools, transit, pedestrian corridors, and bicycle paths should also be emphasized. Goals and Policies to Improve Automobile Circulation and Reduce Usage Goal CCG16 Improve the flow of vehicular traffic through the City Center and minimize increases in congestion. � � Policies CCP14 Improve tr�c flow around and through the City Center by extending the � street network, creating smaller blocks, and completing the ring road along the west edge of the City Center. � CCP15 Reduce congestion by supporting the Commute Trip Reduction Act. Develop � commuting alternatives to single occupancy vehicles, including transit, � walking, and bicycling. CCP16 The City's LOS standard shall be based on average person-delay to allow lower LOS for single-occupant vehicles and support pedestrian-friendly designs and ' HOV treatment. ' --' - _ - - - = - - --- - - - Pedestrian/Bicycle Connections Pedestrian and bicycle mobility is a vital part of the future City Center circulation system. Improvements for pedestrians and bicyclists should support increases in transit services and promote the development of the City Center. � This � ch apter addresses the lack of pedestrian amenities and pathways by � recommending changes to the development patterns and transforming the character of the ' streetscape. As the street system is redeveloped to better accommodate the needs of pedestrians and bicyclists, a network of facilities for people on foot and bikes will be � established such as already exists for people in cars. Revised �9A9 2002 VII-18 � � � � LJ � �� � LJ � � � FWCP— Chapter Seven. Ciry Center � Revised �998 2002 Reducing the size of the street grid as proposed, improving auto circulation, and creating pedestrian paths through larger parcels is critical to establishing walking pattems that reduce dependency on the automobile. As individual sites are designed and developed to be more pedestrian friendly, and as the City provides improved pedestrian linkages, the pedestrian system will handle an increasing share of trips. As such, , , , , , , , • , � . the City adopted special street design standards for the City Center in 1998. These include 12-foot sidewalks with street trees and pedestrian- scale street_ lighting. As streets are constructed, additional amenities such as benches trash receptacles, and landscaped corner treatments mav be added. Bike lanes will also be provided in a�rid ti�hter than the rest of the City on throuQh streets that avoid multiple turn-lane conflicts. In addition to adding public sidewalks and creating mid-block pathways, Map YII-6 depicts three principal pedestrian connections to improve pedestrian circulation. The first is developing connections between the HCT station, adjoining bus transfer facilities, and other uses.. The pedestrian and bicycle system is essential to other travel modes, particularly transit. Virtually all transit trips begin and end as pedestrian trips on public rights-of-way. All buildings within proximity to these areas should be required to facilitate pedestrian and bicycle movement. The second o�al is to establish pedestrian and bicycle connections to SeaTac Mall, the �g�er�'-s Ci 's largest generator of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Linkages between the proposed transit station and the SeaTac Mall are important. Unfortunately, South 320�' Street is wide, congested, and presents a significant barrier to this connection. Providing an at-grade pedestrian and bicycle crossing could increase congestion and vehicular and pedestrian/bicycle conflicts. To facilitate this connection, and encourage redevelopment of existing parking areas, this � chapter proposes the continued consideration of a pedestrian bridge spanning South 320� Street. �-�: The pedestrian over-pass would create a major connection between two areas in the City Center that have a high potential for new development and redevelopment. The third goal is to connect the City Center to nearby neighborhoods and parks. Residential neighborhoods of varying densities surround the City Center. Steel Lake and Celebration Parks are located to the northeast and southwest of the City Center, respectively. Both pedestrian and bicycle trails should extend to these residential neighborhoods and parks. Roads extending to these areas should emphasize the pedestrian connection by including additional pedestrian amenities. In order to provide good pedestrian connectivity across multi-lane arterials such as South 320�' Street and Pacific Highway South, crossings should be provided more closely than the existing 1/4-mile spacing of traffic signals. Unsignalized pedestrian crossings would not be very safe, yet closer spacing of traffic signals make twaway signal coordination VII-19 � � FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center impossible to achieve, creating much more congestion and worsening safety and air quality. These conflicting needs must be resolved through the design process as these streets are reconstructed. Policies to Improve Pedestrian Connections �oal CCG17 Promote and facilitate the effective use of non-motorized transportation. Create a safe, e�cient, and enjoyable pedestrian and bicycle system. Policies �� CCP17 �Q CCP18 GG��B CCP19 � CCP20 Emphasize pedestrian and bicycle circulation as well as other travel modes in all aspects of developing the City Center transportation system. Include public sidewalks, street trees, and other pedestrian amenities for streets. �e Continue to enforce and refine local zoning codes, site planning requirements, and street design standards, as necessary, to establish a more pedestrian and bicycle friendly environment. Encourage new development to include active ground floor uses such as shops, community services, office, and housing units. Provide pedestrian �connections between adjacent buildings where possible to provide for streetscape continuity. Develop clear and safe pedestrian paths through lazge parcels to enhance the pedestrian network. �� CCP21 Continue to Ssite and screen parking lots to minimize impact on the pedestrian environtnent. � CCP22 Connect the main entry of buildings to public sidewalks by a clear, identifiable walkway. � �� � � � � � � � CCP23 Encourage transit use by improving pedestrian and bicycle linkages to the existing and future transit system, and by improving the security and utility of pazk-and-ride lots and bus stops. � Revised �8A8 2002 VII-20 � � � � FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center � � � � � ' CCP24 �� CCP25 GGGg� CCP26 Establish clear and well marked pedestrian crossings to reach transit facilities and other uses at a maximum spacing of 660 feet. Connect Celebration Park and Steel Lake Park via a pedestrian/bicycle pathway bisecting the City Center. Orient buildings, urban open spaces, plazas, etc., to pathways where feasible. � Continue to im�rove the appearance of, and pedestrian/bicycle circulation along, South 320 Street and Pacific Highway South. Transit Efficient, convenient, and reliable transit is important.to *'��°� the FWCC's emphasis to reduce auto dependency through the creation of viable travel options. Transit will play an important role in the development of the City Center and the region as a whole. A multi-modal system �s� that includes transit will bring commuters and shoppers to and from other areas of Federal Way and adjacent communities. A high capacity transit system with a principal stop in the core area will distribute people regionally and connect to other bus based transit systems. Transit stops throughout the center will help shoppers, employees, and residents to circulate around the City Center without the need to get into their cars. Encouraging a mix of land uses and densities at major transit access points will help meet passenger needs and reduce vehicle trips. High Capacity Transit � Sound Transit is working with Puget Sound citizens and City representatives to develop a HCT network linking Everett, Tacoma, Seattle, Bellevue, and communities between them. Four HCT stations are proposed in Federal Way, including one in the City Center core atea. � � Revised �A89 2(102 Map VII-7 depicts the approximate HCT alignment and location of the City Center station. The Federal Way Transit Center is currently located at the Federal Way Pazk & Ride. At the time of the adoption of the 1995 Ee��e�� FWCP, the City Center �1�� ch apter proposed a new location at South 312�' Street and 20'� Avenue South. The primary driver for this location was the assumption that light-rail between Seattle and Tacoma would follow SR-99. Since adoption of the plan, conditions have changed and discussion of alternate locations has emerged. Sound Transit's Sound Move Initiative allocated $4 Million for the construction of a new Transit Center, in coordination with the enhancement and/or relocation of the existing Transit Center and direct access ramps. VII-21 � � FWCP — Chaater Seven, City Center The Transit Center is considered by the City as a major anchor to the urban center designation in the Vision 2020 plan adopted by the PSRC. The location of the Transit Center should be surrounded by property that has potential to redevelop into transit- supportive uses, thus assisting to ensure both the success of the Transit Center itself and the economic vitality of the City Center. Based on these considerations, the Transit Center site has been selected. The site is located on the block bounded bv 23` and 21�` Avenues South, a� to the south of South 316`� Street. �s�la� The FWCP does not depend on the development of a HCT system. The proposed system is one of several transportation options. While HCT will help regional and local transportation needs, other modes will continue to play a vital role. Many of the characteristics that are desired within the City Center, and support HCT, also support other modes such as van/car pooling, busing, bicycling, and walking. To encourage transit use, the high capacity transit station should provide an inviting environment with comfortable pedestrian facilities, including shelter for waiting areas, convenient passenger drop-off zones, safe lighting, and street furniture. Conveniences like telephones, automatic teller machines, secure bicycle storage areas, and outdoor seating areas are also important elements of the station design. Provisions for vendors, small cafes, and carts will make outdoor spaces ��� livelier. Stores adjoining the station can take advantage of the concentrations of people by specializing in goods and services needed by commuters such as dry cleaning, videos, news kiosks, and day care. Federal Way's City Center station will be oriented principally to pedestrians and those arriving by other forms of transit. Providing for pedestrian/bicycle accessibility between surrounding properties, street network, general vicinity, park & ride lots, and the HCT is essential. Policies to Guide Transit Planning and Establish a City Center High Capacity Transit Station Goal CCG18 Work with the transit providers to develop a detailed transit plan for the City Center. Identifyfacilities, services, and implementation measures needed to make transit a viable and attractive travel mode. Tailor the plan to meet local needs through rapid transit, express buses, community service, and/or demand- responsive service. Policies �S CCP27 Focus transportation investments to support transit and pedestrian/bicycle- oriented land use patterns, specifically in the core area. Revised �999 2002 � � � � � � � � � � .� YII-22 ` 1 �J .� � FWCP — Chaater Seven. Ciiy Center , � � � � �� � � EC-�9 CCP28 Participate actively in regional efforts to develop an'��^'� ^�^�^:*�• *�°„°;* HCT system to serve the City Center. ra°^+;� �^a ^° - ° ^�*_^f �„��, f r 1,;..1, .. ..;+., +..� '+ .,1' + .�1 t +' 1 +' t .+, 't� a �r� � a' J YY J ' 11 1. F +1, T.7/ t ' *1�, �+. ��3� �t'����&F6g�S �V�3i6�l�rra-vvzcS�vrcnv-rxvrTfscvnrirrmv-zaccc�v �58: �� CCP29 Establish the most intensive levels of transit service to the City Center area. �33 CCP30 �� CCP31 �4 CCP32 C-G�3� CCP33 Integrate any transit system with existing or new road right-of-way. ���-a�}` Develop a bus transfer facility as part of a HCT station, on or off the street, �#is}� that will connect the City Center with other communities in the City. The HCT and bus transfer stations will set a high standard for design and compatibility with adjoining uses. Integrate the high capacity transit system with other transportation modes serving Federal Way and the region. Integrate bicycle and pedestrian facilities with and connect to high capacity transit facilities during right-of-way acquisition, facility design, and optional phases. Civic Bu�ldings and Open Spaces �l � Revised �998 2002 Public buildings including community centers, libraries, , performing arts theaters, conference centers, and schools provide places for the community to meet, exchange ideas, and socialize. The City should take advantage of every opportunity to locate a variety of civic buildings in and around the City Center. This will occw over time, but it is necessary to establish a clear direction through public policy. A network of outdoor spaces for recreation, strolling, gathering, and dining will make the City Center a lively and attractive place to live, shop, and conduct business. Each type of space should serve a range of users and activities. Outdoor spaces should range from a major urban park �s� that is the focal point for downtown, to pocket urban plazas for lunch time gathering by residents, visitors, and workers. Some spaces will be publicly built and maintained, others will be constructed along with private development. Privately VII-23 � � FWCP — Chaoter Seven, City Center developed gathering space is a major component of all City Centers: small parks and plazas are opportunities to enhance the urbanscape and image of the City Center. Courtyards, mews, and forecourts are ways to efficiently integrate open space to enhance a project. Visitors, shoppers, and employees often perceive these private spaces as public. The City should commit to assist in or provide incentives for, the development of plazas and parks that are open to the public. Map VII-8 proposes a central outdoor gathering place within the core area, such as a park, plaza, or square, which will become the focus of community activities in the core. Uses azound the edges of this plaza, such as transit facilities and cafes, should be sited to generate activity throughout the day. The edges of the plaza should be well defined and landscaped to soften the hard surfaces of adjacent buildings and streets. This space should be physically and visually linked to the central pedestrian spine and transit center. Policies to Promote the Development of Civic Buildings and Urban Spaces Goal � � � � � � � CCG19 Develop civic and cultural facilities in addition to a public space and park system within the City Center to meet the needs of residents, employees, and '� visitors. These facilities and spaces should connect to the Citywide and � regional system of public spaces, parks, and trails. Policies �� CCP34 Promote a diversity of public and privately funded recreational and cultural facilities throughout the City Center. Promote partnerships between the City and other agencies, private organizations, and individuals to develop and meet the needs of City Center and the general community for these types of facilities. � � �� CCP35 Emphasize locating civic and cultural facilities within the core. Planned public � facilities could include library, or performing arts complex. � �� CCP37 Acquire land necessary to provide a broad range of recreational opportunities throughout the City Center. Land bank parcels in the core area for future municipal facilities. � � , � -- — — _ - _ ��� � Revised �999 2002 vn-2a � � � � FWCP - Chaoter Seven, City Center � ��S �i� 7i :s � r. - �����--�3���6 ��ii-�E�iir6S-s�'uirS6t-&-rrr�r�rS��, •,•,•i ,• „ �civ'�i:'aii'i . � . � EE�-�A �l�v��,,,.,,, * � t,�• •+w• *�,e r�:,-., r ,•n � „ i;,,v..... °Psxx vrpavriP�puwTiiiaxxircixv-vrc�vvazcvi�"xxr�w�'cs'svrrznncx:a� Parking � The continued use of expansive surface parking conflicts with the goal of redeveloping the City Center as a higher-density, mixed-use area that is pedestrian-friendly and supports the use of public transportation. , � �_�";^�, ;° ^°,�°°*^°„ �.;°„a'•, °„,� �„^^^..�;•,° ^fu�T, �It is, therefore, necessary to reduce the need for parking and encourage the provision of structured parking within these areas. Moreover, parking lots have high redevelopment potential. There are numerous examples � of communities similar to Federal Way where former parking lots now contain multi- story developments. Large amounts of �parking will be needed for many years to come. However, as development pressures and land values increase, surface parking becomes � expensive and property owners will be able to afford the conversion from surface parking to structured parking. In the interim, the City should encourage site layouts �v#isl� that facilitate future redevelopment of parking areas. s' Private and public partnerships should examine the feasibility of constructing a parking structure in the downtown commercial core area. Figure VII-4 is a conceptual illustration � of the redevelopment of surface parking around a mall. Goal and Policies to Develop Alternatives to Existing Parking Development Goal � CCG20 Encourage the development of a higher-density, mixed-use City Center that in turn will #reduce the demand for large amounts of sepazate parking facilities ` for individual developments �#��e��. � Rev�ed �A09 2002 VII-2 _ 5 lJ �i FWCP — Chaoter Seven, Ciiy Center Figure VII-4 Potential Redevelopment of Surface Parking Areas � - � f ��.�' ���� �< ���� � \����i�� Ouer limr, purkF�g goraga, loaaer parkins �cqui�emmts and sha�ed yaskins ean �low�s� moro rntensiae derirfop�rnt ojland. Policies �� CCP39 Encourage public and private parking structures (below or above ground) in lieu of surface parking in the core area. As redevelopment occurs and surface pazkin� becomes increasin�lv constrained, Gconsider a public/private partnership to develop structured parking in the downtown commercial core area. GGP�3 CCP40 The City will encourage the provision of structured parking #�ex�e�se-e� Revised 2A99 2002 � !J � �� rni-2s ;� � � - � � FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center � � � � � � �' � Revised 2990 2002 �4� CCP41 �44 CCP42 G��4� CCP43 CCP46 CCP44 Buffer parking areas to increase compatibility between surrounding uses. For larger lots, provide substantial landscaping, special lighting, and pedestrian walkways. Site and orient buildings and parking to allow redevelopment of surface parking. Allow on-street parking to create a buffer between pedestrians and traffic depending on street characteristics and role within the City Center. On-street parking should be viewed as a component of the parking supply for the area. Encourage shared parking between uses to maximize the use of available parking within the City Center. Streetscape To improve livability within the City Center area, the City must complete the street network and � continue to develop streets in accord with its new street standards. The street grid must be well interconnected to make travel from one place to another as efficient as possible. The key to achieving this is to ��a consider streets as a network that will serve pedestrians, bicycles, and transit, in addition to automobiles. In areas where increased density is proposed, existing streets must continue to be retrofitted with sidewalks, street trees, street furniture, and other amenities. Allowing on-street parking also creates a buffer between pedestrians and vehicles. It also allows shoppers and visitors to park easily for short amounts of time. On-street parking should be permitted on City Center streets (where feasible) except during the morning and evening commuting hours when the extra lanes are needed to accommodate the extra high volumes of tr�c. The Transportation chapter illustrates several street standards developed specifically for the City Center area. These streets will connect to other proposed and existing streets to complete a street grid. Street standards for existing and proposed streets within the City Center can be found in the second section of the Transportation chapter. These standards also incorporate the City Center Street Design Guidelines adopted by the City Council in May 1998. Policies to Improve the Street Network and Streetscape Character Goal CCG21 �� Maintain street designations that reinforce the unique characteristics of the City Center. VII-27 � � FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center Policies �4'� CCP45 � 48 CCP46 � CCP47 �8 CCP48 �� CCP49 Continue to �acquire right-of-way, primarily through dedication from development, to complete and enhance the street network. Continue to �design streets as public spaces, with appropriate pedestrian amenities, trees, sidewalks, bicycle paths, transit services, street furniture, and trash receptacles. Continue to �construct streetscape improvements as an integral component of any roadway improvement. Encourage buildings to front or face public rights-of-way, providing clear paths from the sidewalk to all entries. Only SR-99 and South 320`� Street shall be wider than five lanes. 7.4 IMPLEMENTATION Developing a City Center will require collaboration between government entities, citizens, and developers. Phasing and development of certain elements, such as high capacity transit, are outside the City's control. Therefore, an implementation program must be flexible. It must also be tied to general goals, policies, and strategies rather than a detailed, step-by-step list of actions. The implementation section consists of: ■ A set of strategies to guide implementing actions; ■ An illustration of how these strategies can be realized over time; and ■ A 15 year action plan. Implementation Strategies Specific strategies must be pursued in order to coordinate various elements and actions that are dependent upon one another. For example, private development depends upon adequate infrastructure and amenities. Effective transit service depends upon supporting land use development to provide sufficient ridership. Residential communities require adequate transportation and services, a pedestrian friendly environment, open spaces, and jobs to foster a sense of community. In addition, much of the City Center's �� � � � � � � � R �� � � VII-28 � � � �� � � � � � � � � � redevelopment is dependent upon market demands and development that is not projected until abe�BA� the later years of the FWCP's plannin� horizon. .. . ����..;+.,+..� �;+,. ,...;a,. „* �,o „io „,e� �,o� o�nnc. However, regulatory and infrastructure actions must be taken in the interim to prepare for these developments. The following strategies forin the basis to achieve desired City Center development. ■�s�abksl� Maintain regulations to shape and influence new development �1- 20 ears . ■ Discourage low intensity auto oriented development in the core. Provide regulations and incentives to achieve a high intensity, mixed-use, pedestrian friendly development. ■ Encourage �-i���� residential development in the City Center frame area. ■ Encourage high-density residential development in the City Center Core (iJrban Center). ■ Allow short-term investment in the frame area that will support long-term core development. ■ Develop specific plans to construct needed street and infrastructure improvements (1-5 years). ■ Develop plans to define the location of street rights-of-way for completing the street grid and constructing transit facilities to provide predictability for developers. ■ Construct arterial improvements with associated landscaping and pedestrian amenities (timing set by capital facilities program). ■ Prepare a pedestrian and bicycle plan and construct sidewalks, pedestrian paths, mid-block connectors, and bicycle connections to all areas of the City Center and particularly to a transit center (ongoing effort). � ■�►�e�e�-a�� Consider development of structured parking facilities as needed to support more intensive development and gradually convert the core into less auto dependent area. � � � Revised �999 2002 FWCP — Chapter Seven. City Center ■ Develop parking standards for the CiTy Center Area. ■ Improve both local and regional transit service. ■ Begin new transit service configuration by adding a center bus stop and route buses to it (begin immediately). ■ Upgrade central bus stop to a transit center/station and enhance regional and local transit services to it (1-3 years). ■ Develop a regional HCT station at transit center (10-15 years). ■ Construct civic features, public spaces, parks, and other urban elements to create a true urban center and promote civic identity (5-10 years). VII-29 � � FWCP — Chaoter Seven, City Center Develop ma�or civic facilities in the City Center such as, , '' }` "''''' performing arts center, and recreation center, to generate social and economic activity (5-10 years). Add amenities to residential areas to build new neighborhoods (begin immediately as an incremental program). Include landscaping and pedestrian improvements in all street construction (incremental program tied to actual improvements). Phasing Transforming the existing downtown commercial core area into the proposed City Center is an ambitious task. It requires a significant transformation from a low-density, automobile oriented, largely retail area to a higher intensity, more pedestrian oriented mixed-use area. i ., ,.�,.,,, :,, �.�„�;,,�. .,.,,+o,..,�� �;co �. � � � a . The City Center � chapter acknowledges that the core will take some time to develop. The City can facilitate these changes if a series of small steps are taken over time. This is especially true if the steps are consistent with the emerging economic, social, and demographic trends. As is the intent of this plan, the phasing scenario presented here accounts for the timing of market projections and future actions. As noted above, the implementation strategy is keyed to projected trends and regional planning goals. Its form and chazacter, as envisioned in the � chapter, are dramatically difFerent from anything that now exists in the center. It will take some time for the development community to redirect its energy and investrnents to produce buildings that respond to the direction of the � chapter The demand for more intense development opportunities in the City Center is not projected ��sa�e within the next few years. In the meantime, there may be some deferred maintenance, short-term, high- turnover tenancies, and even vacancies, as the development community begins to assemble property for future redevelopment. The City should not encourage continued low-scale investment in this area, since it will need to be amortized over a decade or two and will delay accomplishment of preferred development. As regulations are applied to modest renovations, it should be possible to secure some basic improvements. However, the City should not expect full implementation of the vision for the City Center until owners are ready to install long-term, major development projects. Figures VII-S and YII-6 and Map YII-9 (located at the end of t#�s the chapter) illustrate key steps in the evolution of Federal Way's City Center from 1995 through 2025. The illustrations are taken from a viewpoint just north of South 316`� Street between 20`� Avenue South and SR-99. The drawings do not necessarily indicate recommendations for specific sites. The locations of the elements and the time frames may well vary. For example, tlle 1, ;� , •• , r• ,, •;tv tr�n��t lina m�u• �»,,,,• t•� +i� a•� + t• + ,� +i, ' FiQure VII-6 shows an elevated li�ht-rail line that mav not be routed to Federal Wav durin� this plannin� horizon. The drawings do illustrate how a viable City Center can evolve through several coordinated, incremental steps taken over time. The approximate dates are based on current market demand and Revised 2899 � i � � � � � � ,� � � � vn-�o � � � �J i � � � � � � � � � i„�+;,,,+e .,,.,,;,,,, .,,,a ae�;,.., ,.,,;aot• � +a .t, . i � „�r:r.,+a „a ,ie ,;aol;.,o� f +1, �.� *1, + o ,.o ...,......... ...,...::g �., 6AF@: ■ Develop a pedestrian/bicycle plan that outlines a connected, safety-oriented system of routes and facilities. This � chapter shall be used in programming capital projects, reviewing development proposals, and encouraging other agencies to integrate bicycle improvements and linkages into Federal Way projects. The plan should emphasize linkages between transportation facilities, Celebration and Steel Lake parks, SeaTac Mall, and surrounding communities. ��r�tts. ■��ep Continue to plan for and develop a-parks and public spaces � � within the City Center. Begin negotiations for acyuisition of land for a City Center park, plaza, or square. ■ `��#�e�ssa��: Complete streetscape improvements alon� the South 320`�' Street corridor. � r„ , o00 +�,e �;... ,,,;a a�, �� � • ■ Continue to �improve SR and establish mid crossings. � r,,,,,..to*o �wo u;,,,. u,,.,a �� n��� ■ Complete the BPA bike trail. � ■ Continue to �negotiate and acquire rights-of-way to augment the City Center street grid. During permit review, ensure that new development is compatible with the street grid. Construct street �rid enhancements. � � Revised 2698 2002 FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center funding projections. However, new trends, funding priorities, and development opportunities may emerge, changing the timing. An illustration of 1995 conditions is included for reference. '� -�� 2002 — 2010 Actions �� VIi31 � � FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center ■ Develop a. transit center ' . Focus transit activities in the City Center core. ■ Construct streets to serve the transit facilitv. ■ Begin negotiations to form a public private partnership to provide structured parking near SeaTac Mall. Construct the parking structure. � r,,,,�+...,,.* �+..so* .,..:a e„t,�„ o o„+� � �.To,,,,+;,,+o �,.. +t,e ur•r ,.,...,.;a,... ,.,.,,,.e,.t;e� .� „�.,.,,,.� +�,e ..sae�+..;�., „ � z�n� ■ If the for or L__: �� � � �� � I � I ! I � I � I � u„ta ,. „o*;.;,.,, +,. ao�:,.,, �;h, u.,�t r + r•�, u it ■ Enhance educational and recreational opportunities in City Center. �nn�.��� 2010 — 2020 Actions ■ Construct a City Center park with public amenities such as fountains, sculptures, and unique landscaping, separate from Celebration Park. ■ ''xg Potentially construct public-private parking garages. ■ Potentially construct the pedestrian overpass across 320'� Street, and build phase one of the Citv Center pedestrian mall. ■ Improve community-wide transit service and implement a"spokes-of-a- wheel" service delivery pattern with City Center as the hub. Revised 2999 2002 � � � � � I vit�2 � � ' � � � � � � � � � The following have been accomplished to implement goals and policies of the City Center chapter since the initial adoption of the se��s� FWCP: ■ In 1996, the City adopted code amendments for the City Center Core and Frame to allow for increased residential density and flexibility in siting residential uses. T'he City also adopted Community Design Guidelines intended to improve the appearance of non-residential buildings and to expand pedestrian circulation, public open space, and pedestrian amenities. ■ In 1998, in conjunction with King County/METRO, the City improved loca} and intercity transit which should result in more people having access to shopping and other opportunities in the City Center. Since that time, the Citv has worked with the transit providers to develop a detailed transit plan for the C� Center, including sitin� and initial desi�n work for the Citv Center Sound Transit station, as well as imnrovement of two pazk-and-ride lots. � ■ In 1998, the City adopted policies to provide stre�tscape enhancements �le�g t�e-�9�-se�e� and development of standards for streetlights, street trees, and their placement and location in the City Center. Since that time, � substantial progress has been made, with full improvement alon� this corridor from I-5 to 11�' Avenue South. ■ The City has an adopted TIP and CIP plan which addresses major street � improvements in the City Center. Minor collector and local street improvements would be provided by development as redevelopment occurs. � � Revised �999 2002 FWCP — Cha�ter Seven. City Center ■ Seriouslv explore the feasibilitv of Gconstructi� a performing arts center and develop an implementation plan. ■ Establish �be�e€ green parks and corridors throuQhout the Citv Center and/or along �e a City Center pedestrian mall. � r•,,,,�,�... + *�, ur�r � • . '�'�c�Ai3Sa�"'u' v Activity Since 1995 Comprehensive Plan Adoption � :�v-v��'�xzvo°i �a� l.;ro.7 .�.. �......n,..: Tlo . 1 r 4�. *' 1. 41. o m.�ir� r�i r�n4i�.�n .. 0 4�r. �a +�� �.� /�'��4. (� f /Tl 4 f � � ' . In 2001, the City created an Economic Development Division within the Communitv Development Services VIi33 � � � , FWCP — Chaater Seven. City Center Department and hired a Deputy Director to manage it. Among the Division's duties are te lead efforts to encoura�e City Center redevelopment, attract businesses and developments, and increase visitorship to the City Center. ■ Phases I� a� II, and III of the BPA trail have been constructed a��kase�� „.�,o „o,.,,,;,+:.,,, �+.,,,o ■ Infrastructure improvements: ■ 1999 – South 312�' Street between Pacific Highway South and 23`� Avenue South Roadway widened to four lanes; sidewalks constructed; street lighting and street trees installed. ■ 1999 – South 312`� Street and 14�' Avenue South—Pedestrian Crossing Signal added. ■ 2001 – Pacific Hi�hway South/South 320`� Street intersection— Widen roadway and add new turning lanes at each leg of the intersection. Also add street li�hting, street trees, install architectural and IandscapinQ elements at each corner of the intersection, and under�round utilities. ■ 2001 – SeaTac Mall surface water conveyance system upQrade. ■ 2001-02 – South 320�' Street between 1 l�' Avenue South and Interstate 5—Under�round utilities, widen sidewalks where necessarv to add new streetlights, install street trees behind the sidewalks, and install medians where feasible. Add dual left-turn ■ 2002 – 23' Avenue South between South 324`� Street and South 316`� Street Widen roadwav to five lanes and add new sidewalks street IiQhting, and street trees. Install new traffic si�nals at South 316�' Street, South 317`� Street, and South 322" Street. ■ 2002--Comnleted the Rine Road (14�' Avenuel_ ■ 2002 – South 31 Z'° and 14� Avenue sipnal to full traffic signal. ■ New Private Development: ■ 2000 – Courtyard Marriot Hotel ■ 1999 – Marie Calendar's Restaurant ■ 1999 – Holiday Inn Hotel ■ 1999 – Extended Stay Motel ■ 1998 – Comfort Inn ■ 1999 – Walmart ■ 2001-02 – Pavilion Centers, Phases I and II ■ Renovated or Remodeled Projects: ■ 1998 – SeaTac Village ■ 1998 – Sunset Square (Safeway and Longs Drugs) ■ 1999 – Ross Plaza (Rite Aid and Party City) ■ 1999 – Indochine and Genghis Khan Restaurants Revised 2A99 2002 � � � � � � � � � LJ � � � � v�i-�a � �� , ' ' � � � ■ �e�� ��� � ,�-��: , , �—�BAA D.,,.;�� u:,,�, e .�,ie +t, z�n� „a �,�a „,. �.. � + �, i v.�, . +• n i aa r..00+ +..e ��., i i t, •+ �, i a� a i +� � s� °� , � • � ■�9A�� 2002-03 – Pacific Highway South between South 312`� Street and South 324�' Street Widen roadway, add new sidewalks, street lighting, street trees, landscaped raised medians, and underground utilities. � � � �AA�-- c^�� �' �ve�t�e-�et�t�-�� ���e�s��e � ,,.7 ,.+;l;+;o ,•,1 •a t _ ..t,. ..._ ..aa _ ._,.. °� ` -- �oo+l;.,l,+� „�+�11 �+.. ++.. h 1,' ,a tl, ',a ll- .1 'l.l ..� 11 b' � ' � � 71T/Tt � , _ ■ 2003 – South 314`�' Street and 23' Avenue South--Conshuct traffic siQnal � ■ 2003 – I-5/Citv Center Access Studv—Develop plan to increase capacitv between Citv Center and I-5 to improve and/or supplement the existing South 320�' Street interchanQe. � ■ 2003-04 – Potentiallv locate �new municipal facilities ! 2003-OS – Sports and Multipurpose Fieldhouse—potential proiect. � , � � � Rev�sea �eee 2002 � FWCP — Chaoter Seven. City Center PROPOSED PROJECTS ■�88-3 2004 - Flyover ramps from I-5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes connecting to South 317`� Street. ■ �9�� �e�t#-�`�-a�d-�4�' ■ 2004 - South 317`� Street and 23`� Avenue South--Construct Sound Transit's Federal Wav Transit Center ■ 2004 - Add tum lanes on South 324�' Street at SR-99. � vu-�s Figure VII-S Illusiration of City Center,1995 Conditions • • � • • • S. 320th Street • • • • • • 20th Avenue S. Pac'�fic Highway S. - • • • • ; �••••••-Executet �•••••••S.316thStreet i�� � ii� �71 � ::'/�, =1� - � Map VII-1 Vicinity Map � � �� � i � � 1 i� �� � � � 1 1 � � t� Map VII-2 Boundaries of City Center Area �� ° �� p ooQoo� ° Q� 6 �Q9GJb o. 4 0 o Lake �0�� 0[5 °a o ba Q � � ��{y EaSte! � p � � ��� Q � .a ,[,l�o p o p �p f� O p �7 U � U � � � � oQ d ��PPO oas�o p d n o 0 0 0 opFj p o0 �.o � S 312th St � � • o ❑�OOOOmP D � ,J� fYL d�.�� 9 �� o. � a��a fl d� � g L � almarf ��''��?�� � � o � C � g� 8° o o �' � O� Pavi/lions o � v>�� �/1 � o p 0 na �t � Q4 Rp q� CenVe ❑� o Hil/side > o � q °tl °� o �� v ���q p � o � "' Plaza ��_'�, Steel Lake � o'� $ ��. �' 4 ° � d o � � � Park N � ° �° � 6 �O �❑ g roP Target � �°� 0 � 6 � Food � �°�°° CCi �Ip o 9 ❑o �o o�o q� � � Ll � Ha�� s i��m °° 8 ° �o 00 �' ° St �5��3 � � wonsono �o Oo qdd90dop� D ❑ � � a �m� aa a � fl �� d �����' O p Q � �o ° o� [3 D 1.r�� ooClGaaod3�ra 6 O � Q O�°" " � o Q Q � i I �I�� 4��G�DGt�Cp C7 � ❑ t � Gateway i oo � a � O n � �� Center � � � � 3 � . SeaTac U �� � � � � Vil/age o � Plaza '�� LJ � ��� 3� �� S 320th St �❑ �� � O Q � a Q o 0 4 0 0 � p ` 0 a 4�� � � � N p d 4 � p � � Ross � Q �� �� Sateway PIaZQ ea lac Mall � d ° �� �o a . � � � � d Existing �� 0� 0 0 � S 324th St Ra�rk 8 y 0 o� Q�� o t� d���4 O � ° Q .; °� d � � p �. �t� �_n ❑ °u � � � Celebration ������ � ti . ° Park � ������° ,�, � no Q a ��3� / 1V` City Center Boundary 0 City Center 0 Park ;'\ Map Date: February, 2003. � N 0 500 1,000 Feet I ��__ �_ �__ � urr o� � Federal Way TNs map is accompanied by no warranties, and ia simply a grapNC represenla0on _ __ Map VII-3 The Concept Plan i � � � �DU Q OOQoo U � p � 6 �G7qG]p �. p� � Lake � 0 e� 9� � dd p � � Q�i� Easier ('�o Q O 0 ��° Q � ed [7� f� p 9 0 0 lIo � �`J ❑ � �� oo n c � o 00 0 00 � P ❑ fS S � ° o P d �bP Poa.aq � L7 o O �? th St L1 � ' 0 �' ° �°� ' � � ,, � ��-� p � �O ❑ � � ❑ �OOOC7mP CI � g 9 o� a 9 d � �` � � almart � � ��� �� o �00� ��• o$ oo � p � Pavildions o a �� � � e o❑ � O�, °� 4 � � Centre ❑ � � d d 8 od o a4 t , S Nillside > � � o d � p'p c9 Q g q C N Q a o o ��t> O[ PldZa � lS a �o �; �' q � '� o Steel Lake � ° ��• ° ° ' 0 Park N � Q od c � o da bo o at�a o❑ � rop 2rget ��o o / � b�oo oa o�.oa p p � � Foo o ao �o � c ❑ fl � �o �S�Q � r�,� � 0 O o9dd9odop� = St 0� °� �r HiphSc �a 0 � � u � ---�,� �"� a _ � �����° ° ° � 0 ° �o°` ; , ° � � � � 0 � � qocL��dS�qo C 0 q�o ��mdc�� (c �9� � � t •+• �Ce�rter oo � o � � ��� � � q� � SeaTac � �� Center n � � � Village o� Plaza � � � � cID . � 0 � s ocn sc .❑ ��R � � fl p ❑� o o �� Q� �ic Q � d � Cr� ❑ � N 40 0 � � � � �� � Ross � � Safeway Pl�a j ' � ° �� � � �'. ❑�° � �� � � Exisrrng � O o � o � S 324th St Ratlk 8 � o � O �� o ° Celebratio Park � '� � � Q d C° D ❑ � °� a �o ❑ o Ilfl� ° U 0 '�'`" New Transit Center U City Center Core � Potential Pedestrian � City Center Frame Crossings �I Park Potential Bike Route �! Transit Street H Enhanced Street Netwc�rk TNS map is accompanied by no warranties, and is simply a grapMc representa9on l� . . . . . , . „ � Map Date: February, 2003. i N 0 500 1,000 Feet I � _ _ ��— _�__� � Federal Way � i �1 Map VII-4 City C;enter Land Use Designations � � �a � 00000� � � Q apqab �. 4 0 �� lake �0�� � o� e� 9� ° dd p � Eastet n O d' t7 (� �d o � p 9 p a� Q�•� U'o � �� o p 0 0 �� . p o o� o 0 � � o O 0 o p 0 0 P ❑ 0 oP d �C��Q� �PPq p — ogi a,0 ° 0 3 312th St � 0 ' � �'000ama o � � � �o o a 0 �o � g ao 0 o d � �9 g almart ���?�� � oa �� o ° oo � O Pavilkons o � v�� ❑ N 0. � ��� g 4� � Cenb�� o O d v d o0 0 0 . p a ,� q p S Hillside > ❑ > q ° Q�� �° �; q p o �sj Steel La ke � o� � N o aa bo o at4o 0o Q ° o � a/ et P a r k � 47 � d�1 O� 00 �R}OQ p p 6 I � o I I �o o OQ �o� w � P ❑ Q �� �o � 4� Harry S 7ru � Oo qd69oddp� � ---� ��..y,�sit+•++s++« S � u ��� �� °� � H;pnSc o p � +.w-.,. � o � ��"°�o°`� a ❑ '3 � � � � � � C��i��Cso'�Y��. � eO � i 0 d� mr�a�oCS�.. a �.� Q y -- 0 ��----77 qoo pc�C'�°°oR�p� O ,� � � a � Gateway � o 00 0 � ( Cerrter a I � ° � D� �� � n SeaTac � ! J L� � �� � i! Vil/age o� Plaza C'm LJ � � � � s32on,st � � � °, ;� O o0 � Q ❑9� 0 � � U 4� � Q L � •� N � 4 � Ross � � ��" � � Safeway Plaza �j � o �� o �� � ea Tac Mall L1= ❑�° � 0 0 � fl �� � �ar;,� � � � O �.� � S 324th St �k a u e � � o Q�O . � Q d� 0❑ � � ¢7 P ° � �°��� 1�� ° � a� � a �o � oU ,�.c e Celebration �������� ti Park � ������ � I N City Center Boundary , •"» Core/Frame Divide � City Center Core 0 City Center Frame 0 Park TMs map is accompanied by no warrerities, a�W is s�mply a grapluc represenia9on 0 � Map Date: April, 2002. N 0 500 1,000 Feet I �_ _ � 1_ - 1 -� � Federal Way � I Map VII-5 IEnhanced Street Network � � � O� Q OOQooP� � GIO 6 OG1qWq �. 4 � �� Easter o ( � � D � Q d' � e� d(1y ��p "° p p o p � Q�� CCo�O �5 ° 311�SY O000 � � OP ❑ �° oP ° d !] �pPl�o oa.oq p �� � n � ��� °° 72th St � � e� _ o o' • [ L 7 a C I' ( � � ❑ fl000wa O C � � fY� � �� °�d,� �� 1 a ��O � ; � a o�II L1 d � � � ' � � aimart � ���?��IU � o �00� ❑ o° o 0 0 ' p O 1 P avi l lions o Q N� � � o o ° �p D O a � i� I Q 4 R p C 1 CenVe ❑ � S Hi l lsi de � > � ��°" d o o ° 9� � o ��- —.� �' �.,� N P/aza Steel Lake = o� c� � g��`.'� Q�° od � t � o �� � � Park �� o� a�o a a�'a o❑ c{ �oo� � ar get �� �� a � � . �00000�.aa op ffi , � � � �py o�°(�oo � � ��, °° Q ' o0 00 �' ° St O o a��� ° � � Niph Sc� � U ��9dd90ddLafSa �' 0 0 ���� a" L�J b x � � ] � � �' � C�'�� °�\50�� � � 0� m�arnoa� a� � � 1' �� .� � q°o �G�o�cLP� p *. � °� � o � L v �.. � � rsm �.... � Gateway � o � , '� �0 � � Center I 1 � a ��� o ,�� �1 � 4� � � SeaTac � Center � � , � ;� � � � � V�l/age 0 ❑ / Plaza � � ��� s�sotn si G� C] �� 1 o Q fl a� o o� Q o o J�� � 0 Q � � � o ` . tr._.= s 3 � ,:� 6 � 4 � . ' � - �' � �� N . •._.. �,o �� � Ross , 1 I 1 � Q � Plaza 1 � ( � � �� � a Safeway � ] � � ' � �� �! � �V(� a.r � r s L� �r � D �� � � � �� ; � � - � � � ��� �� ! ( � f.l'ASIIlIil �� 0 ' S 324th St N i � Paik S o� oo� Ride � 0 A ,., � �,� e ��j Q�Q o �;` Q O CO �� � QX�t7a7d�7 a]SS� 9� o ` d p � d�JO ❑ o� � � Uo� � �� oQ ° Celebration �� ti � ° Park p ��0 n 0 n � n 0 .. � °�o� ° ° II��II�IIII�r n n� no a ���� d �k� � �ch�. Intersection Street Recently Improvement Canstructed or De�dicated ROW �' New Traffic Signal �� City Center Core H Existing Street � City Center Frame �,� Proposed Street � Park ^I Scheduled Street Improvement TMS map is accompanied by no walrerrties, and is simply a grapNc �epresentation ; \ Map Date: February, 2003. � N 0 500 1,000 Feet I I � l _ _�__J ,. o� , ___ Federal Way Map VII-6 Principal Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections 00 `�� a ��� � U p � � n � 6 (Soo ° o � ¢ �pqW � a.0 � Lake ° o � ° p p o o � ao Q�� Easter � ° Cd� �6� �o0 6° a o 5 � oP ° d �] orapo p �� O � a�l 0 v0 0 0 � 21fi 3t L1 0 Q, [� • � yJ7 � ❑ - O � �47ooOmP O � � u � LJ a/mart � � o ���LJO � �� � ]m �^'� y S)��Q �7 d �pQ � � g � � � � � �OW $�• o❑� o O 0• � O 1 Pa villi0ns o a t/> � � o o❑ � O p ° �, �p G� CenVe ❑� � d � d od a9 t � 4 � Hillside > ° ` � o � p'p cy 4�0 CL r -, N � � 0 8� � o c! �..�, ., � Plaza Steel Lake ��`� a n o � g��. ��° od �� 0 o w �. Park � 0 oa bo 06 C�0DO �M roP� '`Target ���o��, / �� d�00000vr�o op c� I�� Fooa� �� �(� o �? o°oa°� r+a�,rsr��° �° ' oo ❑o th St � I" I � ���° � Hiph ScM � ��9dt�q��dp� � �� � � �o p ° ��p �� u � � � � � ��p�C3 o� [3 p ° °, � � � 1___—_� `� C3(��'�" a d m����amo c 1 o � r d q�o 4��°��c�� (�� �' "°' q �' t r �....�. � �s� 6 ' � � Gateway � Q� � Cemer ��� ��` � � g �� � ��� a � 1 � � SeaTac � � o° �� D� � � � � Village o � P/aza n ���� ° N ��o�� �� °���' O � S Z�th St ❑ 0 Q �� o o� o � � �� �1 G (} 44ri � �� � � ' � � N � V 40 og �� - Ross , 1 1 � a Safeway � � ii �Y�i. �. � � � � � Plaza �b�, � �.,.� � .. � � "�. � �❑ o o � o ° �� � �� i � � � E �.� d � G O� S 3 2 4 t h S t ' � 1 Park 8 Ride �+ � ����� , � ° 0 0 � m �� 1 � a r z� a �aa� m e ` � °�� Q d� U� ❑❑ U � Op �"a � oa � � r� Celebration ������� � , ° Park � ������r n no Q ���o p � � � New Transit Center Potential Bike Route ui■! Potential Pedestrian C� City Center Core Crossings 0 City Center Frame N Existing Street � Park I ��l Proposed Street � Map Date: February, 2003. i N 0 500 1,000 Feet �—�L--� __ 1 � Federal Way This map is accortpanied by no warreMies, aM is simply a grephic representatlon i� � i Map VII-7 ` Potential Transit Alignments and Stops c� - CI �" SI � � � a C� O O(� � q� 6 OL�qL� �-'Oj ° p� �� Lake �� a � o a a `� ° do p � � Easter o O � d � e � o p a p �� 0�� �0� ���S812{F�SY O �00 00 ° ° e � OP 0 °u � � � � � � � � � � � � oQ d �] °�]P P�OP1�q p �: �� • o ao� o il 0 1 th St � � � � ❑ flooOmP O � � ❑ (�k � �� ��W �L� U ' _ O �O � �' ao � t7 � � �9 � ; � d almart � ���?��U� � o , �oa ��• 0 8 0 0 0 � O Pa viUions o a � v>� � p. o p• 4� a� t g Q 4�� �' Centre ��� � Hillside �> ❑ Q d � ° d� o � 0 8 0 o Ct _• o � � � a r� �' P/aza ❑� n -�b ❑ o �J Steel Lake � o o�p` .�� °°� o � � o •I Park N� d o da �oo o ac�o o❑ � � r Target � ��o �, _� 0 9 � d{? OD O� O�.pO p p 6 '� � Food St '�� 0 � � a� � �rry S Tr�m � ��9db9o�ol�� � � �d � � NighScM �a (�1 � e � 0 o a °�'�°°° n , a a� L_1 � � �� a �� ��0�'� � o � o � � • � � � � / D 22 oo�oGS�mo a� � �; ■� � � � � � � �r � q°o �°dP°�oc�� p C� �Q � � _ � � � � / s Gateway a 0 0 � �� � ' � Cerrter � � a �, � � SeaTac � � � �� �� � � � Vil/a e Center � � � � � � � D � �' a � � 9 ❑ ❑ P/aza � �, � � � � � ° S�Oth St = ❑ O ! � a Q ❑ � Q o 0 1� S 3 � ��� ��� �� � �� � � � � � � �� � ��� � �t p c.� � � Q o �S � q s 111 ��� (} � 4 f7 i ' L1 N h� � 4a � � LF � L � � �o� � ROSS � � U a Safeway Plaza ' �j �b � � � � ea Tac Mall "� b � a� . . � ❑ � � � � Existing o � d � � O S 3ytth St � R� s „ O a o � Q0 � "� • o � 1 Q ° o m O ���, , u � � ' d Uo 0 0� � �q � �e O Celebration ������ � ti , � Park � � � p p�0°O °� � ������r���, n no ° o no a ��3� /, ''""""' New Transit Center � City Center Frame � N Potential HCT alignment (2 Alternatives) � Park ��� Potential Transit Routes • Potential Transit Stop � City Center Core ,; � Federal Way Map Date: February, 2003. 0 500 1,000 Feet �__� _� i � Map VII-8 Potential Open Space and Bicycle Routes 0 � n Q � p0° p OOlS°°QD � Q� Q �GlqWc'�l ❑• Q� �� Lake ° 0 e❑ °o � r,c, p 0� Q�� Easter � � � OO � � � d� �° o � ❑, o � �o � � � � � o❑ � 0 0 0 oo� j o op � P ° Sl aQ d �] �QPOO oar�o p �� � �� M1 St C 1 � O,, d. ❑ o' _ � ❑ � �. °�n ❑(1 ❑ �7O Ik � � ❑ �OOOOmP U � � �h � o C� � dJ LJ a � �� ° � a o � a � d � � � �a � almart � ���? �° �"c� ° � o a ��• o � o O � r 0•°� O� PaviUions o a tn� N 0. o❑ 0 �p� aq i g� p�p q� CenVe ❑� � d d d od o �� o o d 4 aq p s Hillside > � ' q � o �� a o Q„ • o p� � r Piaza �? a ❑ c� r� �❑ o � Steel Lake � o c � U Q�� �7 o o�� a� O o e�r--� Park N !3 :o o ba'flo 06C�aoo � D u �� �� o � ' � T B� o a �9 � �OO��o�AO pp p 0 � d I4 �����70 HarryS�ru � ��9dt�90ddp� �� � t �1 ��d� � � H�ons� �a 0 � a �q�op�oop a � � � �� � ����� � C°i � 0 ° 0 � o r L3 O "• p � � � C�p�o �" � 0 d oor�'b�oLSr� LS qoo C�Gn�000m� � � � � a Gateway o � ° 4� o p L � Ceirter l � ��� ° ,',• � �J � C � � � � ���s ochsc �❑ � � C Q � �� � � Q � 44f} IS o � �] � � � � Ross � a Safeway Plaza a � o ❑ � � C� � 0 ° 0� 0 0 � s; �� O o U O ° Q� � Celebration ������ � ti Park Q ������ o SeaTac � � V�llage ❑ � Center PIaz p � a fl aQ❑o 4 0�� � � N � . � � . ; .. . .. .. .. , . • .. . .. .. �� 1 ■ . ,.����i�N�i���qil.l.1�;���u�„Y��,t l J 4���.1�1�1tl�•N' ��1�11• M ■1 � .� � ! �� �� : ., ,�� •.t►Ei��a;r,�� L7 - . r ; �1' ;• ; � .. . ,, , _ = �` "``" • � f- �,� ���,♦ ♦ � . `��i��_��,s ���:�' i�,� . � • _ i 1 . .., :L�!.�.. _ _ � + �� _*.j = � N Existing Bicycle Route U Park ��' Planned Bicycle Route N Target area for Civic Center 0 City Center Core � City Center Frame TMs map is accompanied by no warranties, and is simply a grephic rep'esentatlon ;'\ Map Date: February, 2003. �� N 0 500 1,000 Feet � ___ �� ,. o� �. Federal Way Map VII-9 Phasing Concept 1995-2005 �-• LI� �° � " L�J �a P ooQooQO ° Q� 6 QW9GI� o. ao o Lake �� o � 0[� 9� � da p q � ��� Eas�r p � 0 0 �� � � � ,0 C� o p 9 p �p fJ � O U� U � � ❑� �0 0 o O � Op� p o� �.p � � 0 � . OQ d �] �CIPP oOPPq Q [ k... O^ g 9��n1 � � � ,� 6 t� L5 0 ❑ °� p /� ❑�o ❑ i7ooC7mP C� C . � (�k ��O o � L 4 ° � a o�� � d � � � d almart � �����IJ� �� d 0 ��� o�° o o p O Q PaviOions o a rn N � � ° ❑ p o �, ° � 4 � � CenVe ❑ �� � d °' d o o aQ r , S Hillside � � ' 0 0' c7 �? �o c O q °° o o �° �� L � � N p�aza �j Steel Lake t o� a ��".'� Q� od � 0 0 `''_" Park �� o d a b o o a c� a o❑ � rop Target ���o �, �9 �°�lO�0OO�0 �p � � � Food� S t � po O�Q�4,' Na�rySTiu� Oo 9dd9d�dC�� � � � � �� � � HiphSc �o 0 0 � p� c� b � �{� C � Q����� o a �o B '. Q d� ooc�lo��d�ao C � �� � � qoo ��dc�p� � ;��� ,r t . Gatewa � � � � Cerrter y /, ad ��� o � � � � a � ���° S 320th St C � � � �� � Q ��� � � poO � Ross � � Safeway P/aza j �. 0 � � o � :� �� ❑�� � � ° ° � � � o �°� �� ° [ ��o � � Celebration ������ � ti Park � o o � � [ ;:`� � � SeaTac y; Center 0 Vidage ❑� ks P/aza � � p o a� aQo� _� oo � � 0 � � � �(�j� �/�/ 4 .T ��� ��^ N LJ V ° � Sea Tac Mall � � u$ �g� v � ' �-- _,___� . � ���,� l24th St � �' Parkd �' ��;_ R;d� � m 0❑ �ca�tOdGCAM a] e ° a�oo� ° � ����� / o v°o �,o a ��- Scheduled Street N Street Improvements Improvement Recently Completed Pacific Hwy South - Widen Road to include HOV lanes {� New Transit Center and underground utility poles. Add sidewalks, street � Intersection lights, trees and landscape median. Improvement � City Center Core Proposed Right of Way 0 City Center Frame �] Park � Map Date: February, 2003. 0 500 1,000 Feet L _ �L_. L _ 1 ,� Federal Way This map is accompanied by no wa�renties, and is simply a grephc representaoon J � / � � 1 � � � � � � � LJ �� � � ' , CHAPTER EIGHT - POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREAS 8.0 INTRODUCTION The Growth Management Act (RCW 36.70A. 110, GMA) requires each city to identify an Urban Growth Area (UGA) for itself. A city's UGA is, within certain counties, the unincorporated area surrounding the city that is characterized by urban development and can accommodate additional urban growth with services bei�g provided by the subject city. In King County, the Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) refer to a city's UGA as a Potential Annexation Area (PAA) so that it will not be confused with the Countywide UGA. 'This chapter includes state, regional, and local planning policies that relate to PAAs, summarizes the process and reasoning associated with designating of Federal Way's PAA, and provides policy guidance for future actions within the City's PAA. -rh, r•r. � ,� nn n • � ,� � t ,� � ,.�.o,� ir;.,,. r �;n, rizv-v t r ^ i a � . The Federal Wav PAA is comprised of two separate areas with a total estimated population of 20 960 in 2001. The larger of the two areas is approximatelv 5 000 acres in size and is located to the east of the existin� City limits along the I-5 Corridor The smaller of the two PAA areas is approximatelv 50 acres in size and is located west of Pacific Highwav South (SR 99) and south of South 272° Street at the existin� northwest Citv limits in the Redondo Nei�hborhood. 'r'��° �° °^ °r°° These areas are characterized by urban type growth where urban services (including water, s�� wastewater, police, fire, general government, transportation, parks & recreation, etc.), can be most efficiently provided by the City of Federal Way or other special service districts. 8.1 STATEWIDE PLANNING GOALS Three of the 13 statewide planning goals contained in the GMA relate directly to urban growth areas and PAAs. The three relevant goals aze: ■ Urban growth. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist, or can be provided in an efficient manner. ■ Reduce sprawl. Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. ■ Public facilities and services. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. ' FWCP — Cha�ter Eiqht, Potential Annexation Areas 8.2 COUNTYWIDE PLANNING POLICIES In King County, the CWPPs that were enacted pursuant to the GMA also provide guidance with regard to multi jurisdictional joint planning, annexation, and the phasing of urban development. The most applicable policies are: LU28 Within the Urban Growth Area, growth should be directed as follows: a) first, to centers and urbanized areas with existing infrastructure capacity; b) second, to areas which are already urbanized such that infrastructure improvements can be easily extended; and c) last, to areas requiring major infrastructure improvements. LU29 All jurisdictions shall develop gowth phasing plans consistent with applicable capital facilities plans to maintain an urban area served with adequate public facilities and services to maintain an urban area to meet at least the six year intermediate household and employrnent target ranges consistent with LU67 and LU68. These growth phasing plans shall be based on locally adopted definitions, service levels, and financing commitments, consistent with State GMA requirements. The phasing for cities shall not extend beyond their Potential Annexation Areas. Interlocal agreements shall be developed that specify the applicable minimum zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation for the Potential Annexation Areas. LU30 Where urban services cannot be provided within the next 10 years, jurisdictions should develop policies and regulations to: ■ Phase and limit development such that planning, siting, densities, and infrastructure decisions will support future urban development when urban services become available. ■ Establish a process for converting land to urban densities and uses once services are available. FW13 Cities are the appropriate provider of local urban services to urban areas, either directly or by contract. Counties are the appropriate provider of most countywide services. Urban services shall not be extended through the use of special purpose districts without the approval of the city in whose potential annexation area the extension is proposed. Within the urban area, as time and conditions warrant, cities should assume local urban services provided by special purpose districts. LU31 In collaboration with adjacent counties, cities, and King County, and in consultation with residential groups in affected areas, each city shall designate a potential annexation area. Each potential annexation area shall be specific to each city. Potential annexation areas shall not overlap. Within the potential annexation area, the city shall adopt criteria for annexation, including conformance with Countywide Planning Policies, and a schedule for providing urban services and faciiities within the potential annexation area. This process Revised 2998 2002 VIII-2 lJ 0 � ' � � i � � � � � � � � ' I. � FWCP — Chaoter Eight. Potential Annexation Areas � shall ensure that unincorporated urban islands of King County are not created between cities and strive to eiiminate existing islands between cities. LU32 A city may annex territory only within its designated potential annexation area. � All cities shall phase annexations to coincide with the ability for the city to coordinate the provision of a full range of urban services to areas to be annexed. ' LU33 Land within a city's potential annexation area shall be developed according to that city's and King County's growth phasing plans. Undeveloped lands adjacent to that city should be annexed at the time development is proposed to � receive a full range of urban services. Subsequent to establishing a potential annexation area, in-fill lands within the potential annexation area that aze not adjacent, or not practical to annex, shall be developed pursuant to interlocal � agreements between the County and the affected city. The interlocal agreement shall establish the type of development allowed in the potential annexation area and standards for that development so that the area is developed in a manner consistent with its future annexation potential. The interlocal agreement shall ' specify, at a minimum, the applicable zoning, development standards, impact mitigation, and future annexation within the potential annexation area. � LU34 Several unincorporated areas are cunently considering local govemance options. Unincorporated urban areas that are already urbanized and are within a city's potential annexation area are encouraged to annex to�that city in order to � receive urban services. Where annexation is inappropriate, incorporation may be considered. � As is demonstrated in the remaining sections of this chapter, the process Federal Way used in developing its PAA, and the product itself, is consistent with the applicable statewide and Countywide Planning Policies. � 8.3 CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ANALYSIS � Federal Way began its formal evaluation of a PAA with the publication of a July 1991 issue paper. This paper examined the requirements of GMA as they relate to UGA's, and included a discussion of how urban services were being provided. The paper also , described special purpose district boundaries, the transportation system, parks and recreation facilities, and physical features that potentially affect urban service delivery. , In September of 2000 the Citv of Federal Wav completed a preliminarv analvsis of its PAA that largelv identified potential issues associated with annexin� this area of unincorporated King Countv. A second component of this preliminarv analysis was to , create a scope of work to develop Citv of Federal Wav comprehensive plannin� and zonin� for the PAA, and a fiscal impact analysis that would evaluate the feasibility of any potential future annexations. � Revised:899 2002 VIi13 � n �, FWCP — Chaoter Eiaht, Potential Annexation Areas In November of 2001, the City of Federal Way, in partnership with King County, initiated the preparation of the Federal Way PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study. This work will produce two distinct but interrelated products: a Subarea Plan for inte� in the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan (FWCP) containing policies and plans addressing the full ran�e of lanct uses, capital facilities, public services, and environmental issues; and an Annexation Feasibility Studv that will guide the Citv and inform the citizens about the feasibility and phasing of an�potential future annexations. For purposes of data collection and analysis, the Federal Wav PAA was divided into seven distinct community subareas (refer to Map Vlll-1, all maus are located at the end of the chapter). The community subareas identified in the PAA Subarea Plan include Redondo East, Star Lake, Camelot, North Lake, Jovita, Lakeland, and Parkway. The boundaries of each subarea closely align with nei�hborhood boundaries that were previously designated by Kin� County. The PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Study has two working committees: a Staff Work Grouv and a Steerin� Committee. The Staff Work Group is an intera�encv working committee that provides technical review of all draft work products. Members of the Staff Work Group include staff from the City of Federal Wav, Kin� County, Federal Way Fire Department, Highline Water District, and Pu�et Sound Ener�y. The PAA Steerin� Committee is an advisory committee that acts as a"sounding board" reviewing draft work products and public comments, while assessing the overall direction of the study. Members of the PAA Steerin� Committee include representatives from the Federal Wav City Council and Plannin� Commission, Federal Wav Chamber of Commerce, Federal Way School District, Kin� County, and three PAA resident representatives. The Federal Wav PAA Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibility Studv are scheduled to be completed in the �� of 2003. Upon adoption bv the Federal Way City Council, the Subarea Plan will be inteprated into the FWCP. As noted earlier in this chapter, the GMA requires that urban growth be planned to occnr only in areas that have adequate public services and urban government services to accommodate development. The GMA defines such services as fire, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, sanitary and storm sewers, and domestic water supplies. � - - - .re��r±:r-_ss���re� IS � � � L� � , � � �� � �- � 2002, Potential Annexation Area Inventorv Report, an information piece for the F Subarea Plan and Annexation Feasibilitv Studv that is currentiv being developed. Fire Protection The Federal Way Fire Department provides service to the City of Federal Way and �es� the Federal Way PAA. The Department was Revised �999 2002 � , � vui-a � � LJ � FWCP — Chaoter Eiaht Potential Annexation Areas � formed in 1980 from a series of inergers, which united several smaller fire districts in the area, some of which had been in existence since 1946. The resulting boundary encompasses some 34 square miles and has an estimated population of over 100,000. �� ' Services provided by the Federal Way Fire Department include fire suppression, fire prevention (building inspection and public information), emergencv medical, and communications center operation for 911 emer�ency calls. Emer�ency medical response calls or service make up a majoritv of the calls for the Department. The PAA is served bv four of the Department's six stations (Map YIII-2). One of these � stations is located outside of the PAA, within the Redondo area. The other fire stations servin� PAA are located within the Lakeland, North Lake, and Camelot community subareas. � ' � � � The City has worked closely with the Department in reviewing the Fire District Master Plan, which complies with the GMA. , +� a,r „ v»r_ � f,. �,,,..,+;,.,,��. �e Department's Master Plan identifies the new facilities the Deparhnent will need to continue providing service as its service area grows. The City included the Department's new facilities requirements and cost and revenue estimates in the City's Capital Facilities chapter. This should help to ensure that the Department has access to the most up to date information about population and employment growth, and is doing its long-range facilities planning consistent with the City's Land Use and Economic Development plans. Law Enforcement At the time of incorporation, the City began contracting with the King County Sheriff s � Department for police services. In the spring of 1995, the City decided to terminate its contract relationship with King County and form its own police department. The City's Public Safety Department began limited service on September 16, 1996, and was fully � operational on October 16, 1996. Federal Way's �ise Public Safety �Department could be expanded at some time in the future so that it could effectively provide services to the PAA. � � ' � � Revised 2999 2002 � According to the King Countv Executive's Proposed 2002-2007 Capital Improvement Pro,gram there are no new proposed or expanded capital facilities in the Federal Way PAA. As a result law enforcement related service levels in the PAA could decline as this area undergoes new growth and development. Although calls for service in the PAA have decreased bv five percent between 1999 and 2000, during this time period the number of tra�c citations and traffic accident events increased bv 17 and 12 percent respectively. At present, the crime rate of 35.26 per 1,000 population is nearlv equal to the crime rate for the countvwide area patrolled by the Sheriff's Office. VIibS � FWCP — Chaoter Ei�ht. Potential Annexation Areas Education Probably more than any other special district, a school district provides an area with a sense of community. The Federal Way School District #210 (as outlined on ��e�pp-T�-� Maps Vlll-3 and VIII-4) extends from the county line south to South 252 west of I-5 and South 232 Street, east of I-5 to the north, and for the most part along the edge of the plateau to the east. A school district provides a common thread, be it through school activities such as organized sports, or through voting during elections. City staffmeets regularly with School District administrators to discuss growth management and school development issues. The District administration has indicated in these meetings that they would prefer to work with one jurisdiction as the District attempts to anticipate growth and develop plans for new school facilities. Seven schools are located in the PAA, including five elementary schools, one junior high school, and one high school (as outlined on Map VIII-�. Aside from Thomas Jefferson Hi��i School, all schools within and serving the PAA have some student demand beyond the buildin cg apacity, requiring the use of portable classrooms. Parks and Recreation The City of Federal Way Pazks, Recreation, and Cultural Services PRCS Department has a Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive Plan, which was originally created in 1991 and updated in 1995 and 2000. The PRCS plan is currently being updated and, on�e completed, will be adopted by reference into the FWCP. ��'"� �';*��';-�:+° ��� �"", The plan divides the City into subareas (Map �� VIII-S) for purposes of long-range planning. Areas within the existing City limits are contained within subareas A through H. The majority of subareas I through K are located within the PAA, with small portions located within City limits. �. _ . . _ .. _ � r. . • � - - - _ - - - - - -' Y. 111 - The most recent update of the PRCS Plan adopted by the Federal Way City Council in September of 2000 includes accomplishments, improvements, and chan�es made since the ori�inal plan. It also establishes a direction for the Department and decides how the City will meet future demands for park and recreation services in the Federal Wav area. The primary goal of the Pazks, Recreation, and Open Space Comprehensive �Plan is to assure that a park serves every neighborhood in Federal Way. The City's goal is to provide a level of service of 10.9 acres per 1,000 in population within the City limits. T'he City's goal is to maintain this level of service as Federal Way grows in population and size. Revised 2999 2002 � ' � I _� � � � � � � � � � � , � vm-s � � �� �� � � � �J The City of Federal Way's �e existing parks and recreational areas are divided into six categories. Each category represents a distinct type of recreational activity or opportunity. Please note that this classification system is for the existing parks only. The categories are: Neighborhood Parks, Community Parks, Regional Parks, Special Use Areas, Trails, And Undeveloped Land/Open Space Areas. The total park land in Federal Way is 8�r9 846.0 acres. The PAA is primarilv served bv five countv park sites totalin� 109.52 acres (Map Vlll-�. All of the active park facilities are located in the Lakeland community subarea, while natural park and passive park areas are found in the Camelot community subarea. Completed in 2000 the South Countv Ballfields Phase 2 is the only recent capital project completed in the PAA. Furthermore Kin� Countv Executive's Proposed 2002-2007 Capital Improvement Program does not include plans for anv new projects or improvements in the PAA. , In addition to King Countv parks the Federal Wav School District (durinQ non-school hours) and the State of Washington also provide public recreation facilities and opportunities in the PAA. These include sites located in the Camelot, and North Lake communitv subareas. Private recreation facilities are also required in residential ' subdivisions and developments of five units or more in accordance with Kin� County development regulations. � , FWCP — Chanter Eiaht. Potenfiai Annexation Areas Water and �ev�e� Wastewater Water � � � � � , � Revised �998 2002 � The Lakehaven Utility District and Hi�hline Water District provides water a�-se�wex service to properties within the PAA ' . As indicated on Map -i��-4 VIII-7, the current Lakehaven Utility District boundary is generally bordered on the south by the Pierce/King County line, on the east by the Green River Valley, and on the west by Puget Sound. The Lakehaven Utility District's northern boundary �-�ee� is generally bordered by South 272" Street with a narrow strip extending along Puget Sound to South 252° Street. The Lakehaven Utility District water service area boundary differs from the District boundary most noticeably on the west, where the water service boundary is generally along 30� & 35`� Avenue SW, and does not include the area in Milton along the King County line to the south (as indicated on Map VIII-8). The Lakehaven Utility District northem water service area boundar�generally extends up to South 280 Street. The entire boundary of the District is contiguous with other neighboring water systems. Maps contained in the District's water system comprehensive plan describe an extensive system of wells, storage tanks, and distribution mains. The water distribution infrastructure is sufficient to provide water to virtually all of the Lakehaven Utility District. v�u-� , FWCP — Chaater Eiaht. Potential Annexation Areas The Hi�hline Water District water service area boundary encompasses most of the PAA Star Lake community subarea and parts of the City of Federal Way (Map VIII-9). _ ef�r_�t!�a�sr_r.��s�:eerr.er:�r-ss:r�.x:+f .. � __. ______ __ _ Both the 1998 Lakehaven Utility District Comprehensive Water Svstem Plan and 2002 Highline Water District Capital Improvement Plan have identified the followin� water quality and service goals and obiectives: maintain their water systems and water qualitv to the highest level of service and at least the level required by applicable regulations; participate in the conservation efforts to maximize existin� water supply resources and develop new water resources; and install new water distribution systems as necessarv to serve the existing and future populations within their Districts. Both Districts have existing rate structures and capability to ensure this level of service. Wastewater The Lakehaven Utilitv District provides wastewater service to significant portions of the PAA. T`he sev� wastewater collection system is a combination of gravity flow lines and force mains. Map -K�-.� YIII-1 D indicates the �F Lalcehaven Utilitv District wastewater service area a� ' boundaries. � ' ' . Wastewater service is available in si�nificant portions of the Star Lake, Camelot, and Parkwav community subareas, and small portions of Redondo East and Lakeland (Map YIII-11). T'he City of Federal Way's responsibility with regard to the water and wastewater systems will be limited to updating the FWCP in future years in accordance with the City's regular planning efforts, and providing development applications to the Lakehaven Utility District and Highline Water District for their input as part of the Citv's Development Review Committee process. Surface Water The City of Federal Way operates a surface water management utility, which provides service to properties within the City. The majority of the land azea within the City is contained within the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound Drainage Basins� �Map i1.,� � VIII-12 . �,.o., �.,�+ „�r_c �,,,.� �o .,,�+o,- ,.o„o,.,,tt.. �,,. .,�+ ;,,+„ *�,o r_..00„ u:.,o.. v..ito<. �,.,�;,, . , . King County mapping has identified the followin� five major drainage basins within the PAA: Lower Green River, Mill Creek, White River, Hylebos Creek, and Lower Pu�et Sound. These designations are depicted on Map VIII-13. Revised �999 2002 , � i � LJ I� � ' ' � �� � � � � � vm-a � � � � � � � _J FWCP — Chaoter Eiqht Potential Annexation Areas The PAA is almost entirely within the nearlv level upland plateau, which is immediately adjacent to steep slopes at the edge of the Green and White River Valleys, and Puget Sound (in the case of the Redondo Subarea). As a result, historical stormwater systems within the PAA include a series of lake and wetland complexes that drain in steep ravines to the rivers and streams below. The most distinctive characteristic of the PAA is that most of the area is a headwater to several significant streams (Hylebos Creek, Mullen Slough, Mill Creek). King County currently provides surface water management services to the �ser-perate� ' a�ea PAA. ��e� In the event annexations to the City of Federal Way occur, the City's surface water utility � may be expanded to provide service. , Transportation � In terms of a street system, the area east of Interstate 5 is well connected to the City. There are �� six principal arterials and minor arterials that provide access across I-5. These arterials include: 1) SR 161, 2) SR 18 at South 348`� Street, 3) � South 320�' Street, 4) Military Road at two locations, 5) South 272° Street, 6) South 336�' Street, 7) South 288`� Stree ' �'" �' ' (Map Vlll-1�. This degree of arterial access allows quick response times for emergency service vehicles such II � , � as police, fire, and aid units. . - - , - - � r. ._ �_ . - - � - -- - - � � x�l�+o�,. +�, +l,o ..�llo., :� '�^77� � ' � � . � � ' , Y . Y. � . � The Federal Wav PAA is served bv a series of arterial roadwavs that provide local and ' re�ional transportation access. The followinQ identifies the arterial roadways located within and servin� each of the PAA community subareas: � Rev�ed �A98 2002 VIII-9 � � FWCP — Chaoter Eiaht. Potenlial Annexation Areas • Redondo East is served by South 272 Street, Pacific Hi�hway South (SR 99), and 16�' Avenue South • Star Lake is served by Military Road South, South 272 Street, 55`� Avenue South, and South 288�' Street • C amelnt ic aerved hv Militarv Rnarl �nnth Cnnth 2RR�' 4trPet �4�' Avenne 04� Street, 37`" Aven So S 321 �` Street, and 51 �` Avenue South • North Lake is served by Military Road South, South 320�' Street, and Peasley Canyon Road � _� � � � • Jovrta �s servea by Military Koaa aoutn anci Yeasley l;anyon Way �outri , • Lakeland is served by Military Road South, South 360`� Street, and 28`� Avenue South • Parkway is served by Milton Road South, Enchanted Parkway (SR 161), South 360�' Street, 28�' Avenue South, and South 349` Street The majority of the street network in the PAA is characteristically rural with asphalt concrete pavement, gravel shoulders, and ditches for drainage purposes (Map VIII-1�. The street network is lar�ely underdeveloped, with many cul-de-sacs and dead-end streets creating insufficient connectivity. Furthermore, a�eneral lack of sidewalks and existing luminaries inhibit pedestrian fraffic and present public safety concerns. Luminaries ate limited to street intersections alon� arterial streets and newer subdivisions, with very few mid-block luminaries along arterial streets. Several arterial corridors have been identified as lacking sidewalks and, in most cases, are poorly lit (Map VIII-1 �. The lar�est tr�c volumes exist along east/west arterial routes, which provide access to I-5. Natural Environment �� s- r.. • �, .� _ Y. - 11 � 11 / - _ - _ _ ' -- _ '_ � _- � _ - = Y •_ _ - � 1 Y. Environmentally sensitive areas in the PAA include aquifer rechar�e areas, lakes, streams, wellheads, wetlands, and �eologically hazardous areas (Maps VIII-17 and Vlll- 18). The draft February 4, 2002, Potential Annexation Area Inventory Report provides a detailed inventory and description of these critical areas. Many of these areas have already been identified, delineated, mapped, and classified. In addition, the Inventorv Report details the implications of federal, state, and local policies re�arding ESAs pending any potential future annexation. Revised �998 2002 ' � ' , LJ � � � i � , vm-to � � � ' � FWCP — Chaoter Eiqht. PotenGal Annexa6on Areas � . . � • • � • � \ � � . � � . \�17�1 i�I � � � � � � I \\ � I \��� / �7 �L�� J�I � � � 1 � T�I � \\ � � t � � ��I � � � `�� � � I l l � 1 1 � - � � I 1 I � , � � � � � , , � 8.4 1 , ' , � � , Revised 2988 �02 � � � Y• � r. r. � - �• - Y. - S r• - - . . � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY ADOPTION OF PAA BOUNDARY PROCESS As discussed earlier in this chapter, the analysis that was included in the 1991 issue paper provided the basis for a proposed PAA area for the City. Staff presented the issue paper and proposed Urban Growth Boundary to the Federal Way Planning Commission. The Commission reviewed the proposal and held a public hearing. Most of the testimony received by the Commission was supportive of the proposed urban growth boundary.l'he Commission recommended that the City Council adopt the proposed PAA boundary. The City Council accepted the recommendation, but did not adopt it. Rather, the Council directed staff to begin negotiations with the neighboring cities of Auburn, Milton, Algona, Pacific, Des Moines, and Kent, all of who had developed urban growth boundaries that overlapped with Federal Way's proposal. T`he City negotiated with each of its municipal neighbors for the better part of a year. By the Fall of 1993, staff presented a revised PAA boundary to the City Council. The Council reviewed the proposal and adopted the PAA boundary on December 2l, 1993. That boundary was amended in 1994. The City executed interlocal agreements with all of the neighboring cities based on the boundary shown on Map �8 Vlll-19. rnu-t � � FWCP — Chaoter Eiqht Potential Annexation Areas 8.5 ACCOMPLISHMENTS SINCE 1991 ISSUE PAPER The following has been accomplished since completion of the 1991 Issue Paper. • Used technical information from nei�hborinQ iurisdictions and information from affected citizens to identify and establish a PAA boundary for the City of Federal Wav. ■ Established an interlocal agreement on mutually agreeable PAA boundaries with the followin� South Kin� County Cities: Des Moines, Kent, Aubum, Al��ona, Pacific, and Milton. ■ Completed a preliminary analysis of the PAA that identified potential issues associated with annexation and a scope of work for a more comprehensive study of the PAA. ■ Initiated a comprehensive study of the PAA. 8.6 POLICY/IMPLEMENTATION Implementation of the PAA element of the f�er�� FWCP will involve surrounding cities and King County. Policy direction for the PAA has been established by the CWPPs. The following are the City's goals, policies, and action items that relate to the PAA and establish a framework for reviewing future requests. C! �',� D A!?1 L'..f.,1.l...l. .. D.,f.,w,t;..l A�.�..,,..,r..,« A,..,., 12.,,.«.7.....� f:,�. sl.., !';f„ .,!&'.,.�1 ....I � �LS � > > • �. J �. � ' ' � �� �, � _ ,, Revised 2A98 2002 � � , � i � � � 1 � � ' � ' r'1 j I I I u � Vill-12 � � � ' , ' � ' ' , � ' ' � , � ' FWCP — Chaoter Eiaht. Potential Annexation Areas > > +1, D A n tl, ., , 1, ;,,+0,-1�,..�1 � o.,t ,:,;N, Y;,,.� f`�.�„�� Goal � PAAG1 Policies �� PAAPl � PAAP2 � PAAP3 �� PAAP4 Provide a framework for processing annexatiore requests. Process annexations of appropriate size. Appropriate size means an area that warrants the staff time and expense involved in processing anne�tion requests and complies with the goals of the GMA and the CWPPs. Annexations generally should not have or create abnormally inegular boundaries. The annexation must, to the greatest extent possible, preserve natural neighborhoods and communities. The annexation, where appropriate, should adjust any impractical or irregular boundaries created in the past. �� �8 PAAPS �� PAAP6 �� PAAP7 ' �� � PAAP8 ' Revised �A99 2002 � ��e�s: Upon annexation, properties shall be required to adopt FWCP designations and zoninQ as found in the adopted PAA Subarea Plan. Where appropriate, the City should allow concomitant development agreements in the PAA. The City will require owners of land annexing into Federal Way to assume their proportion of existing City bonded indebtedness. The City will make a reasonable effort to ensure a smooth transition from King County to City of Federal Way administration. VIII-13 � FWCP — Chapter EiQht, Potential Annexation Areas �4 PAAP9 The City should establish departmental service needs prior to major annexations through a fiscal impact analysis. As revenues from each annexation area are collected, increase City services to maintain current citywide levels of service. D�c4F�� �,.,,.>;ao „o.�.�.. .,,,,,o..o,� „ ,,:+�, .�,a e �e.,si „c�o,..,:,.e e,.;,,.,oa �... .,..e..� ;,,�;ae �oae,..,i �x�.,.. .,.t,;to .,. �t,e � o .;..,o .,,..:,,*.,:.,:.,,. ,, e.,+ r:....,.:ae S@FK168-�@i�8� ' Goal � PAAG2 PoGcies �� PAAP10 �� PAAPl l . Adont the comprehensive PAA Subarea Plan. Identify land uses in the �g�e-]P-la� PAA Subarea Plan for the unincorporated areas and include proposed zoning for these areas. Include policy direction in the PAA Subarea Plan for the areas within the PAA boundary relating to land use, transportation, capital facilities, housing, and utilities. LI ' � CJ ' ' lJ lJ ' � PAAP12 Enter into an Interlocal A�reement with Kin� Countv to establish guidelines for development plan review and impact mitiQation for the period between the adoption of the PAA Subarea Plan and anv votential annexation of areas. � Revised �899 2002 il �� ' � ' ' � VIII-14 ' � „ 1���,� '- `. CITY OF FEDERAL WAY 1 <t ,� ls,. STt�c i �� COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 9 , --- -- � � � -�� COMMUNITY LEVEL Des - q .� Moin �s � R�� [) �-� � �� � FaSr,,��� �, ��` _ S U B A R EA :,��� �-�'�� �--�i �_�=� ��, � .��r��-�z,uxe � � � BOUNDARIES , �, , �� -� _ _ . . � ° � g � POTENTIAL ANNEXATION � '�� $� �� � ���� � � � AREA ELEMENT �� � - <� �� � ��' �, _ l � �� 9 ' ► ,�,— _ vL ,�, `�� � � � � � � . � !�`�' , - p ___ � r-_ . . � �, a Q , - ��� ` __ �_ �' _ s�, � �_ r� ; ; . Other Areas: � � j---� � S 304th ST - - � . _ 0 Incorporated Area 1 ~� ;, •i. �] Unincorporated Area 1 ; i ' .''- - - � ' --- � Source: Ciry of Federal Way, GIS Division & � _ j ' ” ' Department o f Communi t y Development Services, � � �}Q/IIP101 � BWR, ECONorthwest, PAA Steering Committee, __ 72ch ST ► De ce mbe r 2001 ��—;� � � � � � _ 1 Auburn �/< _ � '.� x _ / _ � _ � , , . . ..__ _- IL � � ._ —■ V _ _ /� . . • '1 � � a a otr, sT "� 1. � � � . A ( � �� � / T • � , -- � ._ � - ---. Federa��� -+ � � � Wa � . �� � ._ -� � o � \ _ 1 / � 3 � d b , ' i �i� Z - � ' � � �r_ � ti - .��. 9� . '� ��� � j ; �� �� . � ♦ ;.� � � �� u rt h < r � _j �Q � I ike � i � �' �•°• � . . � 1 . � .— � i � � 1 �� ; ' , �. , ' ; _ � � 1 . �, _- ___ _ � , . _ � _ � !Y . . / � � i I _ - _ �. �:_ ` /' � i.:�� .- -, � ,, ..,...., 1 � ,� _ . . . _ . `; — y � I.FIk(=1�t171, �' � 9� O , �'_ ��2 � _. 1'crrk►��ay" ": i °' ' - -� ��� � � � r h1ilton -� � ``. , � 1 � ___ I i . � ` � l . r � . 0_� Vicinity Map � N 0 1/2 Mile � ,; �; t i,,t � Map Date: february 2003 Ciry of Federal Way, 33530 First Way S, - - Federal Way, WA 98003 (253) 661-4000 www.ci.federal-way.wa. us r - , �__P_acific I � � _ _ Please Note: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy. � Federal Way Idata2/labitham/cpmaps/commap.aml M a p V i I I 1 Des ' 1 Moines —. I I sw Lake r' r � #39 a .a 'P '7�14�4l�d�.G II II / Trout Lake . Milton CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FIRE DEPARTMENT Fire istrict #39 POTENTIAL ANNEXATION T I AREA ELEMENT Ci Au i vicinity n FEDENAL WA N 0 1/2 Mile ovita Im Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 0 Fire Station Auburn IV Fire District Boundary CITY of Federal Way Community Level Map VIII -2 Subarea Boundary 1 Incorporated Area 0 unincorporated Area Source: Federal Way Fire Department, City of Federal Way GI Division, February 2002 Ci Au i vicinity n FEDENAL WA N 0 1/2 Mile ovita Im Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal (253) 661 -4000 Way makes no warranty www.ci.federal- way.wa.us as to its accuracy. CITY of Federal Way 1data2Aabnhamlcpmapslf►ed.am1 Map VIII -2 � � ' ' ' I� �� ' ' ' ' � ' � ' � ' ' ' ' 910 11F r r ' 1 '7 �• e IN 1 RY t I a.,— JI _ -11 '(A( "t J El a CITY OF FEDERAL WAY City of Federal Way, COMPREHENSIVE PLAN -- IV i ONLY. The City of Federal �_.. SCHOOLS � r PUBLIC POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT �MEREDfrH HILL Junior High School El a Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use -- IV School District Boundary ONLY. The City of Federal �_.. 'ELEMENTARY � Elementary School WILDWOOD . :AJAWEA ELEMENTARY I IOR HIG . -- �MEREDfrH HILL Junior High School �' _ . r � LAKE DOLLOFF ELEMETARV rr ELEMENTARY . S en i or ' S c h oo l ` KILO JUNIOR Other Areas: I HIGH HIGH I inc o r po r a t ed . I�L 0, IOOL MEN : 01 unincorporated Area Source: Federal Way Sch City of Federal Way GIS Division, 2001 ' TRUMAN ;' 18 - I LAKELAND _ ELEMENTARY ,Y i- Milton a .2 vicinity NI FEDET L WA N 0 1/2 Mile Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal (253) 661 -4000 Way makes no warranty www.ci.federal- way.wa.us I as to its accuracy � I ' urr oe cific Federal Way /data2/tabitham /cpmaps / schldist.aml Map V111-4 N W F y , � � 1 �; � � ��- � �� i� g � A� � r �"" � �o; ���1"� _ - _� `' _- __� � S 288th ST �, �� ` � � / � , -i_; ---- / ,�`_, ` -�-r a !� � ' ' t� >. ---------.— i S -312th 3T � �I I � � , � r � ' s- �� - �' / � �� � I I �� � > w ..� � �\ � 3 �I �,� . � . '�� � � �V Puget Sound � � i , - � �, ,� � �-- , � . �' � , -�= , � ♦ «� i v� . p ♦ '.O N ' �../� _ �__ '� t � Np �� �� � a � 9r N§HQRE PK`N Y ♦� `,,O � i � � � �tP SW3�ST _ I � gT-I __ , � N f� �1 � � , �; ;, ;� i �� ; --=� � _ �/� � _ � > W � ,�� • � \ �W+Y 18 - _ � i^ +/� � _��� � /� _� _ •�../ � - � _/' , ; � ��'� i� i ��'�� � i �=.___ � -- ' , � r .. 3: � �� � ' �'; } � . - -----�; -- � � ' �� . ; , , , ; , � �� » : s 3asm sr � ' ;�' � r _ _— B�' � � � Ni jn� _ � �� rd 8T !�� �� � i �! % . I' � � ��_ . � -' M' � • \ ._ ♦ � , _ _ �� $W 3681h ST ° I r _ ; _ � _ - ---� ��� ; ` \ ,� ♦� �� � w � ♦R �` � , �, r �a � � ���' ��;' '�'� �� � Mq Ri,�,� `��� Q� �' � � �.� ��, h '�� �`�. � � '� � •-- -- ��i'' i ;.:.�, � �,i i 1� I , �� � I� < ;� v •- f .o � � . � �w� '� I /` � � �i ' ' �� � � �� ��� �� i i � � � ..�� I .,.� ��,. NI � � o�� `v > ¢� 1 5� � � � � _�_ _ __ � J � �� � , ; � , , .� ; ; �� � J CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PARKS PLAN PLANNING AREAS POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT �'���'� Federal Way City Limits ��° `� i Potential Annexation Area ''_ _� Planning Area A ___—__�! Planning Area B ' ;� Planning Area C __ �� Planning Area D __ _ ' Planning Area E _ ___ ' Planning Area F _ I Planning Area G —_ Planning Area H _ _ Planning Area I �. �. _ � Planning Area J '� � Planning Area K -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,700 Feet � `Federa� way �AP VII I-5 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation uny. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy prirrted February 2003 llctwpi�k/data2rtabitham/cpma Des � Moin�s--. Ifi ,� r �� Stee/ Leke � s \� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY �� COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SlU Leke , PARKS & CULTURAL ' RESOURCES � °.. � POTENTIAL ANNEXATION ._ � AREA ELEMENT �� C7 �/��� ,� , -. .�. , �•— NORTHLAKE FISHING ACCESS � , C i - � � � .�I WEST HYLEBOS � �� � 6 WETLANDS � STATE PARK � � � ■ �� , m , � �� � �_ i �i � �'- � i 'y � \\ I - ' , , � 1�11' I ., �� � � a .� 1 / ,� �� i� � �� „ � ,. � LAKE GENEVA PARK I�� � � Recreational Facilities: Q Fishing Access, Lake Geneva _. Q Fishing Access, Lake Killarney Q Federal Way Senior Center ��_ � Qi North Lake Improvement Club � Cultural Resources I Auburn � FancherHouse � J � � Sutherland's Gas Station � and Grocery '� Q Westborg House Community Level Subarea Boundary . Public Park 1 � Incorporated Area . 1 - � 0 Unincorporated Area � Source: City of Federal Way GIS, King County Department of Natural Resources, December 2001, Federal Way Senior Center, February 2002 and State of Washington, Department of � Fish and Wildlife, February, 2002 ; :-_ _ j Vicinity Map � . � N . 1 � ' � 0 1/2 Mile FEOE L • r� yy A � � �.� � — �ovita � r4--� ` � �.--� . � ) � �cific �� Map Date: February 2003 � Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 �NLY. The City of Federal (253) 661-4000 Way makes no warranty www.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy. t..ot �. Federal Way /data2/tabitham/cpmapslpark cr.aml M a p V I I I � V � � � � ' IJ � 'laJ r � �� � � � � � � i � �J � � � � � � � � � �' L..� L� � � � ' � ' r � � � � � � � � �' I� � L � � ��� � � � � � � ' V J � � i � � � C � � LJ � � � � � � N W -� � F � 5 I i�� h F �,1 �'" j °� ,. i:, S 2j�nd 8�, <• �. �_..�� s 1 / ,� { ri �' � r 4 � � .- �. i .Lr "`4-.. � � . � . ,. ��� Puget Sound P ; �s o y � �` _�_,. �/ � �.'�� 1I ' _ �! 6 �' r-' f e 5 c� �- � S 2aeth ST � �� ,.F � � ` = � 1 �,.�.•� — Q ,� . ,.�r-°' ~ � Y a p � � �? '�`° � 1 ; `a ,� Po _ ___ ; 1 � ��. ; � ,: y�,,.,.... ° eey s A� �Q° . y � �,_,-- -----_ I � � ': QP � oQ y Q � R'' . - ^ _ ` * ��"'� 9 312th � ( � � „� � _a N � - W� — �.-.,_. <, ; a N { � ,,,�„�,,«... ,; � �.._:� . —�-:��..� ST ' -�� A � � -. 1 � ��.. SW 32Dth ST '� y 1' i... ,�_,:. ._ _ _._ ., � S 320th 3T g _ � , .,�.___. ,... � ---"_�. . __ .� , ��, N m � ,,.,,k<.,,,_ d 0 � � � , `� , � � _ � LL � '., _ t� , f NoRT Y S*a,' 9 N a � �.,., �WY 18 ySHORE PK� � � J / `- Cammanoamanr e. �� � y � �,,��r � � �� � O ,' a� SW 338th sT S 33sch ST �� � v � d :,, . f - � Y , �' ` ��� � .� N ti �, ! ;:. � � l R ''"�. � , ;; ,��'''� i Od ' '�'� p S 348th ST � , 1 r � '� N y ' � ` r � �a ,,,,,� +' < � 33rd ST NE '� w ", S't� ,� ��) t y + � � ' �,J L� .�1 } `� �, S W 358th ST ;A � / ? � �; _ � I� � >. � , rn ` L y � � _ a,. � W � � � �� � � - � .� i � � : � `�. � � ��Q ; � N ti Mq '� � ��' . ` �yc, `��, 9/, �F + t � Q �/ 9 � �,� ��F� ". e / ?1� � � v �, i ', ..� S.� � A � Go_ yT �-, �� � � ` � � ��< �,� , . y � ♦ ( � i ' MILTON WAY �; � 3 r � W � N W 3 Y 3 S � J � > � 3 � �W �� P\'v � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN LAKEHAVEN SEWER SERVICE AREA AN D BASINS POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREAS ELEMENT �``°.�' , � ,� ���,� Federal Way City Limits Potential Annexation Area Lakehaven District Boundary Lakehaven Sewer Service Area SEWER BASINS Pierce Basin Tacoma Basin Lakota Basin Metro Basin Redondo Basin Midway Basin — SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,700 Feet Source: Lakehaven Utility District � `Federa� way MAP VIII-10 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map printed February 2003 /data2ftabithamlcpmaps/Issa.aml ' "� ' CITY OF FEDERAL WAY `,�� _ .�� a,?��r�� str �� � _ � ' '"" " ° ° COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � ,�_ ,. . _. _. s : � :., ? ' , 1 ; i,.,. _ '9• � � � 4 ��� � 3 � .r � �.'�: � , �s , � �� � .�.�� � , � � �� SEWER & SEPTIC Muin � _� • �;� �; M �. � I � � � , _ '�� ,� ,� � �St(I'i� Ctlie� � 1 t ` ,` ,� � r '•' - � �� k � ; 1 � � ` � � i � ,: POTENTIAL ANNEXATION � _ ..: . �' - .-, • , _ . � ���; � � ���; AREA ELEMENT F .. � �� � . � , � �: �-�: �� � �- - � : a� � . � - �.� �- , � , ; � � ,� �, - � �'� !-� ��� Ci� *� s� f - ' - � ���� _ � � .;� : • Septic Repairs (Complete/Pending) � � . . _ . , � � Septic Complaints .f, .:, � ',- ,' ' y .: ' , a�rY� _ : : .t Booster Pump Station , . :'r 3p ' i n ,,� �-� ` =- « Lakehaven Utiliry District Boundary f _ F � _._. -�,-� ; _ �+ _ v � � „ 3i ,f '�, " ° -° Sewer Service Area Boundary � ~ ��� � I � Sewer mains under 10" _� AFlXkR!!�[6� � � �` ' ' + ^/ Sewer mains over 10" � = - �, � ,S , , � �'Q tel � :_� � otnerAreas: �' ' � > � � Aut�,3��t [� Incorporated Area �� � �� � �� - � � __ ''�} � � � � � J Unincorporated Area _ � t? -- � � : �� �.� ��._ � �� Source: Lakehaven Utiliry District, 2002 , - / '�' ` (�r 'g "; .} King County, 2002 � ,., � _ i � ..� � � x � l � S �. i . _. _ � � _ - A �-' r !„ . � �� i � �4 �� rs�r 4 - � l, $ 324�h ? _ � �1 rn , . � ;. � _ Federaf ++ - ', , �, y �/� , � � - �: �: Way ,� � � '��q - I , �; Ji.., � i ` � ' t_. � �, ,'�.' —. '.�� j� � a '�'�_- � � _ ., `� J t � f �� �� :l� � r! �9,6�r 9 � �` � � � -- � F1�1 � � Q v .r� � 3s �� - . . �t� .J_.a� .�� /� � :ak� . ��.. �i . .,. F C --1 ,} ' " \ �, ' S1 l / � i �--� � j � i � ' � .f� ��{�IZC' � � � � ����' � -� `i � ' _ � � � � � F � - Y -� _ ',_,� t , , � � �� 4 � �. , _;- -, � � �� ��;�— � . _ --- d --- 1 � �� _�� ���i=�Fr'r � ��:,� � � '"� -! r `. � �.a , � � - �, � ' �• � � ' Vicinit Ma , � , � , � " ' '' 1 � � N ' � � � ' :� �, , � ; ,; � L ! � - � - - -- �- , � �' ( . e � ��r � F:-c^{� / �— t ... � . ��� l / / ' 'c. , :f -�, �'" F � Mile . . � __ `! . % �} � � y � E A � . r _ / . �,'6.' �.. . "^ �._' �� y ' , � � � -" � .�-. ' ' '�. .—� . .a . . r I. � , . , fi I. , . � . � . ' �_ti 1 � � � � � � f � � - � � r ' w c �� � A � . - - � � r �� � � : � ]� r#eI'a.lrss � -- � ���� ``` � I _ � [y) � � / �� : . < � ' ---�'� . ��� -1`. � - �,}.�: ��.rrke�z��icJ �° . • � .�. 4 ��� _ �.- � . . �'# � �Q�' ��..��}�, - � �[ �� ia ' .. _ I= � ' ' � t ,. -� � , ` >� � � � I . - s-o _ x - ' - i . r� ��` �$''"� A � �, �. Map Date: February 2003 ' Please Note: ' '�n. ;' .�t — a . _ � � , , , � �, City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use . ' 33530 First Way S, I as a graphicai representation a �`"`�€��"���' ,� �- ��� �;, ��: , � Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal ��� � " r (253) 661-4000 Way makes no warranty � �� "" � +� � N � � �' ,� � � z�� "` i www.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy � µ . � ` k; �, � �' �:c . i . y - �--'.; � , : a; , �, o = � �, , _ _ . �.� � �, �, : � , , ; r -- � � ; �_,..� �; : _ � �`� _ � ��� , `� , � : � �;i � ��,� o� . � � ;, � � 1 u�� � - ,` "�,,_! FEEL�E'raI 1lVa jf � �,; � � � ��si�is � 1 �� '� � � � �� ' � _ - _ , - �� - � � � ��� - - - Map VIII-11 MI�tO� � - . � f � � � � � � /data2/[abithaGCpmaps/sewer.aml ' � ' � � � � � � � i � � � C� 1 1 ' � __ �' � � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY w_ s2�2n�sT � � _�;�`_ COMPREHENSIVEPLAN � a _ �� � • :� , _ _ J 9 '�' .. _. � _ _�'� : ' � � — LOCAL SURFACE DBS , � ,9 � Mo��es. ' rl f�����,: r •' WqTER FACILITIES ,� � � Q,�t i �..�. r ' � � � � � j `� � � � �-�-, r- - '^`-s �I. . � - . . . :�n . . � ' - ��,. �,���, POTENTIAL ANNEXATION -' ��o - S 88t Sr � AREA ELEMENT Z � __ _ _ __ . _ � o � J� . � -+ � >, �` �� s - Q ,.. ; \ < j . � R �� ♦ Conveyance Faciliry Nt�` .�� s � � •�— • Residential Surface Water Faciliry 1 � 1 � � � � : � Commercial Suface Water Facility ,\ o - � " � � �' Streams ` " � � � 100 Year Floodplain � � soatn sT � � � � � � � Wetlands _ � �; � � . _ , i � •i. � Hylebos Creek Basin � � � � _ � � _� Lower Green River Basin ; � . - -- f f.Ua�l�����( ; � U Lower PugetSound Basin S 372th ST a Mill Creek Basin e _ �) � � � �- � !;, I Auburn � White River Basin � � � This document is not a substitute for a field � A � . �' survey. ADDITIONAL SENSITIVE AREAS � �' a ,,. h r � y MAY EXIST. a s a2ocn sT � " ' � Source: King Counry Department of e '' — — ' � Natural Resources, December 2001, S � ' January 2002 and February 2002, s s sT � �',c � King Counry Asset Development and Fetleral ' y � Management Section, March 2002 Way Z � �o -� � j � r � �? � Note: � ;, +� r . t 1� � o r Wetlands and streams were identified in a �( � /,�� k(� 9 s �, _ B 1998 City of Federal � � A � Way study. � i s s= � T ) i d� a �"� � � I ( �____ ` � �� �� i� / � � � �. � �, . � t Vicinit Ma � ; � ,J � � � N ( s j r r � :r � 0 1/2 Mile \ Y 8 ` t � ��� FEWA �� - „� � � f S 1 � rE � ; � i � > i � ,,� � � � � .�' a . '_ E � �; r � � �'.c�,ke�a��r1 e , � � { �� � ; � i �-' p �II� � � � � ' �" � � � T �'� `` - �- �� `� :c �` " •" "` g � Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: � 1� � City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use i �'Q 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation � - Federai Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal N (253) 661 4000 Way makes no warranty � ;� � www.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy. A� ' ' -r� ��' � . �, - �--•— � uTV or :� � � � � Pacific � Federal Way , � - • _ �. ,.� , . - -. . i `��� � �_� � � Q � �� , �'--�_.-� � � � � Ma VIII-13 Nlilton �'' . � Idata2flabitham/cpmaps/swfac.aml p ��K t �� aes � 4�q ' ' Moin R tt�lo � � i E Q -* � _ �, _ � . �` � _� � t �- ° _ ' z � ; � �,_\;� � �� � 4 '`��'/. y �/ Q � � �� - r �' � ` � � �� r � . _ � - r� ! .F ° r .��k � ---r � �.1 �•� i I S 9oq�h �'I� � � 4th ST � -� ' �> � M - � � —� Q � � h ST � m � �,: N I s � � . ? �('- 316thIST .__�; � Y I i - °' ' < N I , I � � ^ O l a � .g �+ ' 1 � � 7 ■ p a a � � � Federai -+ � _ � r 1 � W 1 8 330tN ST I � }��� a . �„� ,/- U � � �� �� r 0�7h �� U -� ` ,� � I ke F Y K �• `� o / f N � � � \ l �I N � �• a M ¢ �• � � � � W � � � � m Q . � �� �. , ,,l11 ,`� .. . _ ��, , 'i F � � �,. � � � s °q s � � I nkP ; ' � '� i s asan sr � � �'(! 1'�i Ct� (1 ' � Q° � -� - ' � o`' , v � �fVI1110n �1J � � e CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � � �►' s Z�nn ARTERIALS & LOCAL STREETS Q � POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT _ N Q — Federal Way Street Classifications: � S 2�ch A�r Principal Arterial ,'y` Minor Arterial , Principal Collector Minor Collector King Counry Street Classifications: — - — /`/ Primary Arterial f'`/ Minor Arterial � � — � N Collector Arterial � -- � Other Areas: � Incorporated Area I Auburn � � . �; Unincorporated Area � Source: King County GIS Center, December 2001, � City of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, 2000 8t � + _ .� r ' - � � _ _ � � . � . I � . l ' . �� i.� N urrtu � � � � � N 0 1/2 Mile `■a.J Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 3353D First Way S, � as a graphical representation Federai Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal (253) 661-4000 Way makes nowarranry www.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy. � I ' ciiv o� � ��f�� � Federal Way � Idata2/tabrtham/cpmapsrtransp.aml M a p V I I I 14 I� �II\�� : r_, • �«� �. , , �,� � � �•�r r � I �� . r i � -_" - � - - r�:: -ii� . . \� " ( �I; . 5 �I �� P . � �� ,� ���� • �i7�� ..� �1 N � � ,. . , . � �' `_ �i \� � t 4i '' ^F i,iL �� ,.� � - I 0 � � � � �i • - I � , � � �. � ,r' �.�; - .�wi. iit� � a► .� r �r ��� � �I�►�!; •�' .. �: _ '. .►.rr\1 :i/.ti ��� �� .. .,. � �:; _. , .., `, CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN � ROAD SURFACE � POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT ; ) Traffic Signal _ ��y Fire Signal � Pedestrian Signal � ���� Flashing Beacon f `/ A.C. Road — . — Lite Bituminous ti �✓� ;�'ti! Concrete � � — °� Gravel 1 � incorporated Area ! Auburn � Unincorporated Area � Some street intormation is unavailable. '-'� ,` Source: King Counry Road Log, January 2002, .� BWR, January, 2002, City of Federal Way, 2002 I � . a . ,- � , r � -,., � �r ' �r ti 5 �! ' � � �! � � � �� .. .., ,�.:,: =. ;!: �.� . �► `� �► ` • ' `�;`,. ` �if �� ��/�v A ...� � Pa�°k .%,°"� - , -� ti---- — - MIItOn ,� — r� — ��; � '' , _.__.._ _.__._._ �� � l,QI�PlQ77ff � � � _ � > � ) � ,1 %) I'i lU � 'T i � � iA �i :,, �____ �o � Pacific � i � j-- � N 0 1/2 Mile � Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 first Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federai (253) 661-4000 Way makes no warranty wNn,v.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy. �,.� o, �.., Federal Way Idata2ttabitha/cpmapsMype.aml M a p V I I I 15 d ST �` �-...-�..,.; , .�.`'�� � �� �9�. _ � , Des � ` Moines- Ke'�i�Clo fi �- F ,�� � i Ea�st �� � �, � � _�[ -�+- � � � �; .5'tn�^ I ake - � , . �'± � 1 � _ _ _ � �-y -' ' ° r �"..,. , � o_ , � • z _ ; : v o '" ' • i •• ��, D , p • • ... • y , � 1 � � � ��• d .. � ., �O � 1����'i •� • • b ��� , s 9 �, � � _. �. . - � . •. : � � �� � . � � o — , . . ; _ _ saam sr j � ;� � � 3K� _ - -- _ _ ^ . � � �� nsr� �� � ! Came t ! 1 � _ :� . � � 1 � � _ / i�• _' y - _ , _- - _ i. �-- � Q � � . �� � . � A � �' � � � ��� � - - Federal � � � \ r=, W a�F . � � yy< i �-- �� � � o "�� � e i _ �� �� / � ' � � '� �� �� f ,` ! Oj'lll _.� _ �: _ � , . I ke _ � �' �. _ . , . , �r, l ` . --" � ����`� ; � __ I I, _ � ', W > R �r j ; ao i� ' A '. ; , �. _ � � � . i � ..� Par � ' � I ' � - -1 � Le e v Milton ° - � � r9 . �/ �' ��• � � -• . " I � _� , �. . . ; r.��k ���a,��l � N 0 1/2 Mile �J � �, Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: ' City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federai (253) 661-400o Way makes no warranty www.ci.federal-way.wa.us as to its accuracy. � _ �---- - _' �- PaCific! �_ , v 1 _ � ' - _ CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SIDEWALKS, GUARDRAILS & STREET LIGHTS POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT -"'- � Sidewalk - left Sidewalk - right ,� Guardrail - left /`/ Guardrail - right ti'� � � Street Lights •�3 � � Incorporated Area ; ` - - � Unincorporated Area � Some street information is unavailable. 1 Auburn Source: King County Road Log, January 2002, . BWR, January, 2002 I_ i ' .� , � � i . �. � � i � ___ i 1 � I � � l . r a . �.� .1��i•i�u �..a� � Federal Way /data2ltabitham/cpmaps/swgrsLaml M a p V I I I �� V w s2,2�dST . � ', � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY 'I — --- . , COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ,a � ; 9, t ti � � �Q` . � _ • ♦ a R • �. � � Des �,--' �, �'. � 9 - ♦ � -���� + �� SENSITIVE AREAS Moines R �Clo r • ♦ ♦ 1 q 5t , — _ _ �>> • • �"� i I ' �,;_ � _ _ 1 ��/_ ��� r � � �_ � ' " — � - -� �+ f3 ��„ � � , —' . POTENTIAL ANNEXATION �' � � �.Star I,u�Fe AREA ELEMENT * e • s ast s - ' ` � i ; - AQU/FER r �„� � - EGHARGf' �p ` � � > • � ONE �, _ � � � � # ♦ Lakehaven Utility District Well UDJ ' , ;.,� � � � ���� - , t � � 1 4,-� � � � . �� i Private Well (All Uses, In Use and Unused) � ;' � � � _ , Blue/Green Heron Breeding Nest I _�-���- ,,� • �� � �V Streams , i �, i� ��'- - � � � - � � �/ Anadromous Fish Runs � ! ' _ _ � _ � i� � � _ �__ oa3h ST; ��� � � � � - �_Y;.,��� � ', � Resident Fish Present �-� ! � \ < � � - �► Riparian Areas � ��:.�� ���-' � `/*' �' . ; ; _ Urban Natural Open Space . I r - ��- I. A, Water Fowl a sy � � a�nN�sr I � � � 'CUrIlE'jnl � � � Aquifer Recharge Area (Lakehaven defined) ' j � � �: I Auburn �_] Aquifer Recharge Area - � �� �s ;_ �� _' �� . Medium Sensitiviry _ � � � � Aquifer Recharge Area - �/�J _ ; v - -, _ I� ' -� ' High Sensitivity , � Q _ _ �� l - � 100 Year Floodplain 320th ST ` i � � �� � Wetlands �. �'• � s sr � � � Source: King Counry GIS Center, December 2001, � Federal Ciry of Federal Way Comprehensive Plan, 2000, y• � �� � ' Lakehaven Utiliry Dishict, 2002 '■ � _ �'' wa�,. � y �'- Sheldon and Associates, April 2002 and ' � s ,, State of Washington � y , • � �- •.;� ' I �,�� '� 9 This document is not a substitute for a fieid survey. �� ��l ; � ti Q '� ` "�" (�l�I1 < � 1 ADDITIONAL SENSITIVE AREAS MAY EXIST. � �i� � _ __ 1�� � �._ a - ,� � qo Note: 1 T I � � ` � �a C ry of Way study. ` � �;; ��,- f —: - ` � � Vicinit Ma ;, � � � � / � � 1� � � � i �� � ,� --� - - .- � � � � „. � • , 0 1/2 Mile Y 8 ' FEDE AL � "'" � � -- • 1 • • • � ,� .�_ � _, � �,�kei��zd � � i ( � ` , • .Iui�it�, , r , (� ` 1 � � �"�"° Map Date: February 2003 Please Note: � � 1 , City of Federal Way, This map is intended for use } AQU/FE ■ � � � � 33530 First Way S, as a graphical representation � RECH E � Federal Way, WA 98003 ONLY. The City of Federal � ZONE •' f (253) 661-4000 Way makes no warranty �� (�� � � fi ` Y � u1Ve - w�rnni.ci.federal-way.wa.us I as to its accuracy. ��� i -o t � �! _ � , i • i � ' . , � � � ���� • � � � - �---- • : � ;_� � , �. �:, � �,,, � � ,y��_k�t•��-�� �� � i a � , � .,� � p � i � Federal Way , � � � � � � -- , ' � � i . -� � � � � � � Map VIII-17 �. �_--- - - . � _ -- I _ I Ntilion �' /data2ttabitha m/cpmaps/criY2.a m I �:: �� _ � s <<nna,s�.' _ .,.. _��t� �L. m .L,�_.. _ �, d � _ ' � .a �Ty ) � �� 9 f p ` � s� � �- � . _ .j- l .. Leke Z � � ¢!. t _�� 1 � 7 1 � y S ':+� ��'C��lI�;FY�I � � �-J� F � 1 , .f T ,�� 1 - � '� � � � _ �! � � Fa �S z _ r ,� � � � r _ _ -.. .� � �. ! �� � _ � �� . � � =�� �,., ���x ��.u1�� �� � �'� z � ?�.� r �� y - ] , � � � `� �'' ` " _: s'zsatn �r , � !; I �_ s 2a��ris� - - � _� _ x;^ � � � � � � � i � eR� � �s �j 0 1 a --;. � � � -� � � f '_ �� I � c ' � � � �Q M � i t` a�"'� �� � t �� / � � � . � F �' y i ( '[ L , Y �.J { a ,�., � � � y ��. k � d i � � ;, � ; t . �` t �. (�.: � . `��n� � y . a ��f�' ' `' � s �`-::.? y "��i���}�{t�It�'� ` � � � � 3 1s�' �, - � _ ? �� � �m� �_kfltti� � 304��u� f irr` � �� � , . t�� �� �?� �� IL•'-�. _ . . . �I r� �F� r � af ' �,�i1� �. �, � ��7' � - � - �- - - ` =s I � 4 , �, � ,� - s�ee, � - � ��-a , � - � i �.. ��e � � ��l r � �1�� - �'�- p ,� E � � a � 7�� a y�� �� S� F �. � e . . `� I l. r j � � ' � � � sa,zcrisr k_ { �'�� �� CtllrrrP�or i � F)�� s �, �, � = t ,�� ; ��� ' _ � � , > ! AubLrrr ���:���IJ � � � ( I �'�? ,��� ��`��-��� � �� � � �� - �. _ . '��� •--�. �;` , r �� I�` ; i r � r y /, ,,,�. f� . l� � , r � i '1 : ', u utod �32nsfi"��� I:_ v�" � j ,L � R' , � �� �— � �� � i n� � � A� � � �I �., � � ir ' S '' � �- � r � �� C�l�ati, eT ,�,' s` � i � �fi` � — x U'�.L?a —� F��de�ai j � . , � �- ,S�a' �- �� � ' Way , �,,' � i -� �, � � ��� '� — � ► - _ �, - 1 °� u, �'" , i�F � ti � � » "� � �-� (�T �;`. �Q � � � � , �� ]'!tt � � — I � 's �_ �\ _ � � , � �; -- � ( ., ��/i/ � � �, � � �'(���� � , � Milton: ��� ��; . ° ,� �/�4� :� I.�tke � �� 6�'j � v (� , �.t�,� - - t ' -. � ` . � : ._. �,_ � _ J � ! l i ��lw.,� -' ' i _, i y� � r— , i I ` '�' � t � - � �� � �� � � � - a , � � � � , ;. � � � ,� � -- �� /; f �r �� fi �: � 7' � ,� , ���1a � � ��7 � �- �: �, � � y�, — _ ° ,1 %.' E � �. ,,' i -�. ,; ! ` ._._. .� ; -,-, # �-E I � T _ . , � � I �: � � � � ;��� , � � 1 , F ; ,�._ ` - -- �, � , = s • � � .�_-�� 3 ;. �;n,lr,�lt�atd Q o ; � _ , � ;���� j ~� - -� _' � ,�� .I�a��itu�� � , � ° ____ _ _ �� , � _, , � � � -� i ��-- , - N '�i ' � ' �� � -� ` 'f �+; r �� � � ,� � u_ i� ' > +� r ��5: ' ���� -� � �� � i � ' ; . � � � :'� � , _ , � � �, � : i , 1 ��Q � `r � �JM � a � rt l � �� , _-�__. � . �(' 'O - � Ldk< �.: / Y E.1 �� — ��� h � '� E � � -" , _ � y� /';R+ � h � ( � -- � � o f )� ��� �_ ` �; ! t' t' � � � � � _ '�, .,.� �_ ('^ '� ' �• i, . � - �. f � �.1 � . �: ^ 1 % .. / 7 1 l���'��' � Q�" �,,�` �; F �dcifis � ` . � — � � : � , -; � , � I , �- � � _ �� - .; � .� .,;,.. � ° � �, ., f - . _ � � ; 'r'► r , �,.-- �? ��� � � � , � _ � - CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN GEOLOGIC HAZARDS POTENTIAL ANNEXATION AREA ELEMENT � ;� Landslide Hazard Areas Erosion Hazard Areas (There are NO coal mine hazards or se�smic hazards in this area.) Other Areas: �� Incorporated Area � Unincorporated Area Source: King Counry GIS Center, December 2001 This document is not a substitute for a field survey. ADDITIONAL SENSITIVE AREAS MAY EXIST. Map Date. February 2003 City of Federal Way, 33530 First Way S, Federal Way, WA 98003 (253) 661-4000 www.ci.federal-way.wa. us � N 0 1/2 Mile � Please Note: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation ONLY. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy. CITY OF � Federal Way /data?Jtabitham/cpmaps/c�it1 .aml M a p V I I I 18 ' � � � � , �' CI , � � � , � ' � , ' � , = ,: � � ��, ,� " �°' � � ! � ,, t "� ` _._ � � S 272nd ST � .-.� � — , , � �� � � ` � � �. �`�' d �� •. �,• � � , Puget Sound P�� , ' �i y �� ;� _l , Q ° , � ' / ~•r y� � � � �' c� � � S 288th ST � '�� �- � - I ��. .� ��,�� �.�.� U J � + ' , ' a � + � 1 � � I ��'�• I ` _. . / � � �, ' 1 '� R� r � Dumas � Q� � � � ,�'--� �r ,�Q�O Z, vi 1 ; _ _ � � P y ; SYe9l ' DollolLeke y � -s - '�� O O a i�a� �n a� � s' � S 312th ST �� p ��� � .. -- _.._.`• Mlrroi �y 1AI _� - t ��e IW � - ,� SW 320th ST �� ' - ,� .`,` � N S 320th ST r � � � . W � i ° a = � , � . .. � = ^ LL s . _._ . � O N ♦ a � �.__`, a .1�oir^ /y0 ,� � a ( �a`° NV�1Y 18 --°-`./�;, 9Tf ISHORE PK`�'� Y ,�. �p �/ -1 r-4 \�� '1�: . -> N SW 336th ST S 336th ST • ` ty � � .I � ' _ / �- . � �; � � •` ; ,; + N N , ,�. > � � O � ` a �, ' ; (�.... Commencement ��� � S 348th ST i ° i'^'" � � a 1 Ft B � 3 3 r d S T N E �. N w :..'. — ' — . 1 "� I � - � > � ��� � > J_-` .\_� ----;�---,, -'� SW 356th ST � / � � _ ,` � � ; � , � - __ ; • � : �°, ,' % �• `' �• w � � � / �, � ��u t Q ; -- _ ~ ; �, o .�� �� `� _ ,r' � � � P ' • . . ��. � \� � ,... ` 0 S� -'q� ,.._ . ,� , .. : .;; ` ' � � �� W �t, N «. ' ! 1. `� ti � M � c, �� � — ! y �.�. �' �1 � ,� y� q� ti Q Q �. n� �:;, � 9 � �d r ��' ��L �� � �� � '� '� � md �h- ��G 4 0 . � � � Frout �{; • �. � �lb 7, , �.. � � �� � � �� .��r' ,' '�"d 5i��.'`: -� � y � �� .� , P � �o � d • .� / _ _ ; �� � r � �t � , , � -� �i _ _ �_ __, � �� �� � . r � �� : � _ _ i ��.,; ; �,_ , , � , ,. , �.;� I _.. ____' "F.,�.�A� ( � � �� � � � , ._ _ ' _ -----!__ ---. : ' _ � � _' MILTON WAY �,, ` CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN POTENTIAL ANNEXATI4N AREAS PO�TENTIAL ANNEXATION AREAS ELEMENT i'�,� Federal Way City Limits � �. " Potential Annexation Area Federal Way Algona Auburn Des Moines F:+ Edgewood '� Fife Kent Federal Way, P.A.A. Algona, P.A.A. Auburn, P.A.A. Kent, P.A.A. Milton, P.A.A. Pacific, P.A.A. Milton Annexation areas in Pierce County are not shown. All boundaries are Pacific subject to change. --SCALE - 1 Inch equals 4,300 Feet � `Federa� way MAP VIII-19 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation onry. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map printed February 2003 _ _ Tacoma Idata2rtabitham/cpmaps/acr.aml � i � � 1 � ' ' � � �I CHAPTER NINE - NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 9.0 INTRODUCTION Maintaining and improving the quality of the natural environment in Federal Way is central to the City's vision of the future. The quality of the City's hydrologic features, forested areas, and scenic vistas is one of the primary reasons that many families have chosen to live in Federal Way. Business people also make location decisions based, in some measure, on quality of life factors and one might argue that the quality of the natural environment is important to the economic vitality of the City. Finally, maintaining the viability of the natural environment is prudent and cost effective public policy. If, for example, the City maintains or improves, the natural drainage system and how it functions, it will save tax dollars by not having to build and maintain costly storm drainage facilities. The intent of this chapter, and the goals and policies it contains, is to guide future actions such that the quality of the natural environment is maintained or improved. The State Growth Management Act and Countywide Planning Policies � The Growth Management Act (GMA) defines critical areas as wetlands, aquifer recharge areas, fish and wildlife habitat, frequently flooded areas, and geologically hazardous areas. Pursuant to the GMA (RCW 36.70A.060), the City amended its critical area I regulations in 1993 to regulate development in environmentally sensitive areas. These , regulations, revised in 1999, are contained in Chapter 22, Article XIV of the Federal N'ay City Code FWCC , titled "Environmentally Sensitive Areas." The City refers to "critical , areas" as "sensitive areas" in its ordinances and the two terms are used interchangeably in the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan F( WCP). C! � The GMA also requires the protection of resource lands. Resource lands are defined as land related to resource-based industries, including productive timber, agriculture, fisheries, and mineral extraction. Since Federal Way does not have land used by resource-based industries, policies regarding these types of lands are intentionally absent from this chapter. Development of this chapter is based on the same premise adopted in the King County � Countywide Planning Policies (CWPPs) pertaining to the Natural Environment. CWPP FW-4 states in part, "Land use and development shall be regulated in a manner which respects fish and wildlife habitat in conjunction ' with natural features and functions, including air and water quality. Natural resources and the built environment shall be managed to protect, improve and sustain environmental quality while minimizing public and private costs. " ' - �� C� FWCP — Cha�ter Nine, Natural Environment 9.1 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT G0�4LS AND POLICIES Environmental Stewardship Federal Way recognizes that the natural environment is an intrinsic part of the urban fabric for the following important reasons: ■ It provides opporlunities for recreation; ■ It provides habitat for wildlife and plant life; ■ It is part of the City's surface water management system and water supply; ■ It creates a positive visual image and open space; ■ It supports economic development goals; and ■ It is cost effective public policy. The merits and costs of environmental actions must be weighed and balanced against other important demands, such as public safety and recreation, housing, public infrastructure, and economic development. Goal NEG1 To preserve the City s natural systems in order to protect public health, safety, and welfare, and to maintain the integrity of the natural environment. Policies The City's natural environment is composed of a wide variety of landforms, soils, watercourses, and vegetation. The City's terrain ranges from steep hills and ridgelines to plateaus and lakes. Soil types vary from loam in the lowlands to sand, gravel, and till in the uplands. Land use and development practices need to be compatible with this variety of environmental conditions. As a general rule, the City intends to protect the natural environment rather than try to overcome its limitations for development. NEPl Protect and restore environmental quality through land use plans, surface water management plans and programs, comprehensive park plans, and development review. NEPZ Preserve and restore ecological functions, an� enhance natural beauty, by encouraging community development patterns and site planning that maintains and complements natural landforms. ' 1 1 L�' i , � u IJ LJ � � ' , NEP3 To the m�imum extent practical, the City's future actions will be consistent � with the goals and policies of this chapter of the FWCP. NEP4 The City should work in concert with internal departments, state, and regional agencies, as well as with neighboring jurisdictions and tribes, to protect sensitive area$ and the City's natural environment. Revised �999 2002 IX - 2 � , � �_J ' , ' � , ' � � CJ � ' Water resources include: streams, lakes, frequently flooded areas, wetlands, aquifer recharge areas, and shorelines. The aquifers and aquifer recharge areas are the primary source for the community's drinking water. The streams and wetlands aze an essential part of the City's stormwater drainage system that provides necessary flood and erosion control. The lakes and shorelines provide fish and wildlife habitat and valued places for recreation. To protect the value and function of each individual part, water resources must be managed as an integrated system. Use and modification of water resources and the surrounding terrestrial environment affects how the hydrologic cycle functions. The inappropriate alteration of water resources can cause detrimental impacts such as flooding, erosion, degradation of water quality, reduction in groundwater, and habitat loss. In order to minimize adverse impacts to water resources and to ensure their continued viability, the City promotes responsible land and water resource planning and use. � The City will permit development in a manner that protects water yuality and ensures continued ecological and hydrologic functioning of water resources. Protection should include maintenance of stream base flows, allowance of natural water level fluctuations , in wetlands, aquifer recharge, and stream corridor habitat preservation. Due to the limited capacity of the underlying aquifers and increased water demand, the City also encourages groundwater conservation measures. ' � , ' �. Revised �999 2002 � FWCP — Chapter Nine, Natural Environment NEPS To assist in evaluating existing and proposed environmental policy, the City should prepare inventories for each type of sensitive area to augment data received from other information sources. NEP6 The City encourages private donations of land or conservation easements for sensitive areas and their associated buffers. NEP7 The City may continue to require completion of environmental studies by qualified professionals to assess the impact of proposed development on sensitive areas. 9.2 WATER RESOURCES In order to respond to RCW 36.70A.172, at the end of 2001 the Citv hired consultants to: • Evaluate kev Citv regulations and pro�rams to help identify potential Endan�ered �ecies Act (ESA) and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance issues and develop recommendations for addressing these issues. • Evaluate the Citv's proposed Capital Improvement Program (CIP) proiects to determine if they are still viable or necessarv, or need modifications to comply with ESA/NPDES requirements, and update the project cost estimates. � IX-3 FWCP — Chaater Nine. Natural Environment This study, which was completed in June 2002, evaluated the key City re�ulations and programs in terms of their potential impacts on salmonid habitat. The study did not idei�tify any maior ESA or NPDES compliance issues. However, the review did identify a number of areas where existin� re�u�ations or programs could be improved. The most si�nificant recommendations for ESA improvements are associated with the Critical Areas-Wetlands ReQulations, Critical Areas-Fish and Wildlife Habitat Regulations, the Stormwater/Site Development Standards, and the Stormwater Management Pro�ram. Upon direction from the City Council, staff will prepare code amendments or propose chan�es to programs in order to implement the recommendations from the studv. Goal NEG2 Protect the public health and safety and prevent property damage by reducing surface water problems. Policies NEP8 The CiTy shall continue to identify major capital projects that prevent or reduce flooding or property damage; minimize erosion and instability of streambeds, banks, and slopes; protect or improve water quality; and maintain or improve the reliability and integrity of the drainage system. The City shall implement projects based on priorities that are systematically identified using a rating guide approved by the City Council. NEP9 The City shall identify minor drainage system capital improvement projects, retention/detention system retrofit projects, lake and stream restoration/ rehabilitation projects, and water quality improvement projects; and shall use project prioritization procedure for each category of project. NEP10 The City will implement an effective and efficient operations and maintenance program for its stormwater facilities to assure that the surface water drainage systems are operated and maintained to provide satisfactory quality and flow controls. Standards for operations and maintenance will be established and will apply to public and private stormwater facilities. NEPl l The City shall own and maintain all elements of the storm drainage system in the right-of-way and in easements or tracts dedicated to, and accepted by, the City. Stormwater systems located on private property shall be the responsibility of the owner to maintain and improve. The City will not acquire or accept existing components of the stormwater conveyance system (through easements, ownership, or other property rights) except when needed for City construction projects identified in the Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) or annual Capital Improvements Plan (CIP). NEP12 The City shall respond to drainage-related emergencies and undertake emergency protective measures or projects on private property only as needed Revised �998 2�2 IX - 4 ' ' ' ' ' � , ' � ' ' ' , , ' , , � � ' ' FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment � ' ' � � ' � , , , ' , � , , ' Revised 2809 2002 ' in the event of an imminent threat to public health, safety, or public resources (such as infrastructure, fisheries, and water quality). NEP13 The City will continue to offer education and advice to all property owners with private drainage and related slope stability problems. NEP14 The City will fund sediment removal only in situations involving a threat to life, health, or dwellinas, or public infrastructure from flooding or where the - City has an existing legal obligation by easement or agreement. Any removal will be limited to that needed to alleviate such flooding or to fulfill the legal obligation. The City may provide non-financial support to any private or third party funded dredging projects that are found to be environmentally acceptable. NEP15 The City shall own and maintain all retention/detention (R/D) systems in the public right-of-way and in easements of residential plats dedicated to, and accepted by, the City. The City should not accept ownership and responsibility for new R/D systems (through easements or other property rights) unless all of the following conditions are met: 1. There is a public benefit. 2. An easement or property is offered by the property owner at no cost. 3. 'The system meets City standards. 4. There is access for City maintenance from the public right-of-way. S. The City has adequate resources to maintain the system. 6. The system serves a residential pladsubdivision (rather than a short plat or commercial property). NEP16 During the project design process, the City shall consider the impact to private property due to City construction. When property disruption is unavoidable, the City shall restore the area to the pre-existing conditions to the extent practical. Where not practical, the Cify may compensate the owner for ornamental landscaping in lieu of restoration; compensation is limited to the reasonable replacement value of destroyed specimens in kind, but not in size. Consistent with state and local law, the City shall not install landscaping improvements that increase the value of private property unless that is compensation for property rights granted to the City or unless the primary purpose is to benefit the citywide drainage system. NEP17 The City shall develop and update surface water quality protection programs as needed and shall carry out those programs and use best management practices (BMP) in order to make progess toward meeting state and federal requirements and this plan's water quality and related resource goals. City surface water quality programs will include (but are not necessarily limited to): • Water quality studies and investigations. • A water quality response program, including enforcement • Education programs (including promoting source controls). • Preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of wetlands and streams. IX-5 , FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment • Stormwater quality controls on new development and redevelopment. • An operation and maintenance program, including an inspection program to ensure private maintenance of private drainage systems. • Capital projects to address identified water quality problems. • Participation in regional studies and in the development of regional, state, and federal surface water quality policy. NEP18 The City shall maintain regulations and standards to carry out the Surface Water Management Comprehensive Plan's policy of restricting stormwater runoff from all new development and redevelopment in order to minimize the potential for flooding and stream bank erosion, and preserve and enhance habitat and sensitive areas. Water quality BMP shall be required for new development and redevelopment. City policies, regulations, and standards will meet the comprehensive stormwater program requirements of the Puget Sound Plan, and will comply with fNPDES� permit requirements as applicable. Aquifer Recharge Areas (Groundwater) Federal Way is dependent on groundwater as a primary source of drinking water. Although the Lakehaven Utility District c�ees has procured water from other purveyors, its main source is from four aquifer systems that underlie the City: the RedondaMilton Channel aAquifer the Mirror Lake Aquifer, the Federal Way Deep Aquifer, and the Eastern Upland Aquifer *'�°* ••^a°�'�°° *"° �'�*�� (Map IX-1, maps are located at the end of the chapter). The locations of wells in relationship to the aauifer svstems are shown on Ma� IX-A. Aquifer rechar�e areas are located in areas where permeable soil and rock materials are relatively close to the land surface and where there is an excess of water fr om precipitation. ^* .,,.o�o„+ .�,e �:... �,.,� ., ,..,� ,,, „�+�,e ., ,:� ,...e,.�,.,,.,;e ., o � •���*'��^ *�° �'�*�• T�^���°��°�, *'�° The Lakehaven Utility District notes that the precise extent of the aquifer recharge areas is uncertain, Typical activities associated with land development, such as clearing and grading, affects the natural hydrologic cycle. Historically, stormwater was managed in a way that conveyed it to natural water bodies as expediently as possible. All of these activities decrease the land's ability to absorb and retain water and increases the possibility of contamination. In addition to detrimentally affecting aquifer rechazge potential, increased runoff rate and volume has a deleterious effect on stream channels, water quality, and in- stream habitat. The following CWPPs address aquifer recharge azeas and are consistent with the City's policies. ' ' � I � � � ' � , ' , � LJ u � LJ Countywide Planning Policies Revised �999 2Q02 CAS All jurisdictions shall adopt policies to protect the quality and quantity of � groundwater where appropriate. ix—s ' � � ' FWCP — Chapter Nine. Natural Environment , CA6 Land use actions shall take into account impacts on aquifers determined to serve as water supplies. Th.e depletion and degradation of aquifers needed for potable water supplies should be avoided or mitigated-; otherwise a proven, ' feasible replacement source of water supply should be planned or developed to compensate for potential lost supplies. , , �J ' ' ' ' , NEP19 The City, in cooperation with Lakehaven Utility Dish should s�xe�e identify and map aquifer recharge areas within the City and its otp ential annexation area. Such areas shall be subject to regulations to protect the integrity of identified aquifer recharge areas. NEP20 T'he City should encourage the retention of surface water runoff in wetlands, regional retention facilities, and detention ponds, or use other similar stormwater management techniques to promote aquifer rechazge. ' NEP21 The City should establish land use and building controls to use stormwater infiltration wherever feasible, and to minimize the amount of impervious surface created by development. ' ' , � ' Revised 2989 2002 � Map �IX-2, Areas Susceptible to Ground-Td�water Contamination, is a map produced by the King County Department of Development and Environmental Services and Seattle-King County Health Department as a result of the study entitled MappingAquifer Susceptibility to Contamination in King County. This study looked at three criteria: soils, surface geology, and depth to groundwater. Based on these criteria, areas were mapped as low, medium, or high susceptibility to contamination from activities occurring in the area. This information is the best available at this time and will be used along with other information on streams, wetlands, and wildlife habitat to determine appropriate zoning. Goal NEG3 To protect aquifer recharge areas. Policies NEP22 While offerin� a contribution to groundwater recharge, �the City recognizes that septic tank and drain field systems have a potentially adverse impact on groundwater q_uality within the aquifers. If adequate engineering solutions aze available, the City may require connection to sanitary sewer service where poor soil conditions persist and/or sewer service is available. NEP23 The City will protect the quality and quantity of groundwater supplies by supporting water use conservation programs and adopting regulations to minimize water pollution. The efFect of groundwater withdrawals and artificial recharge on streams, lakes, and wetlands within the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound drainage basins will be evaluated through coordination with the Lalcehaven Utility District. ix-� L� FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Naturat Environment 1�Jellhead Protection Areas Because residents of the City rely�s on groundwater for �s their drinking water, � the C� must take preventative measures to avoid contamination in areas surrounding well sites. In addition, the City and Lakehaven Utility District should work cooperatively to implement the state's Wellhead Protection Program and Section 1428 of the 1986 Amendments to the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act, which generally requires mapping wellhead protection zones and establishing an interagency wellhead protection plan. �e , , .io..el.,.. � \iTelll,o�.i D.-.,+e..+:.,., Dr.,...�.., lU1TLTDD\ .,.;tl, +t,o ..�;...�..., ...,�1 .,F..,.o..o..+:,,.. . The intent of the wellhead protection pro� is to be proactive and prevent contamination of �roundwater used for drinking water. The obiective of wellhead protection is to protect the health of people usin� groundwater supplies for drinking water. This is accomplished by providing management zones around public wells or wellfields to detect and manage potential sources of groundwater contamination. Another goal of the program is to promote awareness of special efforts to protect the groundwater and urge customers to take a proactive approach to protecting the source of the City's drinking water. �#� • In accordance with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 246-290), water utilities in the State of Washington are required to update their Wellhead Protection Pro�ram every two yeazs. At a minimum, the program should include the following elements: • A completed susceptibility assessment. • Delineated wellhead protection areas for each well, wellfield, or spring_ • An inventory within each wellhead protection area of all potential sources of contamination that may pose a threat to the water bearin� zone (aquifer) utilized by the well, spring, or wellfield. • Documentaxion that delineation and inventory findin�s have been distributed to required entities. • Contin�ency plans for providing alternate sources of drinkin� water in the event that contamination does occur. • Coordinafion with local emer�ency responders for appropriate spilUincident response measures. Pursuant to these policy elements, Lakehaven Utility District contracted Kennedy/Jenks Consultants to perform an update to its pro�ram and issued a report in August 2001. This process began by delineating and mappinQ wellhead protection areas around each of Lakehaven's 13 wells that provide drinkinQ water to the area. The primary zones of wellhead protection are defined using a time of travel of groundwater criteria. The three principal zones aze delineated usinQ one, five, and ten year time of travel factors. Next, parcels within these wellhead protection areas were identified and ranked accordinQ to their land use, location within the well's capture zone, and possible susceptibilitv to contamination, which are shown in Maps IX-3, IX-4, and IX-S. This rankin� was assi�ned based on interviews with prot�erty owners and tenants, windshield survey, field Revised �999 ZOU2 , , �_J ' ' � ' LJ C� � , LJ LJ ' LJ ' IX-8 , � I U � ' FlNCP — Chapter Nine. Natural Environment inspections and review bv Environmental Data Resources of the databases of the ' Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Ecology (DOE) for sites within the protection zones that mav have had hazardous spills or other possible Q� cuntamination. In addition questionnaires were mailed to owners of parcels ' identified as havin�the potential to cause wellhead contamination. The parcels were then ranked as either a high, medium, or low risk, as defined below. , High Risk Parcels — These parcels consist of businesses and land uses that have been identified as posing a high risk to the Qroundwater should a leak or spill of hazardous substances occur onsite. Examples include commercial �as stations, car repair shops, dry cleaners buildin�s with hvdraulic lifts or businesses that use/store lar�e amounts of , chemicals or solvents. ' , Medium Risk Parcels — These parcels consist of businesses and land uses that have been identified as posing a medium risk to the groundwater should a leak or spill of hazardous substances occur onsite. Examples include commercial properties that could potentially have a future tenant storing or using substances, or long-term parking for large machinery or trucks. Low Risk Parcels — These varcels consist of businesses and land uses that have been , identified as posing a low risk to the �roundwater should a leak or spill of hazardous substances occur onsite. These parcels are primarilv residential ptoperties and vacant land. , A notification letter was sent to each high-risk parcel, indicatin� that the property has been listed as a high-risk parcel for this wellhead protection proQram update, and encouragin�propertv owners and tenants to responsiblv oversee operations at the parcel. ' Finally the District notified the appropriate re�ulatorv a�encies about each parcel's presence within a defined wellhead protection area. ' , ' The Citv will prepare wellhead protection re�ulations as part of its future work proQram to be performed throu ► a process developed bv a ioint City/District Wellhead Protection Committee, as is required by current state regulations. The following CWPPs and City policies address wellhead protection. Countywide Planning Policies CAS(c�} King Countv and �roundwater purvevors including cities, special purpose districts, and others should jointly: ' � Develop a process by which land use jurisdictions will review, concur with and implement, as appropriate, purveyor Wellhead Protection Programs required by the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. ' , ' Revised �999 2002 , �'��c-�---(3) Determine which portions of mapped recharge areas and Wellhead Protection Areas should be designated as critical: and (4) Update critical areas maps as new information about recharge areas and Wellhead Protection Areas becomes available. ix-9 , FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment Goal NEG4 Implement a local wellhead protection program to ensure a safe source of drinking water and to avoid the darge ftnancial impact of contaminated wells. Policies NEP24 The City will continue to work in conjunction with local water purveyors to delineate Wellhead Protection Areas for each well and wellfield as required and outlined by the state's Wellhead Protection program. NEP25 The City will continue to work with water purveyors to model and map Wellhead Protection Areas, as funds are budgeted for such modeling and mapping. NEP26 The City will work with water purveyors� throu�h a process developed by a joint City/District Wellhead Protection Committee, to conduct an inventory of all potential sources of groundwater contamination within the Wellhead Protection Areas and assess the potential for contamination. NEP27 The City should establish an interagency Wellhead Protection Committee to coordinate and implement a Wellhead Protection Plan, as is required by current state reQulations. NEP28 The City will work with water purveyors, through a process develoued by a joint City/District Wellhead Protection Committee, to develop a contingency plan for the provisions of alternate drinking water supplies in the event of well or wellfield contamination, as funds are budgeted for such purpose. NEP29 The City should establish buffer zones of sufficient size to protect wellhead areas. Streams and Lakes (Surface Water) The City of Federal Way is located within the Hylebos Creek, Lower Puget Sound, and Mill Creek drainage basins. These basins contain an integrated system of lakes and streams that provide a natural drainage system for over 36 square miles of southwest King County and northeast Pierce County (Map ��. Due to rapid urbanization, this natural system has been altered and in many areas no longer provides its original function or habita.t. The primary focus of the policies below is to restore the natural functions that the City's lakes and streams once provided. Moreover, the CWPPs and the City's policies below acknowledge that it is more cost effective to restore the natural system than it is to construct a man-made equivalent. Revised �998 2002 � � '� �J � , , ' � ' � ' , LJ LJ � ' ' '� J ix-�o ' ' � ' ' ' LJ FWCP — Chapter Nine, Natural Environment Countywide Planning Policy CA15 All jurisdictions shall implement the Puget Sound Water Quality Management Plan to restore and protect the biological health and diversity of the Puget Sound Basin. Goal NEGS Protect, restore, and enhance the City's lakes and streams. , ' ' , , ' Policies NEP30 The City will seek to work cooperatively with King and Pierce County Surface Water Management Divisions, the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority, Washington Department of Ecology, and other affected jurisdictions and tribes to implement water quality management strategies and to comply with Municipal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System regulations to address non-point pollution. NEP31 Surface water management facilities that use natural streams and lakes for storage should ensure that those natural features are not adversely impacted by their inclusion in the surface water system. NEP32 The City may regulate private development and public actions to protect water quality and to ensure adequate in-stream flow to protect fisheries, wildlife habitat, and recreation resources. NEP33 1'he City will seek to retain native vegetation within riparian corridors. New ' planting of vegetation with the approval from the City may be required where such revegetation will enhance the corridor's function. Consideration should be given to the removal of non-native invasive species. LJ LJ ' , C ' NEP34 Lakes should be protected and enhanced by proper management of watersheds and shorelines, by improvements in water quality, by removal of invasive plant species, and by restoration of fish and wildlife habitat. NEP35 The City should adopt stream definitions that are reflective of stream function and habitat. The definitions should make a distinction between manmade conveyance systems and natural streams. NEP36 The City should continue to restrict stream relocation projects, the placing of streams in culverts, and the crossing of streams for both public and private projects. Where applicable in stream corridors, the City should consider structures that are designed to promote fish migration and the propagation of wildlife habitat. NEP37 Erosion control measures shall be used for any work in or adjacent to stream or lake buffers. • . Revised �A99 2002 IX -11 ' FWCP Nine, Naturai Environment NEP38 Appropriate mitigation for detrimental impacts may be required for construction work within the buffer area associated with a stream channel or a lake. Furthermore, the City should work in cooperation with the Department of Fish and Wildlife through the Hydraulic Project Approval permit process for all development proposals that involve streams. NEP39 Essential public facilities and utilities may cross lakes or streams where no other feasible alternative exists. T'he amount of intrusion shall be the minimum necessary to complete the project. NEP40 For public access lakes, �the City will take a lead role to develop and implement proactive comprehensive watershed and lake management plans and policies , which are needed to identify and anticipate problems and prevent further deterioration, which could lead to costly lake restoration efforts in the future. Lake management plans identify problems, recommend solutions, and outline plans for implementation. The City will take an administrative role in assisting residents on private lakes to setup and run Lake Management Districts for the implementation of lake management plans. Frequentiy Flooded Areas Frequently flooded areas are defined as, "...areas in the floodplain subject to a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year including but not limited to, such areas as streams, lakes, and wetlands." Development in flood plains reduces the storage capacity and increases the amount of runoff. Increased runoff overtaxes both natural and man-made conveyance systems and leads to damage of public and private property. Currently, there are no frequently flooded areas recognized by the Federal Emergency Management Act (FEMA) within the City of Federal Way. However, there are azeas that meet the City's definition of frequently flooded areas. The policies below have been adopted to address those areas. Countywide Planning Policy CAl2 (b) Each jurisdiction's policies, regulations, and progams should effectively prevent new development and other actions from causing significant adverse impacts on major river flooding, erosion, and natural resources outside their jurisdiction. Goal NEG6 To prevent the loss of life and property in frequently flooded areas. Policies NEP41 In frequently flooded areas, the City. should restrict the rate and quantity of surface water runoff to pre-development levels for all new development and Revised �999 2002 IX -12 � , ' ' ' ' ' � ' , , ' , ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 ' ' ' 1 ' �! ' � FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment redevelopment, in accordance with the current adopted technical desi�n manual requirements. NEP42 Where feasable, the City shall protect and enhance t►atural flood storage and conveyance function of streams, lakes, and wetlands. Wetlands Wetlands are valuable natural resources. There are several types of wetlands in the City and each plays a valuable role in the hydrological system. Wetlands types include marshes, bogs, ponds, forested, and scrub-shrub wetlands. By storing floodwaters, wetlands reduce flooding and down stream erosion; trap and absorb sediments; and help protect water quality. Furthermore, wetlands discharge water to aquifers and streams and help serve to replenish groundwater and maintain base flows of surface water systems. In short, wetlands are productive biological systems providing rich habitat for fish and wildlife, and important storage capacity for the hydrologic system. Federal Way has several regionally significant wetland areas. The largest can be found in and adjacent to the West Hylebos State Park, Dash Point State Park, Dumas Bay, and throughout Spring Valley. Other smaller wetlands also dot the landscape. While most of the City's wetlands have been identified both by private property owners and the City, undoubtedly there are other wetlands that have not yet been precisely located and mapped. The following CWPPs and City policies address the protection of wetlands. Countywide Planning Policies ' � 1 ' ' , � Revised �9A8 2002 ' CA1 . Until the Washin�ton State Department of Ecology adopts a manual for the delineation of wetlands pursuant to Section 11 of Chapter 382 of the Laws of 1995, jurisdictions shall have the o�tion of using either the 1989 manual of the United States Armv Corps of En�ineers or the Corps' 1987 manual in conjunction with the Corps' Washin�ton Regional Guidance. Once the Department of Ecology adopts its manual for the delineation of wetlands, all iurisdictions shall use such manual as it is initially adopted or thereafter amended. CA2 In the long term, all jurisdictions shall work to establish a single countywide classification system for wetlands. CA3 Within each basin, jurisdictions shall formulate their regulations and other non- regulatory methods to accomplish the following: protection of wetlands, assure no net-loss of wetland functions, and an increase of the quantity and qualiTy of the wetlands. The top class wetlands sl�e�� shall be untouched. CA4 Implementation of wetland mitigation should be flexible enough to allow for protection of systems or corridors of connected wetlands. A tradeoff of small, IX-13 FWCP — Chaater Nine, Natural Environment isolated wetlands in exchange for a larger connected wetland system can achieve greater resource protection and reduce isolation and fragmentation of wetland habitat. Goal NEG'7 Protect and enhance the functions and values of the City s wetlands. Policies NEP43 The CiTy will protect its wetlands with an objective of no overall net-loss of functions or values. NEP44 The City shall, as a minimum standard, use the methodology in the March 1997 Washington State Wetlands Identification and Delineation Manual (Department of Ecolo#,ry Publication #96-94) as set forth in WAC 173-22-080, as it exists as of November l, 1999, or as subsequently amended for identification and delineations of wetlands within the City. NEP45 The City will work with other jurisdictions, tribes, and citizen groups to . establish wetland policies and a classification system for wetlands that allows for the designation of both regionally and locally unique wetlands. NEP46 T'he City will work with the Lakehaven Utility District to evaluate pumping rates within the Hylebos Creek and Lower Puget Sound drainage basin to establish the effect of groundwater withdrawal on streams, lakes, and wetlands. NEP47 The City will avoid the use of natural wetlands for use as public stormwater facilities whenever possible. If the use of a natural wetland is unavoidable, the functions/values of that wetland should be replaced to the extent that they aze lost. Special care will be taken to avoid using more sensitive, and valuable wetlands for stormwater management. Wetlands will be protected from excessive flow quantities and poor water quality, especially more sensitive and valuable wetlands. When wetlands are used for stormwater purposes, the maintenance of those facilities will follow carefully evaluated guidelines that meet the maintenance needs but minimize the impact on the wetland. Restoration/enhancement activities in wetlands will also follow carefully evaluated guidance that will maximize the benefits to the wetland, and minimize the short- and long-term negative impacts of the activities. Regulations governing wetland management activities will promote restoration/enhancement activities. T'he City will evaluate allowing the use of wetland buffer areas for water quality treatment facilities, including constructed wetlands. The City should evaluate the application of wetland regulations to constructed wetlands, as defined in the Surface Water Management Comprehensive Plan. Prior to 1999, all wetlands in the City were afforded a 100-foot uniform buffer regardless of wetland size or type. While this allowed for predictability, the guidelines did not provide flexibility nor did they reflect the varying degrees of wetland functions, values, and quality. • Revised �999 2002 IX -14 � � ' � ' � � 1 � ' � � � ' ' ' , � ' � ' � � � FWCP — Chapter Nine, Natural Environment In 1999, the City completed an inventory of wetlands within the City limits and Potential Annexation Area PAA . Wetlands were mapped and classified using a uuee-tiered system. The inventory was used to help the City create policy and regulations that reflect local as well as regional conditions. In 1999, the City adopted amendments to the �a� FWCC Section 22-1 and Chapter 22, Article XIV, "Environmentally Sensitive Areas." The City may permit wban development to cause the destruction of wetlands determined ' to be replaceable based on a variety of factors. In these situations, compensatory wetland mitigation, such as wetland creation, restoration, or enhancement, must be provided. The City recognizes that the elimination of certain wetlands in exchange for appropriate ' mitigation can contribute to the overall wetland system, and may in fact achieve better resource protection. � r Goal NEG8 Explore ways of mitigating wetland loss. Policies NEP48 The City should develop a wetland mitigation-banking program. The plan will � address restoration, creation, enhancement, monitoring, and contingency planning for the replacement or enhancement of wetlands. ' � � , NEP49 Mitigation sites should replace or augment the wetland values to be lost as a result of a development proposal. Sites should be chosen that � would contribute to an existing wetland system or, if feasible, restore an area that was historically a wetland. NEP50 All wetland functions should be considered in evaluating wetland mitigation proposals, including fish and wildlife habitat, flood storage, water quality, recreation, and educational opportunities. NEP51 The City will protect wetlands by m�imizing infiltration opportunities and promoting the conservation of forest cover and native vegetation. NEP52 Wetlands created as a result of a surface or stormwater detention facility will ' not be considered wetlands for regulatory purposes. �e��e�s � � u Shorelines � The City of Federal Way adopted the King County Shoreline Management Program (Program) shortly after the City's incorporation. King County's program is a functional plan and was developed in compliance with the state's Shorelines Management Act. � _ Revised �A99 2� IX -15 � � FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment In 1999, the City adopted a new Shoreline Master Program consistent with community values, land use and environmental protection, state law, and the policy direction of the Natural Environment and Land Use chapters of the FWCP. The program also recognizes the unique recreational and natural habitat of the City's shorelines. Policy NEP53 Keep abreast of proposed changes to the state's Shoreline Management Regulations and amend the City's � Propram in order to enhance the shoreline and protect salmon and other threatened or endangered species. 9.3 GEOLOGIC HAZARDOUS AREAS Geologically hazardous areas include: steep slope hazard, landslide and erosion hazazd, and seismic hazard (liquefaction-prone) areas. WAC 365-195-200(9) defines geographically hazardous azeas as, "...areas that because of their susceptibility to erosion, sliding, earthquake, or other geological events, are not suited to siting of commercial, residential, or industrial development consistent with public health or safety concerns." In Federal Way, geologically hazardous areas have been mapped along much of the Puget Sound shoreline and in more limited areas north of Steel Lake, and west and south of Hylebos State Park (Map �3 IX-7). Landslide-Prone Areas represent a potential hazard to people and property. Inappropriate development activities may disturb the natural stability of soils, surficial geology, slopes, and hydrology to the point that mass wasting, erosion, high run off, and stream siltation may occur. There are many azeas in Federal Way, particularly the high bluffs along Puget Sound that have high potential for landslide. These areas typically have slopes greater than I S percent, springs or groundwater seepage, and highly permeable sand and gravel soils overlaying relatively impermeable silt and clay soils. Seismic Hazard Areas are chazacterized by low-density cohesionless soils in association with a shallow groundwater table. During an earthquake, these soils become highly unstable and are unable to adequately support structures. With appropriate construction techniques, such as soil compaction or pile construction, building owners can minimize the potential for damage to some extent. To identify seismically hazardous sites and recommend appropriate construction techniques typically requires the services of a qualified geotechnical engineer. Soil Erosion problems are typical in all areas of Federal Way. Generally, these problems are the result of improper or inappropriate grading and construction practices, and high volumes of rainfall. However, there are small areas of the City where the soils are so erosion sensitive that urban development is not appropriate because of the sensitivity of these soils to disturbance. - Revised 2998 0�02 ' � � � � � � � � � � ;_.! ix-�s � � I� � � � r u � �� � �I J � � � ' ' FWCP — Chapter Nine. Natural Environment Steep Slope Areas are typically found along the western portion of Federal Way, as the land ends in high banks above the Puget Sound shoreline. In addition, there are other isolated areas throughout the City. These hillsides are either naturally unstable, or susceptible to instability when disturbed. The following CWPP and the City policies address protection of geologically hazardous areas. Countywide Planning Policy CA13 All jurisdictions shall regulate development on certain lands to protect public health, property, important ecological and hydrogeologic functions, and environmental quality, and to reduce public costs. The natural features of these lands include: a) Slopes with a grade greater than 40 percent; b) Severe landslide hazard areas; c) Erosion hazard areas; d) Mine hazard areas; and e) Seismic hazards. Regulations shall include, at a minimum, provisions for vegetation retention, seasonal clearing and grading limits, setbacks, and drainage and erosion controls. Goal NEG9 Adopt standards to ensure against the loss of both public and private property in geologically hazardous areas. Policies NEP54 Land uses on steep slopes should be designed to prevent property damage and environmental degradation, and to enhance open space and wildlife habitat. NEP55 As slope increases, development intensity, site coverage, and vegetation removal should decrease and thereby minimize drainage problems, soil erosion, siltation, and landslides. Slopes of 40 percent or more should be retained in a natural state, free of structures and other land surface modifications. NEP56 Landslide hazard areas should be free of development, unless the risks and adverse impacts associated with such development can be reduced to a negligible IeveL NEP57 In areas with severe seismic hazards, special building design and construction ' measures should be used to minimize the risk of structural damage, fire, and injury to occupants, and to prevent post-seismic collapse. NEP58 Prior to development in severe seismic hazard areas, the City may require special studies to evaluate seismic risks and to identify appropriate measures to reduce these risks. � Revi�ed �A99 2002 uc - �7 � , FWCP — Cha�ter Nine, Natural Environment NEP59 The City should develop special regulations that address construction on or near marine bluffs of Puget Sound. Regulations should take into consideration landslide potential, drainage, and vegetation removal. NEP60 Proposals for development on or near marine bluffs should substantiate, either through design or adherence to special development regulations, that the development has less than a 25 percent chance of failing by collapsing, or becoming dangerous and/or uninhabitable due to slope movement within a 50 year time period. NEP61 Development along marine bluffs should take into consideration the unique habitat these areas provide by leaving as much native vegetation as possible, especially snags. 9.4 FISH AND WILDLIFE HABITAT AREAS Fish and wildlife habitat conservation areas are considered critical areas and are necessary for either resident animal species, or seasonal migratory animal species. These habitats are extremely important and, if altered, may reduce the likelihood that a given species will survive. Habitat conservation areas may include areas of species richness, breeding habitat, winter range, and migration corridors. These also include habitats that are of limited availability or high wlnerability to alteration, such as cliffs, talus, and wetlands (Map �4 �. This chapter also recommends that the City complete the necessary studies to identify and map habitat conservation areas so that they can be protected. Significant habitat also exists in aquatic, wetland, and riparian areas and on steep slopes that are privately owned, but protected by development regulations. Linking public and private natural areas can provide food, shelter, and migration corridors for a healthy and sustainable population of salmon, songbirds, and other species. Urban landscaping, parks, and open space are valuable supplements to natural areas in terms of providing habitax for a wide variety of wildlife. The loss of natural wildlife habitat to urban development can be partially offset by landscaping that includes a variety of native plants, which provide food and shelter for wildlife. Countywide Planning Policies Through the following goals Federal Way sets out to conserve, protect, restore, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat azeas. CA8 All jurisdictions shall identify critical fish and wildlife habitats and species and develop regulations that: a) Promote their protection and proper management; Revised �A99 2002 ! i�J � � r � u � � '� � IX-18 � � , ' � � � � � � r � FWCP — Chaater Nine. Natural Environment and b) Integrate native plant communities and wildlife with other land uses � where possible. CA9 Natural drainage systems including associated riparian and shoreline habitat shall be maintained and enhanced to protect water quality, reduce public costs, protect fish and wildlife habitat, and prevent environmental degradation. Jurisdictions within shared basins shall coordinate regulations to manage basin and natural drainage systems which include provisions to: a) Protect the natural hydraulic and ecological functions of drainage systems� �e maintain and enhance fish and wildlife habitat, and restore and maintain those natural functions; b) Control peak runoff rate and quantity of discharges from new development to approximate pre_ development rates; and c) Preserve and protect resources and beneficial functions and values through maintenance of stable channels, adequate low flows, and reduction of future storm flows, erosion, and sedimentation. CA10 Jurisdictions shall maintain or enhance water quality through control of runoff and best management practices to maintain natural aquatic communities and beneficial uses. CAll The Washington State Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Indian Tribes both mana�e fish and wildlife resources. However, local governments have authoritv for land use re�ulation. Jurisdictions shall coordinate land use planning and management of fish and wildlife resources with affected state agencies and the federally recognized Tribes. Goal � � � � � ,'� � � � NEG10 Preserve, protect, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat. Policies NEP62 As feasible, the City will conduct studies needed to identify and map critical fish and wildlife habitat conservation azeas and may re-evaluate existing regulations for the protection of these areas. NEP63 The City should manage aquatic and riparian (stream side) habitat in a way that minimizes its alteration in order to preserve and enhance its ability to sustain fish and wildlife. NEP64 The City should preserve and enhance native vegetation in riparian habitat a� wherever possible. NEP65 The City should encourage residents and businesses to use native plants in residential and commercial landscaping. � NEP66 The City will protect wildlife corridors in the City owned open space where appropriate. T'hese azeas should use native plants that support native species of birds and animals where appropriate. � . . Revised �909 2002 IX-19 � � FWCP — Chaoter Nine. Natural Environment NEP67 As reasible, the City will adopt and implement fish habitat conservation plans for the salmon runs in the Hylebos drainage, Lakota Creek, Joe's Creek, and any other identified salmon streams. These plans will include recommendarions for improvements to the riparian corridor and provisions for adequate buffers adjacent to all proposed development. NEP68 The City should encourage informational and educational programs and activities dealing with the protection of wildlife. An example of such a program is the Backyard Wildlife Sanctuary program established by the state's Department of Fish and Wildlife. 9.5 AIR QUALITY Air quality, once a problem for other regions of the United States, is now a major problem in the Pacific Northwest. The preservation of clean air is essential to maintaining the quality of life enjoyed in this region. Air pollution in the Puget Sound Region is the result of increased vehicle emissions primarily from cazs and trucks. Therefore, if this region is going to resolve its growing air pollution problem, it must develop a more efficient and less auto-oriented transportation system. The following CWPP and City policies are adopted to protect air quality. Countywide Planning Policy CA14 All jurisdictions, in coordination with the Puget Sound Clean Air � �e�#e� Agency and the Puget Sound Regional Council, shall a�ep� develop policies, methodologies, and standards that promote regional air qualiTy, consistent with the Countywide Policy Plan. Goal NEGl l To protect air quality. Policies NEP68 Support state and federal air quality standards and the regulation of activities that emit air pollutants. NEP70 Encourage transporta.tion demand management and alternatives to the single occupancy vehicle in order to reduce energy consumption, air, and water pollution. Revised �AA9 2�2 u ' � � � �� � � � � � � � �� �X_zo � j � i �� , � � , ' �� � r FWCP — Chauter Nine. Natural Environment 9.6 NOISE Noise pollution can be harmful to the general public's health and welfare and has adversely affected the livability and comfort of neighborhoods within the City of Federal Way. Noise is primarily generated by: air traffic from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SeaTac); vehicle traffic; and construction activities. The City will need to continue its efforts at the regional and state level to mitigate the impacts associated with the SeaTac Airport. Goal NEG12 Develop programs and/or regulations to address noise pollution in all areas of the City. Policies NEP71 The City should develop and adopt construction standards to mitigate noise generated by SeaTac Airport and Interstate 5, as well as other major arterials. NEP72 The City will evaluate potential noise impacts associated with non-residential � uses and activities located in residential areas as part of the site plan review process. The City may adopt noise level standards for all non-residential uses. NEP73 The City will continue to work with the Port of Seattle to mitigate noise � impacts within the 651dn contour. In this effort, the City will work with the Port to field verify the results generated by the Integrated Noise Model. i ' � r NEP74 The City will continue to work in concert with the Puget Sound Regional Council, Regional Commission on Airport Affairs, and the Airport Communities Coalition, or their successors or other entities, to resolve problems associated with the proposed expansion of SeaTac Airport. NEP75 In developing new roadway systems, the City will evaluate the noise impact on residential neighborhoods as appropriate in, or through, residential areas. 9.7 OPEN SPACE ' � � Revised �998 2002 � Trails and open space corridors form linkages between and within neighborhoods, commercial areas, and neighboring jurisdictions. Open space corridors also provide wildlife habitat, recreation areas, as well as visual and physical separation between land uses. In order to achieve an effective open space system, the City will work cooperatively with surrounding jurisdictions to construct a network of open space. Open space can include: environmentally sensitive areas, forests, pasture land, lakes, and waterways. ix-a� i� � FWCP — Cha�ter Nine. Natural Environment Areas identified as open space in the Comprehensive Parks Plan may be purchased or otherwise protected from development by the City. Countywide Planning Policies CC7 All jurisdictions shall work cooperatively to identify and protect open space corridors of regional significance. CC8 Water bodies and rivers of the Pu�et Sound region form an important element of the open space system. Jurisdictions shall work to protect visual access to water bodies and rivers, and provide for physical access where appropriate. CC13 All jurisdictions shall develop coordinated level of service standards for the provision of parks and open space. Goal NEG13 Develop an open space network throughout the City and with adjacent jurisdictions. Policies NEP76 Open space is as important as wildlife habitat and should be linked with open space identified in the King County Open Space Plan. NEP77 The City should identify an open space plan and develop a program to acquire or accept donations of these areas for preservation. NEP78 The City should consider innovative ways of acquiring property for open space such as transfer of development rights and development incentives for set asides. 9.8 IMPLEMENTATION The implementation of the policies contained in this chapter will occur over a number of years and is dependent on resources available to the City and the community. The 1995 Ge�a� FWCP listed the following six-implementation strategies to be implemented within five years. Four of the six have been completed, one is in process, and the last (creation of aquifer recharge maps) still needs to be done: 1. Revise the City's wetland buffering requirement (Completed 1999). 2. Develop a new Shorelines Master Program to be consistent with the policies of this chapter and the Land Use chapter, community values, and state law (Completed 1999). Revised �AA9 2002 ' � , ' � ' r � � � ' � � � ix-22 � � FWCP — Chaater Nine, Natural Environment 3. Adopt a new definition of stream to distinguish between man-made conveyance systems and natural streams, requiring a definition change to the Environmentally Sensitive Areas Ordinance ��'^��'°'°a In late 2001 the City hired a consultant to evaluate key City regulatinns, includinQ the definition and classifcation ofstreams. This study, completed in June 2002 made certain recommendations that mav be implemented upon direction by the City Council.) 4. Map wellhead protection zones (Completed in 2001 by Lakehaven Utility District. 5. Inventory wetlands (Completed 1999). a� 6. Update aquifer rechazge area maps. The City shall adopt a new stream definition at the time code amendments are necessary to implement the Endangered Species Act. � Revised �989 2002 IX - 23 , ' , II U ' ' � ' ' � i� � ' ' C� 1 1 � i 1 , , � ' , ' , , , , � ' ' , ' i ' ' ' I ;-~ N w �7 E {' 5 Puget Sound P y < 1 ;-'»% . � � � •� i ' '���� •��� I � .r' �. � = ,�� ! � / '/ , o �t �! — �/ �� - — , , � ' — • � �r � e,,EF�� '��:,, �,Z. w / • . . O O e •� _ .. � Q � —�� . _ .- � -- � � - ,"�� __ •`' r , �� WfLL N23 EL� �23A � _ _ ; `� ::- - WELL d20 ��'`' �--�. ' �'sw sans�r �vEU+rne _ � -- - ELLM1-7�' WECL�7 � ♦ � � < � � � ' i / I , ' � 1 �� � � e _ > rL. .... ____. N t � ��� �I $T W �' 0 �� �; I . I, I' y � i' _' } W �' �' � � .. __ _ _r-r� 1 � iI � ' I �f-� �s---�� , � {� \ g � �� ':; r \�i . 1_ $ S � I � � , =. � wEU �rs I J� . _, i,� T `� y n b <� "�' ` � l� m � �I •L � : '�,— , r r ' � J ` , , Z � •. o N '� �' �� , � � ♦ '`� - . , < • � � a � y � 3� � � WELL N19 � }, , � LL N1�JC 9 �HSH�E PKw •, w� SW 3F38th�T s 33ath ST. �, ��-� \\ ,```, _ _ _ ' WELL �M19 I t'�r` � r �f �\. ��`�_ . _ �' �� WF�LLN10 "�� � `r� �� � �� p � ! �" - � � canmaw.m.nr �'�, �. ° ��S348t1�T --- °�^�, � > � J a.y ,_33rd ST_NE `��, N l:':. �' WELL N15 � � �� f`�' ; ~ � � t �, ♦ ..-• r --_ - ` 8W 35Qth ST r WELL N2} ' . �._, — - t, - - . - WELL N16 `, -- ' � � ��.i�� IM � ._', i , � I '�! �w �Q P� J � � � � , �� � �� I� , �- r- � � ���� �� � � �� � — — N � . ,�♦ ��G �(vQ-.��" a... i f t � �i ,< � .��� �♦ Q � �� � �,��r�' �� � �•�� �� � � � �� � � - �'� _ ,� / .� , . � a � ..r B� f- y ; , i '� , . ��/ �� � �, � j � /�; '� � � � WELL N22 � „� a� i � w1 � ��� � � � � , -- --__ MIL ON h1NAY �/ ; _ _ --_ _- s; � � � � — -- ----- - �"_ _ _ � \ I � CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AQUIFERS & WELLS NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT i�� Federal Way City Limits / �' Potential Annexation Boundary Deep Aquifer �`'�. Eastern Upland Aquifers Redondo/Milton Channel Aquifer �� Mirror Lake Aquifer •__: Wells Source: Lakehaven Utility District. — SCALE � 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet � `Federa� way MAP IX-1 A NOTE: This map is intended far use as a praphical representation ony. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map priMed Aprll 2002 /data2ltabRhartUcpmaps/aqwell.aml C� ' ,�� � 1 i ' � ' , � �� ' , � , ' ' � ' ' ; ', � �.. � _ � '; ; i w` —E 1 � ,f ; �`, � � , I v - �;` ,�. � � ;r��- �� ,:;. - - i ���- Q '� � % � S 2j�nd � � R� � - r�� �. w , � � ! �� -��. ' _- 1 � . .wr. x�+r�:�s+r� � ��� , ,� Puget Sound PWO,� �A y `e ` �.�,:� _� , e.Y _� o �, ,�•� , ; Q �t� -_ � :� _ > /� j •� C� < ,� S 288th ST . ����� a � � I a � �/� � . � ,•''� ' �! r' I �� � + � i � � _' � � �. 3 x > W � � 3 ;, ;, � � i • ► � �� "� � � °- DB Y 6 Q�� 0 .Z•�� y '. ; :� � �� � � �'"�� .� o.�r ��q � t.,�� �� .....-_..,. � Z . M /o >� � . - � �„�-•„� , '""' . � - " S 312th ST y,�.. � � � �'e ; ' ;'�``� � � N� ,� ,._ . � � �Q. � � • � f � 1 y o � SW 320th ST S 320th ST � d � � w i � y y � , _� �� 0 � n ,� 1� a � � 1 % • i w � I � � � � y N Q ' � '� � a � �WY 18 - - � - ;,7�/ . N � RT HSHORE PKW y �'. o � (. , 1 ♦ °�� N� ' SW 338th ST ' i� S 336th ST � �� � 4� -_ �` `—, _ _ � �:,,.�- , y o r N , �` 1 � �,�� Y ' N �:' *` r � ,t, �° p r . Canmancwnart ° y S 348th ST � � 1 � 1 �' � eiy 33rd ST NE `V W �.� : o' a �/ P � '' � a �• � , � � � SW 356th ST � / � � � ��. � y � H �� � � �� Q . � x ,� u+ �� �uQ� �� N r P �� - ��, v� ,s'� .!R ,�` � � �� r �� ti�� Mq ` � QQ /' � � Z�y � � . � �, �'�` ��� ,�� �� -� ���- ---- -- f � � ...� � '2 Q�, y � .0 � o, �.l___,�< ��� � � l - � � . - "" _ _. _ - -r- .._,_ _ . _ i�� MILTON WAY a 3 �� 4 v �� JP CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AREAS SUSCEPTIBLE TO GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT i"��� Federal Way City Limits � `� '' Potential Annexation Boundary Lakehaven District Boundary i�a�� Lakehaven Water Service Boundary Highline Water Service Boundary Areas of High Susceptibility to Groundwater Contamination Areas of Medium Susceptibility to Groundwater Contamination Areas of Low Susceptibility to Groundwater Contamination Source: King Co. Dept. of Development and Environmental Services. This map compiles existing geologic, soils, and depth to groundwater information to estimate the location of areas where contamination may readily enter groundwater. Its purpose is to communicate the approximate location and area extent of geologic conditions in the greater Federal Way area favorable to the introduction of contaminants to groundwater. This map does not depict aquifer recharge areas. It is intended for planning purposes only and is not guaranteed to exhibit accurate information. Land use decisions should be based on site-specific data. - SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet �► Federa� way M A P I X-2 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation only. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy Map printed April 2002 � 1 W� �( � �, � Puget Sound P�,�,, ,�_ ,.i � � -1 -; � .� � .�- .� � ,�.� Y . , �.� �._ . �.� � . � ' �--'' ' � ' �• ; , I . � -�.�% Dumae �� �` ,�.�.� gay y Q �/�;� 1 ,� tfl � "�C ,�'� � .. � .', � / � � �_ . _� , , � —� , � ....--- , r ♦ � � _, L N20A - -- ` �_ �'; •� � SV� Oth . � -� ,.- -- -- — - �' � c�nl N � ♦� °"� �i � ♦. � � � � � �) ���. �a�, v "� --� ' a , `' � � �- __��, �1�y� F�E Rt�`i� �' ♦� t�1 : ELLN18 n "; - � � -- _ �� � �� �5, yf_3 6fh $T � S 87 � T � � �� ,, � �. � T ,.I �_.. �.� � � I \ �� CommencemeM �Y N� 3� f� � �� 1 , � � i Q i• � � � � — � � � "w / r ' �� �' �`t. � �� _ ♦ 4 C � . p y � 03 � \ q {�ifY� ♦ T° I I `, " ,� . �� � , � . ; '� — � � . ____.____-_ � � ' S!M_3561h ST� ,�; LL N21 �<: - .� �, --� �' � `• / � `� �� �\ � ;' � � .`,` ��/ �� � �� � � �; � \ . � ��' ' ,� � �?' � i `` `�' / i' ` � '�^ y�`� �R��11 ♦� �,+�' � ;i � � • � � • � �� � � ' � �,� `` , �� ' ��`'g, ��:� �� �+ r L.. � � l� i� �� � � � `,��� � � ,; ;, ji;� � 1 � � � �� ' 1 I i/ � — � �,;�. �� � � \ i, �� i 1 vt — ti �, ,� ,� .� �` � .1�_�� �' � , ,, /U� � 1 � � � � �--- ���� � 1 ' • �L H10E ��� � �� �' iJ �_�_ \ 1 r- � �' . -> f . °-�'°�1�%� � � ' ,-- ', � __ _� . , ,. �. us �aa � '�� � �- � Ktb t ,.,5 �_ _ � � > � <. :r 1 I � ' \ I ?a /' I /� � c 1 .�, �, �� � � � � — — � - �-' ,� �, � I' �,; �I � � � ti � �_ _ � ��,. � �� ___ _. CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WELLHEAD CAPTURE zoNEs NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT i�� Federal Way City Limits / � ° Potential Annexation Boundary /�/ 1 Yr. Capture Zone ' 5 Yr. Capture Zone �\/ 10 Yr. Capture Zone 100 Yr. Capture Zone _� Weils Source: Lakehaven Utility District. -- SCALE — 1 Inch equals 4,166 Feet � `Federa� way MAP IX-3 NOTE: This map is intended far use as a qraphical representation onry. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy xuary 2003 ldata2rtabRhartUa � � � � � ' � 1 LJ , , � � ' � ' ' � � ' N W " E �, ' � ; v���. _ $ �7 ', � r Puget Sound P �� ,�. �.�1 . �' , � �',_ __ _ ��; /' . .. • � � �'� ��. i , � ''• ^a �—.� ♦ .� . t ���, -_ _ Dumas � �� - • � ,�•---�� ear P� -- y � � - �� �,� !t�...� P/ ��. rJ : �% J �� s a�z�n ,^/` ��.r � -- _ _ � -� � � 7 - `` �.,_.._ � ELL 0 . °__ � � � S 320th . ♦• � ; �, ,:. u� ♦ N! • W , � � i �4 �� • � ♦ � � � i � � . �e ; � � � ,�� ..; _. T��:�' a . �' ���'�rtisN��� ��c�'�-�-,� �, � �� �� '' I �, � �,,,{ 3 th 7 36th ST ♦ �� �.. � . ; � �=�---- '.~.�-.�� ; .� , ; ��- ' r I �; v� � � � __ _ �� ♦�� �� �� � / � I . � �° 48th � nmencemenr ��, • `� r � . _ Bey � CV � 33rd ST E _ •� �� � � '�;� �`, a l . � _ _ �� �� , �,� r � � � ��� �y � � � �� � �� �, � \ � �` '�.. I � Q .1 � ' ' ; -f- � � � 1 1 '+ ' � '� �__-� / � 1 ' �, — � � I . � � �i ,� i �``� //w I � �, • � �L I -, , � I �v , I�/ELL M � ,� > a _�� �S W 3581h ST � �l -- . — � _ _ , � �`� � _���- .` � �-[/r .` �tt> � . �- ♦ y L ; p,,'�'� • �;" �,�sL � ♦�� �,C�„r� ' �,�, ,� � �b ���'� �♦ �� ��� �2� � N,,�� `` Q, / y � �� �� '� � � �',� �L _ �� � ,a ��. : " / -� r �� � i ,� � � ' � �i���� � 4 � �� � � � � � • �i % `�� � : --� -- CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN r WELLHEAD CAPTURE � ZONES NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT � w I I I �� i Federal Way City Limits �l / �' Potential Annexation Boundary /�/ 1 Yr. Capture Zone � `� 5 Yr. Capture Zone /�/ 10 Yr. Capture Zone 100 Yr. Capture Zone ���, Wells � _ I �' � I � ' �d I l ^ � I � �t- � 1 _ _ — � ui � v� �' \ Source: Lakehaven Utility District. � SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet �`Federa� way M A P I X-4 NOTE: This map Is intended for use as a praphical representatlon onty. The City af Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy prirrted February 2003 /data2rtabftham/cpmapslwpz2.aml � ' � �' 1 ' ' � 1 ' i l___ � � i ' ' , 1 N � w E , Puget Sound ---- - --- __ -- �,� � � � '� i ; — _ _ � S 272 S �, _(. _' � �-_ , � '��; 1 � � � ,,. r �� Po��r � ' ` eay �F p,;� \ \i , � . I'� �. � � � �„� ,�;� , � _ � ;, . � i-' � � . _ --��.� . �'' � .� . r Dumas � • �•�.,� 8���,_. � • i �'� � ° � , �• -- , , � ����.�'� ♦ -- • - . � ___ �.- . � .� •� � . _ � �� W • , � q ' x °' �. ♦ • a ;! �-����_�, � - �� 0 �'r�sH � �� y��'� �I v � j� a �' --- ; __ �RE P � � ; .""�� I S6th ST �� , W 3 2h ST � 1 . � � � � � � � � � � . _ ; �1s % � `_ � 3 , {,, � �� � ,� \ , �� ���_ _ � i . nmencemenr �` � r v ` � �� ' � �48th $T �� Bay � �� � �� �� t V9 `, 33rd S7 ME - -- '� � � �: ' _ . ¢ ,; . Z s�v ��st�, s � ♦ �, �� . � �, _ -- - � r �. . __ - -- --_ ` --= ` , � '� � t>'�� `� �� �. .'° �'�� , ♦ ��' ��/ , .`,`, G � ` � ��� ' a� ��. �' �Lt `, ��,. / .' �— - r �� � �� � � �,��� � � �� � L ��� •�� � � � .� ' ,..L — I �' �� I � ,i' i ,� / �� � . ` � . , y , i � ; j �. .; , � �" � _ ��� � '� _ _ __ - ----�e_ � `. � _ i �� �_��th s�' _ i _ _ r � � �s � � 3� �� W �� �I � � I � - ��. � � ; i - � �. i � �,'�#�`� `� �'; �-- 1 `� .��-�. � _ ' _ �4—� ' I ' I — � � �. .' � - �+ e . 1 ♦ � / ��:�`� I `� ', , A�� ' � �'� � � � ri � �� i �.� � i „t �� � ���— �. '� - —=-r r � . � ��; ;�+ , I � :� / �' � � • ; � � �, � 9 � � � �.. � �� � �; s � �' , � �� ,' CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN WELLHEAD CAPTURE ZONES NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT i�� Federal Way City Limits / � � Potential Annexation Boundary /�/ 1 Yr. Capture Zone 5 Yr. Capture Zone �/ 10 Yr. Capture Zone 100 Yr. Capture Zone ;_+� WeIIS Source: Lakehaven Utility District. -- SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet � `Federal way MAP IX-5 NOTE: This map Is intended for use as a�raphical representation only. The Ciry of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy prirrted February 2003 ' ' � ' , ' � � , � � � � � � 1 ' � a � � � S 272n� ST .�. . , � —� t , _� \ W _'__ -' E � , " r-- - > � � � � , , �, j � ,� . . _� -��. S �! >� � Puget Sound Po�am �r y � a8y , � � 0 1; . ,.- , � �_ �, � _-_.. � �._ , � ` �� � c� � _1 S 288th ST . �� � � � � � e.�� � � I �'�^ , a � 1 � ��� � r —� '�� ' I _ � � , . ��..�� : i . � ' �r;;....,:'�� ..� _. /� I I � ' , �,� a� �'. . � y .� , i I ♦ ' .� ' � �gay ' Q �Q N " � `. y , � � � — � • � � .� � , � ,> 9 d�� � ; � c ,` ;O QQ� � . T � W � , , � i �, [�" 'a l �.-- ��I ,. � _! S 312th ST � _ ' � � `� � � � - _ P \ ' Q - �I .� . , � � e ;� - � .� .� � � � � � /'� — -- � � SW 320th S'1'. '� r '" � - � � �"_ _f __ S320thST t_I , � j � • 3 � � �'� — — � ,� �� � � �,� � '�� � y � `� l __ � . �l - � W h ; - � � > � , Z �� , � a � 1 C� � . � � � , � , ; 0 2 � — , r � LL I \ � ' �� �' � \ � N : � � a � I ° e - -- ! �� � No9 �hSHORE PKw y ��`� � � � S � ' '� N SW 336th ST � � S 336th ST � � '��'+'' � F��' � � ; � � , 'r � "� ��� -� . , -.,�.. � ,R �. • e� � �\\ � `� j - �/ . y '� � ``' � o,� W - � � �+� � ' -� Q �� � i . - ' « ..... . � � a �.. nmencement �+ r S 348th $'r`' �_ y q _ -.-- �'� - � 33rd ST NE ��` � ui�� " P � ������� �"'�� � ��V Y 18 � �� 0 N O �- � Q t t� r� � � � , � � H 3 , �w J � f�� , � J Q O : � � � L / .� ; � ��S � .� SW 358th ST � - , �,,-., ; � � � > � � J � r � ' �,, ♦ � - � � �„ � �` ,� �:, h � W � � ` , , �tl/ �` Q , J � ' • .� °� ��` � • � - . , � � � �' �. ao +� � , -� �� , �lv � � c� i �/ � , s M'q �� �, � �� �e e .I 't� � � �°�� A �NF ` • � Q j � � y _ � ,' � *� �F � `a r • � � � � � � � �' •--L� -�-. � v'�� � �� Q � ♦ `f , �: � � ,�� ,� �_ , ;6 �� m =� � � , � � �� I .: ' o � � {i' �� CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN SURFACE WATER RESOURCES NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT /�' Federal Way City Limits 9 �° � �' Potential Annexation Boundary Streams Wetlands Lakes Source: Washington Department of Wildlife, King County SWM Division & 1999 Wetland Inventory. -- SCALE - 1 Inch equals 4,000 Feet � `Federa� way MAP IX-6 NOTE: This map ls lntended for use as a praphical representation ony. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy 2003 ' � � � , ' � , � � � � � � , � � � N W—r� ��E s Puget Sound f a� ,� .� 4 c 9 a�� NORT h 3 HORE PKw y `` Cammeraemenf e.y � �� � y � 3 � � �� � �. SW 320th ST 3 N W > a � �� �} �.,. �,� � � �� [�.� k s A r �� ' x S 273nd ST i � : � � � � � e _ .� � y I / t I s y �:- . � ��..:. � t � �� � � � . � ;� w �� � Pov�ry � � eay ����� �� �� �p` � ;f � * � m i ' t • . j N r t"� ��' - 7e 1 ,{� � . _ A , � : � � - y ��� ! 3 , W � � N � < �� W� 'IY ' � S 312th ST p.. a � � � ,� /Q' ,.�ss4- zc..; S 320th ST � d f ". y � � e � � �y 0 s w LL � ,� N a , �' I a / v ` '�,,. N� SW 338th ST 3 338th ST `, f v � � } '. � .r- � R V � o � �,� � J � f � �� (B � u ., s �� ' i �� W ���� w �=.f� : � � ��+ , t � � � o , �� -, 6 ` ` y 3 348th ST � > df .`- e r Q �` 33rd ST NE ��e, N w ��' � r t � '� Q ', Le — ,; . - ^ � ? r e SW 356th ST � c `� B ., ��y .,t _� � � � ,. �, e � �� `' �� � � x �, �+ • � ��� , `� N � Mq ° �� �. ` , s � , ,�.lR .�' - ; � � ��F ,�� > � ��� 0 �� '� l•�� � ; / /, ��' � ` � s , ? � � a,� a O� �..— '� �)..�0� � _.� ���m� � � ^v ! ` '.; �� ¢� y I ♦ � ° '' - - � , 3 x } W J � > ►- N 3 �` Y _ w J J � y W � � 3 �� �� vv � JP CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN GEOLOGIC HAZARDS NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT �'�! Federal Way City Limits �' � ' Potential Annexation Area _ Geologic Hazards Note: The Geologic Hazards indicated on this map reflect possible landslide, erosion or seismic hazards. Possible hazards based on ground slope are not indicated on this map. So�,rce: King County Planning-Environmental Division � SCALE -- 1 Inch equals 4,800 Feet � Federa� way MAP IX-7 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a graphical representation only. � The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy \�1� TA\I W ��i Map printed February 2003 Idata2ftabithamlcE - , '� ` . • � Camm�ncwnant & � � � $ � � � � 4 � � � � Pugei Sound �� �' ;. ' I � � - � ;. ( = Z c� ■ ` NI __.-- LL � �° � � /� � � � a� , r �• `� o �� , ,; . -- �W� SW 9 Bth ST � � ���8S6th ST � _ � _ �� � � � , �- � � �. �« I --- �; __ /� . , -- _------� -- ; ' �� � �� � �. � ,�� , . � �� ��'� � � . �� �' � s sastn s r _ _ N tll . � � � Md 8T NE �' � ; � _ i � < � � — ` , � ' �� 8W 868th sT �� ° � .� _ ♦ i � ___ — . _ � � �--� � b � �� / i • ��'' i�' �� � � y ��� � � ��� _ � , ���'� �'� � U� �l � ��� � � • Q ,�� � �, l � �` —� ' ,,,�.--� �" � , � „� � � ��� �, � � ..;= v; �. �x� !_i �� � � � __ °� / , o I d� � �'; � 4 � � ; �! , CITY OF FEDERAL WAY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN PRIORITY HABITATS & SPECIES NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ELEMENT �`� � Federal Way City Limits /�,� Potential Annexation Area IMPORTANT FISH HABITATS , Anadromous Fish Runs /�,� Resident Fish Present (Dolly VardenBull Trout and/or Olympic Mud Minnow) PRIORITY HABITAT & SPECIES BOUNDARY ,� HaleBald Eagle Riparian Area � Urban Natural Open Space Water Fowl CITY OF FEDERAL WAY WETLAND INVENTORY W'etlands NATURAL HERITAGE WILDLIFE DATA � BreedingMest � Seabird Colony � Nestbox � I Source: , i� � -- SCALE -- Nashington Department of Wildlife 1 Inch equals 5,000 Feet � `Federa� way MAP IX-8 NOTE: This map is intended for use as a praphical representation ony. The City of Federal Way makes no warranty as to its accuracy =ebruary 2003 /data2/tabitham/cpmaps/phaaml ' ' � � CHAPTER TEN - PRIVATE UTILITIES 10.0 INTRODUCTION � This chapter satisfies a Growth Management Act (GMA) requirement that cities prepare a Private Utilities chapter. This chapter describes the location of existing utilities and the proposed location of new utilities, as well as the capacity of existing and proposed � utilities. The GMA requires the Federal Way Comprehensive Plan FWCP to have internal consistency. This means that the Private Utilities chapter must be fully coordinated with other chapters of the �ex�a� FWCP. This is particularly ' important for Federal Way's City Center and in the I-5/99 conidor where new development and other land use change is anticipated in the near future. ' � In accordance with WAC 365-195-320(2)(c), this Private Utilities chapter includes plans for natural gas, electricity, telecommunications, and cable television service for the City and its planning area (Map X-I — Council Approved PAA Boundary, maps are located at the end of the chapter). Each utility plan will describe and analyze existing and proposed utility systems within Federal Way and improvements necessary to meet growing consumer demand. In most cases, maps are provided to illustrate the existing system and proposed improvements. Plans for water supply and sewer are found in the Capital Facilities chapter of the G FWCP. The City sees the GMA requirement to prepare a Private Utilities chapter as an ' opportunity to identify ways of improving the quality of services provided within the CiTy. The City will use this Private Utilities chapter to identify goals and develop policies to ensure that provision of utilities is properly coordinated with land use. � � 1 ,l u � �� � The City acknowledges that it would not have been possible to prepare this chapter without the assistance of local utility providers. 10.1 ORGANIZATIONAL AND LEGAL CONTEXT Privately owned electrical, natural gas, and line telephone utilities are regulated by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC). Cellular telephone communication companies are licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). Cable television companies are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Communications Act of 1934, as amended. Private utilities , must have a franchise agreement to place utilities in the public right-of-way or on private property. Franchise agreements give each utility the non-exclusive right to provide its category of service within the City. "* *"° +;m° ^� •*• �n •� �nnm .�, r•,, t, f w; o � „+.�,;+�. -rrr �.. ATR T!`� t��e � c � n, * c a � �,r . „a e.. ,,. ,,,� ;�_:,, +t,o „F., „*:.,+:« > > , ' � ° Y �., ec a L� � FWCP — Chaoter Ten, Private Utilities 10.2 COUNTYWIDE LAND USE POLICIE� FOR UTILITIES The King County Growth Management Planning Council (GMPC) drafted the following Countywide Planning �Policy CWPP � that is relevant to private utilities: C06 Aggressive conservation efforts shall be implemented to address the need for adequate supply for electrical energy and water resources, protect natural resources, and achieve improved air quality. Efforts shall include, but not be limited to, public education, water reuse and reclamation, landscaping which uses native and drought-resistant plants and other strategies to reduce water consumption, small lot size, low-flow showerheads, conservation credits, and energy efficiency incentives in new and existing buildings. This Private Utilities chapter is consistent with the aforementioned �ek�� CWPP. 10.3 PUGET SOUND ENERGY Description of Utility Puget Sound Energy Company, Inc. P( SE) is an investor owned, private utility headquartered in Bellevue, Washington. It provides electric and natural gas service to approximately 1,377,388 metered customers within the company's 6,000 square mile service territory. This service territory encompasses eleven counties in westem and central Washington. D e^ �^°r^^� �pSE}�e�rr� is regulated by the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (WUTC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Nahual Gas Policy Act of 1978 was designed to increase competition among energy sources by encouraging the development of new natural gas resources and the development of nationwide transmission pipelines. PSE builds, operates, and maintains an extensive electric and gas distribution system consisting of generating plants, electric transmission lines, gas supply mains, distribution systems, substations, and pressure regulating stations. It is a hydroelectric-based company purchasing about 40 percent of its power from utilities that own five large hydro facilities on the Columbia River. Six PSE owned hydroelectric plants, on the Nooksack, Baker, Snoqualmie, White, and Puyallup rivers add to the hydro base on the west side of the Cascades. Other PSE owned or partly owned sources include €�€ three coal-fired plants (in ', � Colstrip, Montana), and six gas and oil-fired plants. , � 1 � � � ' M �1 J � � � �I � u � Revised �999 2002 X-2 � � ' � � � � �J , � � � � � ' r � � �� ' Revised 2999 2002 FWCP — Chaoter Ten. Private Utilities General Location PSE supplies electric and natural gas service within the entire limits of the City of Federal Way. The quality of service within Federal Way is dependent on the local delivery system operated by PSE, the bulk transmission system operated by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and power generation by a number of agencies, including PSE. Natural gas is supplied to the entire region through pipelines owned and operated by ,.T ..,-th,,,o�t D;..o �;,,o �,,,.,,,,,..,+;,,,, W��liams Gas Pipeline — West, Salt Lake City, Utah. The "gate station" off the pipeline that provides most of the natural gas supply to Federal Way is located in Deninger (near Auburn). Type of Service: Electric Transmission Lines (IlSki�. Schematically, FigureX-1 describes how electricity is transmitted from the generation source to customers. Map X-2 describes that portion of PSE's transmission system that covers Federal Way. It is a grid that provides a link between BPA's Bulk Transmission System and the local distribution system that connects with customers. The "Bulk Transmission System" is operated by the BPA, which operates a region wide, interconnecting, transmission system that supplies electric power to utilities from federal hydroelectric projects east and west of the Cascades. The primary service BPA provides to PSE is wheeling energy around the region. All the transmission lines supplying Federal Way are energized at 115kV (Kilovolt). T'hese lines supply power into the Federal Way distribution system and provide connections to Tacoma City Light, King, and Pierce Counties. Power is transferred from the transmission system to Federal Way's local distribution system at six distribution substations. Power also comes into the City from substations located in Pierce County and unincorporated King County. Transmission Switching Stations. The only switching station in Federal Way is the Starwood Station. Switching stations are used to control and monitor power flow on 115kV lines in order to increase system reliability. Distribution Substations. Distribution substations transform voltages of 11 SkV or greater to lower voltages of 12 or 34kV. The following stations are located in Federal Way: Lakota, Kitts Corner, Belmore I, Belmore II, Marine View, Starwood, West Campus, and Weyerhaeuser. Future Facility Construction PSE predicts that the load for the greater Federal Way area will grow by 103.9 NNA between 1990 and 2020. Map X-2 shows proposed transmission lines and substations necessary to increase service reliability and/or capacity in the Federal Way area to meet this projected load growth. The additional substations needed include: • Enchanted • Killarney • Federal Way • Dolloff • Steel • Twin Lakes • Five Mile Lake In addition, Marine View will be expanded to a switching station. X-3 � FWCP — Chaater Ten, Private Utilities Figure X-1 Electricity Supply From Source to Customer � � � � � ' LJ 'J L � � � � PSE forecasts that these improvements, along with others elsewhere in the subarea, will produce a system that will be operating at 72.5 percent of capacity by the yeaz 2020. ' Additional transmission line and transformer capacity may be necessary on the PSE/Tacoma City Light (TCL) intertie at Starwood. Proposed cogeneration facilities in TCL's tideflats area could potentially expand the existing system. The timing of any � improvement would depend on the design and capacity of the cogeneration facility. PSE also has an active asset management plan. The plan includes replacinQ poles as thev � age, and as necessary to maintain or to increase line clearances. �� Revised �9A9 2002 X-0 , I � ' � � ' � � PSE provides natural gas to the City and surrounding communities through a network of interconnecting supply and distribution mains (Map X-3). The components and hierarchy of natural gas supply are illustrated in Figure X-2. According to PSE's Rate Department, the average house (using natural gas for both heat and hot water) consumes about 1,000 therms per year. Ten therms equals approximately one "mcf '(one thousand cubic feet) of gas per year. When planning the size of new gas mains, PSE uses a saturation model which assumes all new households will use natural gas since 99 percent of new homes constructed, where builders have the choice, are using natural gas. Extension of service (typically conversion) is based on request and the results of a market analysis to determine if revenues from an extension will offset the cost of construction. PSE had 17,319 gas customers in the City as of November 1999. There were 12,855 in ' the City in November 1989. Based on growth, PSE anticipates 22,500 customers in the City by 2009. The existing system is capable of supplying approximately 50,000 customers in the Federal Way area. � ' ' � Gas Supply Mains: These are generally larger diameter (g six-inch steel �� and e� lar�er) mains designed to operate at higher pressure (100 psig to 250 psig) to deliver natural gas from the supply source to pressure reducing stations. PSE has 35,650 feet of 12 ��(���} supply main located in Military Road South and 3,200 feet of 6 six-inch S-1� located elsewhere. Pressure Reducing (District Regulators) Stations: These are located at various locations throughout the system to reduce supply main pressure to a standazd distribution operating pressure of approximately 60 psig. There are five � regulator stations located in Federal Way. Distribution Mains: Distribution mains are fed from District Regulators. These aze typically � 8, 6, 4, 2 and -�+ 1.25 inch in diameter. The pipe material is typically polyethylene (PE). PSE currently has approximately 350 miles of distribution main serving within the City of Federal Way. u r ' �� �_� FWCP — Chapter Ten, Private Utilities Type of Service: Natural Gas Future Facility Construction ' Revised 2809 2002 There are three types of construction anticipated in the Federal Way area. These include: New installation due to increased capacity of existing customers or conversions from an alternate fuel. Main replacement projects to facilitate improved maintenance and system reliability. Replacement or relocation of facilities due to municipal and state projects. X-5 FWCP — Cha�ter Ten. Private Utilities 0 ^ 1 1 � • r � � � � � � • � r C Figure X-Z Typical Puget Sound Energy Distribution System oase srnnot+ TAepoMl�twAkhpat trao NW PlOepn� entas thelYNR sYsten►Here �noaa�ntis �o0ee Iaa1cl�Ressurcts tednadto200to300 Qsl,mOtAeqas b m�taed. ^ �> � � � �o � REODLATOR Mori metef tele � f . tequWtaMdcrMS � LIMITtNQ StATiON ihepeasmetO�boW Nae IAe prnrxe is 1/� Pst.fie METER rMueee trom2600si at )outAome mefstaes ►o betrreen G0 ond 200 psL ►Ae mw�mt ol mluni limlthq ri�Uonsxe ohen pu Ddnp use0 fat �eore�proune auue�aes, sp�ee and mtahe�q uidolhetmes. SEAVICE UNE t�t tm0� III sht ftom DJ� n v ��pqhq�p2tmitt: n v MalametetrAtApn�n w • . .. froni45to60DS1. A A tt1ANSMISStON LINE 1Aese ai0aproun0 �es ae Lamen 6 m016 M�ct�es � dlLpeta Presfue b mese Ilaa itet�pes �ouad 250 pst. �te � NORTFUNE9TPIPELINE TAe btasqte P�e reMnD WNQ k NW PID�M0. widd► Cqlsists � 2 p�pel D�es. � 2BdACA m0 i 30�eA. Pressnre inttes pom 600 to 900 �c ad� � r�re�u�i as� ��es.� aroaata.au � r � lr .. fNiEAME0IATEPAESSURE (IP) DISifl16T REGULAT'OR HaetAe qte0ut� ���Ou rolh�'i�lame�depeuare I�) dis1t10tAbn sritem. Long Range Plans (within five years): Install 12-inch STW High Pressure Supply Main in the north end of Federal Way at approximately South 272° Street and Military Road South (Map X-4). 10.4 TELECOMMUNICATIONS PLAN The telecommunications section focuses on line telephone, wireless communication, Internet service and cable TV. Telecommunications is not only important for voice transmission but also provides the infrastructure for the transmission of images and electronic data. In the City,�telecommunications service providers include � West, M Revised �999 2002 X-6 � � ' �J , , ' , , FWCP — Chaater Ten, Private Utilities which operates both land-based and cellular provides cable TV service. systems, and AT&T The telephone portions of the telecommunications industry are extremely competitive and for this reason, the City had difficulty obtaining detailed information about operations and plans. As a result, t#�s the section of the plan addressing telephone service: (i) reflects the City's commitrnent to providing advanced telecommunications services; (ii) provides a general description of how the existing system works; and (iii) describes the process for improving delivery. Telephone System Existing Facilities and Operations — L� West Communication, Inc. delivers telecommunication service to the Federal Way planning area as regulated by WUTC. A local exchange area is served by a Central Office (CO), which contains various kinds ' of switching equipment. From a CO, there are typically four main cable routes extending relatively north, south, east, and west. From each main cable route there are branch distribution routes. These facilities may be aerial or buried, copper or fiber. Extending ' from the branch distribution roates are local lines �sk that can be used for voice or data transmission by subscribers. � ' ' , �_J , , � Proposed Improvements —� West is required by law to provide adequate telecommunications services on demand. Accordingly, � QWest will provide facilities to accommodate whatever growth pattern occurs within the City. Due to advances in technology, additional capacity is easily and quickly added to the system. Wireless Networks Existing Systems — The City of Federal W� service . W lreless commumcation is becoming increasingly important in the telecommunications world. It is a combination of a portion of the radio frequency spectrum with switching technology, making it possible to provide mobile or portable telephone service to virtually any number of subscribers within a given area. Transmission quality is comparable to that provided by conventional wireline telephones, and the same dialing capabilities and features available to wireline users are available to cellular users. The wireless/cellulaz communications sector of the economy is growing rapidly. , , � ' ' T TC �U � A T.P T\IlI' 1 A' T...,..1, (:'TR C,..�;..* l�ia,r�l �T,,;..vQ�.,..�. m"aTlilvI'vC[.Tiii�-'VTtTV.'TC��viv f f � I' > > . In 1997, the City adopted land use review procedures for siting facilities associated with these services. These regulations ' Revised �999 2002 X-7 , FWCP — Chaoter Ten, Private Utilities were subsequently revised in -�-9�-9 2000 and 2001. All of these technologies use a line- of-sight radio signal transmitted and received by antennas. Therefore, it is not possible to underground the antennas or structures on which the antennas are mounted. The FCC regulates the cellular telephone industry by controlling where carriers can operate and what frequencies can be utilized in their operation. This ensures that their operation does not interfere with AM/FM radio and cable television transmissions. If interference does occur, the cellular tower operator is required by the FCC to eliminate any noise or interference �v#isl� that impacts local citizens. For example, if a television set or radio experiences interference from the tower, the operator must either correct the problem or disable the cellular site. Wireless service transmits and receives low power high frequency radio signals. The basic technology is as follows: 1. The service originates from a cellular phone, pager, computer, dispatch service, or personal communications service. 2. The signal is transmitted to the nearest cellular communications facility, known as a cell site, which processes numerous cellular phone calls and routes them to the nearest hub cellular switching office. 3. At the cellular switching office, also known as a Mobile Telephone Switching Office, the call is further processed and the call is routed to the party being called. The call may be routed via traditional landline or via a cellular network depending on the nature of the receiving device. System Capacity — Capacity i� a function of frequency of use, the number of sites in a geographic area, and the number of customers. However, wireless service providers consider site locations, the number of calls handled, number of customers, and cell site capacity to be proprietary information. Improvements to the Cellular System — Like the non-cellular telephone companies, wireless companies expand services in response to growth. For this reason, companies closely analyze market demand to determine expansions into new service areas. The cellular network is expanded by dividing a larger cell into several smaller cells to increase the number of available channels. Capacity may also be expanded through technological advances in digital equipment. Internet Service Internet service is presently provided by telephone, cable, and satellite. QWest provides Internet service via telephone lines and AT&T Broadband provide� Internet service via cable. The Weyerhaeuser Com�any and Williams Communication have recently obtained franchises from the City to construct fiber optic communication svstems throughout the City. In addition, as the Citv constructs or reconstructs streets, it is providin� conduits to assist in the installation of fiber optic communication svstems. , � L_I ' , � � � ' � � , ' �J , .� Revised 2998 2002 X-8 � �I �_J ' , FWCP — Chaater Ten. Private Utilities Cable TV Plan ' , � ' ' ' ' ' � � ' � ' ' ' Headquartered in Denver, Colorado, , AT&T f�a �s Broadband was formed in 1968 with the merger of the cable company and a common carrier microwave operation. The company is one of the nation's largest cable operators with approximately 14.4 million customers at year-end 1997. _ _ r. Figure X-3 is a general description of the components of the cable TV (CATV) system and shows supply from source to customer. One of the primary components of a cable system is the headend site—an electronic control center where the information signal is processed for distribution through the cable system. The signal can be received either off a hard line (cable), satellite dish, microwave antennas, and/or TV antenna. Existing Conditions Map X-S shows-the � AT&T '�s Broadband service areas covering the City. �s AT&T Broadband's Tacoma, Pierce County system, serves the majority of the City. A small area in the northern part of Federal Way and parts of the area to the east of I-5 are served by the � AT&T �a Broadband's Auburn system. The headends, located north and south of the City, supply the signal by microwave feed. The majority of the system has been designed and built at a capacity of 450 MHz and will be upgraded consistent with the franchise agreement between � AT&T ���sos Broadband and the City of Federal Way. Map designations depict the main trunk cable lines (coax and fiber) distributing signals throughout Federal Way. Feeder cables (not depicted) branch from the main trunk cables to distribute the signals to neighborhood areas. From there, individual connections aze made to the customer's service entry. System Analysis , Revised �A99 2002 In June 1998, � AT&T ' es Broadband was providing cable TV service to 29,787 customers citywide. This service level represents 71 percent of potential customer connections in the City. Existing cable television facilities are currently capable of servicing approximately 98 percent of the potential customer connections in Federal Way. � AT&T Broadband makes every attempt to provide service to all residents within its franchise areas. Factors considered in extending service are overall technical integrity, economical feasibility, and franchise requirements. X-9 FWCP — Cha�ter Ten. Private Utilfies Figure X-3 Cable Source to Customer Proposed Improvements Cable television installations are made to new subscribers (either to new dwelling units or, to a much smaller degree, to residences who have not opted for cable before) at published rates, provided they are less than 150 feet from a distribution or feeder line. Connections requiring longer runs are charged on a time and material basis. Most public work considerations, such as tree trimming, work in the right-of-way, restoration of Revised �898 2002 X-10 � I � ' ' L_J ' l J ' ' 1 ' � , ' ' FWCP — Chapter Ten, Private UtiliGes property, and so on, are covered in the City of Federal Way Master Cable Television Ordinance and Franchise Agreement. � AT&T 's�s Broadband works closely with utility companies and the City to stay informed on proposed developments so that cable can be a part of a development's plans. Each year, engineers assigned to the Federal Way area assess the need for system expansion based on telephone inquiries, permitting data from the City and County, and technological advances in distribution equipment. The total mileage of cable plant within the City is approximately 280 miles. The company now offers digital service to Federal Way customers, enabling the delivery of 36 additional channels and the potential of expanding that capacity. � AT&T 6ab�e �s Broadband has also begun replacing existing copper cable trunk lines with fiber optic, which can be configured to carry video or data transmission signals. 10.5 GOALS AND POLICIES FOR CITY ACTION The Private Utilities �� chapter provides an opportunity for the City to assist utility companies in delivering efficient service to customers, arid to seek to reduce potential negative impacts on the natural and built environments. This section builds upon system descriptions to identify issues and sets forth policies to coordinate the provision of utilities with City planning. The GMA requires that the utilities element include the general location, proposed location, and capacity of all existing and proposed utilities. This has resulted in cities and counties becoming more actively involved in the way in which utilities aze sited and provided. In order to protect both citizens and utility customers, the City will work in accordance with the following goals and policies: Goals PUGl Work with private utility companies to allow them to provide full and timely ' service that meets the needs of the City's residents and businesses, both present and future. , PUG2 Work with private utility companies to allow them to provide service in a way that balances cost-effectiveness with environmental protection, aesthetic impact, public safety, and public health. 1 n � 1 Revised �999 2002 PUG3 Process permits for private utility facilities in an efficient and timely manner, in accordance with franchise agreements, development regulations, the F( WCP), and adopted codes. X_„ �1 � U FWCP — Chaater Ten, Private Utilities PUG4 Ensure that development regulations are consistent with public service obligations imposed upon private utilities by federal and state law. Policy and Issue Statements Issue Statement: Provision of Timely and Economic Services to the Citizens and Businesses of Federal Way. Partnership with private and public service providers is a continual theme of t�s �e�l�s��� the FWCP. The City plays a critical role in the provision of private utilities. The City approves permits that allow utilities to build transmission towers, lay distribution lines; and connect customers. If the City responds quickly and appropriately, it helps the utility companies respond to customer needs quickly and efficiently. However, the City must balance these considerations with its other responsibilities, including bringing them into compliance with due process, ensuring consistency with �s • ' the FWCP, addressing aesthetic impacts, and protecting the natural environment. Therefore, the City must continue to communicate with utilities and periodically review their needs as well as the policies in �� the FWCP and its permit processing to ensure that the results are in the best interest of Federal Way residents and businesses. The City must also be mindful of the need to provide a choice of energy sources to Federal Way's residents and businesses. Choice of energy source is important because it creates competition in the marketplace �� that helps to keep costs down. Providing alternative energy sources is also important because if one energy source fails, the other may be available. Policies PUPl PUP2 The City's right-of-way permitting process should not unnecessarily delay the expansion or improvement of the utility network. The City will, if possible, coordinate with other jurisdictions on proposed utility improvements that impact a multi jurisdictional area. PUP3 The City should work to encourage, to the extent possible, the supply of all utilities to existing and new homes, offices, industrial, and commercial buildings. Issue Statement: Coordination Between Utilities, Capital Facilities, City, and Private Developers. The costs of pipe, cable, or conduit installation can add significantly to the cost of providing service. Installing utility lines, which follow existing right-of-ways and easements, can also create disruptions to traffic and cause damage to pavement and � ' � � � , ' IJ u , � ' ' � i , , Revised 2999 2002 X-12 � i �� �I ' , ' u �� ' � ' l� C landscaping. These costs and disruptions can be reduced if utilities share the same trench and perform work simultaneously. Consequently, the City encourages utilities to continue exchanging information about plans for expansion, maintenance, and upgrading of facilities. The City presently provides information to all utilities about its public works projects, such as street improvements, which may provide opportunities for installing new systems. Policies PUP4 The City encourages the joint use of trenches, conduits, or poles, so that utilities may coordinate expansion, maintenance, and upgrading facilities with the least amount of right-of-way disruption. PUPS PUP6 PUP7 The City encourages utilities to inform one another of plans to expand or improve utility services. The City will endeavor to inform utilities of upcoming improvements or expansions �sk that may provide opportunities for joint use. The City will endeavor to notify utilities of proposed plans to make highway or right-of-way improvements. PUP8 The City hereby incorporates by reference PSE's GMA Electrical Facilities Plan into this private utilities element as now existing or hereafter amended or adopted. Issue Statement: Energy Conservation. State and federal law requires energy conservation in building design. State and Federal ' statues also require that power providers implement energy conservation policies. In accordance with these mandates, PSE has an Energy Select Program that provides information on qualified contractors for potential customers. , ' u ' ' ' Revised �A98 2002 FWCP — Chaater Ten. Prnrate Utilities State law requires that the City's building code conforms to the Washington Energy Code (WAC 51-11). However, the energy code sets out only minimum standards for energy conservation. Therefore, cities have developed conservation conscious design codes �#isk that go beyond the minimum requirements of the energy code. Policies PUP9 The City shall, at minimum, ensure that its buildings comply with State and Federal standards for energy conservation. PUP10 The City will endeavor to work with utility companies to promote and educate the public about strategies for conserving energy. ' X-13 ' FWCP — Chapter Ten, Private Utilities Issue Statement: Importance of Telecommunications and the Information Superhighway. Society is in the midst of a revolution in information and communication that �a�ka � is changinQ the way that people interact with each other. For example, today, many of the transactions and communications that make up the majority of our day }s are possible from a single workstation. This revolution is being fueled by recent advances in computing and telecommunication technology. There are several technological innovations that have stimulated these changes in our lifestyles, including: fiber optic cables, the "Integrated Services Digital Network" (ISDN) and digital subscriber loop (high-speed communications over copper) technology. These technologies combine to expand the capacity of the telecommunications network. This expansion allows the provision of a diverse range of services on one system including, telecommunications, cable TV, radio, business services, shopping, and professional services. It will also be possible for institutions such as schools, universities, government, and emergency services to broadcast on this single system. Technology is also being developed to expand capabilities for transmitting information. In the past, one could transmit voice by telephone, textlgraphics by facsimile, and data by modem. Now it is possible to transmit video images, and potentially to broadcast to a mass audience using these new technologies. These advances in technology are forcing telecommunication companies to reevaluate their business strategies. Technological change has made it possible for all services to be provided on one cable, and companies are jockeying for position to create that system. These advances have great potential to alter the way we do business in Federal Way. For economic development reasons, the City must ensure that the atmosphere for investment encourages companies to bring these advanced services to Federal Way, and that the community's growing needs are addressed. It is critical for people and businesses to have access to the information superhighway if they are to enjoy a fully active role in society and the economy. In this sense, the information superhighway is analogous to the road network, where all citizens have a "right-of-way." For this reason, government has an essential role in ensuring that the right of citizens to both receive and transmit information is protected, and in ensuring that municipalities maintain their ability to regulate information providers in the same manner that they regulate users of the rights-of-way. Policies PUPl l The City will encourage and work with telecommunication and cable companies to develop fiber optic cable networks and to increase interconnectivity between different networks. PUP12 The City will endeavor to work with utility companies and other public . institutions, sucfi as the School District, to develop a full range of community L�l � , ' � � , , ' ' ' , �� � � � , �J Revised �AA9 2002 X-14 ' � � ' �J C LJ C ' CI ' ' � � I� � C J � ' FWCP — Chaoter Ten. Private Utilities information services, available to citizens and businesses through the telecommunication network. Issue Statement: Health Impact of Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMF) and Microwaves. There is much public and scientific interest about the health efFects of Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMF) created by the electricity supply system. This interest has resulted primazily from studies that suggest a possible link between EMF and certain forms of cancer. However, this statistical link does not necessarily indicate cause-and-effect relationships. Considerable research is underway, supported in large part by the $65 million funding provision in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. Puget Sound Energy has taken an active role in this debate. However, there are, as yet, no agreed upon safety thresholds or tolerance levels for human exposure to EMF. Electro-Magnetic Fields are found wherever electricity exists. EMF are generated by high-voltage transmission lines, low-voltage lines, and substations, as well as electrical appliances and devices found in homes and businesses. The strength of an EMF depends on the amount of current flow, not on voltage, and current is a function of energy consumption. Research is clear that EMF are not blocked, reduced, or altered by most solid objects. This means they aze not blocked by vegetation, � or by any form of screening, or covering by earth. It is however, important to note that EMF diminish rapidly with distance from source. Research on both EMF and microwaves has been contradictory and generally inconclusive. However they are issues that must continue to be monitored. Policy responses to this issue must be adopted as more information becomes available. Policies PUP13 The CiTy shall continue to monitor research into the health effects of Electro- Magnetic Fields (EMF) and microwaves. The City will take appropriate action once definitive conclusions about health implications aze reached. Issue Statement: Environmental and Aesthetic Impacts. Utility systems have a broad range of associated environmental and visual impacts. Much of Federal Way's electrical, telecommunications, and cable system is mounted on overhead poles. Pole-mounted systems not only reduce the aesthetic appeal of streetscapes but also contribute to system failures and power outages caused by falling trees and branches. Undergrounding utilities is a potential solution to both problems, but must be balanced against the cost associated with such undergrounding. As with other types of development, the impacts of utilities on environmentally sensitive areas need to be evaluated. These impacts are addressed in the context of broad environmental protection policies in the Natural Environment chapter of � the FWCP and through measures for protecting critical areas in the zoning code. On the other hand, there is also a need to provide for the location and continuing maintenance of ' ' Revised �998 2002 X-15 � FWCP — Chaoter Ten. Private Utilities essential public and private utilities in environmentally sensitive areas, if no feasible alternative location exists. The �xisting Federal Way �e�i�tg City ECode F( WCC) makes provisions for this in the environmer,tally sensitive area provisions. �°;°*;^^ �';*-� ^^de The FWCC sets out some requirements for undergrounding utilities in new subdivisions and in existing right-of-way in accordance with the WLTTC. These exemptions include the undergrounding of transmission lines 115 kV and greater. The City should continue to work in partnership with the utility companies to further address aesthetic impacts. Requiring undergrounding across the entire Federal Way area is prohibitively expensive. However, there are key areas, such as the City Center and along Highway 99, where undergrounding of utilities is important to improving the visual image of the area in order to stimulate economic development. The City should work with the utilities and also support statewide efforts by WUTC to devise a method of paying for such improvements. The City has a right-of-way vegetation ordinance that allows removal or pruning of vegetation within rights-of-way without a permit only when there is imminent danger to the health, safety, or welfare of residents. This process could be further improved if the City and utility companies prepared a right-of-way vegetation plan meeting utility needs and addressing environmental and streetscape improvements to be made by the City. This approach to streetscape is particularly important in the newly developing City Center. Policies PUP14 To the maximum extent possible and based upon applicable regulations, the City should require the undergrounding of utility distribution lines in new subdivisions, new construction, and significantly reconstructed facilities, consistent with all applicable laws. PUP15 To the maximum extent possible and based upon applicable regulations, the City should work with the utilities in preparing a plan for undergrounding utilities in areas where their visual impact is critical to improving the appearance of the City, such as the City Center and along Highway 99. PUP16 The City should, to the extent practical, work with utility providers in preparing a right-of-way vegetation plan �v#3s� that ensures that the needs of landscaping and screening are balanced with the need to prevent power outages. PUP17 The City should require that site-specific utility facilities such as antennas and substations